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gironde

gironde

gironde Sentence Examples

  • Along the Atlantic coast from the mouth of the Adour to the estuary of the Gironde there stretches a monotonous line of sanddunes bordered by lagoons on the land side, but towards the sea harbourless and unbroken save for the Bay of Arcachon.

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  • In the lower part of its course, from the Bec-dAnibez, where it receives the Dordogne, it becomes considerably wider, and takes the name of Gironde.

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  • The principal affluents are the AriCge, the Tarn with the Aveyron and the Agout, the Lot and the Dordogne, which descends from Mont Dore-lesBains, and joins the Garonne at Bec-dAmbez, to form the Gironde.

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  • - 829,000, , 21.5 Finistre Gard About two-thirds of the French departments, corn- Gers prising a large proportion of those situated in Gironde mountainous districts and in the basin of the Garonne, Haute-Ga where the birth-rate is especially feeble, show a Haute-Lo Haute-Mi decrease in population.

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  • The three principal regions for the production of tobacco are the basin of the Garonne (Lot-et-Garonne, Dordogne, Lot and Gironde), the basin of the Isre (Isre and Savoie) and the department of Pas-de-Calais.

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  • The department of Gironde (95,559,000 gals.

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  • (a) Normandy, Perche, Cotentin and maritime Flanders, where horses are bred in great numbers; (b) the strip of coast between the Gironde and the mouth of the Loire; (c) the Morvan including the Nivernais and the Charolais, from which the famous Charolais breed of oxen takes its name; (d) the central region of the central plateau including the districts of Cantal and Aubrac, the home of the famous beef-breeds of Salers and Aubrac.1 The famous pre-sal sheep are also reared in the Vende and Cotentin.

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  • Auch GIRONDE Bordeaux .

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  • BORDEAUX - Charente, Dordogne, Gironde.

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  • - Gironde, Dordogne, Landes, Lot-et-Garonne, Basses- PyrnCes.

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  • on the Puy-de-Sancy, a mountain of the department of Puy-de-Dome, and flowing to the Garonne with which it unites at Bec d'Ambes to form the Gironde estuary.

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  • Below the town of Bergerac it enters the department of Gironde, where at Libourne it is joined by the Isle and widens cut, attaining at its union with the Garonne 45 m.

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  • The estimated loss by the vine Phylloxera in the Gironde alone was £32,000,000; for all the French wine districts £IOO,000,000 would not cover the damage.

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  • In 1650 he fitted out at his own expense a squadron with which he blockaded the mouth of the Gironde, and compelled the city to surrender.

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  • ST Emilion, a town of south-western France, in the department of Gironde, 22 m.

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  • Their eldest son, Henri Auguste Georges, marquis de La Rochejacquelein, born at Château Citran in the Gironde on the 28th of September 1805, was educated as a soldier, served in Spain in 1822, and as a volunteer in the Russo-Turkish War of 1828.

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  • Elie DECAZES, Duc (1780-1860), French statesman, was born at Saint Martin de Laye in the Gironde.

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  • He became minister plenipotentiary at Madrid and at Lisbon, but the revolution of 1848 caused him to withdraw into private life, from which he did not emerge until in 1871 he was elected deputy to the National Assembly by the Gironde.

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  • In 1790 he became procureur of the Commune, and in July 1791 was elected by the newly created department of the Gironde a member of the court of appeal.

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  • Gensonne was accounted one of the most brilliant of the little band of brilliant orators from the Gironde, though his eloquence was somewhat cold and he always read his speeches.

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  • The Girondists were, indeed, rather a group of individuals holding certain opinions and principles in common than an organized political party, and the name was at first somewhat loosely applied to them owing to the fact that the most brilliant exponents of their point of view were deputies from the Gironde.

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  • As strictly party designations these first came into use after the assembling of the National Convention (September 20th, 1792), to which a large proportion of the deputies from the Gironde who had sat in the Legislative Assembly were returned.

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  • In all this there was no apparent line of cleavage between "La Gironde" and the Mountain.

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  • On the 28th of July a decree of the Convention proscribed, as traitors and enemies of their country, twenty-one deputies, the final list of those sent for trial comprising the names of Antiboul, Boilleau the younger, Boyer-Fonfrede, Brissot, Carra, Duchastel, the younger Ducos, Dufriche de Valaze, Duprat, Fauchet, Gardien, Gensonne, Lacaze, Lasource, Lauze-Deperret, Lehardi, Lesterpt-Beauvais, the elder Minvielle, Sillery, Vergniaud and Viger, of whom five were deputies from the Gironde.

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  • From here it flows with ever increasing width between two flat shores to the Bec d'Ambes (151 m.), where, after a course of 357 m., it unites with the Dordogne to form the vast estuary known as the Gironde.

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  • BLAYE-ET-STE LUCE, a town of south-western France, capital of an arrondissement in the department of Gironde, on the right bank of the Gironde (here over 2 m.

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  • ARCACHON, a coast town of south-western France, in the department of Gironde, 37 m.

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  • JEAN MARIE ANTOINE DE LANESSAN (1843-), French statesman and naturalist, was born at Sainte-Andre de Cubzac (Gironde) on the 13th of July 1843.

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  • In the name of this committee he was charged with the drawing up of reports to the Convention upon the absorbing themes of the overthrow of the party of the Gironde (report of the 8th of July 1793), of the Herbertists, and finally, of that denunciation of Danton which consigned him and his followers to the guillotine.

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  • The Bituriges Vivisci occupied the strip of land between the sea and the left bank of the Garonne, comprising the greater part of the modern department of Gironde.

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  • In 1789 Vergniaud was elected a member of the general council of the department of the Gironde.

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  • Vergniaud was chosen a representative of the Gironde to the National Legislative Assembly in August 1791, and he forthwith proceeded to Paris.

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  • It contained nothing but sound and patriotic suggestions, but it was greedily seized upon by the enemies of the Gironde as evidence of treason.

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  • According to Pliny, Spanish, Gallic and Greek wines were all consumed in Rome during the 1st century of the Christian era, but in Gaul the production of wine appears to have been limited to certain districts on the Rhone and Gironde.

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  • In this respect the famous Bordeaux or Gironde district is, perhaps, more fortunate than any other part of the world.

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  • The red wines include the elegant and delicate (though not unstable) wines of the Gironde, and again the full, though not coarse, wines of the Burgundy district.

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  • Although other parts of France produce excellent wines, the Gironde is easily first if high and stable character, elegance and delicacy, variety and quantity are considered together.

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  • The total area of the departments of the Gironde is about 21.

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  • broad, in which the chief watersheds are those of the Garonne, Dordogne, and their confluent the Gironde.

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  • The Gironde viticultural region is divided into six main districts, namely, Medoc, Sauternes, Graves, Cotes, Entre-deux-Mers and Palus.

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  • The most important subdivision of the Gironde district is that of the Medoc. It is here that the wine which is known to us as claret is produced in greatest excellence and variety.

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  • The Medoc consists of a tongue of land to the north of Bordeaux, bounded by the Garonne and Gironde on the east, and by the sea on the west and north.

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  • The Gironde red wines have sufficient body and alcohol to ensure stability without being heavy or fiery.

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  • It has been said that chemistry is of little avail in determining the value of a wine, and this is undoubtedly true as regards the bouquet and flavour, but there is no gainsaying the fact that many hundreds of analyses of the wines of the Gironde have shown that they are, as a class, distinctly different in the particulars referred to from wines of the claret type produced, for instance, in Spain, Australia or the Cape.

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  • The district of Sauternes produces the finest white wines of the Gironde, one might say of the whole of France.

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  • The annual output of the Gironde during the last few years has been roughly 70 to 100 million gallons.

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  • Champagne is not, as is the case, for instance, with the classified growths of the Gironde, the product of a single vineyard.

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  • Comparing the fine wines of the better vintages with, for instance, the red wines of the Gironde, the main features of interest are the relatively high proportions of acid and glycerin and the low proportion of tannin which they contain.

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  • After the revolution he was deputy for the Gironde to the Constituent Assembly, and in 1849 to the Legislative Assembly, where he was one of the leaders of the Right until the coup d'etat on the 2nd of December 1851 drove him from public life.

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  • On the drift-sands of France, especially in the Gironde, forests have been formed mainly of this pine; the seeds, sown at first under proper shelter and protected by a thick growth of broom sown simultaneously, vegetate rapidly in the sea-sand, and the trees thus raised have, by their wind-drifted seed, covered much of the former desert of the Landes with an evergreen wood.

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  • Du Guesclin, having been appointed Constable, defeated the English at Pontvallain in 1370, at Chize in 1373, and drove them from their possessions between the Loire and the Gironde, while the duke of Anjou retook part of Guienne.

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  • PIERRE LAFFITTE (1823-1903), French Positivist, was born on the 21st of February 1823 at Beguey (Gironde).

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  • Just after his first succours had sailed fOr the Gironde, the great Welsh rebellion of 1294 broke out, and the king was compelled to turn aside to repress.

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  • BAZAS, a town of south-western France, in the department of Gironde, 382 m.

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  • The Left consisted of the Jacobins, a term which still included the party afterwards known as the Girondins or Girondists - so termed because several of their leaders came from the region of the Gironde in southern France.

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  • The vain attempts of the Gironde to reconcile the king and the Revolution, the ill-advised decree of the Assembly on the 8th of August, freeing La Fayette from his guilt in forsaking his army; his refusal to vote for the deposition of the king, and the suspected treachery of the court, led to the success of the republican forces when, on the 10th of August, the mob of Paris organized by the revolutionary Commune rose against the monarchy.

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  • They drew support from the Parisian democracy, and considered the decentralization of the Girondins as endangering Frances unity, circumstances demanding a strong and highly concentrated government; they opposed a republic on the model of that of Rome to the Polish republic of the Gironde.

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  • To avert the danger threatened by popular dissatisfaction, the Gironde was persuaded to vote for the creation of a revolutionary tribunal to judge suspects, while out of spite against Danton who demanded it, they refused the strong government which might have made a stand against the enemy (March 10, 1793).

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  • Whilst the insurrection in La Vende was spreading, and Dumouriez falling back upon Neerwinden, sentence of death was laid upon migrs and refractory priests; the treachery of Dumouriez, disappointed in his Belgian projects, gave grounds First corn- for all kinds of suspicion, as that of Mirabeau had mittee ot formerly done, and led the Gironde to propose the public new government which they had refused to Danton.

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  • Sixty-nine Fail of departmental governments protested against the Gironde.

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  • She was the ruin of the Gironde, but taught it how to die.

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  • The fall of the Gironde left the country disturbed by civil war, and the frontiers more seriously threatened than before Valmy.

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  • deist and therefore hostile to anti-religious masquerades, while uneasy at the absolute authority of the Paris Commune, which aimed at suppressing the State, and at its armed propaganda abroad, Robespierre resumed the struggle against its illegal power, so fatal to the Gironde.

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  • Along the Atlantic coast from the mouth of the Adour to the estuary of the Gironde there stretches a monotonous line of sanddunes bordered by lagoons on the land side, but towards the sea harbourless and unbroken save for the Bay of Arcachon.

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  • In the lower part of its course, from the Bec-dAnibez, where it receives the Dordogne, it becomes considerably wider, and takes the name of Gironde.

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  • The principal affluents are the AriCge, the Tarn with the Aveyron and the Agout, the Lot and the Dordogne, which descends from Mont Dore-lesBains, and joins the Garonne at Bec-dAmbez, to form the Gironde.

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  • - 829,000, , 21.5 Finistre Gard About two-thirds of the French departments, corn- Gers prising a large proportion of those situated in Gironde mountainous districts and in the basin of the Garonne, Haute-Ga where the birth-rate is especially feeble, show a Haute-Lo Haute-Mi decrease in population.

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  • The three principal regions for the production of tobacco are the basin of the Garonne (Lot-et-Garonne, Dordogne, Lot and Gironde), the basin of the Isre (Isre and Savoie) and the department of Pas-de-Calais.

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  • The department of Gironde (95,559,000 gals.

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  • (a) Normandy, Perche, Cotentin and maritime Flanders, where horses are bred in great numbers; (b) the strip of coast between the Gironde and the mouth of the Loire; (c) the Morvan including the Nivernais and the Charolais, from which the famous Charolais breed of oxen takes its name; (d) the central region of the central plateau including the districts of Cantal and Aubrac, the home of the famous beef-breeds of Salers and Aubrac.1 The famous pre-sal sheep are also reared in the Vende and Cotentin.

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  • Auch GIRONDE Bordeaux .

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  • BORDEAUX - Charente, Dordogne, Gironde.

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  • - Gironde, Dordogne, Landes, Lot-et-Garonne, Basses- PyrnCes.

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  • on the Puy-de-Sancy, a mountain of the department of Puy-de-Dome, and flowing to the Garonne with which it unites at Bec d'Ambes to form the Gironde estuary.

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  • Below the town of Bergerac it enters the department of Gironde, where at Libourne it is joined by the Isle and widens cut, attaining at its union with the Garonne 45 m.

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  • The estimated loss by the vine Phylloxera in the Gironde alone was £32,000,000; for all the French wine districts £IOO,000,000 would not cover the damage.

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  • This pamphlet, which had its origin in a petty squabble, was followed in 1793 by a Fragment de l'histoire secrete de la Revolution, in which the party of the Gironde, and specially Brissot, were most mercilessly attacked.

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  • The success of the brochure, so terrible as to send the leaders of the Gironde to the guillotine, alarmed Danton and the author.

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  • In 1650 he fitted out at his own expense a squadron with which he blockaded the mouth of the Gironde, and compelled the city to surrender.

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  • ST Emilion, a town of south-western France, in the department of Gironde, 22 m.

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  • Their eldest son, Henri Auguste Georges, marquis de La Rochejacquelein, born at Château Citran in the Gironde on the 28th of September 1805, was educated as a soldier, served in Spain in 1822, and as a volunteer in the Russo-Turkish War of 1828.

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  • Elie DECAZES, Duc (1780-1860), French statesman, was born at Saint Martin de Laye in the Gironde.

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  • He became minister plenipotentiary at Madrid and at Lisbon, but the revolution of 1848 caused him to withdraw into private life, from which he did not emerge until in 1871 he was elected deputy to the National Assembly by the Gironde.

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  • In 1790 he became procureur of the Commune, and in July 1791 was elected by the newly created department of the Gironde a member of the court of appeal.

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  • Gensonne was accounted one of the most brilliant of the little band of brilliant orators from the Gironde, though his eloquence was somewhat cold and he always read his speeches.

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  • The Girondists were, indeed, rather a group of individuals holding certain opinions and principles in common than an organized political party, and the name was at first somewhat loosely applied to them owing to the fact that the most brilliant exponents of their point of view were deputies from the Gironde.

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  • As strictly party designations these first came into use after the assembling of the National Convention (September 20th, 1792), to which a large proportion of the deputies from the Gironde who had sat in the Legislative Assembly were returned.

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  • In all this there was no apparent line of cleavage between "La Gironde" and the Mountain.

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  • On the 28th of July a decree of the Convention proscribed, as traitors and enemies of their country, twenty-one deputies, the final list of those sent for trial comprising the names of Antiboul, Boilleau the younger, Boyer-Fonfrede, Brissot, Carra, Duchastel, the younger Ducos, Dufriche de Valaze, Duprat, Fauchet, Gardien, Gensonne, Lacaze, Lasource, Lauze-Deperret, Lehardi, Lesterpt-Beauvais, the elder Minvielle, Sillery, Vergniaud and Viger, of whom five were deputies from the Gironde.

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  • From here it flows with ever increasing width between two flat shores to the Bec d'Ambes (151 m.), where, after a course of 357 m., it unites with the Dordogne to form the vast estuary known as the Gironde.

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  • BLAYE-ET-STE LUCE, a town of south-western France, capital of an arrondissement in the department of Gironde, on the right bank of the Gironde (here over 2 m.

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  • ARCACHON, a coast town of south-western France, in the department of Gironde, 37 m.

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  • JEAN MARIE ANTOINE DE LANESSAN (1843-), French statesman and naturalist, was born at Sainte-Andre de Cubzac (Gironde) on the 13th of July 1843.

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  • In the name of this committee he was charged with the drawing up of reports to the Convention upon the absorbing themes of the overthrow of the party of the Gironde (report of the 8th of July 1793), of the Herbertists, and finally, of that denunciation of Danton which consigned him and his followers to the guillotine.

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  • The Bituriges Vivisci occupied the strip of land between the sea and the left bank of the Garonne, comprising the greater part of the modern department of Gironde.

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  • In 1789 Vergniaud was elected a member of the general council of the department of the Gironde.

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  • Vergniaud was chosen a representative of the Gironde to the National Legislative Assembly in August 1791, and he forthwith proceeded to Paris.

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  • It contained nothing but sound and patriotic suggestions, but it was greedily seized upon by the enemies of the Gironde as evidence of treason.

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  • According to Pliny, Spanish, Gallic and Greek wines were all consumed in Rome during the 1st century of the Christian era, but in Gaul the production of wine appears to have been limited to certain districts on the Rhone and Gironde.

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  • In this respect the famous Bordeaux or Gironde district is, perhaps, more fortunate than any other part of the world.

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  • The red wines include the elegant and delicate (though not unstable) wines of the Gironde, and again the full, though not coarse, wines of the Burgundy district.

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  • Although other parts of France produce excellent wines, the Gironde is easily first if high and stable character, elegance and delicacy, variety and quantity are considered together.

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  • The total area of the departments of the Gironde is about 21.

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  • broad, in which the chief watersheds are those of the Garonne, Dordogne, and their confluent the Gironde.

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  • The Gironde viticultural region is divided into six main districts, namely, Medoc, Sauternes, Graves, Cotes, Entre-deux-Mers and Palus.

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  • The most important subdivision of the Gironde district is that of the Medoc. It is here that the wine which is known to us as claret is produced in greatest excellence and variety.

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  • The Medoc consists of a tongue of land to the north of Bordeaux, bounded by the Garonne and Gironde on the east, and by the sea on the west and north.

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  • The Gironde red wines have sufficient body and alcohol to ensure stability without being heavy or fiery.

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  • It has been said that chemistry is of little avail in determining the value of a wine, and this is undoubtedly true as regards the bouquet and flavour, but there is no gainsaying the fact that many hundreds of analyses of the wines of the Gironde have shown that they are, as a class, distinctly different in the particulars referred to from wines of the claret type produced, for instance, in Spain, Australia or the Cape.

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  • The district of Sauternes produces the finest white wines of the Gironde, one might say of the whole of France.

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  • The annual output of the Gironde during the last few years has been roughly 70 to 100 million gallons.

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  • Champagne is not, as is the case, for instance, with the classified growths of the Gironde, the product of a single vineyard.

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  • Comparing the fine wines of the better vintages with, for instance, the red wines of the Gironde, the main features of interest are the relatively high proportions of acid and glycerin and the low proportion of tannin which they contain.

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  • After the revolution he was deputy for the Gironde to the Constituent Assembly, and in 1849 to the Legislative Assembly, where he was one of the leaders of the Right until the coup d'etat on the 2nd of December 1851 drove him from public life.

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  • On the drift-sands of France, especially in the Gironde, forests have been formed mainly of this pine; the seeds, sown at first under proper shelter and protected by a thick growth of broom sown simultaneously, vegetate rapidly in the sea-sand, and the trees thus raised have, by their wind-drifted seed, covered much of the former desert of the Landes with an evergreen wood.

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  • Du Guesclin, having been appointed Constable, defeated the English at Pontvallain in 1370, at Chize in 1373, and drove them from their possessions between the Loire and the Gironde, while the duke of Anjou retook part of Guienne.

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  • PIERRE LAFFITTE (1823-1903), French Positivist, was born on the 21st of February 1823 at Beguey (Gironde).

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  • Just after his first succours had sailed fOr the Gironde, the great Welsh rebellion of 1294 broke out, and the king was compelled to turn aside to repress.

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  • BAZAS, a town of south-western France, in the department of Gironde, 382 m.

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  • The Left consisted of the Jacobins, a term which still included the party afterwards known as the Girondins or Girondists - so termed because several of their leaders came from the region of the Gironde in southern France.

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  • The dominant group among these was that of the Girondins or Girondists, so called because its most brilliant members had been elected in the Gironde (see GIRONDISTS).

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  • The vain attempts of the Gironde to reconcile the king and the Revolution, the ill-advised decree of the Assembly on the 8th of August, freeing La Fayette from his guilt in forsaking his army; his refusal to vote for the deposition of the king, and the suspected treachery of the court, led to the success of the republican forces when, on the 10th of August, the mob of Paris organized by the revolutionary Commune rose against the monarchy.

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  • They drew support from the Parisian democracy, and considered the decentralization of the Girondins as endangering Frances unity, circumstances demanding a strong and highly concentrated government; they opposed a republic on the model of that of Rome to the Polish republic of the Gironde.

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  • To avert the danger threatened by popular dissatisfaction, the Gironde was persuaded to vote for the creation of a revolutionary tribunal to judge suspects, while out of spite against Danton who demanded it, they refused the strong government which might have made a stand against the enemy (March 10, 1793).

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  • Whilst the insurrection in La Vende was spreading, and Dumouriez falling back upon Neerwinden, sentence of death was laid upon migrs and refractory priests; the treachery of Dumouriez, disappointed in his Belgian projects, gave grounds First corn- for all kinds of suspicion, as that of Mirabeau had mittee ot formerly done, and led the Gironde to propose the public new government which they had refused to Danton.

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  • Sixty-nine Fail of departmental governments protested against the Gironde.

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  • She was the ruin of the Gironde, but taught it how to die.

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  • The fall of the Gironde left the country disturbed by civil war, and the frontiers more seriously threatened than before Valmy.

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  • deist and therefore hostile to anti-religious masquerades, while uneasy at the absolute authority of the Paris Commune, which aimed at suppressing the State, and at its armed propaganda abroad, Robespierre resumed the struggle against its illegal power, so fatal to the Gironde.

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