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gives

gives Sentence Examples

  • It's this queer light that gives her that color.

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  • He makes us pay taxes and gives us nothing in return.

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  • This gives me confidence that, in the wisdom-seeking systems of the future, people will be willing to share data to make the algorithms better.

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  • That gives you three hours.

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  • I keep records on each goat and how many pounds of milk she gives daily, when she reached peak production and how long she lactated.

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  • It's only two blocks, and it gives me a chance to wake up.

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  • Aphro, hypo, who gives a damn.

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  • The moon is a fickle lover, like a beautiful woman…she gives her whole heart but once a month and leaves you before dawn…why fear you the night?

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  • I keep telling him that as long as he gives her money, she'll never get out of trouble, but he just says she's the only sister he has and he has the money.

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  • The bond creates more than dependency; it gives you a helluva lot of influence over him.

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  • Nobody much gives a damn anyway.

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  • This railway gives Cuzco an outlet to the coast, and also direct connexion with La Paz, the Bolivian capital.

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  • I guess I shouldn't have said anything, but don't you realize that the way Alex treats you gives Jonathan reason to question your authority?

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  • Reason gives expression to the laws of inevitability.

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  • I bought one of those answering machines and I let the phone ring until it gives my messages and I find out who's calling.

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  • For the most part the farmer gives to his cattle and hogs the grain of his own producing, and buys flour, which is at least no more wholesome, at a greater cost, at the store.

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  • This equation does not give us the value of the unknown factor but gives us a ratio between two unknowns.

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  • The commander-in-chief never takes direct part in the action itself, but only gives general orders concerning the movement of the mass of the troops.

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  • If I see a ghost and it gives me a hard time, I'll pull my gun and send it packing!

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  • This place gives me the creeps.

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  • Sure, 'til someone snatches that whip out of your hand and gives you the spankin' you've been asking for.

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  • When someone gives me some more definitive info on her, I'll tell you.

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  • He gives me shit all the time, Dusty corrected him.

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  • What gives you the right to go poking around up there?

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  • It is because they do not obey the hint which God gives them, nor accept the pardon which he freely offers to all.

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  • It gives me the shivers just to picture it!

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  • Before you start to deteriorate and your body gives out on you?

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  • If Tamer gives you any resistance, let me know, and I.ll drag him here myself, he instructed.

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  • Take off the rose colored glasses—'my sins will continue'—or better yet, wait until you decipher a few more pages and she gives it to you in black and white, chapter and verse and supplies the sinful details.

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  • I am alone in this house, with only a cat for company though he gives me little solace.

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  • We'll fight until Greenie gives the order to leave.

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  • After all, how can asking for the same treatment it gives all others be bad?

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  • All this brush right next to the house gives them a place to hide.

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  • "Ours gives us kisses," said Charlot.

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  • The Bible gives me a deep, comforting sense that "things seen are temporal, and things unseen are eternal."

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  • To understand in what this dependence consists it is necessary to reinstate another omitted condition of every command proceeding not from the Deity but from a man, which is, that the man who gives the command himself takes part in the event.

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  • The soldier himself does the stabbing, hacking, burning, and pillaging, and always receives orders for these actions from men above him; he himself never gives an order.

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  • If this woman gives you the power to do so…

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  • Especially if the law gives him an okay.

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  • Each case I handle gives me that much more experience.

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  • That gives him the right.

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  • I wear it always when we're together as it gives comfort to him about our situation which I know troubles him greatly.

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  • Then this one snot-nose gives me the finger.

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  • Gives a whole new dimension to poetic license, don't it?

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  • She sure gives a lot of detail, the borrowed knife, him looking up, her wearing a disguise.

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  • It gives you a hint why the whole crowd wants to carve up Mr. Baratto a piece at a time.

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  • Never gives me a speck of concern.

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  • Just thinking of Billie gives me the willies.

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  • You gotta admit, it gives me a lot better chance of checking out the crowds for Byrne.

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  • He gives you an allowance?

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  • It gives me all its power and strength, to use to crush the barbarians and throw them all from the cliffs.

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  • Being a veterinarian gives you connections other people might not have.

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  • Horace Walpole, who gives an unfavourable picture of his private character, acknowledges that Stone possessed "abilities seldom to be matched"; and he had the distinction of being mentioned by David Hume as one of the only two men of mark who had perceived merit in that author's History of England on its first appearance.

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  • In addition to various sounds produced at other times, an elephant when about to charge gives vent to a shrill loud 'trumpet'.

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  • The above gives some idea of the evidence that has been accumulated in favour of the laws of chemical combination, laws which can be deduced from the atomic theory.

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  • In the second he not only enlarges his matter and gives multiplied applications of his ideas, but also follows the synthetic method, first expounding the laws he had discovered and then proving them by the facts to which they are applied.

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  • It is a brown coloured powder which is stable in air, but gives a higher oxide when heated.

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  • Heated at 190-300° in a current of hydrogen it gives the oxide C0304, while at higher temperatures the monoxide is formed, and ultimately cobalt is obtained.

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  • Electrolysis of a solution in hydrofluoric acid gives cobaltic fluoride, CoF3.

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  • A kind of jam-cake, called a "Bakewell pudding," gives another sort of fame to the place.

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  • The elevation of a large part of the department gives it a temperate climate and permits the cultivation of cereals and other products of the temperate zone.

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  • By dry distillation it gives ammonium cyanide.

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  • It gives name to a school of gunnery, where officers are instructed and experiments carried out.

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  • She keeps her eye on the object, but adds, like Wordsworth, the visionary gleam, and receives from nature but what she herself gives.

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  • Zolss (11) gives 98.

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  • The first line gives the mean value of the potential gradient, the second the mean excess of the largest over the smallest hourly value on individual days.

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  • The third line gives the range of the regular diurnal inequality, the next four lines the amplitudes of the first four Fourier waves into which the regular diurnal inequality has been analysed.

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  • This gives a convection current of 2.7 X108 electrostatic units, or about 1/27 of the conduction current.

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  • gives some data as to the variability of thunder from year to year.

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  • It is remarkable that he gives the same pecuniary bequests to Winchester and New Colleges as to his own college of Magdalen, but the latter he made residuary devisee of all his lands.

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  • This page gives an overview of all articles in the 1911 Brittanica which are alphabetized under Orp to Ozo.

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  • But a careful study of the seventh poem of the last book, in which Propertius gives an account of a dream of her which he had after her death, leads us to the belief that they were once more reconciled, and that in her last illness Cynthia left to her former lover the duty of carrying out her wishes with regard to the disposal of her effects and the arrangements of her funeral.

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  • Simple roofs in general use with a double slope are the " coupled rafter roofs," the rafters meeting at the highest point upon a horizontal ridge-piece which stiffens the framework and gives a level ridge-line.

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  • This page gives an overview of all articles in the 1911 Brittanica which are alphabetized under Gre to Gri.

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  • (1773), p. 190) also gives results of measurements by Gascoigne of the diameters of the moon, Jupiter, Mars and Venus with his micrometer.

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  • Delambre gives 3 the following comparison between the results of Gascoigne's measurements of the sun's semi-diameter and the computed results from modern determinations: Gascoigne.

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  • 21, p. 373, Adrien Auzout gives the results of some measures of the diameter of the sun and moon made by himself, and this communication led to the letters of Townley and Bevis above referred to.

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  • This angle, therefore, divided by the magnifying power of the telescope gives the real angular distance of the centres of a double star.

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  • The method of counting the total number of revolutions gives more friction and is less convenient than Repsolds', and no provision seems to be made for illuminating the micrometer head in the practical and convenient plan adopted by Repsolds.

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  • The electric lamp a gives illumination of the webs in a dark field, nearly in the manner described for the Cape transit circle micrometer; the intensity of illumination is regulated by a carbon-resistance controlled by the screw b.

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  • 3377, Repsold gives a detailed description of two forms of eye-ends of transit circles, fitted with means of observing in this manner, to which he gives the name of " the impersonal micrometer."

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  • Aemilius Scaurus, praetor in 53 B.C. Cicero, speaking no doubt to his brief, gives them a very bad character, adding " ignoscent alii viri boni ex Sardinia; credo enim esse quosdam ".

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  • The existence of such mixed matters gives rise to inevitable conflicts of jurisdiction, which may lead, and sometimes have led, to civil war.

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  • The oil when brought to the surface has the appearance of a whitish-blue water, which gives out brilliant straw-coloured rays, and emits a strong pungent odour.

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  • Hamilton, "the measurement of a number of tails of the [European] wild cat and of the domestic cat gives a range between 11 in.

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  • It gives no evidence of science, he remarks, to possess a tolerable knowledge of the Roman tongue, such as once was possessed by the populace of Rome.'

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  • They propose, that is, to find a simple and indecomposable point, or absolute element, which gives to the world and thought their order and systematization.

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  • The disturbing conditions of will, life and organic forces are eliminated from the problem; he starts with the clear and distinct idea of extension, figured and moved, and thence by mathematical laws he gives a hypothetical explanation of all things.

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  • But Muratori, reproducing the account given by one of Thomas's friends, gives no hint of foul play.

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  • Plato, while admiring Pericles' intellect, accuses him of pandering to the mob; Aristotle in his Politics and especially in the Constitution of Athens, which is valuable in that it gives the dates of Pericles' enactments as derived from an official document, accepts the same view.

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  • Plutarch (Pericles) gives many interesting details as to Pericles' personal bearing, home life, and patronage of art, literature and philosophy, derived in part from the old comic poets, Aristophanes, Cratinus, Eupolis, Hermippus, Plato and Teleclides; in part from the contemporary memoirs of Stesimbrotus and Ion of Chios.

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  • about 1190), in his biography of Thomas Becket, gives a graphic sketch of the London of his day and, writing of the summer amusements of the young men, says that on holidays they were "exercised in Leaping, Shooting, Wrestling, Casting of Stones [in jactu lapidum], and Throwing of Javelins fitted with Loops for the Purpose, which they strive to fling before the Mark; they also use Bucklers, like fighting Men."

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  • We note here that though Ritschl gives Jesus a unique and unapproachable position in His active relation to the kingdom, he declines to rise above this relative teaching.

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  • The happy coincidence of a lunar eclipse gives us the 20th of September 331 as the exact day upon which the Macedonian army crossed the Tigris.

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  • He then makes his Persian expedition; the Indian campaign gives occasion for descriptions of all kinds of wonders.

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  • He gives no diameter or wind-pressure.

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  • He further tells us this pitch was a tone, nearly a tone and a half, higher than a suitable church pitch (Chorton), for which he gives a diagram.

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  • His determinations of pitch by a weighted wire are not trustworthy; Ellis thinks they are not safe within four or five vibrations per second, but gives a mean pitch for this organ, when altered, of a' 395.2.

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  • Stein tuned Mozart's piano to a fork a' 421.6, and the Broadwood pianos used at the London Philharmonic Society in its first concerts (1813) were tuned to a fork c 2 506.8, which gives a mean tone a' 423.7.

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  • 22, 23) gives them equal rights with the homeborn.

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  • 4 ff.) gives the duration of the national punishment in loose chronological reckoning: 40 years (a round number) for Judah, and 150 more (according to the corrected text) for Israel, the starting-point, probably, being the year 722, the date of the capture of Samaria; the procedure described in v.

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  • This page gives an overview of all articles in the 1911 Brittanica which are alphabetized under Pos to Pre.

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  • It gives its name to a Roman Catholic diocese, the cathedral of which is at Queenstown.

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  • 2 The stem of David is superseded by the house of Zadok, the kingship has yielded to the priesthood, and the extinction of national hopes gives new importance to that strict organization of the hierarchy for which Ezekiel had prepared the way by his sentence of disfranchisement against the nonZadokite priests.

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  • A closed stove acts mainly by convection; though when heated to a high temperature it gives out radiant heat.

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  • In the diaphragm valve a thin piece of metal is fixed to an outlet from the boiler, and when a moderate pressure is exceeded this gives way, allowing the water and steam to escape.

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  • The table gives the logarithms of sines for every minute to seven figures.

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  • In the Rabdologia he gives the chronological order of his inventions.

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  • It has been usually supposed that John Napier was buried in St Giles's church, Edinburgh, which was certainly the burialplace of some of the family, but Mark Napier (Memoirs, p. 426) quotes Professor William Wallace, who, writing in 1832, gives strong reasons for believing that he was buried in the old church of St Cuthbert.

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  • This page gives an overview of all articles in the 1911 Brittanica which are alphabetized under Gis to God.

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  • The three great rivers that form the La Plata system - the Paraguay, Parana and Uruguay - have their sources in the highlands of Brazil and flow southward through a great continental depression, two of them forming eastern boundary lines, and one of them, the Parana, flowing across the eastern part of the republic. The northern part of Argentina, therefore, drains eastward from the mountains to these rivers, except where some great inland depression gives rise to a drainage having no outlet to the sea, and except, also, in the " mesopotamia " region, where small streams flow westward into the Parana and eastward into the Uruguay.

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  • Another report gives the arrivals in 1904 as 125,567 and the departures 38,923.

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  • wing table gives the area in square miles of each of the eighty-seven :s with its population according to the census returns of 1886, 1896

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  • The table below gives the average production of zinc, argentiferous lead, iron-pyrites and other ores during the quinquennial period 1901f 905.

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  • The respective shares of the leading customs in the tfade of the country is approximately shown in the following table, which gives the value of their exports and imports (general trade) in 1905 in millions sterling.

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  • The city is built on a rocky hill rising from the Guayangareo valley, which gives to it a strikingly picturesque appearance.

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  • The quaint architecture of the houses, many of which present their curious and handsome gables to the street, gives Stralsund an interesting and old-fashioned appearance.

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  • The extraordinary number of craters, a few of which are reported still to be active, gives evidence that the archipelago is the result of volcanic action.

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  • This page gives an overview of all articles in the 1911 Brittanica which are alphabetized under Bok to Bor.

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  • This page gives an overview of all articles in the 1911 Brittanica which are alphabetized under Lao to Lav.

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  • The account which Herodotus gives of the hostilities between the two states in the early years of the 5th century B.C. is to the following effect.

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  • Sodium amalgam or zinc and hydrochloric acid reduce it to lactic acid, whilst hydriodic acid gives propionic acid.

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  • It is somewhat readily oxidized; nitric acid gives carbonic and oxalic acids, and chromic acid, carbonic and acetic acids.

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  • In aqueous solution it gives a red colour with ferric chloride.

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  • When warmed with baryta water it gives uvitic acid.

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  • The single species, which is a native of western and southern Australia, is about the size of an English squirrel, to which its long bushy tail gives it some resemblance; but it lives entirely on the ground, especially in sterile sandy districts, feeding on ants.

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  • Heated with sulphuric acid and with nitric acid it is oxidized to boric acid, whilst on fusion with alkaline carbonates and hydroxides it gives a borate of the alkali metal.

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  • It is decomposed by water, and with a solution of yellow phosphorus in carbon bisulphide it gives a red powder of composition PBI 2, which sublimes in vacuo at 210° C. to red crystals, and when heated in a current of hydrogen loses its iodine and leaves a residue of boron phosphide PB.

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  • But this gives no correct idea of the true character of the Darling, for it can hardly be said to drain its own watershed.

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  • in a direct line, the river gives rather than receives water from the country it flows through.

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  • They present to the fierce play of the sun almost a level surface, so that during the day that surface becomes intensely heated and at night gives off its heat by radiation.

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  • This terminates in a long spike thickly studded with white blossoms. The grass-tree gives as distinct a character to an Australian picture as the agave and cactus do to the Mexican landscape.

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  • In 1905 there were about 1 1,000,000 telegraphic messages sent, which gives an average of 2.7 messages per inhabitant.

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  • In the second of these notices he gives the general formulae without demonstrations.

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  • An article in the Spectator of the 17th of February 1883, by Lord Justice Bowen, gives perhaps the best idea of Smith's extraordinary personal qualities and influence.

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  • This page gives an overview of all articles in the 1911 Brittanica which are alphabetized under Het to Hir.

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  • A line drawn diagonally down the centre from the isthmus of Kra to Cape Romania (Ramunya) gives the extreme length at about 750 miles.

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  • On oxidation with chromic or nitric acids, or potassium permanganate, it yields nicotinic acid or (3-pyridine carboxylic acid, C 5 H 4 N CO 2 H; alkaline potassium ferricyanide gives nicotyrine, C10H10N2, and hydrogen peroxide oxynicotine, C10H14N20.

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  • It gives rise to various decomposition products such as pyridine, picoline, &c., when its vapour is passed through a red-hot tube.

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  • With bromine in acetic acid solution at ordinary temperature, nicotine yields a perbromide, C10H10Br2N20 HBr 3, which with sulphur dioxide, followed by potash, gives dibromcotinine, C10H10Br2N20, from which cotinine, C10H12N20, is obtained by distillation over zinc dust.

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  • Pictet and P. Crepieux (Comptes rendus, 1903, 137, p. 860) and Pictet and Rotschy (Ber., 1904, 37, p. 1225):, -aminopyridine is converted into its mucate, which by dry distillation gives N-13-pyridylpyrrol.

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  • By passing the vapour of this compound through a red-hot tube, it yields the isomeric a0- pyridylpyrrol, the potassium salt of which with methyl iodide gives a substance methylated both in the pyridine and pyrrol nuclei.

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  • By distillation over lime, the methyl group is removed from the pyridine ring, and the resulting a- pyridyl-Nmethylpyrrol gives i-nicotine on reduction.

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  • It is situated on the west side of a bay of the Mediterranean, to which it gives its name, in 36° 47' N., 3° 4' E., and is built on the slopes of the Sahel, a chain of hills parallel to the coast.

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  • The astringent principle is a peculiar kind of tannic acid, called by chemists quercitannic, which, yielding more stable compounds with gelatine than other forms, gives oak bark its high value to the tanner.

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  • Robur than any other species, forming a thick trunk with spreading base and, when growing in glades or other open places, huge spreading boughs, less twisted and gnarled than those of the English oak, and covered with a whitish bark that gives a marked character to the tree.

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  • rubra, has thin large leaves on long petioles, the lobes very long and acute, the points almost bristly; they are pink when they first expand in spring, but become of a bright glossy green when full-grown; in autumn they change to the deep purplered which gives the tree its name.

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  • Both these oaks grow well in British plantations, where their bright autumn foliage, though seldom so decided in tint as in their native woods, gives them a certain picturesque value.

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  • 14, gives examples of ecstatic utterance interpreted by the sane.

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  • in the " Deeps," the Globigerina ooze gradually gives place to red clay.

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  • The book gives (1) evidences of witchcraft; (2) rules for discovering it; (3) proceedings for punishment.

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  • This page gives an overview of all articles in the 1911 Brittanica which are alphabetized under Gem to Ges.

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  • This page gives an overview of all articles in the 1911 Brittanica which are alphabetized under Spl to St.

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  • Adopting the centigrade scale, this gives 1390.846 foot-pounds.

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  • 2 gives a lift of load four times the stroke of the cylinder.

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  • This latter gives the ratio of the length of the working periods to the whole time; e.g.

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  • This type of crane used to be in great favour, in consequence of the great clearance it gives under the jib, but it is expensive and requires very heavy foundations.

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  • The galvanometer being so adjusted that a current of definite strength through one of the coils gives a definite deflection of the needle, the amount of leakage expressed in terms of the insulation resistance of the wires is given by the formula.

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  • The average speed is obtained very accurately from solar and stellar observations for the position of the ship. The difference between the speed of the ship and the rate of paying out gives the amount of.

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  • I I the edge of the disk serves as the pointer and the scale gives the percentage of slack, or (N - n)/n.

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  • One diaphragm gives the mirror a movement in a vertical direction while the other gives it a horizontal motion.

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  • Owing to the difficulty of maintaining perfect balance on duplexed cables, curb sending is not now used, but the signals are transmitted by means of an apparatus similar to the Wheatstone automatic transmitter used on land lines and differing from the latter only in regard to the alphabet employed; the signals from the transmitter actuate a relay having heavy armatures which in turn transmit the signals to the cable; this arrangement gives very firm signals, a point of great importance for good working.

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  • As with other duplex systems it is possible to obtain several approximately correct adjustments with the bridge and its accessories, but only one gives a true balance, and careful experiment is required to make sure that this is obtained.

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  • This hammer is arranged so that when the armature vibrates it gives little blows to the underside of the tube and shakes up the filings.

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  • An important modification of this method enables not only audible signals but articulated words to be transmitted, and gives thus a system of wireless telephony.

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  • This is mixed with small coal, and when redistilled gives an enriched dust, and by repeating the process and distilling from cast iron retorts the metal is obtained.

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  • This page gives an overview of all articles in the 1911 Brittanica which are alphabetized under X to Yve.

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  • It gives the real values in one column and tenth parts in another column of each of the benefices in the archdeaconry of Lothian.

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  • Tuscany gives I20, Latium 1.14%, Apulia only I~02, while Sardinia with 0.34% occupies an exceptional position.

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  • The great variety in physical and social conditions throughout the peninsula gives corresponding variety to the methods of agriculture.

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  • In bad years the tiller, moreover, gives up seed corn before beginning harvest.

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  • Emilia gives a maximum rate of 10.48 per ioo,ooo, while that of Liguria and Lazio is little lower.

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  • The minimum of 1.27 is found in the Basilicata, though Calabria gives only 2.13.

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  • Natorp's article quoted there gives the reference to the passage in Aristotle, but does not recognize its connexion with the later Stoical distinction.

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  • Not to speak of the canonists, Thomas Aquinas gives natural law an important place; while Melancthon, drawing from Aquinas, gives it an entrance into Protestant thought.

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  • He also gives us " natural law " 2 - a Stoic inheritance, preserving the form of an idealist appeal to systematic requirements of reason, while practically limiting its assumptions to those of intuitionalism.

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  • In Alciphron or the Minute Philosopher Berkeley gives the fullest statement of this argument, while adding more commonplace attacks on the pettiness of religious scepticism.

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  • Finally the Ontological argument sums up the truth in the two previous arguments, and gives it worthier utterance in its vision of the philosophical Absolute.

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  • Browning reasons as far as he can; if reasoning fails him, he gives a leap of faith.

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  • Wallace (Lectures and Essays, incorporating Glasgow lectures) gives some useful historical references.

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  • gives to the citizens of London all their ancient liberties and free customs.

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  • gives to the founders of religious houses the right of acting as guardians of such houses when they are without heads.

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  • Polyp 7 has proof sense, 1 o c oduced as its first bud, 8; as its second bud, a7, motion and nutriwhich starts a uniserial pinnule; and as a third t i on, until its bud I', which starts a biserial branch (I I'-VI') medusoid nature that repeats the structure of the main stem and and organization gives off pinnules.

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  • The first case gives a colony entirely composed of polyps, as in many Hydroidea.

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  • The second case gives a colony partly composed of polyp-individuals, partly of medusa-individuals, a possibility also realized in many colonies of Hydroidea.

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  • The third case gives a colony entirely composed of medusa-individuals, a possibility perhaps realized in the Siphonophora, which will be discussed in dealing with this group.

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  • the entocodon, however developed, gives rise at first to a closed cavity, representing a closing over of the umbrella, temporary in the bud destined to be a free medusa, but usually permanent in the sessile gonophore.

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  • The buds of Margellium are produced on the manubrium in each of the four interradii, and they arise from the ectoderm, that is to say, the germinal epithelium, which later gives rise to the gonads.

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  • The spore cell gives rise to a " sporelarva," which is set free in the coelenteron and grows into a medusa.

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  • The planula may fix itself (I) by one end, and then becomes the hydrocaulus and hydranth, while the hydrorhiza grows out from the base; or (2) partly by one side and then gives rise to Modified from a plate by L.

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  • Apart from the weighty arguments which the development furnishes against the theories of Allman and Mechnikov, it may be pointed out that neither hypothesis gives a satisfactory explanation of a structure universally present in medusae of whatever class, namely the endoderm-lamella, discovered by the brothers O.

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  • This is in some degree parallel to the cases described above, in which a planula gives rise to the hydrorhiza, and buds a polyp laterally.

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  • The pneumato phore arises from the ectoderm as a pit or invagination, part of which forms a gas-secreting gland, while the rest gives rise to an air-sack lined by a chitinous cuticle.

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  • Woltereck [59], on the other hand, have shown that the ectodermal pit which gives rise to the pneumatophore represents an entocodon.

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  • Next the pit closes up to form a vesicle with a pore, and so gives rise to the pneumatophore.

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  • Thus from the original planula three appendages are, as it were, budded off, while the planula itself mostly gives rise to coenosarc, just as in some hydroids the planula is converted chiefly into hydrorhiza.

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  • The planula develops, on the whole, in a similar manner, but the ectodermal invagination arises, not at the pole of the planula, but on the side of its broader portion, and gives rise, not to a pneumatophore, but to a nectocalyx, the primary swimming bell or protocodon (" Fallschirm ") which is later thrown off and replaced by secondary swimming bells, metacodons, budded from the coenosarc.

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  • He may be said to furnish a further contribution to a metaphysical conception of evolution in his view of all finite individual things as the infinite variety to which the unlimited productive power of the universal substance gives birth.

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  • Hegel gives a place in his metaphysical system to the mechanical and the teleological views; yet in his treatment of the world as an evolution the idea of end or purpose is the predominant one.

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  • a vinculo), it only gives a provisional decision, which is reported by the bishop, with his own opinion, for final judgment, to the Most Holy Governing Synod.

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  • But above all, what gives the sentences of Marcus Aurelius their enduring value and fascination, and renders them superior to the utterances of Epictetus and Seneca, is that they are the gospel of his life.

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  • This balsam gives the tree a fragrant odour when the leaves are unfolding.

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  • A papyrus of Sent, 3300 B.C., gives directions as to the preparation of prescriptions.

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  • This page gives an overview of all articles in the 1911 Brittanica which are alphabetized under O to Ogd.

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  • In other species, however, a peculiar type of polystely is met with, in which the original diarch stele gives rise to se-called dorsal and ventral stelar cords which at first lie on the surface of the primary stele, but eventually at a higher level separate from it and form distinct secondary steles resembling the primary one.

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  • The outermost is the caiyptrogen, which gives rise to the root-cap, and in Dicotyledons to the piliferous layer as well.

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  • The periblem, one cell thick at the apex, produces the cortex, to which the piliferous layer belongs in Monocotyledons; and the plerome, which is nearly always sharply separated from the periblem, gives rise to the vascular cylinder.

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  • An ordinary cambium is scarcely ever found in the Monocotyledons, but in certain woody forms a secondary meristem is formed outside the primary bundles, and gives rise externally to a little secondary cortex, and internally to a secondary parenchyma in which are developed numerous zones of additional bundles, usually of concentric structure, with phloem surrounded by xylem.

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  • and the whole of the tissue it gives rise to is known as periderm.

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  • Schoutes Die Steldr-Theorie (Groningen, 1902), gives an important critical account of this subject.

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  • Very soon the single cell gives rise to a chain of cells, and this in.

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  • This is a primal necessity of the protoplast,and every cell gives evidence of its need by adopting one of the various ways in which such need is supplied.

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  • This pressure leads to the filling of the vessels of the wood of both root and stem in the early part of the year, before the leaves have expanded, and gives rise to the exudation of fluid known as bleeding when young stems are cut in early spring.

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  • The absorption of these rays implies that the pigment absorbs radiant energy from the sun, and gives us some explanation of its power of constructing the carbohydrates which has been mentioned as the special work of the apparatus.

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  • It gives a characteristic red-brown reaction with iodine solution.

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  • This body has been called a blepharoplast, and in the Pteridophytes, Cycads and Ginkgo it gives rise to the spiral band on which the cilia are formed.

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  • The furrowed surface of the earth gives the land-area a star-shaped figure, which may from time to time have varied in outline, but in the main has been permanent.

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  • This gives to it unity and definiteness, and renders superfluous the attemps that have been made from time to time to define the limits which divide geography from geology on the one hand and from history on the other.

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  • His work Suma de Geografia, which was printed in 1519, is the first Spanish book which gives an account of America.

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  • Wagner's year-book, Geographische Jahrbuch, published at Gotha, is the best systematic record of the progress of geography in all departments; and Haack's Geografihen Kalender, also published annually at Gotha, gives complete lists of the geographical societies and geographers of the world.

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  • With ferric chloride it gives a violet coloration, and with bromine water a white precipitate of tribromphenol.

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  • Chromium oxychloride reacts violently on phenol, producing hydroquinone ether, O(C 6 H 4 OH)2; chromic acid gives phenoquinone, and potassium permanganate gives paradiphenol, oxalic acid, and some salicylic acid (R.

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  • Biog,, which gives a full bibliography.

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  • This page gives an overview of all articles in the 1911 Brittanica which are alphabetized under Sup to Szo.

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  • This page gives an overview of all articles in the 1911 Brittanica which are alphabetized under Cin to Cla.

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  • - The earliest writer on patristics was Jerome, whose book De viris illustribus gives a brief account of one hundred and thirty-five Church writers, beginning with St Peter and ending with himself.

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  • The sides of the hill are rocky, and remarkable for the regular stratification of the limestone, which gives the hill at a distance the appearance of being terraced.

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  • Their long lists of the occurrences of words and forms fixed with accuracy the present (Masoretic) text, which they had produced, and were invaluable to subsequent lexicographers, while their system of vowel-points and accents not only gives us the pronunciation and manner of reading traditional about the 7th century A.D., but frequently serves also the purpose of an explanatory commentary.

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  • This page gives an overview of all articles in the 1911 Brittanica which are alphabetized under Hep to Hes.

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  • At this point was another passage of the river, defended by the castle which gives its name to the spot, and which stands on a high hill overhanging the right bank, its base washed by an abundant stream, the Sanjeh (Gr.

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  • "Yah [well] gives").

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  • The town gives its name to an important coalbasin, and carries on the manufacture of glass.

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  • This was continued in the Grundprincip der Philosophie (1845-1846), which also gives his speculative position.

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  • The acid is considered to possess the structure 0 2 S(SH) (OH), since sodium thiosulphate reacts with ethyl bromide to give sodium ethyl thiosulphate, which on treatment with barium chloride gives presumably barium ethyl thiosulphate.

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  • He points out that the available oxygen in the oxides may react either as SO 2 + H 2 O ?-- O = H 2 SO 4 or as 2S0 2 -IH20 + 0 = H 2 S 2 0 6; and that in the case of ferric oxide 96% of the theoretical yield of dithionate is obtained, whilst manganese oxide only gives about 75%.

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  • Venice, a city not exactly belonging to any of these classes, essentially a city of the Eastern empire and not of the Western, gives us an example than which none is more instructive.

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  • In both cases the older nobility gives way to a newer; and in both cases the newer nobility was a nobility of office.

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  • The preface to this edition collects all the biographical details and gives full bibliographical references to MSS.

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  • And he gives as a crowning instance that he exposed himself to the hatred of the informer Cyprianus by preventing the punishment of Albinus, a man of consular rank.

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  • It is still very valuable as a help in ascertaining the principles of ancient music, and gives us the opinions of some of the best ancient writers on the art.

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  • used, it gives the Book of Lupus, " De Metris Boetii," the "Vita Boetii " contained in some MSS., " Elogia Boetii," and a short list of the commentators, translators and imitators of the Consolatio.

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  • This gives a new and moral filling to the conception of " supernatural revelation."

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  • 24 §§ 3-7) gives a sketch of Basilides' school of thought, perhaps derived from Justin's Syntagma.

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  • Maori tradition is explicit as to the cause of the exodus from Samoa, gives the names of the canoes in which the journey was made and the time of year at which the coast of New Zealand was sighted.

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  • This page gives an overview of all articles in the 1911 Brittanica which are alphabetized under Fos to Fra.

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  • Bede gives no information about its origin except that its earliest settlers were Angles.

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  • While thus carried about by the host-insect, the female is fertilized by the free-flying male, and gives birth to a number of tiny triungulin larvae.

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  • The urban population, divided into two categories according to their taxable wealth, elects delegates direct to the college of the government (Guberniya), and is thus represented in the second degree; but the system of division into categories, according not to the number of taxpayers but to the amount they pay, gives a great preponderance to the richer classes.

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  • Lastly, it examines into registers and promulgates new laws, a function which, in theory, gives it a power, akin to that of the Supreme Court of the United States, of rejecting measures not in accordance with the fundamental laws.

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  • The spring is exceptionally beautiful in central Russia; late as it usually is, it sets in with vigour, and vegetation develops with a rapidity which gives to this season in Russia a special charm, unknown in warmer climates.

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  • But a closer observation of what is going on in the recently colonized confines of the empire - where whole villages live without mixing with the natives, but slowly bringing them over to the Russian manner of life, and then slowly taking in a few female elements from them - gives the key to this feature of Russian life.

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  • For each of these classes a rate-sheet gives the actual ratecharge per unit of weight between the various stations covered by the tariff.

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  • per lb; then the mechanical energy available in footpounds per hour is approximately 0-06 X 778 X Ec, and this expressed in horse-power units gives I.H.P. - o 06X778XEc _648.1,980,000.

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  • This corrected pull is then divided by the weight of the vehicles hauled, in which must be included the weight of the dynamometer car, and the quotient gives the resistance per ton of load hauled at a certain uniform speed on a straight and level road.

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  • 17 gives values which must be regarded as only very approximate.

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  • 26 gives a general idea of the American gauge in a particular case, generally typical, however, of the American limits.

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  • 3 In other words, the evidence is rarely strictly experimental, and this not only gives facilities for fraud, but makes it necessary to allow a large margin for accidents, mistakes and mal-observation.

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  • Count Agenor de Gasparin, in his Tables tournantes (Paris, 1854), gives an account of what seem to have been careful experiments, though they are hardly described in sufficient detail to enable us to form an independent judgment.

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  • Public sittings are apt to be means of obtaining money by false pretences, and the great scandal of spiritualism is undoubtedly the encouragement it gives to the immoral trade of fraudulent mediumship.

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  • This page gives an overview of all articles in the 1911 Brittanica which are alphabetized under Tic to Tob.

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  • Although he wrote poetry, also an anthology of verses on the monasteries of Mesopotamia and Egypt, and a genealogical work, his fame rests upon his Book of Songs (Kitab ul-Aghani), which gives an account of the chief Arabian songs, ancient and modern, with the stories of the composers and singers.

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  • This page gives an overview of all articles in the 1911 Brittanica which are alphabetized under Ati to Aur.

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  • Arrived there he slays the dragon and carries the apples to Argos; and finally, like Perseus, he gives them to Athena.

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  • This vegetation, covering plains, mesas, and even extending up the sides of the mountains, gives the entire landscape the greyish or dull olive colour characteristic of the Great Basin.

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  • An unusual: provision in the constitution, a result of its adoption in the midst of the Civil War, gives soldiers and sailors in the service of the United States the right to vote; their votes to be applied to the township and county in which they were bona fide residents at the time of enlistment.'

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  • A rare work on the earlier church (Buonamici, La Metropolitana di Ravenna) gives details of its construction.

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  • Apollinare Nuovo gives some faint idea of the palace.

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  • Strabo, writing probably a few years after Ravenna had been thus selected as a naval arsenal, gives us a description of its appearance which certainly corresponds more closely with modern Venice than with modern Ravenna.

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  • He gives an account of the barons' war from a royalist standpoint, and is a severe critic of Montfort's policy.

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  • iv.), gives a probable representation of Demeter (or her priestess) from the stone of a vault in a Crimean grave.

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  • Lyons, in Brigadier-General Thomas Francis Meagher (New York, 1870), gives a eulogistic account of his career.

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  • In these forms the pregnant female, instead of laying eggs, as Diptera usually do, or even producing a number of minute living larvae, gives birth at one time but to a single larva, which is retained within the oviduct of the mother until adult, and assumes the pupal state immediately on extrusion.

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  • He gives us a detailed account of his sufferings in prison, his loss of civil rights, &c., in the third part of his History.

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  • The following table gives the heats of neutralization of the commoner strong monobasic acids with soda: - Hydrochloric acid Hydrobromic acid Hydriodic acid Nitric acid Chloric acid Bromic acid Within the error of experiment these numbers are identical.

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  • This page gives an overview of all articles in the 1911 Brittanica which are alphabetized under Dro to Dzu.

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  • The temperature of the water varies from 98° to 130° Fahr.; in all cases it gives off carbonic acid gas and contains lime, magnesium and sodium products.

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  • 11, &c.), who gives a somewhat exaggerated description of the site, and as Urbs Vetus elsewhere after his time.

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  • The book of Kings gives the standpoint of a later Judaean writer, but Josiah's authority over a much larger area than Judah alone is suggested by xxiii.

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  • 28-30 gives a total of 4600 persons, in contrast to 2 Kings xxiv.

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  • which gives a list of families who returned from exile each to its own city, and (b) in the return of the holy vessels in the time of Cyrus (contrast 1 Esdras iv.

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  • Nehemiah naturally gives us only his version, and the attitude of Haggai and Zechariah to Zerubbabel may illustrate the feeling of his partisans.

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  • The whole gives an impression of unity, which is designed, and is to be expected in a compilation.

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  • In connexion with Alexander's march through Palestine Josephus gives a tradition of his visit to Jerusalem.

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  • The legendary tradition which even Philo accepts gives it a formal nativity, a royal patron and inspired authors.

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  • Such is the account which Josephus gives in the Antiquities; in the Jewish War he represents the rabbis and their disciples as looking forward to greater happiness for themselves after such a death.

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  • The law of 1890 makes it " compulsory for every Jew to be a member of the congregation of the district in which he resides, and so gives to every congregation the right to tax the individual members " (op. cit.).

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  • During the Third Middle Minoan period, the lower limits of which approach 1600 B.C., this pictographic script finally gives way to a still more developed linear system - which is itself divided into an earlier and a later class.

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  • This gives access to a whole series of halls and private rooms (halls " of the Colonnades," " of the Double Axes," " Queen's Megaron" with bath-room attached and remains of the fish fresco, " Treasury " with ivory figures and other objects of art), together with extensive remains of an upper storey.

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  • A fine paved corridor running east from this gives access to a line of the later magazines, and through a columnar hall to the central court beyond, while to the left of this a broad and stately flight of steps leads up to a kind of entrance hall on an upper terrace.

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  • The above summary gives, indeed, a very imperfect idea of the extent to which the remains of the great Minoan civilization are spread throughout the island.

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  • In any case, only the eastern districts would have been affected by invaders from over the Rhine, the chief seat of the Belgae proper being in the west, the country occupied by the Bellovaci, Ambiani and Atrebates, to which it is probable (although the reading is uncertain) that Caesar gives the distinctive name Belgium (corresponding to the old provinces of Picardy and Artois).

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  • S5) notices this false etymology, shows how similarity of sound had led to it, and gives the correct derivation.

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  • shores, adds to its naturally high temperature, and the absence of high mountainous ridges to intercept the moisture-bearing clouds from the Atlantic gives it a limited rainfall.

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  • Claiborne's Mississippi as a Province, Territory and State (Jackson, 1880), gives the best account of the period before the Civil War.

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  • Father Braun (Liturgische Gewandung, p. 457) gives a picture of a seal of Charles IV.

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  • Mitres with horns on either side seem to have been worn till about the end of the 12th century, and Father Braun gives examples of their appearances on episcopal seals in France until far into the 13th.

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  • In many of those ants whose third abdominal segment forms a second " node," the basal dorsal region of the fourth segment is traversed by a large number of very fine transverse striations; over these the sharp hinder edge of the third segment can be scraped to and fro, and the result is a stridulating organ which gives rise to a note of very high pitch.

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  • This page gives an overview of all articles in the 1911 Brittanica which are alphabetized under Ske to Smy.

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  • The word Orchis is used in a special sense to denote a particular genus of the Orchid family (Orchidaceae); very frequently, also, it is employed in a more general way to indicate any member of that large and very interesting group. It will be convenient here to use the word Orchis as applying to that particular genus which gives its name to the order or family, and to employ the term "orchid" in the less precise sense.

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  • Krishna gives 102° 15", Kreitner 102° 5", Baber 102° 18".

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  • above the present level of the Caspian, gives support to this hypothesis, which is further advanced by the ascertained nature of the Kara-kum sands, which appear to be a purely marine formation exhibiting no traces of fluviatile deposits which might be considered as delta deposits of the Oxus.

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  • The cinchona has recently been introduced with complete success; and the mahogany of America reaches a large size, and gives promise of being grown for use as timber.

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  • dant; leafless forms being of frequent occurrence, which gives the vegetation a very remarkable aspect.

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  • Catherine Welch, in The Little Dauphin (1908) gives a résumé of the various sides of the question.

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  • and xii.3 The shorter text, represented by the Septuagint, gives an account of Saul's jealousy which is psychologically more intelligible.

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  • For his wars a larger force than his early bodyguard was required, and the Chronicler gives an account of the way in which an army of nearly 300,000 was raised and held by David's thirty heroes (i Chron.

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  • Toke gives reason to believe that the date must be set back at least as early as 910.

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  • This page gives an overview of all articles in the 1911 Brittanica which are alphabetized under Sao to Sax.

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  • The dorsal vessel also communicates with the ventral vessel indirectly by the intestinal sinus, which gives off branches to both the longitudinal trunks, and by tegementary vessels and capillaries which supply the skin and the nephridia.

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  • The sole difference is therefore that in Eudrilus the ovarian sac gives rise to a tube which bifurcates, one branch meeting a corresponding branch of the other ovary of the pair, while the second branch reaches the exterior.

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  • Evaporation and subsequent distillation under a high vacuum gives crude glycerin.

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  • 214 gives him a reign of 29 years) began in 553 B.C., and from the annals that in 550 Astyages marched against Cyrus, but was defeated; his troops revolted against him, he was taken prisoner, and Cyrus occupied and plundered Ecbatana.

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  • Cyrus had 10,400 Greek hoplites and 2500 peltasts, and besides an Asiatic army under the command of Ariaeus, for which Xenophon gives the absurd number of ioo,000 men; the army of Artaxerxes he puts down at 900,000.

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  • gives a typical example of it.

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  • None the less, he gives a more vivid impression of his, age than any other English chronicler; and it is a matter for regret that his great history breaks off in 1259, on the eve of the crowning struggle between Henry III and the baronage.

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  • This page gives an overview of all articles in the 1911 Brittanica which are alphabetized under Gos to Gra.

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  • Loserth gives a bibliography of authorities dealing with the history of the Order on pp. 131, 365 and 567-8.

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  • To find three numbers such that the product of any two added to the sum of those two gives a square (III.

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  • 22) To find two numbers such that their product their sum gives a cube (IV.

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  • 29); To find three squares such that their continued product added to any one of them gives a square (V.

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  • The following table gives particulars of temperature averages at a few typical places: In respect of precipitation the entire region of Caucasia may be divided into two strikingly contrasted regions, a wet and a dry.

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  • This page gives an overview of all articles in the 1911 Brittanica which are alphabetized under Sna to Sor.

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  • Derbyshire probably originated as a shire in the time of ZEthelstan, but for long it maintained a very close connexion with Nottinghamshire, and the Domesday Survey gives a list of local customs affecting the two counties alike.

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  • This page gives an overview of all articles in the 1911 Brittanica which are alphabetized under Ble to Bo.

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  • " In some places," he says, " a horse plough is better," and in others an oxen plough, to which, upon the whole, he gives the preference.

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  • The author then points out the great advantages of enclosure; recommends " quycksettynge, dychynge and hedgeyng "; and gives particular directions about settes, and the method of training a hedge, as well as concerning the planting and management of trees.

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  • The hay made from clover, sainfoin and grasses under rotation generally gives a bigger average yield than that from permanent grass land.

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  • This volume records the births in the herds of members of the society, and gives the pedigrees of cows and bulls, besides furnishing lists of prizewinners at the principal shows and butter-test awards, and reports of sales by auction of Jersey cattle.

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  • Shield Nicholson's Principles of Political Economy (3 vols.) not only gives a survey of economic principles since Mill's time, but contains much suggestive and original work.

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  • This page gives an overview of all articles in the 1911 Brittanica which are alphabetized under Wau to Wes.

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  • The boughs and their side-branches, as they increase in length, have a tendency to droop, the lower tier, even in large trees, often sweeping the ground - a habit that, with the jagged sprays, and broad, shadowy, wave-like foliage-masses, gives a peculiarly graceful and picturesque aspect to the Norway spruce.

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  • movement flexure is also produced by the coiling of the visceral sac and shell; primitively the latter was bowl-shaped; but the ventral flexure, which brings together the two extremities of the digestive tube, gives the visceral sac the outline of a more or less acute cone.

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  • 38) gives a faithful representation of the great mobility of the various parts of the body.

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  • Laterally the foot gives rise to a pair of mobile fleshy lobes, the parapodia (ep), which can be thrown up so as to cover in the dorsal surface of the animal.

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  • The first is flaccid and sluggish in its movements, and has not much power of contraction; its epipodial lobes are enormously developed and extend far forward along the body; it gives out when handled an abundance of purple liquid, which is derived from cutaneous glands situated on the under side of the free edge of the mantle.

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  • sp, Abdominal ganglion which represents also the supra-intestinal ganglion of Streptoneura and gives off the nerve to the osphradium (olfactory organ) o, and another to an unlettered socalled " genital " ganglion.

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  • Krohn posite to it is the visceral ganglion of in Marsenia =Echino- the right side, which gives off the long spira) there may be a nerve to the olfactory ganglion and break at a later stage, osphradium o.

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  • He is, moreover, a judicious critic. The union of these four elements gives character to his theology, and in a certain degree to all subsequent theology.

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  • The art of all the area gives evidence of one spirit and common models; in religious representations it shows the same anthropomorphic personification and the same ritual furniture.

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  • Alongside of Mana rabba frequent mention is made of D'mutha, his "image," as a female power; the name "image of the father" arises out of the same conception as that which gives rise to the name of 'vvota among the Greek Gnostics.

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  • He gives an account (chapter viii.) of the unwearied efforts made by himself and his agents to collect books.

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  • A notice of Richard de Bury by his contemporary Adam Murimuth (Continuatio Chronicarum, Rolls Series, 1889, p. 171) gives a less favourable account of him than does William de Chambre, asserting that he was only moderately learned, but desired to be regarded as a great scholar.

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  • Petrunkevich (1901-1903), the second polar nucleus uniting with one daughter-nucleus of the first polar body gives rise to the germ-cells of the parthenogenetically-produced male.

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  • The travels of Le Vaillant in South Africa having been completed in 5785, his great Oiseaux d'Afrique began to appear in Paris in 1797; but it is hard to speak properly of this work, for several of the species described in it are certainly not, and never were in his time, inhabitants of that country, though he sometimes gives a long account of the circumstances under which he observed them.1° From travellers who employ themselves in collecting the animals of any distant country the zoologists who stay at home and study those of their own district, be it great or small, are really not so much divided as at first might appear.

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  • Of this kind of retribution Scott in The Abbot gives a vivid picture, the Protestants interrupting the mass celebrated by the trembling remnant of the monks in the ruined abbey church, and insisting on substituting the traditional Feast of Fools.

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  • The Peterborough Chronicle, not content with voicing this sentiment, gives Eustace a bad character.

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  • Strabo himself talks of Armoric Heneti, and supposes them to have come from the neighbourhood of Brittany; another theory gives us Sarmatian Heneti, from the Baltic provinces; while the most widely accepted view was that they reached Italy from Paphlagonia.

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  • The Cronica altinate in the vision of Fra Mauro gives us a picturesque account of the founding of the various parishes, Olivolo or Castello, St Raffaello, St Salvadore, Sta Maria Formosa, S.

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  • Its subject, which is of high historical value as a record of costume, represents the translation of the body of St Mark, and gives us a view of the west façade of the church as it was at the beginning of the 13th century before the addition of the ogee gables, with alternating crockets and statues, and the intermediate pinnacled canopies placed between the five great arches of the upper storey.

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  • The facade is a triumph of graceful elegance; so light is the tracery, so rich the decoration, so successful the breach of symmetry which gives us a wing upon the left-hand side but none upon the right.

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  • Special notes of the style are the central grouping of the windows, leaving comparatively solid spaces on each side, which gives the effect of FIG.

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  • The municipal bulletin of the 31st of December 1906 gives a total of 169,563, not including 4835 soldiers.

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  • This page gives an overview of all articles in the 1911 Brittanica which are alphabetized under Nes to New.

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  • Mere argument is never sufficient; it may decide a question, but gives no satisfaction or certainty to the mind, which can only be convinced by immediate inspection or intuition.

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  • Now this is what experience gives.

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  • As an instance of his method, Bacon gives an investigation into the nature and cause of the rainbow, which is really a very fine specimen of inductive research.

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  • Aristotle's Constitution of Athens (c. 22) gives a.

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  • The great fiscal inscription, which still remains where it was set up, gives the fullest picture of the life and commerce of the city.

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  • A breach of the covenant to repair gives the landlord an action for damages which will be measured by the estimated injury to the reversion if the action be brought during the tenancy, and by the sum necessary to execute the repairs, if the action be brought later.

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  • Section 47 of the act gives the tenant the same rights to compensation as if his holding had been a holding under the Agricultural Holdings Act 1908 (vide supra).

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  • A word must be added as to letting by cheptel (bail a cheptel) - a contract by which one of the parties gives to the other a stock of cattle to keep under conditions agreed on between them (Art.

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  • This page gives an overview of all articles in the 1911 Brittanica which are alphabetized under Ded to Dep.

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  • This page gives an overview of all articles in the 1911 Brittanica which are alphabetized under Kna to Kra.

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  • above the middle of the row, which in four-foot rows gives a slope of i in.

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  • The actual amounts differ with different varieties, conditions of cultivation, methods of ginning, &c.; a recent estimate in the United States gives 35% of lint for Upland cotton and 25% for Sea Island cotton as more accurate.

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  • The average of a large number of analyses of Upland cotton seed gives the following figures for its fertilizing constituents: - Nitrogen, 3.07%; phosphoric acid, 1.02%; potash, 1.17%; besides small amounts of lime, magnesia and other valuable but less important ingredients.

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  • The following diagram, modified from one by Grimshaw, in accordance with the results obtained by the better class of modern mills, gives an interesting resume of the products obtained from a ton of cotton seed: - Products from a Ton of Cotton Seed.

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  • The preceding table gives the quantity, value and character of the crop for each of the cotton-growing states in 1906, as reported by the Bureau of the Census.

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  • Glycerin when treated with hydrochloric acid gives propenyl dichlorhydrin, which may be oxidized to s-dichloracetone.

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  • Citric acid digested at a temperature below 40° C. with concentrated sulphuric acid gives off carbon monoxide and forms acetone dicarboxylic acid.

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  • This page gives an overview of all articles in the 1911 Brittanica which are alphabetized under Bav to Bee.

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  • In the southwest of Manchuria a line of the imperial railways of Northern China gives connexion from Peking, and branches at Kou-pang-tsze to Sin Population.

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  • At the same time, if our text is thus late, it must be remembered that its content gives us the earliest and purest exposition of French feudalism, and describes for us the organization of a kingdom, where all rights and duties were connected with the fief, and the monarch was only a suzerain of feudatories.

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  • He gives an ecclesiastic's account of the First Crusade, and is specially full on the spiritualistic phenomena which accompanied and followed the finding of the Holy Lance.

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  • Each consists of a more or less coiled, ciliated, longitudinal canal, which on its external surface gives origin to one or more transverse canals, which pass to the exterior and open a little way behind the mouth on the sides of the body.

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  • On its inner surface the longitudinal canal is adpressed to the lateral bloodvessel, and gives off a number of small, blind caeca or tags, each of which ends in a small clump of cells.

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  • A series 750.) I, The longitudinal of sacs lined with an epithelium, the proexcretory canal; 2, one liferation of which gives rise to the ova of the tags containing the or spermatozoa, alternate between the flame-cells.

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  • Each instrument is accompanied by a pair of weights and by a square root table, so that the product of the square root of the number corresponding to the position of the sliding weight and the ascertained constant for each weight, gives at once the value of the current in amperes.

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  • The potential difference of the ends of the low resistance is at the same time measured on the potentiometer, and the quotient of this potential difference by the known value of the low resistance gives the true value of the current passing through the ammeter.

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  • The peculiar outline of Florida gives it the name of " Peninsula State."

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  • But the unusual severity of the winters of 1887, 1894 and 1899 (the report of the Twelfth Census which gives the figures for this year being therefore misleading) destroyed three-fourths of the orange trees, and caused an increased attention to stockraising, and to various agricultural products.

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  • c. 1 r) adds nothing by way of definition or restriction, but merely gives additional remedies against encroachments, providing heavy fines for those who improperly sue in the court, and those officials of the court who improperly assert jurisdiction.

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  • 9-Ir, a sort of collegium, of which he was the head; and as instructor of this body he gives his criticism of life.

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  • He gives a number of illustrations.

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  • 7 point to social, not intellectual, conditions, and a slight change (pm for 'non) gives the sense" poor."death is practically the end-all; and so poor a thing is life that the dead are to be considered more fortunate than the living, and more to be envied than either class is he who never came into existence (iv.

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  • 26 (God gives joy to him who pleases him, amd makes the sinner toil to lay up for the latter), viii.

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  • 7), suggest the troublous time of the later Greek and the Maccabean rulers, of which the history of Josephus gives a good picture.

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  • 10, § 12) - hence its highly rhetorical character - from which Eusebius gives the extract about the Essenes; while this in its turn may have constituted the fourth book of a large work entitled ("sarcastically," says Eusebius, H.E.

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  • The cake on weighing gives the free acid.

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  • The residue on the filter paper gives (3) the substances insoluble in water.

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  • Some are in Greek and demotic, and one, of peculiar interest from the chemical point of view, gives a number of receipts, in Greek, for the manipulation of base metals to form alloys which simulate gold and are intended to be used in the manufacture of imitation jewellery.

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  • Berthelot gives reproductions of the British Museum MSS.

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  • At the same period he founded the abbey of Fulda, as a centre for German monastic culture, placing it under the Bavarian Sturm, whose biography gives us so many picturesque glimpses of the time, and making its rule stricter than the Benedictine.

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  • The Old Testament depicts the history of the people as a series of acts of apostasy alternating with subsequent penitence and return to Yahweh, and the question whether this gives effect to actual conditions depends upon the precise character of the elements of Yahweh worship brought by the Israelites into Palestine.

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  • A mixture of carbon bisulphide vapour and sulphuretted hydrogen, when passed over heated copper, gives, amongst other products, some methane.

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  • The solution may be worked out directly or through the determination of the equation of the centre which, being added to the mean anomaly, gives the true anomaly.

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  • Problems in artillery occupy two out of nine books; the sixth treats of fortification; the ninth gives several examples of the solution of cubic equations.

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  • The Agora was commonly described as the " Ceramicus," and Pausanias gives it this name; of the numerous buildings which he saw here scarcely a trace remains; their position, for the most part, is largely conjectural, and the exact boundaries of the Agora itself are uncertain.

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  • The brilliant summary of the historian Thucydides in the famous Funeral Speech of Pericles (delivered in 430), in which the social life, the institutions and the culture of his country are set forth as a model, gives a substantially true picture of Athens in its greatest days.

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  • Bluhme also gives the rubrics of the Lombardae, which were published by F.

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  • Ignatius, with his military instinct and views of obedience, intervenes with a director who gives the exercises to the person who in turn receives them.

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  • He gives various methods of prayer; methods of making an election; his series of rules for the discernment of spirits; rules for the distribution of alms and the treatment of scruples; tests of orthodoxy.

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  • The latest critics, even those of the Society itself, give 1548 as the date when the book received its final touches; though Father Roothaan gives Rome, the 9th of July 1541, as the date at the end of the ancient MS. version.

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  • Ignatio (Rome, 1650, 1659) Genelli wrote Das Leben des heiligen Ignatius von Loyola (Innsbruck, 1848); Nicolas Orlandinus gives a life in the first volume of the Historiae Societatis Jesu (Rome, 1615).

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  • Van Middeldyk gives a brief bibliography of historical works, and a more extensive list is given in General George W.

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  • If Marca's criticism is too often undecided, both in the ancient epochs, where he supports the text by a certain amount of guesswork and in certain points where he touches on religion, yet he always gives the text correctly.

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  • Bromine converts it into dibromacrylic acid, and it gives with hydrochloric acid (3-chloracrylic acid.

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  • Schmidt gives a full bibliography of the numerous writings of Menius, who translated several of Luther's biblical commentaries into German.

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  • BENARES, the Holy City of the Hindus, which gives its name to a district and division in the United Provinces of India.

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  • This page gives an overview of all articles in the 1911 Brittanica which are alphabetized under Das to Dec.

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  • Elements.-The following table gives the names, symbols and atomic weights of the perfectly characterized elements: International Atomic Weights, 1910.

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  • This acid gives with silver nitrite the corresponding nitromalonic acid, which readily yielded the third nitromethane, CHaHb(N02),Hd, also identical with the first.

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  • Thus ethane gives H3C CH2 CH3, propane; ethylene gives H 2 C:CH CH 3, propylene; and acetylene gives HC: C CH 3, allylene.

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  • It will be seen that each type depends upon a specific radical or atom, and the copulation of this character with any hydrocarbon radical (open or cyclic) gives origin to a compound of the same class.

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  • The introduction of hydroxyl groups into the benzene nucleus gives rise to compounds generically named phenols, which, although resembling the aliphatic alcohols in their origin, differ from these substances in their increased chemical activity and acid nature.

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  • Substituted acetylenes also exhibit this form of condensation; for instance, bromacetylene, BrC: CH, is readily converted into tribrombenzene, while propiolic acid, HC: C. COOH, under the influence of sunlight, gives benzene tricarboxylic acid.

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  • These compounds are both decomposed by water, the former giving dichloraceto-trichlorcrotonic acid (4), which on boiling with water gives dichlormethylvinyl-a-diketone (5).

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  • The heptachlor compound when treated with chlorine water gives trichloraceto-pentachlorbutyric acid (6), which is hydrolysed by alkalis to chloroform and pentachlorglutaric acid (7), and is converted by boiling water into tetrachlor-diketo-Rpentene (8).

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  • This compound is converted by chlorine water into octachloracetylacetone (3) by methyl alcohol into the ester of dichlormalonic acid and tetrachioracetone (4); whilst ammonia gives dichloracetamide (5) (Th.

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  • Resorcin on reduction gives dihydroresorcin, which G.

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  • The prism formula also received support from the following data: protocatechuic acid when oxidized by nitrous acid gives carboxytartronic acid, which, on account of its ready decomposition into carbon dioxide and tartronic acid, was considered to be HO C(COOH) 3.

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  • The octahedral formula discussed by Julius Thomsen (Ber., 1886, 19, p. 2 944) consists of the six carbon atoms placed at the corners of a regular octahedron, and connected together by the full lines as shown in (I); a plane projection gives a hexagon with diagonals (II).

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  • Thus benzene, (CH) gives thiophene, (CH) S, from which it is difficultly distinguished; pyridine, (CH) N, gives thiazole, (CH) N S, which is a very similar substance; naphthalene gives thionaphthen, C 11 S, with which it shows great analogies, especially in the derivatives.

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  • Similarly a CH group may be replaced by a nitrogen atom with the production of compounds of similar stability; thus benzene gives pyridine, naphthalene gives quinoline and isoquinoline; anthracene gives acridine and a and 3 anthrapyridines.

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  • Thiophene also gives rise to triazsulphole, three nitrogen atoms being introduced.

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  • Selenophene gives the series: selenazole, diazoselenide and piaselenole, corresponding to oxazole, diazo-oxides and furazane.

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  • From the pyrone ring the following series of compounds are derived (for brevity, the hydrogen atoms are not printed): Penthiophene gives, by a similar introduction of nitrogen atoms, penthiazoline, corresponding to meta-oxazine, and para-thiazine, CH 2 CH 2o CH CO „ .„0 C ?

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  • Pyridine gives origin to: pyridazine or ortho-diazine, pyrimidine or metadiazine, pyrazine or para-diazine, osotriazine, unsymmetrical triazine, symmetrical triazine, osotetrazone and tetrazine.

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  • a-pyrone condenses with the benzene ring to form coumarin and isocoumarin; benzo-'y-pyrone constitutes the nucleus of several vegetable colouring matters (chrysin, fisetin, quercetin, &c., which are derivatives of flavone or phenyl benzo-y-pyrone); dibenzo--ypyrone is known as xanthone; related to this substance are fluorane (and fluorescein), fluorone, fluorime, pyronine, &c. The pyridine ring condenses with the benzene ring to form quinoline and isoquinoline; acridine and phenanthridine are dibenzo-pyridines; naphthalene gives rise to a-and /3-naphthoquinolines and the anthrapyridines; anthracene gives anthraquinoline; while two pyridine nuclei connected by an intermediate benzene nucleus give the phenanthrolines.

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  • A sublimate may be formed of: sulphur - reddish-brown drops, cooling to a yellow to brown solid, from sulphides or mixtures; iodine - violet vapour, black sublimate, from iodides, iodic acid, or mixtures; mercury and its compounds - metallic mercury forms minute globules, mercuric sulphide is black and becomes red on rubbing, mercuric chloride fuses before subliming, mercurous chloride does not fuse, mercuric iodide gives a yellow sublimate; arsenic and its compounds - metallic arsenic gives a grey mirror, arsenious oxide forms white shining crystals, arsenic sulphides give reddish-yellow sublimates which turn yellow on cooling; antimony oxide fuses and gives a yellow acicular sublimate; lead chloride forms a white sublimate after long and intense heating.

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  • When present in sufficient quantity the five last-named give enamel-white beads; lead oxide in excess gives a yellowish bead.

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  • If silica be present, it gives the iron bead when heated with a little ferric oxide; if tin is present there is no change.

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  • Potassium gives a blue-violet flame which may be masked by the colorations due to sodium, calcium and other elements.

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  • The solution with ammonium sulphide gives a white precipitate of zinc sulphide.

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  • The increase in weight of the calcium chloride tube gives the weight of water formed, and of the potash bulbs the carbon dioxide.

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  • The increase in weight of the potash bulbs and soda-lime tube gives the weight of carbon dioxide evolved.

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  • The following table gives a comparative view of the specific heats and the ratio for molecules of variable atomic content.

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  • The values are for the Ha line: The empirical formula (n2-I)/(n2-1-o 4)d apparently gives more constant values with change of temperature than the LorenzLorentz form.

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  • (3) If a colourless compound gives a coloured one on solution or by salt-formation, the production of colour may be explained as a particular form of ionization (Baeyer), or by a molecular rearrangement (Hantzsch).

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  • telluric acid forms cubic and monoclinic crystals from a hot nitric acid solution, and ammonium fluosilicate gives cubic and hexagonal forms from aqueous solutions between 6° and 13°.

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  • Direct nitration gives (principally) m-nitrobenzoic acid, also pseudotetragonal with a much shorter principal axis.

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  • Bernard Shaw, though concerned mainly with the social philosophy of the Ring, gives a luminous account of Wagner's mastery of musical movement.

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  • The climate is sub-tropical and humid, though the elevation (3700-3800 ft.) gives a temperate climate in winter.

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  • hydroxylamine gives the dioxime of succinic aldehyde.

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  • When heated with resorcin to 200° C. it gives trioxybenzophenone.

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  • Bromine water in dilute aqueous solution gives a white precipitate of tribromophenol-bromide C 6 H 2 Br 3.

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  • When boiled with calcium chloride and ammonia, salicylic acid gives a precipitate of insoluble basic calcium salicylate, C 6 H 4 ‹ 0 2 i Ca, a reaction which serves to distinguish it from the isomeric metaand para-hydroxybenzoic acids.

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  • Methyl Salicylate, C,H 4 (OH) CO 2 CH 31 found in oil of wintergreen, in the oil of Viola tricolor and in the root of varieties of Polygala, is a pleasant-smelling liquid which boils at 222° C. On passing dry ammonia into the boiling ester, it gives salicylamide and dimethylamine.

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  • When boiled with aniline it gives methylaniline and phenol.

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  • Hydrolysis with baryta water gives acetic and salicylic acids.

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  • The description given by Justin of the army which Antiochus Sidetes took to the East in 130 B.C., boot-nails and bridles of gold, gives an idea of their standard of splendour (Just.

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  • The official portrait by Muytens, engraved by Petit, gives a less convincing impression that an excellent chalk drawing of the head by Gabriel Mattei.

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  • This compound gives a blue potassiumand lithium-ultramarine when treated with the corresponding chloride, and an ethyl-ultramarine when treated with ethyl icdide.

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  • gives further details with reference to the principal towns of each map, as to geographical position, length of day, climata, &c.

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  • It is printed in three colours, and gives contours at intervals of io metres.

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  • Barnabas 15) gives us the Jewish theory (from Gen.

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  • 14 gives a representation of the winged Harpies.

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  • To the student of ecclesiastical history it is remarkable as exhibiting a form of Christianity widely divergent from the prevalent types, being a religious fellowship which has no formulated creed demanding definite subscription, and no liturgy, priesthood or outward sacrament, and which gives to women an equal place with men in church organization.

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  • They believe that an experience of more than 250 years gives ample warrant for the belief that Christ did not command them as a perpetual outward ordinance; on the contrary, they hold that it was alien to His method to lay down minute, outward rules for all time, but that He enunciated principles which His Church should, under the guidance of the Holy Spirit, apply to the varying needs of the day.

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  • The Sufferings of the Quakers by Joseph Besse (1753) gives a detailed account of the persecution of the early Friends in England and America.

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  • Joseph Smith's Descriptive Catalogue of Friends' Books (London, 1867) gives the information which its title promises; the same author has also published a catalogue of works hostile to Quakerism.

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  • A pass through the hills gives access to Bahr-Assal; the last of a chain of salt lakes beginning 60 m.

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  • - Sinker, Testamenta XII Patriarcharum (1869); [this work gives b in the text and a in the footnotes; subsequently (1879) Sinker issued an Appendix with variations from cg]; Charles, The Greek Versions of the Testaments of the XII.

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  • Alberta thus gives rise to the two great rivers Saskatchewan and Mackenzie.

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  • It is the region in winter of constant ice and snow, but its lower altitude gives it a summer climate with a mean temperature of only 1.6° less than Calgary, and i � 8° less than Edmonton.

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  • The list of grievances presented by Wesley's enemies to the Grand Jury at Savannah gives abundant evidence of his unwearying labours for his flock.

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  • The real attack had been pressed home on the British right, and the History of the Queen's Royal West Surrey Regiment gives no undue praise to the regiments of the reserve in saying that "the determined attack would have been successful against almost any other troops."

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  • This page gives an overview of all articles in the 1911 Brittanica which are alphabetized under Ope to Oro.

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  • He gives a faithful sketch of the doctrines, mythology and dualistic system of the Magian Zoroaster.

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  • The Vendidad also merely gives accounts of the dialogues between Ormazd and Zoroaster.

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  • De Rossi gives a comparative table of these Itineraries and other similar lists.

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  • 3) from Northcote gives a very correct idea of these galleries, with the tiers of graves pierced in the walls.

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  • - bs Plan of of St Circular marks that this cemetery " gives an Syracuse.(From Agincourt.) idea of a work executed with design and leisure, and with means v e ry different from those at command in producing the catacombs of Rome."

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  • In the four last chapters the author, returning to the history, gives a detailed account of the provision made for the Israelites in the wilderness and of the pains and terrors with which the Egyptians were plagued.

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  • The Mexican Central gives it railway connexion with the national capital and other prominent cities of the Republic. Leon stands in a fertile plain on the banks of the Turbio, a tributary of the Rio Grande de Lerma, at an elevation of 5862 ft.

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  • Thiers, Histoire de la revolution francaise, gives a full and graphic account of the assignats, the causes of their depreciation, &c.; J.

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  • There is no doubt that the men who led the Creole opposition contemplated independence, and this gives the incident peculiar interest.

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  • For building and miscellaneous purposes, in addition to the rare woods above named, there are cedars (used in great quantities for cigar boxes); the pine, found only in the W., where it gives its name to the Isle of Pines and the province of Pinar del Rio; various palms; oaks of varying hardness and colour, &c. The number of alimentary plants is extremely great.

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  • The cucujo or Cuban firefly (Pyrophorus noctilucus) gives out so strong a light that a few of them serve effectively as a lantern.

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  • In a similar manner phorone gives rise to triacetone hydroxylamine, CO :[CH2 C(CH3)2]2:NOH.

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  • p. 862), calcium is heated in a current of hydrogen, and nitrogen passed over the hydride so formed; this gives ammonia and calcium nitride, the latter of which gives up its nitrogen as ammonia and reforms the hydride when heated in a current of hydrogen.

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  • It may be recognized by the blue colour it gives with diphenylamine sulphate and by its reaction with potassium iodide-starch paper.

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  • On reduction it gives a strongly reducing substance, probably hydrazine.

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  • Dry hydrochloric acid gives ammonia but no nitrogen; with ammonia it gives N:SNH 2 and S :S(NH 2) 2; and with secondary amines it forms thiodiamines, S(NR2)2, nitrogen and ammonia being liberated.

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  • Each definition gives rise to a corresponding algebra of higher complex numbers.

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  • Every branch of physics gives rise to an application of mathematics.

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  • It comprised the principalities of Tribunia or Travunja, with its capital at Trebinje; and Hlum or Hum, the Zachlumia of Constantine Porphyrogenitus, who gives a clear picture of this region as it was in the 10th century.'

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  • Sporadic insurrections had already broken out among the Bosnian Christians, and on the 1st of July 1875 the villagers of Nevesinje, which gives its name to a mountain neolithische Station von Butmir (Vienna 1895-1898); P. Ballif, Romische Strassen in Bosnien and Herzegovina (Vienna, 1893, &c.).

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  • Its elevation, 8839 ft., gives it an exceptionally agreeable climate.

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  • Table A gives the produce of the revenues in 1881-1882, the last year of the administration of the " Galata Bankers," the average product of the first, second, third, fourth and fifth quinquennial periods since the public council was established, and of the year 1907-1908.

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  • Pindar, in the fourth Pythian ode, gives the oldest detailed account of it.

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  • Realworterbuch gives a succinct account of the older views.

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  • This page gives an overview of all articles in the 1911 Brittanica which are alphabetized under Pec to Pen.

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  • The earliest writer after himself who gives us any information with regard to him is Eusebius.

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