Give-rise-to sentence examples

  • A mixture of the melanistic with the albinistic type will of course give rise to parti-coloured cats.

  • The vast number of microphonic contacts present give rise to very strong electrical undulations, and hence to a loud sound.

  • The common mushroom (Agaricus campestris) is propagated by spores, the fine black dust seen to be thrown off when a mature specimen is laid on white paper or a white dish; these give rise to what is known as the "spawn" or mycelium, which consists of whitish threads permeating dried dung or similar substances, and which, when planted in a proper medium, runs through the mass, and eventually develops the fructification known as the mushroom.

  • Since concordats are contracts they give rise to that special mutual obligation which results from every agreement freely entered into; for a contract is binding on both parties to it.

  • The eggs of the female give rise to embryos within the body of the mother; her other organs undergo a retrogressive change and serve as food for the young, until the body-wall only of the mother remains as a brown capsule.

  • The Crati, which flows from Cosenza northwards, and then turns abruptly eastward to enter the same gulf, is the only stream worthy of notice in the rugged peninsula of Calabria; while the arid limestone hills projecting eastwards to Capo di Leuca do not give rise to anything more than a mere streamlet, from the mouth of the Ofanto to the south-eastern extremity of Italy.

  • Small leeches taken into the mouth with drinking-water may give rise to serious symptoms by attaching themselves to the fauces and neighbouring parts and thence sucking blood.

  • The buds may all become detached after a time and give rise to separate and independent individuals, as in the common Hydra, in which only polyp-individuals are produced and sexual elements From Allman's Gymnoblastic Hydroids, by permission of are developed the Council of the Ray Society.

  • Or a polyp on the main stem, after having budded a second time to form a pinnule, may give rise to a third bud, which starts a new biserial FIG.

  • In Tubularia by a process of decapitation the hydranths may separate off and give rise to a separate individual, while the remainder of the body grows a new hydranth.

  • It is convenient to distinguish buds that give rise to polyps from those that form medusae.

  • The two ends of the planula become greatly lengthened and give rise to the two primary tentacles of the actinula, of which the mouth arises from one side of the planula.

  • This is known as exogenous branch-formation In the root, on the other hand, the origin of branches is endogenous The cells of the pericycle, usually opposite a protoxylem strand divide tangentially and give rise to a new growing-point.

  • stems. But in nearly all perennial Dicotyledons, in all dicotyledonous and gymnospermous trees and shrubs and in fossil Pteridophytes belonging to all the great groups, certain layers of cells remain meristematic among the permanent tissues, or after passing through a resting stage reacquire menstematic properties, and give rise to secondary tissues.

  • A tissue mother-cell of the phloem may give rise to (i) a segment of a sieve-tube with its companion cell or cells; (2) a phloem fibre; (3) a single phloem-parenchyma (cambiform) cell, or a ve~rtical file of short parenchyma cells.

  • Such frost-cracks, sun-cracks, &c., may then be slowly healed over by callus, but if the conditions for necrosis recur the crack may be again opened, or if Fungi, &c., interfere with occlusion, the healing is prevented; in such cases the local necrosis may give rise to cankers.

  • The applications of anthropogeography to human uses give rise to political and commercial geography, in the elucidation of which all the earlier departments or stages have to be considered, together with historical and other purely human conditions.

  • The discovery of the insularity of Greenland might again give rise to the argument as to the distinction between island and continent.

  • In the intervening space (the object-box) are contained a number of fragments of brilliantly coloured glass, and as the tube is turned round its axis these fragments alter their positions and give rise to the various patterns.

  • It should be noted that the oxidation of sulphur itself by atmospheric influence may give rise to sulphuric acid, which in the presence of limestone will form gypsum: thus the sulphur-deposits of Sicily suffer alteration of this kind, and have their outcrop marked by a pale earthy gypseous rock called briscale.

  • The miasmatic exhalations caused by the sun playing on stagnant waters after the floods give rise to the "Sennar fever," which drives even the natives from the plains to the southern uplands.

  • The upper surface of the elytron is sharply folded inwards at intervals, so as to give rise to a regular series of external longitudinal furrows (striae) and to form a set of supports between the two chitinous layers forming the elytron.

  • The noises made by some Ptinidae (Anobium) tapping on the walls of their burrows with their mandibles give rise to the "death tick" that has for long alarmed the superstitious.

  • This swelling includes the Donets coal-measures and the middle granitic ridges which give rise to the rapids of the Dnieper.

  • which give rise to the Volga and the W.

  • so that a known animal may give rise to another known animal of a different race, species, genus, or even family, or to a plant, or vice versa.

  • This stage in the life-history was formerly regarded as a distinct fungus with the name Roestelia cancellata; it is now known, however, that the spores germinate on young juniper leaves, in which they give rise to this other stage in the plant's history known as Gymnosporangium.

  • The gelatinous, generally reddish-brown masses of spores - the teleutospores - formed on the juniper in the spring germinate and form minute spores - sporidia - which give rise to the aecidium stage on the pear.

  • These scales breed very rapidly; Howard states one may give rise to a progeny of 3,216,080,400 in one year.

  • These two endoderm-rudiments embryonic membrane formed by delamination from the blastoderm, ultimately grow together and give rise to the epithelium of the midwhile in a few insects, including the wingless spring-tails, the emgut.

  • The bite, however, of any spider, strong enough to pierce the skin, may give rise to a certain amount of local inflammation and pain depending principally upon the amount of poison injected.

  • The roots also are affected, and instead of growing considerably in length, branch repeatedly and give rise to little tufts of rootlets.

  • The earlier supporters of the organic theory held that it was a product of the natural distillation of coal or carbonaceous matter; but though in a few instances volcanic intrusions appear to have converted coal or allied substances into oil, it seems that terrestrial vegetation does not generally give rise to petroleum.

  • A comparatively slight injury affecting a portion of the body imperfectly supplied with blood may give rise to an inflammatory condition which in a healthy part might pass unnoticed,.

  • Such increase would give rise to excessive reaction, which, in tissues already weakened, might actually produce.

  • The reason is to be found in its geographical position, a cold ice-covered polar current 68' running south along the land, while not far outside there is an open warmer sea, a circumstance which, while producing a cold climate, must also give rise to much precipitation, the land being C', thus exposed to the alternate erosion of a rough atmosphere and large glaciers.

  • For if we inquire into this causal relation we find that though we know isolated facts, we cannot perceive any such connexion between them as that the one should give rise to the other.

  • The maceration of the soft parts of a scorpion preserved in weak spirit and the cleaning of the chitinized in-grown 1nus cuticle give rise to the false appearance of a limb axis carrying the lamellae.

  • The vomiting may take place every two or three days, enormous quantities of undigested food mixed with frothy, yeast-like mucous being thrown up. And whilst the stomach is slowly filling up again after one of these uncontrollable emptyings, sudden and violent movements of the individual may cause the fluid to give rise to audible "splashings."

  • A characteristic feature of cancer is the carrying of the epithelial cells (which are the essential element of the growth) to the nearest lymphatic glands, and in cancer of the stomach the secondary implication of the glands may cause the formation of large masses between the stomach and the liver, which may press upon the large veins and give rise to dropsy.

  • Of these latter, two grades were further distinguished by Lankester - those which remain possessed of a single archenteric cavity and of two primary cell-layers (the Coelentera or Diploblastica), and those which by nipping off the archenteron give rise to two cavities, the coelom or body-cavity and the metenteron or gut (Coelomata or Triploblastica).

  • When the original light is white, the presence of some components and the absence of others will usually give rise to coloured effects, variable with the precise circumstances of the case.

  • It wastes in the disease known as " myxoedema," and the above product gathers in the tissues, in that disease, to such an extent as to give rise to what has been termed a " solid oedema."

  • In this way they give rise to a malignant new growth.

  • At a later date in the life of the individual, by some unknown stimuli, they resume their active power of proliferation and so give rise to new growths.

  • They may at some later date become active in some way, and so give rise to a cellular proliferation that may imitate the structure in which they grow, so giving rise to new growths.

  • From these experiments it is shown that cells taken from these growths and introduced into animals of the same species give rise to a cancerous growth, whose cells have acquired unlimited powers of proliferation.

  • Clay-pipes may also give rise to cancer of lips in males in England, while cancer of the mouth of both sexes is common in India where chewing a mixture of betel leaves, areca-nut, tobacco and slaked lime is the usual practice.

  • However close the relationship is between chronic irritation and the starting of cancer, we are not in a position to say that irritation, physical or chemical, by itself can give rise to new growths.

  • Should this take place into a closed gland space it will give rise to cysts, which may attain a great size, as is seen in the ovarian adenomata.

  • These cells are readily carried to distant parts and give rise to secondary growths.

  • Certain metallic poisons give rise to pigmentation of the tissues, e.g.

  • Similarly, the streaming velocity V reversed will give rise to a thrust 27rpmV in the direction xC. Now if the cylinder is released, and the components U and V are reversed so as to become the velocity of the cylinder with respect +m /a) 2 - U2 The components of the liquid velocity q, in the direction of the normal of the ellipse n and hyperbola t, are -mJi sh(n--a)cos(r-a),mJ2 ch(n-a) sin (E-a).

  • A torsion of the ellipsoidal surface will give rise to a velocity function of the form 4)--- where SZ can be expressed by the elliptic integrals in a similar manner, since dX/P3.

  • The chroniclers speak of 5000 killed and 1 i,000 prisoners; and, although these figures must be exaggerated, so great was the number of captives taken by the Genoese as to give rise to the saying - "To see Pisa, you must now go to Genoa."

  • But there are really few comets which pass sufficiently near the earth to give rise to a meteoric shower.

  • If present in large numbers they may give rise to obstruction of the liver-ducts or to inflammation of other tissues.

  • In addition to these suckers the sides of the anterior region may become infolded and give rise to an accessory adhesive organ (Holostomidae).

  • In this manner a single egg may give rise to a large number of sexual individuals.

  • Some of the central cells remain in clumps as "germ-balls," others form a mesenchyma in which "flame-cells" arise; others again give rise to muscles; and at the thicker end of the body, rudiments of the brain and digestive system are observable.

  • In the slighter forms no inconvenience may result; but in higher degrees prolonged work is apt to give rise to aching and watering of the eyes, headache, inability to read or sew for any length of time, and even to double vision and internal strabismus.

  • ect, Thickened part of the ectoderm, which will give rise to the inner layer of the polypidebud.

  • But later Jewish exegesis was especially concerned to eliminate everything in the sacred writings that might give rise to misconception with respect to God on the part of the unlearned.

  • But the tendency of his art is to give rise to new tales of the gods.

  • There are no glaciers near its sources, although they must have existed there in geologically recent times, but masses of melting snow annually give rise to floods, which rush through the midst of the valley in a turbid red stream, frequently rendering the river impassable and cutting off the crazy brick bridges at Herat and Tirpul.

  • It occurs in such abundance in certain geological formations as to give rise to the name of green-sand.

  • When A is held still, and B rotated, centrifugal action sets up vortex currents in the water in the pockets; thus a continuous circulation is caused between B and A, and the consequent changes of momentum give rise to oblique reactions.

  • Some, however, give rise to dangerous or fatal diseases, while others may cause ravaging epidemics; instances of these are given under the various orders.

  • In other cases small portions of the stem or leaves give rise to new plants by budding, as in Bryophyllum, where buds develop at the edges of the leaf and form new plants.

  • Valleys are deeply sunk in the plateau, the largest with bottom lands of sufficient width to give rise to strips of fertile farm land.

  • We shall discuss the disturbance which is propagated from the source to the ear, and which there produces sound, and the modes in which various sources vibrate and give rise to the disturbance.

  • Again, rapidly changing forces, due to the moving parts of the engine which are unbalanced vertically, act on the bridge; and, lastly, inequalities of level at the rail ends give rise to shocks.

  • But there exists a striking difference between the crests of the Astin-tagh and those of the ranges which give rise to the gigantic ridge and furrow arrangement on the Tibetan plateau.

  • But though the great morphological features of this latitudinal valley forcibly recall the latitudinal valleys of Tibet, the climatic differences give rise to differences between the basins corresponding to the differences between the mountain-ranges themselves.

  • Lichtenstein has established the fact that from the egg of the Aphis of Pistachio galls, Anopleura lentisci, is hatched an apterous insect (the gall-founder), which gives birth to young Aphides (emigrants), and that these, having acquired wings, fly to the roots of certain grasses (Bromus sterilis and Hordeum vulgare), and by budding underground give rise to several generations of apterous insects, whence finally comes a winged brood (the pupifera).

  • 2 Certain minute Nematoid worms, as Anguillula scandens, which infests the ears of wheat, also give rise to galls.

  • (x.) The use of animals in magic may sometimes give rise to a kind of respect for them, but this is of a negative nature.

  • They are the most resistant to unfavourable conditions of environment, and are able, by a process of parthenogenesis, to give rise to ordinary, indifferent forms again, which can repopulate the gnat.

  • Moreover, it is very probable that conjugation occurs soon after the arrival of the parasites in their specific invertebrate host; and this act may perhaps give rise to an aflagellar copula, which is gregariniform and comparable to an ookinete.

  • But it is probable that, in the developed procedure, where it was known that the judgment pronounced might legally give rise to the appeal, the magistrate pronounced no sentence, but brought the case at once before the people.

  • Sometimes a gall-stone which has found its way into the intestine is large enough to block the bowel and give rise to intestinal obstruction which demands abdominal section.

  • In the case of dramas, different acting editions will give rise to them.

  • The different works are more or less connected by a system of references, which give rise to difficulties, especially when they are cross-references: for example, the Analytics and Topics quote one another: so do the Physics and the Metaphysics; the De Vita and De Respiratione and the De Partibus Animalium; this latter treatise and the De Animalium Incessu; the De Interpretatione and the De Anima.

  • In the philosophies of Descartes and Locke a large share of attention had been directed to the idea of matter, which was held to be the abstract, unperceived background of real experience, and was supposed to give rise to our ideas of external things through its action on the sentient mind.

  • For what does it matter to metaphysics whether by association sensations suggest ideas, and so give rise to ideas of substance and causation a posteriori, or synthetic unity of consciousness combines sensations by a priori notions of substance and causation into objects which are merely mental phenomena of experience, when it is at once allowed by the followers of Hume and Kant alike that reason in any logical use has no power of inferring things beyond the experience of the reasoner?

  • When limonite is dehydrated and deoxidized in the presence of carbonic acid, it may give rise to chalybite.

  • The different values of the angle of minimum deviation for rays of different refrangibilities give rise to spectral colours, the red being nearest the sun, while farther away the overlapping of the spectra forms a flaming colourless tail sometimes extending over as much as ro° to 20 °.

  • The axes will take up any position, and consequently give rise to a continuous series of parhelia which touch externally the inner halo, both above and below, and under certain conditions (such as the requisite altitude of the sun) form two closed elliptical curves; generally, however, only the upper and lower portions are seen.

  • A pair of triangular prisms having a common face, or a stellate crystal formed by the symmetrical interpenetration of two triangular prisms admits of two internal reflections by faces inclined at 120°, and so give rise to two colourless images each at an angular distance of 120° from the sun.

  • Here prevailing granite and diabase give rise to a complicated mountain system through which the rivers cleave their way in a curved and irregular course.

  • The various sclerotia, if kept moist, give rise to the fructifications of the fungi concerned, much as a potato tuber does to a potato plant, and in the same way the reserve materials are consumed.

  • In some cases resting spores are formed inside the host (Chytridium), and give rise to zoosporangia on germination.

  • Ball thinks that the former legend originated in the Indian practice of sacrificing cattle to the evil spirits when a new mine is opened; birds of prey would naturally carry off the flesh, and might give rise to the tale of the eagles carrying diamonds adhering to the meat.

  • Natural springs give rise to oases at intervals and make the crossing of large deserts possible.

  • The vascular bundles and cellular tissue are sometimes developed in such a way as to form a circle, with a hollow in the centre, and thus give rise to what are called fistular or hollow leaves, as in the onion, and to ascidia or pitchers.

  • This might give rise to constant errors in the results.

  • in area) and Mauersee are the largest lakes; they are situated in the centre of the plateau, and give rise to the Pregel.

  • Here they give rise to a number of small rivers, which collect in the rift and form the Benue, the great eastern affluent of the Niger.

  • Nureddin loyally aided his deputy in dealing with Frankish invasions of Egypt, but the anomaly by which he, being a Sunnite, was made in Egypt to recognize a Fa~timite caliph could not long continue, and he ordered Saladin to weaken the Fatimite by every available means, and then substitute the name of the Abbasid for his in public worship. Saladin and his ministers were at first afraid lest this step might give rise to disturbances among the people; but a stranger undertook to risk it on the 17th of September 1171, and the following Friday it was repeated by official order; the caliph himself died during the interval, and it is uncertain whether he ever heard of his deposition.

  • The British position in Egypt was anomalous, and might easily give rise to international complications.

  • Such filaments may not give rise to mucilage on the I.

  • After a time they come to rest and give rise to new colonies.

  • In Zygnemaceae and Mesocarpaceae the zygospore, after a period of rest, germinates, to form a new filamentous colony; in Desmidiaceae its contents divide on germination, and thus give rise to two or more Desmids.

  • The discovery by Brebner of the specific identity of Haplospora globosa and Scaphospora speciosa marks an important step in the advance of our knowledge of the group. Three kinds of reproductive organs are known: first, sporangia, which each give rise to a single tetra-, or multi-nucleate non-motile, probably asexual spore; second, plurilocular sporangia, which are probably antheridia, generating antherozoids; and third, sporangia, which are probably oogonia, giving rise to single uninucleate non-motile oospheres.

  • Melobesia callithamnioides gives rise to multicellular propagula; Griffithsia corallina is said to give rise to new individuals, by detaching portions of the thallus from the base of which new attachment organs have already arisen.

  • In all these cases, however, the end-cells of the filaments each give rise to a carpospore, and the aggregate of such sporiferous filaments is a cystocarp. Again, in the family of the Gelidiaceae, the single filament arising from the carpogonium grows back into the tissue and preys upon the cells of the axis and larger branches, after which the end-cells give rise to carpospores and a diffused cystocarp is formed.

  • In the Gigartinales, the filaments which arise from the auxiliary cell may spread and give rise to isolated tufts of sporogenous filaments, as in the Cryptonemiales.

  • Eight chromosomes appear again in the ultimate divisions which give rise to the carpospores.

  • The spores of the Aglaozonia form are known to give rise to sexual plants, and the oospore of Cutleria has been observed to grow into rudimentary Aglaozonia.

  • To take an example, Lemanea and Batrachospermum are Florideae which bear densely-whorled branches, but which, on the germination of the carpospore, give rise to a laxly-filamentous, somewhat irregularly-branched plant, from which the ordinary sexual plants arise at a later stage.

  • Some Siphonales (Codium) give rise to proteid crystalloids, and they are of constant occurrence among Florideae.

  • 10-15%, it may hydrate and set after the general setting of the cement, and may give rise to disruptive strains causing the cement to "blow" and fail.

  • - The oldest rocks in Brecknockshire are the Llandeilo shales and intrusive diabases of pre-Llandovery age which near Builth extend across the Wye from Radnorshire; another patch with volcanic outflows comes up at Llanwrtyd, and at both places they give rise to mineral springs.

  • Although the pre-Darwinian writers amongst them invoked nearly every principle that Darwin or his successors have suggested, they failed to carry conviction with regard to evolution, and they neither propounded a coherent philosophy of variation nor suggested a mechanism by which variations that appeared might give rise to new species.

  • Put into modern language this is that the conditions necessary to make an individual are also the conditions that necessarily give rise to sorrow.

  • Russian explorers and natives of India trained for geographical reconnaissance, and employed in connexion with the great trigonometrical survey of India, had done so much towards clearing away the mists which enveloped the actual course of the river, that all the primary affluents were known, although their relative value was misunderstood, but the nature of the districts which bordered the river in Afghan Turkestan was so imperfectly mapped as to give rise to considerable political complication in framing the boundary agreement between Great Britain and Russia.

  • Off the coast of Holland in summer it is more plentiful, entering the Zuider Zee in such numbers as to give rise to a regular and valuable fishery.

  • The eggs are laid in the spring as a rule, and after about a week they give rise to a minute, ringed larva with a protrusible boring apparatus consisting of three chitinous rods.

  • 6, C) of laying eggs - necessarily unfertilized - which always give rise to males ("drones"), and, since the researches of J.

  • Dickel and others have lately claimed that fertilized eggs can give rise to either queens, workers or males, according to the food supplied to the larvae and the influence of supposed "sex-producing glands" possessed by the nurse-workers.

  • The Conditions Of Use Of A Mercury Thermometer In A Calorimetric Experiment Are Necessarily Different From ' Those Under Which Its Corrections Are Determined, And This Difference Must Inevitably Give Rise To Constant Errors In Practical Work.

  • Ellipsoidal, pear-shaped or hour-glassshaped stars would all give rise to the phenomena of a short-period variable, and doubtless examples of these intermediate forms exist.

  • The determination of stellar parallaxes is a matter of great difficulty on account of the minuteness of the angle to be measured, for in no case does the parallax amount to I"; moreover, there is always an added difficulty in determining an annual change of position, for seasonal instrumental changes are liable to give rise to a spurious effect which will also have an annual period.

  • By their friction on each other the leaves give rise to a rustling sound.

  • Hence the magnitude F and the position of F relatively to the centre of gravity of the link, necessary to give rise to the couple M, are known, and this force is therefore the resultant force required.

  • We thus at last attain a definite conclusion with regard to forms, and it appears clear that in Bacon's belief the true function of science was the search for a few fundamental physical qualities, highly abstract and general, the combinations of which give rise to the simple natures and complex phenomena around us.

  • Thus, the same evidence could give rise to widely differing conflicting interpretations, which may not be directly deducible from or justified by the Scripture.

  • These occluded gases are all liberated when the copper cools, and so give rise to porous castings, unless special precautions are taken.

  • The most important are cuprous oxide, Cu 2 0, and cupric oxide, CuO, both of Oxides which give rise to well-defined series of salts.

  • Conversely every positive quadratic surd number, when expressed as a simple continued fraction, will give rise to a recurring fraction.

  • Various morbid conditions of the body generally may give rise to different symptoms. Thus a gouty condition may manifest itself in one man as eczema of the skin, giving rise to redness and intense itching; in another as neuralgia, causing most severe pain; in a third as bronchitis, producing a distressing cough; in a fourth as dyspepsia, giving rise to flatulence and intestinal disturbance; and in a fifth as inflammation of the great toe, accompanied by redness, swelling and pain.

  • These enter the body through various channels, and once they have effected a lodgment they grow, multiply and give rise to various poisons which attack and injure or destroy different tissues or organs in the body.

  • The thickening of the epidermis in the hands and feet, which occurs from constant use, is nature's provision for meeting the extra wear to which these parts are subjected by much use; but pressure is apt to cause the defensive process to be carried too far, and to lead to corns, which give rise to much pain and annoyance.

  • The food thus reaches the stomach in large lumps which cannot be readily digested, and either remain there till they decompose and give rise to irritation in the stomach itself, or pass on to the intestine, where digestion is likewise incomplete, and the food is ejected without the proper amount of nourishment having been extracted from it; while at the same time the products of its decomposition may have been absorbed and acted as poisons, giving rise to lassitude, discomfort, headache, or perhaps even to irritability and sleeplessness.

  • It sometimes answers very well in persons troubled with flatulence, since meat does not give rise to the same amount of gas in the intestines as carbohydrates.

  • There are few ailments which give rise to greater human suffering.

  • It is possible that the hybridizing of the potato with one or other of the wild types of tuberous Solanums may give rise to a variety which shall be immune, though unfortunately most are themselves liable to the attacks of the fungus, and one of the few crosses so made between the common potato and Solanum Maglia has exhibited the same undesirable trait.

  • Thus, to mention examples, diphtheria toxin produces inflammatory oedema which may be followed by necrosis; dead tubercle bacilli give rise to a tubercle-like nodule, &c. Furthermore, a bacillus may give rise to more than one toxic body, either as stages in one process of change or as distinct products.

  • In fact, organic molecules can be divided into two classes according as they give rise to anti-substances or fail to do so.

  • The bacterium, being a complex organic substance, may thus give rise to more than one antagonistic or combining substance.

  • The plain sweeps round south of the Lancashire coal-field, forms the valley of the Mersey from Stockport to the sea, and farther south in Cheshire the salt-bearing beds of the Keuper marls give rise to a characteristic industry.

  • These conditions sometimes prevail in misty or foggy weather, more particularly at sea, and thus give rise to the phenomena known as "looming."

  • Hime, after a close examination of the available evidence, concludes that what distinguished Greek fire from the other incendiaries of the period was the presence of quicklime, which was well known to give rise to a large development of heat when brought into contact with water.

  • In the interval between his election and the assumption of his duties at Baltimore, he studied physics under Helmholtz at Berlin, and carried out a well-known research on the effect of an electrically charged body in motion, showing it to give rise to a magnetic field.

  • The cells forming the limbs of the ectodermic folds secrete nodules of calcite, and these, fusing together, give rise to six (or twelve) vertical radial plates or septa.

  • A form which presents itself is when two ovals, one inside the other, unite, so as to give rise to a crunode - in default of a better name this may be called, after the curve of that name, a limacon.

  • As mentioned with regard to a branch generally, an infinite branch of any kind may have cusps, or, by cutting itself or another branch, may have or give rise to a crunode, &c.

  • The notions of distance and of lines at right angles are connected with the circular points; and almost every construction of a curve by means of lines of a determinate length, or at right angles to each other, and (as such) mechanical constructions by means of linkwork, give rise to curves passing the same definite number of times through the two circular points respectively, or say to circular curves, and in which the fixed centres of the construction present themselves as ordinary, or as singular, foci.

  • The spores, when liberated by the dehiscence of the sporangium, give rise to the prothallus, which is now, owing mainly to the investigations of Treub and Bruchmann, known in a number of tropical and temperate species.

  • On germination the microspores give rise to a reduced prothallus, consisting of the small cell first cut off and a wall of cells enclosing two to four central ones; "from these latter the biciliate spermatozoids originate.

  • The microspores on germination produce a small, greatly reduced male prothallus bearing one or two antheridia which give rise to a number of spirally coiled, multiciliate spermatozoids.

  • 3), we find the same essential structure, but the prostomium may give rise to two or more tactile tentacles, From Goodrich, Q.

  • - Diagram third, as well as the first, may give rise to FIG.

  • (After De Bary.) uredospores probably survive the winter in Europe as well as in Australia and give rise to the rust of the following year.

  • A small portion of the drug is removed by the skin, in which it may give rise to an erythematous rash.

  • anobaav to hear), a title frequently given to the science of sound, that is, to the description and theory of the phenomena which give rise to the sensation of sound.

  • Then when an outbreak occurs the snow and ice melt, and in that way they sometimes give rise to serious catastrophes (jokulhlaup), through large areas being suddenly inundated by great floods of water, which bear masses of ice floating on their surface.

  • Ethane, C 2 H 6, in a similar manner, can only give rise to one alcohol, namely ethyl alcohol, CH 3 CH 2 OH, which is also primary.

  • Propane, CH 3 CH 2 CH 3, can give rise to two alcohols - a primary alcohol, CH 3 CH 2 CH 2 OH (normal propyl alcohol), formed by replacing a hydrogen atom attached to a terminal carbon atom, and a secondary alcohol, CH 3.

  • Even where they undergo healing they may cause such a stricture of the calibre of the intestinal canal as to give rise to the symptoms of obstruction which ultimately prove fatal.

  • These Silurian areas give rise to hummocky regions, where small hills abound, without much relation to the trend of the axis of elevation.

  • Ice forms over fresh water if the temperature of the air has been for a sufficient time at or below the freezing-point; but not until the whole mass of water has been cooled down to its point of maximum density, so that the subsequent cooling of the surface can give rise to no convection currents, is freezing possible.

  • That the triangle could give rise to no other solid followed from the fact that six covertically placed triangles formed a plane.

  • It follows then that if a stream of light be incident at the polarizing angle on a pile of parallel transparent plates of the same nature, each surface in turn will be met by the light at the polarizing angle and will give rise to a reflected portion polarized in the plane of incidence.

  • They enclose the jaws (j), mouth (M), and opening of the salivary glands (o.·), and so give rise to the buccal cavity.

  • If an astronomer is confronted by some phenomenon which has no obvious explanation he may postulate some set of conditions which from his general knowledge of the subject would or might give rise to the phenomenon in question; he then tests his hypothesis until he discovers whether it does or does not conflict with the facts.

  • The sterile bracts of the daisy occasionally produce capitula, and give rise to the hen-and-chickens daisy.

  • H the secondary floral axes give rise to tertiary ones, the raceme is branching, and forms a panicle, as in Yucca gloriosa.

  • Eggs produced in the autumn by fertilized females remain on the plant through the winter and hatching in the spring give rise to female individuals which may be winged or wingless.

  • But in the Labyrinthodonta, grooves are more or less marked along the teeth and give rise to folds of the wall which, extending inwards and ramifying, produce the complicated structure, exhibited by transverse sections, whence these batrachians derive their name; a somewhat similar complexity of structure is known in some holoptychian (dendrodont) Crossopterygian fishes.

  • Some metals are only absorbed from the alimentary canal to such a very limited amount that they exert no general action, while others readily pass into the blood and give rise to more or less marked effects.

  • Platelet transfusion through negatively charged filters can also activate the contact system and give rise to significant hypotension in patients receiving ACE inhibitors.

  • They give rise to narrow vertical bands of clearly anomalous wind data in the quick-look plots.

  • atypical mycobacteria ') can give rise to a condition which usually infects children.

  • These then branch to give rise to several orders of progressively smaller airways called bronchioles, the smallest of which are called terminal bronchioles.

  • Distinctive black chevrons on the upper part of the abdomen give rise to part of it's common name.

  • cisplatin therapy may give rise to persistent or worsening symptoms.

  • For example, a belief can give rise to a higher-order belief without thereby being phenomenally conscious.

  • co-workers ' behavior could give rise to danger.

  • The adjudicator's decision, although not finally determinative, may give rise to an immediate payment obligation.

  • firing of objective neurons give rise to a subjective world?

  • This would give rise to differential flexure and expansion of the instrument as its various parts cooled at different rates during the following night.

  • Alien genetic material invading genomes also give rise to gene mutations, some of which may result in cancer.

  • However they could vibrate at much lower harmonics, which could feasibly give rise to a low frequency hum.

  • The aggregates comprise the amyloid deposits in the diseased brain and give rise to the SAFs found in treated brain homogenates.

  • immorality of this war will yet give rise to other occasions for philosophical debates.

  • inflexible working may give rise to a claim of indirect sex or marriage discrimination under the SDA.

  • Branches within the primary lobule give rise to alveolar ducts, which in turn give off alveoli.

  • Brain cells can give rise to all previous cells types including the peripheral nervous system and smooth muscle.

  • mutation in a patterning gene could give rise to a simple heart defect, not a full scale patterning defect.

  • mycobacteriummilar to tuberculosis (called ' atypical mycobacteria ') can give rise to a condition which usually infects children.

  • The other factor which may give rise to heterophoria changes is the potential of HMDs to induce transient myopia.

  • The term net refers to net of reinsurance and the subscript refers to the policies that give rise to (say) mortality risk.

  • Further it will eventually breakdown to produce nitric acid and hence give rise to acid rain which harms the environment.

  • For instance, spasm of muscles may give rise to writer's or musician's cramp.

  • The freely-draining limestone soils give rise to a canopy generally dominated by ash with hazel, and occasional rowan and holly in the understorey.

  • These cliffs give rise to areas of block scree.

  • selectivityng/closing of channels with different ion selectivities give rise to changes in voltage across cell membranes.

  • sigmoid colon or rectum can give rise to bladder spasms which obstruct free drainage of urine.

  • Now this in itself may give rise to some serious academic soul-searching.

  • spasm of muscles may give rise to writer's or musician's cramp.

  • An impacted sigmoid colon or rectum can give rise to bladder spasms which obstruct free drainage of urine.

  • In many harbor areas or at the mouths of large river systems, these summer afternoon or evening breezes give rise to sudden squalls.

  • Without treatment threadworm may give rise to vaginitis (inflammation of the vagina) in girls and women.

  • Earlier in the month, however, the emotional undercurrents may give rise to tensions.

  • However it did give rise to a rather good wheeze.

  • The incident nearly give rise to war between England and Russia; but the amir Abdur-Rahman, who was present at the Rawalpindi conference with Lord Dufferin at the time, affected to regard the matter as a mere frontier scuffle.

  • There not merely do they serve to nourish the organ, they also give rise to a fine ethereal flame or wind through the action of the brain upon them, and thus form the so-called " animal " spirits.

  • It was of course well known, as a necessity of Maxwell's mathematical theory, that the polarization and depolarization of an insulator must give rise to the same electromagnetic effects in the neighbourhood as a voltaic current in a conductor.

  • The Nematode parasites of the Invertebrata are usually immature forms which attain their full development in the body of some vertebrate; but there are a number of species which in the sexually adult condition are peculiar to the Invertebrata.2 The Nematoda contain about as many parasitic species as all the other groups of internal parasites taken together; they are found in almost all the organs of the body, and by their presence, especially when encysted in the tissues and during their migration from one part of the body to another, give rise to various pathological conditions.

  • 36), has in circuit a battery B and an in terrupter I, and at some distance and parallel to this primary circuit is placed a secondary circuit S, having a telephone T included in it, the interruptions or reversals of the current in the primary circuit will give rise to a varying magnetic field round that circuit which will induce secondary currents in the other circuit and affect the telephone receiver.

  • At celtain points the cambium does not give rise to xylem and phloem elements, but cuts off cells on both sides which elongate radially and divide by horizontal walls.

  • The immense volumes of sulphurous acid evolved give rise to many complaints; all the minor pits suspend work during the summer to avoid destruction of the crops.

  • Thus, the formation of hydrochloric acid from hydrogen and chlorine is correctly represented by the equation H2+C12=2HC1; that is to say, a molecule of hydrogen and a molecule of chlorine give rise to two molecules of hydrochloric acid; whilst the following equation merely represents the relative weights of the elements which enter into reaction, and is not a complete expression of what is supposed to take place: H+CI =HC1.

  • Their terms, however,could not fail to give rise to some ambiguity, and their validity was especially contested on the ground that the council was not ecumenical, since it represented at that date the obedience of only one of three rival popes.

  • Kossel) they give rise to important cell constituents - haemoglobin, nucleo-proteids, &c. " Thymus histone " occurs in the thymus gland; globin occurs in combination as haemoglobin; other histones have been extracted from the red blood corpuscles of the goose and the testes of fishes and other animals.

  • Minute acicular inclusions, probably of rutile, arranged parallel to the rays of the percussion figure, give rise to the phenomenon of "asterism" in some micas, particularly phlogopite: a candle-flame or spot of light viewed through a cleavage sheet of such mica appears as a six-rayed star.

  • The use of negative coefficients leads to a difference between arithmetical division and algebraical division (by a multinomial), in that the latter may give rise to a quotient containing subtractive terms. The most important case is division by a binomial, as illustrated by the following examples: - 2.10+1) 6.100+5.10+ 1(3.10+I 2.10+I) 6.100+I.10 - I (3.10 - I 6.100+3.10 6.100+3.10 2.10+ I - 2.10 - I 2.10 +I - 2.10 - I In (1) the division is both arithmetical and algebraical, while in (2) it is algebraical, the quotient for arithmetical division being 2.10+9.

  • These appearances are probably due toa pathological mitosis, commonly found in cancer, in which there is an irregular diminution in the number of chromosomes; some are cast out and become degenerated or some pass over to one of the daughter cells, leaving a reduced number in the other, and thus give rise to asymmetrical mitosis.

  • On the other hand, in certain saw-flies and among the higher families, the unfertilized eggs, capable of development, usually give rise to male insects (see BEE).

  • They always give rise to parthenogenetic females (see Reproduction).

  • It has been denied by some that pure thermal motion can ever give rise to line spectra, but that either chemical action or impact of electrons is necessary to excite the regular oscillations which give rise to line spectra.

  • The different values of the angle of minimum deviation for rays of different refrangibilities give rise to spectral colours, the red being nearest the sun, while farther away the overlapping of the spectra forms a flaming colourless tail sometimes extending over as much as ro° to 20 °.

  • A pair of triangular prisms having a common face, or a stellate crystal formed by the symmetrical interpenetration of two triangular prisms admits of two internal reflections by faces inclined at 120°, and so give rise to two colourless images each at an angular distance of 120° from the sun.

  • deserere, to abandon; distinguish "desert," merit, and "dessert," fruit eaten after dinner, from de and servier, to serve.) Deserts are conveniently divided into two classes according to the causes which give rise to the desert conditions.

  • Phys., 51, p. 225) the discovery that these cathode particles or corpuscles could pass through a window of thin sheet aluminium placed in the wall of the vacuum tube and give rise to a class of radiation called the Lenard rays.

  • Some traces of this confused fashion of regarding sense-perceptions are left even in the Kritik, specially perhaps in the Aesthetik, and they give rise to much of the ambiguity which unfortunately attaches to the more developed theory of cognition.

  • The increase in demand for gasoline will give rise to further demands for new refinery capacity.

  • The opening/closing of channels with different ion selectivities give rise to changes in voltage across cell membranes.

  • Unfortunately, it is very unclear to what extent a certificate will give rise to tortious liability to a third party.

  • These finding serve to highlight the different aetiologies that can give rise to the same triad of symptoms of ADHD.

  • Very surprisingly, the adult cell DNA was able to give rise to a complete individual, not just more udder cells.

  • Indian food has a variety of common ingredients that give rise to a myriad of flavor combinations.

  • Brachial plexopathy is any injury to the brachial plexus-the nerve bundles located on each side of the neck that give rise to the individual nerves controlling the muscles of the shoulders, arms, and hands.

  • Instead of mutation occurring in an individual sperm or egg, it occurs in a percentage of the cells that give rise to a parent's multiple sperm or eggs.

  • There are two categories of hemoglobinopathy: in one, abnormal globin chains give rise to abnormal hemoglobin molecules; in the other, normal hemoglobin chains are produced but in abnormal amounts.

  • These suits are truly unique because the designs that are paired together give rise to unexpected combinations.

  • A Mr. School Spirit Pageant can give rise to numerous humorous photos as well as do something for the common good.

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