How to use Give-way in a sentence

give-way
  • Russell, however, refused to give way a hair's-breadth.

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  • It was amended with the rule that bait fishers will give way to fly anglers.

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  • Her knees were trembling as if they were going to give way at any moment, and her face felt devoid of blood.

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  • Soon afterwards, however, his health began to give way permanently, and he died at Naples on the 12th of August 1901.

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  • Thence proceeding eastwards to higher altitudes where coffee plantations give way to fields of wheat and barley, they reached the town of Jibla situated among a group of mountains exceeding 10,000 ft.

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  • Towards the end of the 6th century the last-named began to give way to the Sla y s, who ultimately made themselves masters of the entire district.

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  • The ministry of enthusiasm which they represent is about to give way to the ministry of office, a transition which is reflected in the New Testament in the 3rd Epistle of John.

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  • Charles stubbornly insisted that this question must be referred to the Diet, and Maurice was obliged to give way.

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  • The majority are distinguished from snakes by the possession of two pairs of limbs, of external ear-openings and movable eyelids, but since in not a few of the burrowing, snake-shaped lizards these characters give way entirely, it is well-nigh impossible to find a diagnosis which should be absolutely sufficient for the distinction between lizards and snakes.

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  • One thing is certain, that the book of Psalms of the new revision had fairly soon to give way before the wellknown and smooth rendering of the Great Bible.

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  • It is still the language of the Channel Islands, though there too it tends more and more to give way before the advance of English.

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  • Not till the eleventh hour, when the election of the Habsburg, to whom he was entirely opposed, was seen to be certain did he give way.

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  • In 1509 the place became a source of contention between the chiefs of Mewar and Marwar, and was ultimately conquered in 1532 by the latter prince, who in his turn in 1559 had to give way before the emperor Akbar.

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  • In the war with Sweden, generally known as the "Kalmar War," because its chief operation was the capture by the Danes of Kalmar, the eastern fortress of Sweden, Christian compelled Gustavus Adolphus to give way on all essential points (treaty of Knared, 10th of January 1613).

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  • But to his surprise the Lutheran princes who attended the diet refused to give way.

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  • He was, however, one of the bishops who pressed Anselm, in 1106, to give way to the king.

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  • Isolation in a home is far the best, as friends may give way to entreaties and servants be bribed.

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  • In the 14th century this social arrangement, based primarily on natural economy and on the feudal disruption of society, began to give way.

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  • The flight from a cursory survey of facts to wide so-called principles must give way to a gradual progress upward from propositions of minimum to those of medium generality, and in these consists the fruitfulness of science.

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  • This phase began to give way in the irth century to a commercial and industrial renaissance, which received a great impetus from the crusading movements - themselves largely economic - and by the 14th century had made the Netherlands the factory of Europe, the Rhine a vast artery of trade, and north Italy a hive of busy cities.

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  • Then the king intervened personally; not to quell the commons, as the senate insisted, but to compel the nobility to give way.

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  • He was finally compelled to give way in Castile and Leon to his stepson Alphonso,, son of Urraca and her first husband.

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  • As any given region is opened up by railways, cheapening transportation, milling is apt to give way to smelting.

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  • The birch and larch woods of this zone give way to pine forests as the altitude increases; and the pines to mosses, lichens and alpine plants, just below the jagged iron-grey peaks, many of which attain altitudes of 6000 to 8000 ft.

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  • Going north, the hills give way to papyrus and ambach swamps, which mark the delta of the Kagera.

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  • They failed, for neither the king nor the archbishop would give way.

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  • For the present the House was ready to give way.

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  • Rather than give way on this question Pitt resigned office early in 1801, when both he and the king urged Addington to form a government.

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  • Only in a secondary sense is approval due to certain " abilities and dispositions immediately connected with virtuous affections," as candour, veracity, fortitude, sense of honour; while in a lower grade still are placed sciences and arts, along with even bodily skills and gifts; indeed, the approbation we give to these is not strictly moral, but is referred to the " sense of decency or dignity," which (as well as the sense of honour) is to be distinguished from 1 In a remarkable passage near the close of his eleventh sermon Butler seems even to allow that conscience would have to give way to self-love, if it were possible (which it is not) that the two should come into ultimate and irreconcilable conflict.

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  • Even in the Shumadia, where materials are plentiful, the roads rapidly give way under heavy traffic, or after bad weather; in the Machva, Podrinye and remoter districts, they are often impassable.

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  • The road has chicanes and give way junctions near them.

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  • The earlier villas were completed in Regency cottage style, which was later to give way to mid and early Victorian Palladian classicism.

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  • Eventually we will reach the pass and the lush cloud forests give way first to Puna then arid montane scrub.

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  • Stephen long ago queried why the state coercion of the criminal law should give way to the private coercion that is duress.

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  • Yet it saw political concord give way to suspicion and resentment.

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  • Further along the main path, the firs give way to reveal sweet chestnut coppice.

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  • To give way to working boats, rowing boats and other human propelled craft.

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  • The rounded volcanic domes seen in the last few days now give way to the more dramatic rugged skyline of the French Alps.

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  • Eventually the mansions give way to a more pastoral vision of cows grazing under willow trees.

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  • The blue flowered Ceratostigma is another valuable late bloomer which sees its blooms eventually give way to a glorious display of autumn foliage.

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  • In Russia and South Africa, gently deposited mudstones and limestones suddenly give way to massive dumps of pebbles and boulders.

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  • That was an innocent lie which hurts nobody; and in my position I find that inconvenient truths have to give way to lies.

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  • As you cross the peninsula, high open moorland and ancient woodland give way to coastal waterfalls tumbling from hanging valleys onto rocky shores.

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  • Please give way to emergency vehicles using sirens or emergency lights.

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  • Its visible and religious forms then give way to abstract formulae, which in their turn are slowly replaced by the rational manifestation of the philosophic principles of law that gains the victory in the final stage of development, designated by Vico as that of civil and human law.

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  • Georgia and Armenia were invaded and in great part occupied by the Khazars, and then for more than a thousand years the mountain fastnesses of this borderland between Europe and Asia were the refuge, or the restingplace, of successive waves of migration, as people after people and tribe after tribe was compelled to give way to the pressure of stronger races harassing them in the rear.

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  • His elder brother, Joseph, a mild and dreamy boy, had to give way before him; and it was a perception of this difference of temperament which decided the father to send Joseph into the church and Napoleon into the army.

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  • The essential characteristic of a new growth is that this subordination is lost and the tissue elements, freed from the-normal mutual restraint of their interdependence, give way to an abnormal growth.

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  • But the priest belongs to the realm of religion proper, which involves a relation of dependence on the superior power, whereas the asipu belongs to the realm of magic, which is coercive and seeks " to constrain the hostile power to give way " (Lagrange).

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  • When I was a little older I felt the need of some means of communication with those around me, and I began to make simple signs which my parents and friends readily understood; but it often happened that I was unable to express my thoughts intelligibly, and at such times I would give way to my angry feelings utterly....

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  • The ice bore him but it swayed and creaked, and it was plain that it would give way not only under a cannon or a crowd, but very soon even under his weight alone.

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  • Little as Nicholas had occupied himself with Sonya of late, something seemed to give way within him at this news.

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  • He feared to give way to his thoughts, yet could not get rid of them.

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  • Nicholas, for the first time, felt that his mother was displeased with him and that, despite her love for him, she would not give way.

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  • He did not know why, but he had to have a biscuit from the Tsar's hand and he felt that he must not give way.

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  • Though she concealed from him her intention of keeping him under her wing, Petya guessed her designs, and instinctively fearing that he might give way to emotion when with her--might "become womanish" as he termed it to himself--he treated her coldly, avoided her, and during his stay in Moscow attached himself exclusively to Natasha for whom he had always had a particularly brotherly tenderness, almost lover-like.

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  • On your southward journey peer out over the frosty waters of mighty glaciers, which give way to majestic fjords colored with wild flowers.

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  • Dunes and spinifex grass give way to smooth rock walls that rise suddenly from the red earth.

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  • They give way to ' C ' below springer level.

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  • Hazel thickets on the lower slopes give way to mixed woodland of ash, birch, hawthorn and rowan.

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  • Baby blues can turn dull or give way to other shades.

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  • Classic wedding music can give way to Christmas carols for a holiday wedding.

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  • That said, if you happen to live with Godzilla in fur, even the red Kong will eventually begin to give way.

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  • Some companies give away free merchandise as rewards for employees' hard work or as part of a giveaway at corporate events.

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  • As the positive symptoms of the acute phase subside, they may give way to what is called residual schizophrenia.

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  • When wintertime blahs give way to warmer weather, parents want to know what spring activities for young children they can find to keep their youngsters entertained and active.

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  • If we take in to account all of the bad omens and wives tales surrounding comets, these myths and fears can also give way as a means to signify change in someone's life.

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  • A good rule of thumb is to leave an area cleaner than you found it, but if you sort through the clutter as you go, you can also help to eliminate extra clutter when the chilly days of winter give way to the warmer days of spring.

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  • The Diet, which met in 1839, supported the agitation for the release of the prisoners, and refused to pass any government measures; Metternich long remained obdurate, but the danger of war in 1840 obliged him to give way.

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  • The principal trees are the oak, the valonia oak, the beech, ash, elm, plane, celtis, poplar and walnut, which give way in the higher regions to the pine and fir.

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  • Pressed by overwhelming forces, the Italians, after a violent combat, began to give way.

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  • But in January 1410 Arundel had to give way to the king's half-brother, Thomas Beaufort.

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  • It must be remembered also that economic work in modern times is carried on by consciously or unconsciously associated effort, and although it must always require high qualities of judgment, capacity and energy, many of the difficulties which at first sight appear so insuperable give way when they are attacked.

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  • Another consideration which largely conduced to the disasters of the retreat was Napoleon's postponement of any movement back from Moscow to the date of October 19th, and this is known to have resulted from his conviction that the tsar would give way as he had done at Tilsit.

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  • But this vandalism, which Wagner condoned with a very bad grace, now happily begins to give way to the practice of presenting long scenes or entire acts, with the singers, on the concert-platform.

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  • The British ambassador sought by every means in his power to induce Turkey to give way to Russia, going so far as to guarantee the withdrawal of the Russian troops from Moldo-Walachia if the Porte remained at peace, and threatening that if Turkey persisted in her opposition England would join with Russia against her.

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  • The Portuguese troops of the capital at first assumed a coercive attitude, but were forced to give way before the ardour and military preparations of the Brazilians, and submitted to embark for Portugal.

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  • Their function being at an end they give way to these cells which carry on the process of absorption.

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  • Farther northwards they give way again, as in the south, to schists and eruptive rocks.

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  • The billowy plains still remain in places, but in the vicinity of streams the billows give way to deep ravines.

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  • Saisset in the spiritualistic school, the influence of Descartes began to give way to that of Leibnitz.

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  • That wise and necessary restraint did not more often give way to oppression and violence is amazing in a country where the frontier had but recently disappeared.

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