Germinates sentence example

germinates
  • The seed is sown between the 1st and 15th of November, acid germinates in ten or fifteen days.
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  • The seeds, or properly fruits, are contained singly in a stony involucre or bract, which does not open until the enclosed seed germinates.
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  • In other species of the genus the seed germinates on a branch, and the seedling produces clasping roots, and roots which grow downwards hanging like stout cords, and ultimately reaching the ground.
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  • So soaked is the soil after the flood, that the grain germinates, sprouts, and ripens in April, without a shower of rain or any other watering.
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  • more; it is indehiscent, and the small seed germinates whilst the fruit is still attached to the tree, putting out a tuft of roots and a shoot, and not falling till the latter is 6 in.
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  • germinates to produce ha first flower.
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  • In Zygnemaceae and Mesocarpaceae the zygospore, after a period of rest, germinates, to form a new filamentous colony; in Desmidiaceae its contents divide on germination, and thus give rise to two or more Desmids.
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  • The carpogonium germinates forthwith, drawing its nourishment almost wholly from the parent plant.
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  • Turn ing first to the Rhodophyceae, both on account of the high place which they occupy among algae and also the remarkable uniformity in their reproductive processes, it is clear that, as is the case among Archegoniatae, the product of the sexual act never germinates directly into a plant which gives rise to the sexual organs.
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  • Among Phaeophyceae it is well known that the oospore of Fucaceae germinates directly into the sexual plant, and there is thus only one generation.
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  • If the seed lies at a depth lower than a foot from the surface, it rarely germinates.
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  • bosom of the earth, where the muse Thalia lies silent, the song germinates.
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  • The embryo is generally surrounded by a larger or smaller amount of foodstuff (endosperm) which serves to nourish it in its development to form a seedling when the seed germinates; frequently, however, as in pea or bean and their allies, the whole of the nourishment for future use is stored up in the cotyledons themselves, which then become thick and fleshy.
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  • Imported seed germinates without difficulty.
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  • Seed ripens freely, and germinates without any trouble in sunny seaside gardens.
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  • germinates at higher temperatures than fresh seed.
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