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gibraltar

gibraltar

gibraltar Sentence Examples

  • It may be that his early death, during the great plague of 1350, at the siege of Gibraltar, only averted a desperate struggle with his legitimate son, though it was a misfortune in that it removed a ruler of eminent capacity, who understood his subjects well enough not to go too far.

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  • Its position, as has been frequently remarked, is not unlike that of Gibraltar, as the town is built along the northwestern base of a rocky promontory (1157 ft.

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  • They could not even prevent Admiral George Darby from relieving Gibraltar and Minorca in April.

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  • of Gibraltar, on the opposite side of the Bay of Algeciras.

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  • of Gibraltar, on the opposite side of the Bay of Algeciras.

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  • This accounts for Gibraltar and Alexandria being shown as lying due east and west of each other, although there is a difference of 5° of latitude between them, a fact known long before Ptolemy.

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  • Haldane was afterwards present at the relief of Gibraltar, but at the peace of 1783 he finally left the navy, and soon afterwards settled on his estate of Airthrey, near Stirling.

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  • Algiers is the chief coaling station in the Mediterranean, having become so largely at the expense of Gibraltar.

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  • During his long service as a lieutenant he took part in the bombardment of Tripoli, and on a subsequent occasion showed great firmness in resisting the seizure of a seaman as an alleged deserter from the British navy, his ship at the time lying under the guns of Gibraltar.

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  • On the change of ministry in March 1782 he was selected to command in the Channel, and in the autumn of that year, September, October and November, he carried out the final relief of Gibraltar.

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  • He announced a complete reorganization of the navy, which was to be grouped in four fleets, three being for home defence, based on home ports (the third being the Atlantic fleet previously based on Gibraltar), and the fourth, based on Gibraltar, to operate either in home waters or in the Mediterranean.

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  • 4 Coming to the Iberian peninsula,we must, i n default of separate works depart from our rule of not mentioning contributions to journals, for of the former there are only Colonel Irby's Ornithology of the Straits of Gibraltar (8vo, 1875) and Mr A.

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  • Gibraltar >>

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  • He was an enthusiastic and most useful leader of the volunteer movement from its beginning, and a writer, composer and singer of humorous and patriotic songs, some of which, as "The Three Foot Rule" and "They never shall have Gibraltar," became well known far beyond the circle of his acquaintance.

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  • Similar currents exist in the Bosporus to those of the Strait of Gibraltar.

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  • At the beginning of 1801, a British naval force, commanded by Lord Keith, had sailed from Gibraltar, escorting an army of 18,000 men under General Abercromby.

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  • By the 13th of June he had learnt the truth, and sailed for Gibraltar under the erroneous impression that the French admiral would return to Toulon.

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  • Nelson, who reached Gibraltar on the very day the action off Ferrol was fought, was too far away to interfere with him.

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  • The British force consisted of 9000 men from Cork, under Sir Arthur Wellesley - at first in chief command; 5000 from Gibraltar, under General (Sir Brent) Spencer; and io,000 under Sir John Moore coming from Sweden; Wellesley and Moore being directed towards Portugal, and Spencer to Cadiz.

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  • Peniscola, often called the Gibraltar of Valencia, is a fortified seaport, with a lighthouse, built on a rocky headland about 220 ft.

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  • of Gibraltar, 1168 m.

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  • Throughout the middle ages it was the scene of vigorous struggles between Sla y s, Byzantines, Franks, Turks and Venetians, the chief memorials of which are the ruined strongholds of Mistra near Sparta, Gerald (anc. Geronthrae) and Monemvasia, "the Gibraltar of Greece," on the east coast, and Passava near Gythium.

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  • It is a widelydistributed species, being found throughout the northern and temperate seas of Europe, Asia and America, extending as far south as Gibraltar, but not entering the Mediterranean, and inhabits water from 25 to 50 fathoms deep, where it always feeds close to the bottom.

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  • Spain, Portugal, Andorra and Gibraltar

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  • It is entirely terrestrial in habits, at least on Gibraltar, and goes about in droves.

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  • Up to 1668 the entrepot for the inland settlements was a station named Gibraltar at the head of the lake, but the destruction of that station by pirates in that year transferred this valuable trade to Maracaibo.

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  • Peterwardein, the "Gibraltar of Hungary," is believed to represent the Roman Acumincum, and received its present name from Peter the Hermit, who here in 1096 marshalled the levies of the first crusade.

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  • Reinforcements sent out from Holland were stopped in the Straits of Gibraltar and blockaded in Cadiz.

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  • Straits have been formed (I) by fracture across isthmuses, and such may be by longitudinal fracture as in the Strait of Bab-el-Mandeb, or transverse fracture as in the Strait of Gibraltar or Cook Strait; (2) by erosion, e.g.

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  • The Mediterranean Sea, the best-known member of the intercontinental class, is separated from the Atlantic Ocean by a ridge running from Cape Spartel to Cape Trafalgar on which the greatest depth is only 175 fathoms. The depth increases so rapidly towards the east that soundings exceeding 500 fathoms occur off Gibraltar.

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  • An under-current flows out from the Red Sea through the Strait of Bab-el-Mandeb, and from the Mediterranean through the Strait of Gibraltar, raising the salinity as well as the temperature of the part of the ocean outside the gates of the respective seas.

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  • Hence a strong surface current sets inwards through the Straits of Bab-el-Mandeb and Gibraltar, while an undercurrent flows outwards, raising the temperature and salinity of the ocean for a long distance beyond the straits.

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  • Captain Garrick, who had made his home at Lichfield, where he had a large family, in 1731 rejoined his regiment at Gibraltar.

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  • On his father's return from Gibraltar, David, who had previously been educated at the grammar school of Lichfield, was, largely by the advice of Gilbert Walmley, registrar of the ecclesiastical court, sent with his brother George to the " academy " at Edial, just opened in June or July 1736 by Samuel Johnson, the senior by seven years of David, who was then nineteen.

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  • Bringing the oxen of Geryones from Erythia in the far west, which errand involved many adventures in the coast lands of the Mediterranean, and the setting up of the " Pillars of Hercules " at the Straits of Gibraltar.

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  • io of 1895, Gibraltar; No.

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  • of the Strait of Gibraltar, and about 40 m.

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  • Rabat trades with Fez and the interior of Morocco, with the neighbouring coast towns and Gibraltar, and with Marseilles, Manchester and London, and is the greatest industrial centre in Morocco.

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  • Plato describes how certain Egyptian priests, in a conversation with Solon, represented the island as a country larger than Asia Minor and Libya united, and situated just beyond the Pillars of Hercules (Straits of Gibraltar).

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  • Somewhat similar legends are those of the island of Brazil, of Lyonnesse, the sunken land off the Cornish coast, of the lost Breton city of Is, and of Mayda or Asmaide - the French Isle Verte and Portuguese Ilha Verde or "Green Island" - which appears in many folk-tales from Gibraltar to the Hebrides, and until 1853 was marked on English charts as a rock in 44° 48' N.

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  • "Sumter" made a successful cruise on the high seas, and before she was abandoned at Gibraltar had made seventeen prizes.

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  • A violent current, starting from the Straits of Gibraltar, rushes eastward along the shore, and, hurled back from the headlands, is deflected to the west.

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  • As no attempt was made to stop him in the Straits of Gibraltar, he passed them on the 16th of May, and though the rawness of his crews and his own error in wasting time in pursuit of prizes delayed his passage, he reached the mouth of the Delaware on the 8th of July unopposed.

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  • In the meantime the Spaniards had formed the siege of Gibraltar.

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  • At the close of 1779 Sir George Rodney had been appointed to command a large naval force which was to relieve Gibraltar, then closely blockaded, and send stores to Minorca.

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  • He sailed on the 29th of December 1779 with the trade for the West Indies under his protection, captured a Spanish convoy on his way off Finisterre on the 8th of January, defeated a smaller Spanish force near Cape St Vincent on the 16th, relieved Gibraltar on the 19th, and left for the West Indies on the 13th of February.

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  • The rambling operations of the naval war till the close of 1780 - directed by the allies to such secondary objects as the capture of West Indian islands, or of Minorca and Gibraltar, and by Great Britain to defensive movements - began to assume a degree of coherence in 1781.

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  • At home Howe relieved Gibraltar for the last time in September and October 1782.

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  • Dr William Harris Rule (1802-1890), who was appointed chaplain at Gibraltar in 1832, won for it fuller recognition from the authorities.

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  • In the "Venerable" Hood was present at the action of Algesiras and the battle in the Straits of Gibraltar (1801).

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  • TANGIER (locally Tanjah), a seaport of Morocco, on the Straits of Gibraltar, about 14 m.

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  • Tangier is almost destitute of manufactures, and while the trade, about £750,000 a year, is considerable for Morocco, it is confined chiefly to imports, about two-fifths of which come from Great Britain and Gibraltar, and one quarter from France.

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  • The exports are chiefly oxen, meat, fowls and eggs for Gibraltar and sometimes for Spain, with occasional shipments of slippers and blankets to Egypt.

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  • The disposition of the Spaniards to make concessions was further quickened by the destruction of their fleet at Gibraltar by the Dutch admiral Heemskerk, (April 1607).

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  • North Africa from beyond the straits of Gibraltar to the Syrtes became again a Roman province, although the Moorish tribes of the interior maintained a species of independence; and part of southern Spain was also recovered for the empire.

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  • Although the hulks at home had been condemned, convict establishments in which these floating prisons still formed the principal part were organized at Bermuda and Gibraltar.

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  • The spot where he landed thence acquired the name of Jebel Tariq, "Mountain of Tariq," afterwards corrupted into Gibraltar.

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  • After going home to Tangier, Ibn Batuta crossed into Spain and made the round of Andalusia, including Gibraltar, which had just then stood a siege from the "Roman tyrant Adfunus" (Alphonso XI.

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  • Algeciras stands at the head of a railway from Granada, but its only means of access to Gibraltar is by water.

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  • The Moorish city was destroyed by Alphonso; it was first reoccupied by Spanish colonists from Gibraltar in 1704; and the modern town was erected in 1760 by King Charles III.

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  • of Gibraltar and 130 m.

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  • There is regular communication with Marseilles, Cette, Barcelona, Valencia, Cartagena, Malaga, Gibraltar, and the various ports on the Barbary coast.

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  • The king escaped to Ericeira, and thence, with the other members of the royal family, to Gibraltar.

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  • It is the best-built port of the sultanate and is generally second in point of trade, which is carried on mainly with Marseilles, London, Gibraltar and the Canaries, the principal exports being almonds, goat-skins, gums and olive-oil, and the principal imports cotton goods, sugar and tea.

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  • He wrote home to that effect to the ministry from Gibraltar.

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  • After remaining near Minorca for four days without making any further attempt to communicate with the fort or sighting the French, Byng sailed away to Gibraltar leaving Fort St Philip to its fate.

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  • To promote the " brotherly feeling between the members of the two churches," for which the patriarch expressed a desire, a committee was formed under the presidency of the Anglican bishop of Gibraltar.

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  • At one moment he withdrew from it, because Lord John Russell persisted in presenting a project of reform which appeared to him entirely out of season; and he advocated, with reason, measures 1 David Pacifico (1784-1854) was a Portuguese Jew, born a British subject at Gibraltar.

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  • It is governed by a naval captain borne on the books of the flagship of the admiral superintendent at Gibraltar.

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  • The Gulf of Venezuela, with its towns of Maracaibo and Gibraltar, were attacked and plundered under the command of a Frenchman named L'0110nois, who performed, it is said, the office of executioner upon the whole crew of a Spanish vessel manned with ninety seamen.

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  • TREATY OF UTRECHT, the general name given to the important series of treaties which in 1713 and 1714 concluded the great European war of the Spanish Succession, and by which inter alia England obtained possession of Newfoundland, Nova Scotia and Gibraltar.

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  • Spain ceded to England Gibraltar and Minorca and promised to give up Sicily to Savoy.

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  • MACAQUE, a name of French origin denoting the monkeys of the mainly Asiatic genus Macacus, of which one species, the Barbary ape, inhabits North Africa and the rock of Gibraltar.

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  • Spain, Gibraltar was captured by Rooke (1704) and Barcelona by Peterborough (1705).

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  • RockingA treaty of peace acknowledging the independence ~ of the United States of America was at once set on foot; and the negotiation with France was rendered easy by the defeat of a French fleet by Rodfiev, and by the failure of the combined forces of France and Snain to take Gibraltar.

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  • In particular Don Pacifico, a Jew, but a native of Gibraltar, cornPacifko.

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  • It is in a letter from Gibraltar to the same hand that we read of his two canes - "a morning and an evening cane" - changed as the gun fires.

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  • This promontory marks the south-eastern end of the straits of Gibraltar, which between Ceuta and Gibraltar have a width of 14 m.

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  • Meantime, in 1418, Henry had gone in person to relieve Ceuta from an attack of Morocco and Granada Mussulmans; had accomplished his task, and had planned, though he did not carry out, a seizure of Gibraltar.

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  • In the north the chief movements gave rise to the system of latitudinal folding and faulting of the Moroccan and Algerian Atlas, the last stages being represented by the formation of the Algerian and Moroccan coast-outline and the sundering of Europe from Africa at the Straits of Gibraltar.

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  • SPAIN (Espana), a kingdom in the extreme south-west of Europe, comprising about eleven-thirteenths of the Iberian Peninsula, in addition to the Balearic Islands, the Canary Islands, and the fortified station of Ceuta, on the Moroccan coast opposite to Gibraltar.

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  • The British rock of Gibraltar, in the extreme south of the peninsula, is separated from Spain by a low isthmus known as the Neutral Ground.

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  • The seaboard is generally flat from the frontier of Portugal to the Straits of Gibraltar.

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  • From the Straits of Gibraltar a bold and rocky coast continues almost to Cape Palos, a little beyond the fine natural harbour of Cartagena.

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  • The magot or Barbary ape (Inuus ecaudatus), the sole species of monkey still found wild in Europe, is also a native of Spain, but only survives on the rock of Gibraltar (qv.).

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  • The birds of Spain are very numerous, partly becatise the Peninsula lies in the route of those birds of passage which cross from Africa to Europe or Europe to Africa by way of the Straits of Gibraltar.

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  • Settlements of Italian veterans or of Spanish soldiers who had served for Rome were made at Hispalis (Seville) and at Carteia near Gibraltar, and a beginning was made of a Romanized provincial population, though in a somewhat half-hearted way.

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  • Some were described as from sea to sea, and seven times a day, that is to say they could take him anywhere in the kings dominions from the Bay of Biscay to the Straits of Gibraltar, and change him as often as they pleased.

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  • His death at the age of thirty-eight, during the great plague, and while he was besieging Gibraltar, was a misfortune to Spain.

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  • The part taken by Spain in the actual170~3~ struggle was mainly a passive one, and it ended for her with the loss of Gibraltar and the islaiid of Minorca, which remained in the hands of England, and of all her dominions in Italy and Flanders.

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  • A feeble attempt to regain Gibraltar was made in 1733, and a serious war was only averted by the resolute peace policy of Sir Robert Walpole.

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  • He had a deep dislike of England, and a strong desire to recover Minorca and Gibraltar, which she held.

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  • The third, John, became chaplain at Gibraltar, where he accumulated much material for a work on the natural history of the rock and its neighbourhood, and carried on a scientific correspondence, not only with his eldest brother, but with Linnaeus.

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  • In order to get possession of them, Heracles travelled through Europe and Libya, set up the two pillars in the Straits of Gibraltar to show the extent of his journey, and reached the great river Oceanus.

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  • On board the mail steamship "Hermes" they visited Gibraltar, Malta and the Ionian Islands, and subsequently Sicily, Naples and Rome, where Newman made the acquaintance of Dr Wiseman.

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  • A foundation has officers, with prescribed duties, a secretary, a registered office in Gibraltar, and a supervisory board.

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  • comply with all applicable laws in Gibraltar.

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  • confederacy of dunces Henry McDonald: What is it that unites the IRA and Eta or the UDA and Gibraltar?

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  • The department is headed by Peter Rodney, senior legal draftsman for the Government of Gibraltar.

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  • This was to be the convoy escorted by two dance class trawlers, destination Gibraltar.

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  • They finally got the firedrake into a dry dock at Gibraltar and could now see just how bad the damage really was.

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  • In the event she was sent in June to Gibraltar with a convoy of troops to reinforce the garrison there.

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  • bombed Gibraltar 's naval wrapped in smoked million th million.

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  • Games stay open of surrendering Gibraltar ultimately you will wife won't even.

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  • Banks Internet service Gibraltar will be the facade of.

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  • With the constant influx of fresh water from the Atlantic Ocean, Gibraltar enjoys teeming marine life in a vibrant display of colors.

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  • limited partnership must have its principal place of business in Gibraltar.

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  • A limited partnership must have its principal place of business in Gibraltar.

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  • perpetuity period of a Gibraltar trust is 100 years.

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  • rooftops of the town of Gibraltar toward the rocky hillside beyond.

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  • rosebay willow-herb which is plentiful at Gibraltar Point.

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  • splutters something incomprehensible about five tests, Peter Caruana, Gibraltar's chief minister, outlines his plans.

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  • Gibraltar is also going down the route of extra heavy-duty tripods that you can mount loads of arms off.

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  • uncle's death at Gibraltar in 1942.

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  • Suess divides the Mediterranean basin into four physical regions, which afford probably the best means of description: (I) The western Mediterranean, from Gibraltar to Malta and Sicily, enclosed by the Apennines, the mountains of northern Africa, and of southern and south-eastern Spain (Cordillere betique).

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  • The isothermal of 65° runs from Gibraltar to the north of Sardinia, and thence by the Strait of Messina to the Gulf of Corinth.

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  • A similar distribution is found loo fathoms from the surface, temperature falling from 60° in the Levant to 55° east of Gibraltar.

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  • Such a determination is, however, extremely hazardous, even if it be admitted that the remains of cats from the rock-fissures of Gibraltar pertain to Felis ocreata.

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  • Haldane was afterwards present at the relief of Gibraltar, but at the peace of 1783 he finally left the navy, and soon afterwards settled on his estate of Airthrey, near Stirling.

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  • Algiers is the chief coaling station in the Mediterranean, having become so largely at the expense of Gibraltar.

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  • During his long service as a lieutenant he took part in the bombardment of Tripoli, and on a subsequent occasion showed great firmness in resisting the seizure of a seaman as an alleged deserter from the British navy, his ship at the time lying under the guns of Gibraltar.

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  • On the change of ministry in March 1782 he was selected to command in the Channel, and in the autumn of that year, September, October and November, he carried out the final relief of Gibraltar.

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  • He announced a complete reorganization of the navy, which was to be grouped in four fleets, three being for home defence, based on home ports (the third being the Atlantic fleet previously based on Gibraltar), and the fourth, based on Gibraltar, to operate either in home waters or in the Mediterranean.

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  • 4 Coming to the Iberian peninsula,we must, i n default of separate works depart from our rule of not mentioning contributions to journals, for of the former there are only Colonel Irby's Ornithology of the Straits of Gibraltar (8vo, 1875) and Mr A.

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  • He returned, via Gibraltar, with Prim, Serrano and others, to take part in the rising at Cadiz, which culminated in the revolution of September 1868, and Sagasta was in succession a minister several times under Serrano and then under King Amadeo of Savoy, 1868-187 2.

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  • The meridian distance between the Straits of Gibraltar and Beirut in Syria amounts upon them to about 3000 Portolano miles, equal in lat.

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  • This accounts for Gibraltar and Alexandria being shown as lying due east and west of each other, although there is a difference of 5° of latitude between them, a fact known long before Ptolemy.

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  • He was an enthusiastic and most useful leader of the volunteer movement from its beginning, and a writer, composer and singer of humorous and patriotic songs, some of which, as "The Three Foot Rule" and "They never shall have Gibraltar," became well known far beyond the circle of his acquaintance.

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  • Similar currents exist in the Bosporus to those of the Strait of Gibraltar.

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  • At the beginning of 1801, a British naval force, commanded by Lord Keith, had sailed from Gibraltar, escorting an army of 18,000 men under General Abercromby.

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  • The British admiral, delayed by contrary winds, had not been able to start from the entry to the Straits of Gibraltar till the 1 r th of May..

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  • By the 13th of June he had learnt the truth, and sailed for Gibraltar under the erroneous impression that the French admiral would return to Toulon.

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  • Nelson, who reached Gibraltar on the very day the action off Ferrol was fought, was too far away to interfere with him.

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  • The British force consisted of 9000 men from Cork, under Sir Arthur Wellesley - at first in chief command; 5000 from Gibraltar, under General (Sir Brent) Spencer; and io,000 under Sir John Moore coming from Sweden; Wellesley and Moore being directed towards Portugal, and Spencer to Cadiz.

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  • Peniscola, often called the Gibraltar of Valencia, is a fortified seaport, with a lighthouse, built on a rocky headland about 220 ft.

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  • of Gibraltar, 1168 m.

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  • Throughout the middle ages it was the scene of vigorous struggles between Sla y s, Byzantines, Franks, Turks and Venetians, the chief memorials of which are the ruined strongholds of Mistra near Sparta, Gerald (anc. Geronthrae) and Monemvasia, "the Gibraltar of Greece," on the east coast, and Passava near Gythium.

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  • It is a widelydistributed species, being found throughout the northern and temperate seas of Europe, Asia and America, extending as far south as Gibraltar, but not entering the Mediterranean, and inhabits water from 25 to 50 fathoms deep, where it always feeds close to the bottom.

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  • Spain, Portugal, Andorra and Gibraltar

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  • Its position, as has been frequently remarked, is not unlike that of Gibraltar, as the town is built along the northwestern base of a rocky promontory (1157 ft.

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  • BARBARY APE, a tailless monkey inhabiting Algeria, Morocco, and the rock of Gibraltar (where it may have been introduced), and referable to the otherwise Asiatic group of macaques, in which it alone represents the subgenus Inuus.

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  • It is entirely terrestrial in habits, at least on Gibraltar, and goes about in droves.

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  • GEORGE TIERNEY (1761-1830), English Whig politician, was born at Gibraltar on the 10th of March 1761, being the son of a wealthy Irish merchant of London, who was living there as prize agent.

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  • With Sir Cloudesley Shovel he took part in the capture of Gibraltar on the 21st of July 1704.

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  • Up to 1668 the entrepot for the inland settlements was a station named Gibraltar at the head of the lake, but the destruction of that station by pirates in that year transferred this valuable trade to Maracaibo.

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  • Peterwardein, the "Gibraltar of Hungary," is believed to represent the Roman Acumincum, and received its present name from Peter the Hermit, who here in 1096 marshalled the levies of the first crusade.

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  • Reinforcements sent out from Holland were stopped in the Straits of Gibraltar and blockaded in Cadiz.

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  • Straits have been formed (I) by fracture across isthmuses, and such may be by longitudinal fracture as in the Strait of Bab-el-Mandeb, or transverse fracture as in the Strait of Gibraltar or Cook Strait; (2) by erosion, e.g.

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  • The Mediterranean Sea, the best-known member of the intercontinental class, is separated from the Atlantic Ocean by a ridge running from Cape Spartel to Cape Trafalgar on which the greatest depth is only 175 fathoms. The depth increases so rapidly towards the east that soundings exceeding 500 fathoms occur off Gibraltar.

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  • An under-current flows out from the Red Sea through the Strait of Bab-el-Mandeb, and from the Mediterranean through the Strait of Gibraltar, raising the salinity as well as the temperature of the part of the ocean outside the gates of the respective seas.

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  • Hence a strong surface current sets inwards through the Straits of Bab-el-Mandeb and Gibraltar, while an undercurrent flows outwards, raising the temperature and salinity of the ocean for a long distance beyond the straits.

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  • Captain Garrick, who had made his home at Lichfield, where he had a large family, in 1731 rejoined his regiment at Gibraltar.

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  • On his father's return from Gibraltar, David, who had previously been educated at the grammar school of Lichfield, was, largely by the advice of Gilbert Walmley, registrar of the ecclesiastical court, sent with his brother George to the " academy " at Edial, just opened in June or July 1736 by Samuel Johnson, the senior by seven years of David, who was then nineteen.

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  • Bringing the oxen of Geryones from Erythia in the far west, which errand involved many adventures in the coast lands of the Mediterranean, and the setting up of the " Pillars of Hercules " at the Straits of Gibraltar.

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  • io of 1895, Gibraltar; No.

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  • of the Strait of Gibraltar, and about 40 m.

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  • Rabat trades with Fez and the interior of Morocco, with the neighbouring coast towns and Gibraltar, and with Marseilles, Manchester and London, and is the greatest industrial centre in Morocco.

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  • Plato describes how certain Egyptian priests, in a conversation with Solon, represented the island as a country larger than Asia Minor and Libya united, and situated just beyond the Pillars of Hercules (Straits of Gibraltar).

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  • Somewhat similar legends are those of the island of Brazil, of Lyonnesse, the sunken land off the Cornish coast, of the lost Breton city of Is, and of Mayda or Asmaide - the French Isle Verte and Portuguese Ilha Verde or "Green Island" - which appears in many folk-tales from Gibraltar to the Hebrides, and until 1853 was marked on English charts as a rock in 44° 48' N.

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  • "Sumter" made a successful cruise on the high seas, and before she was abandoned at Gibraltar had made seventeen prizes.

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  • A violent current, starting from the Straits of Gibraltar, rushes eastward along the shore, and, hurled back from the headlands, is deflected to the west.

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  • As no attempt was made to stop him in the Straits of Gibraltar, he passed them on the 16th of May, and though the rawness of his crews and his own error in wasting time in pursuit of prizes delayed his passage, he reached the mouth of the Delaware on the 8th of July unopposed.

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  • The British government, having neglected to occupy the Straits of Gibraltar in time, despatched Admiral Byron from Plymouth on the 9th of June with thirteen sail of the line to join Admiral (Lord) Howe, Sir William's brother, in America, and collected a strong force at home, called the Western Squadron, under Viscount Keppel.

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  • In the meantime the Spaniards had formed the siege of Gibraltar.

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  • At the close of 1779 Sir George Rodney had been appointed to command a large naval force which was to relieve Gibraltar, then closely blockaded, and send stores to Minorca.

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  • He sailed on the 29th of December 1779 with the trade for the West Indies under his protection, captured a Spanish convoy on his way off Finisterre on the 8th of January, defeated a smaller Spanish force near Cape St Vincent on the 16th, relieved Gibraltar on the 19th, and left for the West Indies on the 13th of February.

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  • The rambling operations of the naval war till the close of 1780 - directed by the allies to such secondary objects as the capture of West Indian islands, or of Minorca and Gibraltar, and by Great Britain to defensive movements - began to assume a degree of coherence in 1781.

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  • They could not even prevent Admiral George Darby from relieving Gibraltar and Minorca in April.

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  • At home Howe relieved Gibraltar for the last time in September and October 1782.

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  • Although lacking military tastes, he joined the French army at the siege of Gibraltar in 1772, merely for distraction.

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  • It may be that his early death, during the great plague of 1350, at the siege of Gibraltar, only averted a desperate struggle with his legitimate son, though it was a misfortune in that it removed a ruler of eminent capacity, who understood his subjects well enough not to go too far.

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  • On the site at the junction of the two rivers where Verandreye, the first white explorer to visit the Red river, had three-quarters of a century before this time erected Fort Rouge, and where some ten years earlier in the century the Nor'-Westers of Montreal had erected Fort Gibraltar, the Hudson's Bay Company, which at the time Lord Selkirk and his friends controlled, erected Fort Douglas, bearing the family name of the colonizer.

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  • The products of the interior were conveyed by the native Iberians to the maritime colonies, such as Abdera (Adra), Calpe (Gibraltar) or Malaca (Malaga), founded by the foreign merchants.

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  • Dr William Harris Rule (1802-1890), who was appointed chaplain at Gibraltar in 1832, won for it fuller recognition from the authorities.

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  • In the "Venerable" Hood was present at the action of Algesiras and the battle in the Straits of Gibraltar (1801).

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  • TANGIER (locally Tanjah), a seaport of Morocco, on the Straits of Gibraltar, about 14 m.

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  • Tangier is almost destitute of manufactures, and while the trade, about £750,000 a year, is considerable for Morocco, it is confined chiefly to imports, about two-fifths of which come from Great Britain and Gibraltar, and one quarter from France.

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  • The exports are chiefly oxen, meat, fowls and eggs for Gibraltar and sometimes for Spain, with occasional shipments of slippers and blankets to Egypt.

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  • The disposition of the Spaniards to make concessions was further quickened by the destruction of their fleet at Gibraltar by the Dutch admiral Heemskerk, (April 1607).

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  • The principal cables are from Alexandria to Malta, Gibraltar and Ergland; from Alexandria to Crete and Brindisi; from Suez f,., A.lsn ~ Ch~,-,,,, ~rn1 ~

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  • There are also industrial schools and orphanages, and the institute has branches in Australia, India, Gibraltar and Newfoundland.

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  • North Africa from beyond the straits of Gibraltar to the Syrtes became again a Roman province, although the Moorish tribes of the interior maintained a species of independence; and part of southern Spain was also recovered for the empire.

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  • Although the hulks at home had been condemned, convict establishments in which these floating prisons still formed the principal part were organized at Bermuda and Gibraltar.

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  • The spot where he landed thence acquired the name of Jebel Tariq, "Mountain of Tariq," afterwards corrupted into Gibraltar.

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  • After going home to Tangier, Ibn Batuta crossed into Spain and made the round of Andalusia, including Gibraltar, which had just then stood a siege from the "Roman tyrant Adfunus" (Alphonso XI.

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  • Algeciras stands at the head of a railway from Granada, but its only means of access to Gibraltar is by water.

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  • The Moorish city was destroyed by Alphonso; it was first reoccupied by Spanish colonists from Gibraltar in 1704; and the modern town was erected in 1760 by King Charles III.

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  • During the siege of Gibraltar in 1780-1782, Algeciras was the station of the Spanish fleet and floating batteries.

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  • Out of the breeding-season it shows itself in most parts of the North Atlantic, but never seems to stray farther south than Gibraltar or Morocco, and it is therefore a matter of much interest to find the Southern Ocean inhabited by a bird - the "Port Egmont Hen" of Cook's Voyages - which so closely resembles the Skua as to have been for a long while regarded as specifically identical with it, but is now usually recognized as distinct under the name of S.

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  • of Gibraltar and 130 m.

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  • There is regular communication with Marseilles, Cette, Barcelona, Valencia, Cartagena, Malaga, Gibraltar, and the various ports on the Barbary coast.

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  • The king escaped to Ericeira, and thence, with the other members of the royal family, to Gibraltar.

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  • It is the best-built port of the sultanate and is generally second in point of trade, which is carried on mainly with Marseilles, London, Gibraltar and the Canaries, the principal exports being almonds, goat-skins, gums and olive-oil, and the principal imports cotton goods, sugar and tea.

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  • He wrote home to that effect to the ministry from Gibraltar.

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  • After remaining near Minorca for four days without making any further attempt to communicate with the fort or sighting the French, Byng sailed away to Gibraltar leaving Fort St Philip to its fate.

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  • To promote the " brotherly feeling between the members of the two churches," for which the patriarch expressed a desire, a committee was formed under the presidency of the Anglican bishop of Gibraltar.

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  • At one moment he withdrew from it, because Lord John Russell persisted in presenting a project of reform which appeared to him entirely out of season; and he advocated, with reason, measures 1 David Pacifico (1784-1854) was a Portuguese Jew, born a British subject at Gibraltar.

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  • It is governed by a naval captain borne on the books of the flagship of the admiral superintendent at Gibraltar.

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  • The Gulf of Venezuela, with its towns of Maracaibo and Gibraltar, were attacked and plundered under the command of a Frenchman named L'0110nois, who performed, it is said, the office of executioner upon the whole crew of a Spanish vessel manned with ninety seamen.

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  • TREATY OF UTRECHT, the general name given to the important series of treaties which in 1713 and 1714 concluded the great European war of the Spanish Succession, and by which inter alia England obtained possession of Newfoundland, Nova Scotia and Gibraltar.

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  • Spain ceded to England Gibraltar and Minorca and promised to give up Sicily to Savoy.

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  • MACAQUE, a name of French origin denoting the monkeys of the mainly Asiatic genus Macacus, of which one species, the Barbary ape, inhabits North Africa and the rock of Gibraltar.

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  • Spain, Gibraltar was captured by Rooke (1704) and Barcelona by Peterborough (1705).

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  • RockingA treaty of peace acknowledging the independence ~ of the United States of America was at once set on foot; and the negotiation with France was rendered easy by the defeat of a French fleet by Rodfiev, and by the failure of the combined forces of France and Snain to take Gibraltar.

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  • In particular Don Pacifico, a Jew, but a native of Gibraltar, cornPacifko.

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  • It is in a letter from Gibraltar to the same hand that we read of his two canes - "a morning and an evening cane" - changed as the gun fires.

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  • This promontory marks the south-eastern end of the straits of Gibraltar, which between Ceuta and Gibraltar have a width of 14 m.

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  • Of these the highest is the Monte del Hacko, the ancient Abyla, one of the "Pillars of Hercules," which faces Gibraltar and rises 636 ft.

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  • Meantime, in 1418, Henry had gone in person to relieve Ceuta from an attack of Morocco and Granada Mussulmans; had accomplished his task, and had planned, though he did not carry out, a seizure of Gibraltar.

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  • In the north the chief movements gave rise to the system of latitudinal folding and faulting of the Moroccan and Algerian Atlas, the last stages being represented by the formation of the Algerian and Moroccan coast-outline and the sundering of Europe from Africa at the Straits of Gibraltar.

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  • A century later their pciitical hegemony, extending from the Black Sea to the Strait of Gibraltar, began to disintegrate, and the Gauls then embarked on more distant migrations, from the Columns of Hercules to the plateaux of Asia Minor, taking Rome on their way.

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  • SPAIN (Espana), a kingdom in the extreme south-west of Europe, comprising about eleven-thirteenths of the Iberian Peninsula, in addition to the Balearic Islands, the Canary Islands, and the fortified station of Ceuta, on the Moroccan coast opposite to Gibraltar.

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  • The British rock of Gibraltar, in the extreme south of the peninsula, is separated from Spain by a low isthmus known as the Neutral Ground.

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  • The seaboard is generally flat from the frontier of Portugal to the Straits of Gibraltar.

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  • From the Straits of Gibraltar a bold and rocky coast continues almost to Cape Palos, a little beyond the fine natural harbour of Cartagena.

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  • The magot or Barbary ape (Inuus ecaudatus), the sole species of monkey still found wild in Europe, is also a native of Spain, but only survives on the rock of Gibraltar (qv.).

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  • The birds of Spain are very numerous, partly becatise the Peninsula lies in the route of those birds of passage which cross from Africa to Europe or Europe to Africa by way of the Straits of Gibraltar.

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  • Settlements of Italian veterans or of Spanish soldiers who had served for Rome were made at Hispalis (Seville) and at Carteia near Gibraltar, and a beginning was made of a Romanized provincial population, though in a somewhat half-hearted way.

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  • Some were described as from sea to sea, and seven times a day, that is to say they could take him anywhere in the kings dominions from the Bay of Biscay to the Straits of Gibraltar, and change him as often as they pleased.

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  • His death at the age of thirty-eight, during the great plague, and while he was besieging Gibraltar, was a misfortune to Spain.

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  • The part taken by Spain in the actual170~3~ struggle was mainly a passive one, and it ended for her with the loss of Gibraltar and the islaiid of Minorca, which remained in the hands of England, and of all her dominions in Italy and Flanders.

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  • A feeble attempt to regain Gibraltar was made in 1733, and a serious war was only averted by the resolute peace policy of Sir Robert Walpole.

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  • He had a deep dislike of England, and a strong desire to recover Minorca and Gibraltar, which she held.

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  • The third, John, became chaplain at Gibraltar, where he accumulated much material for a work on the natural history of the rock and its neighbourhood, and carried on a scientific correspondence, not only with his eldest brother, but with Linnaeus.

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  • In order to get possession of them, Heracles travelled through Europe and Libya, set up the two pillars in the Straits of Gibraltar to show the extent of his journey, and reached the great river Oceanus.

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  • On board the mail steamship "Hermes" they visited Gibraltar, Malta and the Ionian Islands, and subsequently Sicily, Naples and Rome, where Newman made the acquaintance of Dr Wiseman.

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  • They arrived at Gibraltar during the night of 3 June bringing the first news of the resumption of hostilities with France.

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  • A view looking over rooftops of the town of Gibraltar toward the rocky hillside beyond.

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  • These larvae feed on rosebay willow-herb which is plentiful at Gibraltar Point.

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  • While Tony splutters something incomprehensible about five tests, Peter Caruana, Gibraltar 's chief minister, outlines his plans.

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  • Meanwhile, the crew of Sheffield had been enjoying the sun at Gibraltar when Force H was summoned to assist the hunt for Bismark.

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  • He is trying to find out about his uncle 's death at Gibraltar in 1942.

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  • With ports such as Rome, Barcelona, Capri, Sardinia, Gibraltar, Cannes, Florence, Lisbon, and Marseille, the western sailings are typically more popular than similar eastern Mediterranean cruises.

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  • Such a determination is, however, extremely hazardous, even if it be admitted that the remains of cats from the rock-fissures of Gibraltar pertain to Felis ocreata.

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  • He returned, via Gibraltar, with Prim, Serrano and others, to take part in the rising at Cadiz, which culminated in the revolution of September 1868, and Sagasta was in succession a minister several times under Serrano and then under King Amadeo of Savoy, 1868-187 2.

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  • The British admiral, delayed by contrary winds, had not been able to start from the entry to the Straits of Gibraltar till the 1 r th of May..

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  • GEORGE TIERNEY (1761-1830), English Whig politician, was born at Gibraltar on the 10th of March 1761, being the son of a wealthy Irish merchant of London, who was living there as prize agent.

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  • With Sir Cloudesley Shovel he took part in the capture of Gibraltar on the 21st of July 1704.

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  • In the North Atlantic a strong submarine current flowing outward from the Mediterranean leaves the Strait of Gibraltar with a salinity of 38 per mille, and can be traced as far as Madeira and the Bay of Biscay in depths of from 600 to 2800 fathoms, still with a salinity of 35.6 per mille, whereas off the Azores at equal depths the salinity is from 0.5 to 0.7 per mille less.

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  • The British government, having neglected to occupy the Straits of Gibraltar in time, despatched Admiral Byron from Plymouth on the 9th of June with thirteen sail of the line to join Admiral (Lord) Howe, Sir William's brother, in America, and collected a strong force at home, called the Western Squadron, under Viscount Keppel.

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    1
  • Although lacking military tastes, he joined the French army at the siege of Gibraltar in 1772, merely for distraction.

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    1
  • There are also industrial schools and orphanages, and the institute has branches in Australia, India, Gibraltar and Newfoundland.

    0
    1
  • During the siege of Gibraltar in 1780-1782, Algeciras was the station of the Spanish fleet and floating batteries.

    0
    1
  • Out of the breeding-season it shows itself in most parts of the North Atlantic, but never seems to stray farther south than Gibraltar or Morocco, and it is therefore a matter of much interest to find the Southern Ocean inhabited by a bird - the "Port Egmont Hen" of Cook's Voyages - which so closely resembles the Skua as to have been for a long while regarded as specifically identical with it, but is now usually recognized as distinct under the name of S.

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    1
  • In the North Atlantic a strong submarine current flowing outward from the Mediterranean leaves the Strait of Gibraltar with a salinity of 38 per mille, and can be traced as far as Madeira and the Bay of Biscay in depths of from 600 to 2800 fathoms, still with a salinity of 35.6 per mille, whereas off the Azores at equal depths the salinity is from 0.5 to 0.7 per mille less.

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    1
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