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ginkgo

ginkgo

ginkgo Sentence Examples

  • On account of the resemblance of the leaves to those of some species of Adiantum, the appellation maiden-hair tree has long been given to Ginkgo biloba.

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  • In the spermatozoids of Chara, Vascular Cryptogams, and in those of Cycas, Zamia and Ginkgo, the cilia arise from a centrosome-like body which is found on one side of the nucleus of the spermatozoid mother-cell.

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  • This body has been called a blepharoplast, and in the Pteridophytes, Cycads and Ginkgo it gives rise to the spiral band on which the cilia are formed.

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  • This body has been called a blepharoplast, and in the Pteridophytes, Cycads and Ginkgo it gives rise to the spiral band on which the cilia are formed.

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  • In Monoblepliaris, one of the lower Fungi, in some Algae, in the Vascular Cryptograms, in Cycads (Zamia and Cycas), and in Ginkgo, an isolated genus of Gymnosperms, the male cell is a motile spermatozoid with two or more cilia.

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  • In the Characeae, the Vascular Cryptogams, in Zamia and Cycas, and in Ginkgo, the spermatozoids are more or less highly modified cells witi+m.-S, ~..

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  • Amongst Conifers the archaic genera, Ginkgo and Araucarus still persist.

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  • Ginkgo - Maidenhair Tree.

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  • These six groups were the dominant types throughout the period, but during Upper Carboniferous time three other groups arose, the Coniferales, the Cycadophyta, and the Ginkgoales (of which Ginkgo biloba is the only modern representative).

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  • He drew attention also to certain p roximal end of structural similarities between Cycas and Ginkgo.

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  • - Ginkgo adiantoides.

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  • - This class-designation has been recently proposed to give emphasis to the isolated position of the genus Ginkgo (Salisburia) among the Gymnosperms. Ginkgo biloba, the maidenhair tree, has usually been placed by botanists in the Taxeae in the neighbourhood of the yew (Taxes), but the proposal by Eichler in 1852 to institute a special family, the Salisburieae, indicated a recognition of the existence of special characteristics which distinguish the genus from other members of the Coniferae.

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  • The discovery by the Japanese botanist 'Erase of the development of ciliated spermatozoids in the pollen-tube of Ginkgo, in place of the non-motile male cells of typical conifers, served as a cogent argument in favour of separating the genus from the Coniferales and placing it in a class of its own.

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  • In 1712 Kaempfer published a drawing of a Japanese tree, which he described under the name Ginkgo; this term was adopted in 1771 by Linnaeus, who spoke of Kaempfer's plant as Ginkgo biloba.

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  • Ginkgo is common as a sacred tree in the gardens of temples in the Far East, and often cultivated in North America and Europe.

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  • Ginkgo biloba, which may reach a height of over 30 metres, forms a tree of pyramidal shape with a smooth grey bark.

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  • - Ginkgo biloba.

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  • The endosperm detached from a large Ginkgo ovule after fertilization bears a close resemblance to that of a cycad; the apex is occupied by a depression, on the floor of which two small holes mark the position of the archegonia, and the outgrowth from the megaspore apex projects from the centre as a short peg.

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  • After fertilization the ovum-nucleus divides and cell-formation proceeds rapidly, especially in the lower part of the ovum, in which the cotyledon and axis of the embryo are differentiated; the long, tangled suspensor of the cycadean embryo is not found in Ginkgo.

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  • - Ginkgo.

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  • During the Triassic and Jurassic periods the genus Baiera - no doubt a representative of the Ginkgoales--was widely spread throughout Europe and in other regions; Ginkgo itself occurs abundantly in Mesozoic and Tertiary rocks, and was a common plant in the Arctic regions as elsewhere during the Jurassic and Lower Cretaceous periods.

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  • The structure of the seed, the presence of two neck-cells in the archegonia, the late development of the embryo, the partially-fused cotyledons and certain anatomical characters, are features common to Ginkgo and the cycads.

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  • Cordaites is an extinct type which in certain respects resembles Ginkgo, cycads and the Araucarieae, but its agreement with true conifers is probably too remote to justify our attri buting much weight to the bearing of the morphology of its female flowers on the interpretation of that of the Coniferae.

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  • During the growth of the cell which forms the megaspore the greater part of the nucellus is absorbed, except the apical portion, which persists as a cone above the megaspore; the partial disorganization of some of the cells in the centre of the nucellar cone forms an irregular cavity, which may be compared with the larger pollen-chamber of Ginkgo and the cycads.

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  • Ginkgo).

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  • Araucaria, the leaf-traces persist for a considerable time, perhaps indefinitely, and may be seen in tangential sections of the wood of old stems. The leaf-trace in the Coniferales is simple in its course through the stem, differing in this respect from the double leaf-trace of Ginkgo.

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  • Ginkgoales; Hirase, " Etudes sur la fecondation, &c., de Ginkgo biloba," Journ.

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  • (1898); Seward and Gowan, " Ginkgo biloba," Ann.

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  • (1900) (with bibliography); Ikeno, " Contribution a l'etude de la fecondation chez le Ginkgo biloba," Ann.

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  • (1901); Sprecher, Le Ginkgo biloba (Geneva, 1907).

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  • In most cases the leaf-traces passed out from the stem in pairs, as in the recent Ginkgo; dividing up further as they entered the leaf-base.

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  • The stamens are probably best compared with those of Ginkgo, but they have also been interpreted as corresponding to the male " flowers " of the Gnetaceae.

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  • In the light of our present knowledge of Ginkgo and the Cycads, there can scarcely be a doubt that spermatozoids were formed in the cells of the antheridium of the Cordaitean pollen-grain and that of other Palaeozoic Spermophyta; the an theridium is much more developed than in any recent Gymnosperm, and it may be doubted whether any pollen-tube was formed.

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  • The morphology of the female inflorescence of Cordaiteae has not yet been cleared up, but Taxus and Ginkgo among recent plants appear to offer the nearest analogies.

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  • Isolated fossil seeds are common in the Carboniferous and Permian strata; in all cases they are of the orthotropous type, and resemble the seeds of Cycads or Ginkgo more nearly than those of any other living plants.

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  • 18), there are others separated as a distinct B, C, D, E, F, H, Ginkgo leaves.

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  • Male flowers, like those of Ginkgo biloba, but usually H, after Krasser.

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  • size.) characterized by a rather larger number of oval pollen-sacs on the stamens, have been found in England, Germany, Siberia and elsewhere in association with Ginkgo and Baiera foliage.

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  • Seeds like those of Ginkgo biloba have also been recorded as fossils in Jurassic rocks, and it is possible that the type of flower known as Beania, from the Inferior Oolite rocks of Yorkshire, may have been borne by Ginkgo or Baiera.

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  • The regions from which satisfactory examples of Ginkgoales (Baiera or Ginkgo) have been recorded are shown in Map B (G1-G17).

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  • Among modern floras we find here and there isolated types, such as Ginkgo, Sequoia, Matonia, Dipteris and the Cycads, persisting as more successful survivals which have held their own through the course of ages; these plants remain as vestiges from a remote past, and as links connecting the vegetation of to-day with that of the Mesozoic era.

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  • Of trees now extinct in America, Eucalyptus and Ginkgo are perhaps the most noticeable.

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  • Callitris (2 species), Sequoia, Athrotaxis (?) Ginkgo, Podocarpus, Pinus; and several genera of palms, of which the tropical Nipa is the most abundant and most characteristic, among the others being fan-palms of the genera Sabal and Chamaerops.

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  • The plants include a Fern, Onoclea hebridica, close to a living American form; four Gymnosperms belonging to the genera Cryptomeria, Ginkgo, Taxus and Podocarpus; Dicotyledons of about 30 species, several of which have been figured.

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  • The plants of Disco include, besides the plane and Sequoia, such warm-temperate trees as Ginkgo, oak, beech, poplar, maple, walnut, lime and magnolia.

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  • Smoking Ginkgo's ability to scavenge free radicals means that it will make a substantial difference to the potential damage smoking may present.

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  • ginkgo's phenomenal survival abilities are due to its ' unique chemistry, which pharmaceutical companies find difficult to synthesize.

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  • There were no significant differences between those taking ginkgo and those taking placebo on any of the objective or subjective measures.

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  • Allergic skin reactions were reported in one trial with oral ginkgo 240 mg.

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  • ginkgo biloba is one of the oldest trees on the planet, dating back about 200 million years.

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  • ginkgo supplementation were stomach upset and nausea.

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  • ginkgo extract boosts memory in humans has not been confirmed by science.

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  • ginkgo trees.

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  • ginkgo leaf and panax ginseng root.

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  • ginkgo products to choose from.

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  • Ginkgo Biloba The herb ginkgo Biloba The herb ginkgo biloba has been used for many years in Chinese medicine.

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  • Matthews MK Jr. Association of Ginkgo biloba with intracerebral hemorrhage.

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  • The elderly often suffer from poor circulation and lowered immunity and Ginkgo works well on both counts.

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  • lowered immunity and Ginkgo works well on both counts.

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  • Smoking Ginkgo's ability to scavenge free radicals means that it will make a substantial difference to the potential damage smoking may present.

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  • Improving blood flow throughout the body, Ginkgo biloba can also reduce blood ' stickiness ', which lowers the risk of blood clots.

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  • In Monoblepliaris, one of the lower Fungi, in some Algae, in the Vascular Cryptograms, in Cycads (Zamia and Cycas), and in Ginkgo, an isolated genus of Gymnosperms, the male cell is a motile spermatozoid with two or more cilia.

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  • In the Characeae, the Vascular Cryptogams, in Zamia and Cycas, and in Ginkgo, the spermatozoids are more or less highly modified cells witi+m.-S, ~..

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  • .;.:~~: cilia are grouped along .~ the cytoplasmic anterior D portion of the spiral In Zamia (fig 4 A), Cycas and Ginkgo they consist of large spherical or oval cells with a coiled band of cilia at one end, and ~ ~ a large nucleus which nearly fills the cell They are carried by the pollen tube to the apex of the prothallus, where they are extruded, and by means of their ciba swim through a small quantity .D of liquid, contained in a slight depression to the oosphere.

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  • In the spermatozoids of Chara, Vascular Cryptogams, and in those of Cycas, Zamia and Ginkgo, the cilia arise from a centrosome-like body which is found on one side of the nucleus of the spermatozoid mother-cell.

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  • London, 1894); Hirase, Etudes sur Ia fhcondation et lEmbryogenie du Ginkgo biloba, Journ.

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  • Amongst Conifers the archaic genera, Ginkgo and Araucarus still persist.

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  • Ginkgo - Maidenhair Tree.

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  • These six groups were the dominant types throughout the period, but during Upper Carboniferous time three other groups arose, the Coniferales, the Cycadophyta, and the Ginkgoales (of which Ginkgo biloba is the only modern representative).

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  • The Cordaitales (see Palaeobotany: Palaeozoic) are represented by extinct forms only, which occupied a prominent position in the Palaeozoic period; these plants exhibit certain features in common with the living Araucarias, and others which invite a comparison with the maidenhair tree (Ginkgo biloba), the solitary survivor of another class of Gymnosperms, the Ginkgoales (see Palaeobotany: Mesozoic).

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  • He drew attention also to certain p roximal end of structural similarities between Cycas and Ginkgo.

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  • - Ginkgo adiantoides.

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  • - This class-designation has been recently proposed to give emphasis to the isolated position of the genus Ginkgo (Salisburia) among the Gymnosperms. Ginkgo biloba, the maidenhair tree, has usually been placed by botanists in the Taxeae in the neighbourhood of the yew (Taxes), but the proposal by Eichler in 1852 to institute a special family, the Salisburieae, indicated a recognition of the existence of special characteristics which distinguish the genus from other members of the Coniferae.

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  • The discovery by the Japanese botanist 'Erase of the development of ciliated spermatozoids in the pollen-tube of Ginkgo, in place of the non-motile male cells of typical conifers, served as a cogent argument in favour of separating the genus from the Coniferales and placing it in a class of its own.

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  • In 1712 Kaempfer published a drawing of a Japanese tree, which he described under the name Ginkgo; this term was adopted in 1771 by Linnaeus, who spoke of Kaempfer's plant as Ginkgo biloba.

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  • In 1797 Smith proposed to use the name Salisburia adiantifolia in preference to the " uncouth " genus Ginkgo and " incorrect " specific term biloba.

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  • On account of the resemblance of the leaves to those of some species of Adiantum, the appellation maiden-hair tree has long been given to Ginkgo biloba.

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  • Ginkgo is of special interest on account of its isolated position among existing plants, its restricted geographical distribution, and its great antiquity (see Palaeobotany: Mesozoic).

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  • Ginkgo is common as a sacred tree in the gardens of temples in the Far East, and often cultivated in North America and Europe.

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  • Ginkgo biloba, which may reach a height of over 30 metres, forms a tree of pyramidal shape with a smooth grey bark.

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  • - Ginkgo biloba.

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  • The endosperm detached from a large Ginkgo ovule after fertilization bears a close resemblance to that of a cycad; the apex is occupied by a depression, on the floor of which two small holes mark the position of the archegonia, and the outgrowth from the megaspore apex projects from the centre as a short peg.

    0
    0
  • After fertilization the ovum-nucleus divides and cell-formation proceeds rapidly, especially in the lower part of the ovum, in which the cotyledon and axis of the embryo are differentiated; the long, tangled suspensor of the cycadean embryo is not found in Ginkgo.

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  • This is not the place to discuss in detail the past history of Ginkgo (see Palaeobotany: Mesozoic).

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  • During the Triassic and Jurassic periods the genus Baiera - no doubt a representative of the Ginkgoales--was widely spread throughout Europe and in other regions; Ginkgo itself occurs abundantly in Mesozoic and Tertiary rocks, and was a common plant in the Arctic regions as elsewhere during the Jurassic and Lower Cretaceous periods.

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  • Some unusually perfect Ginkgo leaves have been found in the Eocene leafbeds between the lava-flows exposed in the cliffs of Mull (fig.

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  • The structure of the seed, the presence of two neck-cells in the archegonia, the late development of the embryo, the partially-fused cotyledons and certain anatomical characters, are features common to Ginkgo and the cycads.

    0
    0
  • Cordaites is an extinct type which in certain respects resembles Ginkgo, cycads and the Araucarieae, but its agreement with true conifers is probably too remote to justify our attri buting much weight to the bearing of the morphology of its female flowers on the interpretation of that of the Coniferae.

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  • During the growth of the cell which forms the megaspore the greater part of the nucellus is absorbed, except the apical portion, which persists as a cone above the megaspore; the partial disorganization of some of the cells in the centre of the nucellar cone forms an irregular cavity, which may be compared with the larger pollen-chamber of Ginkgo and the cycads.

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  • Araucaria, the leaf-traces persist for a considerable time, perhaps indefinitely, and may be seen in tangential sections of the wood of old stems. The leaf-trace in the Coniferales is simple in its course through the stem, differing in this respect from the double leaf-trace of Ginkgo.

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  • Ginkgoales; Hirase, " Etudes sur la fecondation, &c., de Ginkgo biloba," Journ.

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  • (1898); Seward and Gowan, " Ginkgo biloba," Ann.

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  • (1900) (with bibliography); Ikeno, " Contribution a l'etude de la fecondation chez le Ginkgo biloba," Ann.

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  • (1901); Sprecher, Le Ginkgo biloba (Geneva, 1907).

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  • In most cases the leaf-traces passed out from the stem in pairs, as in the recent Ginkgo; dividing up further as they entered the leaf-base.

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    0
  • The stamens are probably best compared with those of Ginkgo, but they have also been interpreted as corresponding to the male " flowers " of the Gnetaceae.

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  • In the light of our present knowledge of Ginkgo and the Cycads, there can scarcely be a doubt that spermatozoids were formed in the cells of the antheridium of the Cordaitean pollen-grain and that of other Palaeozoic Spermophyta; the an theridium is much more developed than in any recent Gymnosperm, and it may be doubted whether any pollen-tube was formed.

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  • The morphology of the female inflorescence of Cordaiteae has not yet been cleared up, but Taxus and Ginkgo among recent plants appear to offer the nearest analogies.

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  • Isolated fossil seeds are common in the Carboniferous and Permian strata; in all cases they are of the orthotropous type, and resemble the seeds of Cycads or Ginkgo more nearly than those of any other living plants.

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  • The living Maidenhair-tree (Ginkgo biloba) (see Gymnosperms) remains, like Matonia and Dipteris, among the ferns, as an isolated relic in the midst of recent vegetation.

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  • 18), there are others separated as a distinct B, C, D, E, F, H, Ginkgo leaves.

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  • Male flowers, like those of Ginkgo biloba, but usually H, after Krasser.

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  • size.) characterized by a rather larger number of oval pollen-sacs on the stamens, have been found in England, Germany, Siberia and elsewhere in association with Ginkgo and Baiera foliage.

    0
    0
  • Seeds like those of Ginkgo biloba have also been recorded as fossils in Jurassic rocks, and it is possible that the type of flower known as Beania, from the Inferior Oolite rocks of Yorkshire, may have been borne by Ginkgo or Baiera.

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    0
  • The regions from which satisfactory examples of Ginkgoales (Baiera or Ginkgo) have been recorded are shown in Map B (G1-G17).

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  • Among modern floras we find here and there isolated types, such as Ginkgo, Sequoia, Matonia, Dipteris and the Cycads, persisting as more successful survivals which have held their own through the course of ages; these plants remain as vestiges from a remote past, and as links connecting the vegetation of to-day with that of the Mesozoic era.

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  • Of trees now extinct in America, Eucalyptus and Ginkgo are perhaps the most noticeable.

    0
    0
  • Callitris (2 species), Sequoia, Athrotaxis (?) Ginkgo, Podocarpus, Pinus; and several genera of palms, of which the tropical Nipa is the most abundant and most characteristic, among the others being fan-palms of the genera Sabal and Chamaerops.

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  • The plants include a Fern, Onoclea hebridica, close to a living American form; four Gymnosperms belonging to the genera Cryptomeria, Ginkgo, Taxus and Podocarpus; Dicotyledons of about 30 species, several of which have been figured.

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  • The plants of Disco include, besides the plane and Sequoia, such warm-temperate trees as Ginkgo, oak, beech, poplar, maple, walnut, lime and magnolia.

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  • However, when Ginkgo is commercially grown, a soil rich in humus and nitrogen is preferable.

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  • Improving blood flow throughout the body, Ginkgo biloba can also reduce blood ' stickiness ', which lowers the risk of blood clots.

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  • Ginkgo biloba, Ginseng, Dong Quai and Resihi are just a few of the multitude of healing herbs found at your local pharmacy or grocery store.

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  • Ginkgo biloba is named after the ginkgo tree, a prevalent and historic Asian tree.

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  • The Mayo Clinic recommends herbs such as ginseng, ginkgo biloba and yohimbe, but each of these herbs addresses different causes of erectile dysfunction from the psychological to the circulatory aspects of this condition.

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  • Ginkgo has an effect on the blood vessels and increases both circulation and oxygen to the cells of the body.

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  • In adults, alternative treatments for cramps include gingko (Ginkgo biloba) or Japanese quince (Chaenomeles speciosa).

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  • SSRIs should not be used with any drug that increases serotonin concentrations, including MAO inhibitors, tramadol, sibutramine, meperidine, sumatriptan, lithium, St. John's wort, ginkgo biloba, and some anti-psychotic agents.

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  • These include lutein (for strong eyes), ginkgo biloba (suggested to help with memory and mental sharpness), vitamins A, C, B6, B12, and the minerals calcium and zinc.

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  • Doctors caution against using supplements with too many herbal additives (like ginkgo), because they have not been tested thoroughly.

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