Geology sentence example

geology
  • There are museums of mineralogy and geology, a lower school of mining, model room and scientific library.
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  • Little is known of the geology of Uruguay.
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  • Studying geology can help teach us the history of the land.
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  • During this period Elie de Beaumont published many important memoirs on the geology of the country.
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  • As a kid, I loved rocks – I guess it was a sign I would study geology in college.
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  • It is the Tertiary limestones which form the predominant feature in the geology of Cuba.
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  • Geology is one of my favorite sciences.
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  • The most remarkable feature in the geology of Elba is the extent of the granitic and ophiolitic eruptions of the Tertiary period.
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  • Some people find the science of geology to be very boring.
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  • This theory of crust blocks dropped by subsidence is opposed to Lapworth's theory of vast crust-folds, but geology is the science which has to decide between them.
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  • The most striking feature in the geology of Russia is its remarkable freedom from disturbances, either in the form of mountain folding or of igneous intrusions.
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  • She moved here to study the geology of the area.
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  • Thus geology, meteorology, oceanography and anthropology developed into distinct sciences.
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  • The Karroo system (sandstones and marls) covers immense areas (see Africa, § Geology).
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  • The rest of the southern coast west as far as 124° E., with the exception of the southern projection of Eyre Peninsula, which receives from 10 to 20 in., belongs to the 1 The literature of the geology of Australia is enumerated, to 1884, in the bibliography by Etheridge and Jack.
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  • The geology of Italy is mainly dependent upon that of the Apennines (q.v.).
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  • This gives to it unity and definiteness, and renders superfluous the attemps that have been made from time to time to define the limits which divide geography from geology on the one hand and from history on the other.
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  • The territorial divisions and subdivisions often survive the conditions which led to their origin; hence the study of political geography is allied to history as closely as the study of physical geography is allied to geology, and for the same reason.
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  • (b) Geology has also won its battles, and few now try to harmonize it with Genesis.
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  • Draper, Notes on the Geology of South-eastern Africa," Quart.
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  • He then settled for some years as a medical practitioner at Penzance; there geology engaged his particular attention, and he became secretary of the Royal Geological Society of Cornwall.
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  • The series appears to be in line with Geology similar formations at Tripoli in Africa, Cagliari in and Water Sardinia, and to the east of Marseilles.
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  • The origin and subsequent formation of rivers and the valleys along which they flow are considered under Geography, § Principles of Geography, and Geology, § viii.
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  • It has a geological and mineralogical museum and under its supervision is carried on the state geological and natural history survey, the state geologist being head of the department of geology and mineralogy of the university.
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  • In 1845 he issued his Catalogue of British Fossils (2nd ed., 1854), a work of essential service to geology.
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  • In 18J5 he became professor of Geology in University College, London, a post which he held until 1877.
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  • Very little is known of the geology of Siam.
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  • Ransome, Geology and Gold Deposits of the Cripple Creek District, Colorado, with maps (Washington, 5906), being Professional Paper No.
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  • Its geology, flora and fauna are therefore described under Central America.
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  • The anatomical and pathological laboratories of the university are modern, and the museums of geology and mineralogy have been restored.
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  • This principle he endeavoured to deduce from his knowledge of geology, in contrast to Lorenz Oken, who developed the same theory on biological grounds.
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  • Little is known of the geology of Paraguay.
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  • Stefansson's expedition also brought back many observations in anthropology and geology.
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  • The role of geology in influencing coastal or karst geomorphology at a range of scales.
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  • The geology, fauna and flora of Nicaragua may be studied in connexion with those of the neighbouring countries (see Central America).
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  • Every fact in geology proclaims that neither the land, nor the bed of the sea retain for indefinite periods the same level.
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  • Towering red rocks formed into arches are a very notable part of Utah's geology.
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  • Geology: Roller coasters are massive machines, and they must be built on a solid foundation suitable for their structure.
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  • The subject will be treated in its biological aspects, because the relations of palaeontology to historical and stratigraphic geology are more appropriately considered under the article Geology.
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  • I.-First Historic Period The scientific recognition of fossils as connected with the past history of the earth, from Aristotle (384-322 B.C.) to the beginning of the 19th century, in connexion with the rise of comparative anatomy and geology.
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  • It is most interesting to note that William Smith (1769-1839), now known as the " father of historical geology," was born in the same year as Cuvier.
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  • Cuvier (1769-1832) is famous as the founder of vertebrate palaeontology, and with Alexandre Brongniart (1770-1847) as the author of the first exact contribution to stratigraphic geology.
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  • The history of invertebrate palaeontology during the second period is more closely connected with the rise of historic geology and stratigraphy, especially with the settlement of the great and minor time divisions of the earth's history.
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  • We shall pass over here the labours of Adam Sedgwick (1785-1873) and Sir Roderick Murchison (1792-1871) in the Palaeozoic of England, which because of their close relation to stratigraphy more properly concern geology; but must mention the grand contributions of Joachim Barrande (1799-1883), published in his Systeme silurien du centre de la Boheme, the first volume of which appeared in 1852.
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  • A clear narrative of the work of many of the earlier contributors is found in Founders of Geology, by Sir Archibald Geikie (London, 1897-1905).
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  • Ogilvie-Gordon, entitled " History of Geology and Palaeontology to the end of the 19th Century."
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  • The geological formation is principally of volcanic rocks, with schists and tertiary limestone; and an early physical connexion of the islands with New Zealand is indicated by their geology and biology.
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  • The geology, fauna and flora of Guatemala are discussed under Central America.
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  • The explanation of the apparent conformity of the strata from the Cambrian to the Pennsylvanian in some parts of the west, with no fossils defining with certainty any horizon between the Ordovician and the Mississippian, is one of the open problems in the geology of the United States.
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  • Among the more important periodicals are the Bulletin of the Geological Society of America (Rochester, N.Y., 1889 seq.); the American Journal of Science (New Haven, Conn., 1818 seq.); the American Geologist (Minneapolis, i888 seq.); Journal of Geology (Chicago, 1893 seq.); Economic Geology (Lancaster, Pa., 1905 seq.).
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  • The development of the coal and iron interests, and the increasing importance of the gold product of the Appalachian auriferous belt, and also of the lead product of the Mississippi Valley, led to a more general and decided interest in geology and mining; and about 1830 geological surveys of several of the Atlantic states were begun, and more systematic explorations for the ores of the metals, as well as for coal, were carried on over all parts of the country then open to settlement.
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  • The physical geography of Canada is so closely bound up with its geology that at least an outline of the geological factors involved in its history is necessary to understand the present physiography.
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  • In 1855 he was appointed professor of mineralogy and geology at the Polytechnic Institute at Karlsruhe, and he took part in the geological survey of Baden.
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  • From 1863 to 1896 he was professor of mineralogy and geology at the university of Wiirzburg.
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  • In the year 1866 he published a little book about girls, and written for girls, a mixture of morals, theology, economics and geology, under the title of Ethics of the Dust; and this was followed by a more important and popular work, The Crown of Wild Olive.
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  • The geology of the Moluccas is very imperfectly known.
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  • The distinguishing feature of these explorations, led by Russian officers, is their high scientific value and the contributions they have offered to the botany, natural history, geology and meteorology of the regions under investigation in addition to the actual geographical data attained.
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  • In 1850 he became professor of geology and mineralogy in the Royal Polytechnic School ' at Dresden, and in 1857 he was made director of the Royal Mineralogical and Geological Museum;.
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  • In prosecuting the study of this part of British geology it is soon discovered, and it is essential to bear in mind, that, during the Carboniferous period, the land whence the chief supplies of sediment were derived rose mainly to the north and north-west, as it seems to have done from very early geological time.
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  • In the Lower Carboniferous rocks of Scotland intercalated volcanic rocks are strikingly abundant, and now form an important feature in the geology of the southern portion of that country.
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  • The hills on the right bank Geology, of the Tiber culminating in Monte Mario (455 ft.) belong to the first of these, being of the Pliocene formation; they consist of a lower bluish-grey clay and an upper group of yellow sands and gravels.
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  • But the most important technical use of the word is in geology, as introduced by C. Lyell in 1840 in place of " Diluvium."
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  • He was an enthusiastic student in particular of natural history and geology.
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  • Of Scottish descent, he went to Edinburgh to complete his education, and graduated at the university in 1842, having gained a knowledge of geology and natural history from Robert Jameson.
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  • Subsequently he was appointed to the post of superintendent of education (1850-1853); at the same time he entered zealously into the geology of the country, making a special study of the fossil forests of the coal-measures.
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  • From 1855 to 1893 he was professor of geology and principal of M`Gill University, Montreal, an institution which under his influence attained a high reputation.
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  • He was the author of many scientific papers and reports, especially on the surface geology and glacial phenomena of the northern and western parts of Canada.
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  • In the vicinity are the Governor's Mansion, the Supreme Court Building, the State Library, the building of the State Department of Agriculture, housing the State Museum (of geology, mineralogy, agriculture and horticulture, botany, zoology, ethnology, &c.), and the Post Office.
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  • See for geology Carl von Zittel, Beitrage zur Geologie and Palaontologie der libyschen Whste (Cassel, 1883); Reports of the Geological Survey of Egypt (Cairo, 1900, at seq.).
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  • Coral formations on heights in the interior would indicate oscillations of the land in several periods, but a detailed geology of the island is wanting.
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  • His interest in mineralogy led him to study the geology of volcanic regions, and he made frequent visits to the Eifel with a view to the discovery of a theory of volcanic action.
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  • Here you find articles in the encyclopedia about geology.
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  • The laboratory examination may be used in subjects like physics, chemistry, geology, zoology, botany, anatomy, physiology, to test powers of manipulation and knowledge of experimental methods.
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  • Daubeny and others gained their first lessons in geology.
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  • Lastly, under the head of " organic," come geology, botany and animal physiology - presenting the concrete results of these processes in the three kingdoms of nature.
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  • The camel, the horse and the donkey are the draught animals; the flesh of the first Geology and Geography of Arabia Petraea, Palestine and adjoining Districts (London, 1886).
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  • (For geology, and the general consideration of Jutland in connexion with the whole kingdom, see Denmark.) Although in ancient times well wooded, the greater portion of the interior of Jutland consisted for centuries of barren driftsand, which grew nothing but heather; but since 1866, chiefly through the instrumentality of the patriotic Heath association, assisted by annual contributions from the state, a very large proportion of this region has been more or less reclaimed for cultivation.
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  • For geology and mineral resources consult the Reports of the New York State Geologist and the Bulletins of the New York State Museum.
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  • A idler, under the auspices of the Imperial Academy of Sciences of Vienna, visited Sokotra, Abd-el-Kuri and some other islets of the group to investigate their geology and languages.
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  • In 1832 he went to the university of Copenhagen, and shortly afterwards turned his attention to the natural sciences, especially geology.
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  • Most of his writings on geology are in Danish.
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  • The geology of the Himalayas being described elsewhere (see Himalayas), the following account deals only with the IndoGangetic plain and the Peninsula.
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  • No polar expedition had been fitted out with greater care for the purpose of scientific research in meteorology, geology, glaciology and biology.
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  • This is also the case as to geology, and the bearings of geological evidence on the probable nature and extent of the Antarctic continent, and the relations of that land mass to the other continents.
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  • For orography and geology see an article by P. Verri in Boll.
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  • The geology of Korea is very imperfectly known.
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  • On geology, see C. Gottsche, "Geologische Skizze von Korea," Sitz.
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  • One of the striking features in the geology of Arran is the remarkable series of intrusive igneous rocks of Tertiary age which occupy nearly one-half of the area and form the wildest and grandest scenery in the island.
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  • Darton, " Preliminary Description of the Geology and Water Resources of the Southern Half of the Black Hills and adjoining regions in South Dakota and Wyoming," pp. 489-599 of Pt.
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  • Man's place is not even central, as he appears a temporary inhabitant of a minor planet in one of the lesser stellar systems. Every science is involved, and theology has come into conflict with metaphysics, logic, astronomy, physics, chemistry, geology, zoology, biology, history and even economics and medicine.
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  • Christianity is dependent upon the understanding of the universe; hence it is the duty of believers to put it into the new setting, so that it adopts and adapts astronomy, geology, biology and psychology.
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  • The geology of Borneo is very imperfectly known The mountain range which lies between Sarawak and the Dutch possessions, and may be looked upon as the backbone of the island, consists chiefly of crystalline schists, together with slates, sandstones and limestones.
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  • For Geology see Tchihatcheff, Asie Mineure, Geologic (Paris, 1867-1869); Schaffer, Cilicia, Peterm.
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  • Cavendish also had a taste for geology, and made several tours in England for the purpose of gratifying it.
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  • He was a fellow of his college, and was appointed Woodwardian professor of geology in 1762, and in 1767 rector of Thornhill in Yorkshire, where he died on the 29th of April 1793.
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  • He soon showed an inclination towards the study of natural science, devoting himself at first more particularly to geology, and later to botany, thus equipping himself for what was to be the main occupation of his life - the investigation of fossil plants.
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  • For geology, see the section of Le Portugal ....
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  • The Royal Institution of South Wales, founded in 1835, is housed in a handsome building in the Ionic style erected in1838-1839and possesses a museum in which the geology, mineralogy, botany and antiquities of the district are well represented, there being a fine collection of neolithic remains from the Gower Caves and from Merthyr Mawr.
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  • The geology is imperfectly known.
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  • He was educated at Midhurst grammar school and at the Royal College of Science, where he was trained in physics, chemistry, astronomy, geology and biology.
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  • Alexander Winchell, Michigan: Being Condensed Popular Sketches of the Topography, Climate and Geology of the State (1873), is in large measure restricted to the south half of the state.
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  • In the latter year Brocchi sailed for Egypt, in order to explore the geology of that country and report on its mineral resources.
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  • In 1810, at the invitation of the Dublin Society, he gave a course of lectures on electro-chemical science, and in the following year he again lectured in Dublin, on chemistry and geology, receiving large fees at both visits.
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  • The geology of New South Wales has been described in the Monographs, Memoirs and Records of the Geological Survey, which in the fullness and high scientific character form the most valuable contribution to Australasian geology.
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  • Stretching in a semicircle round the broad campus are the library, the medical building, the biology building and museum, the school of practical science, the geology and chemistry buildings and the convocation hall, their architecture varying very greatly, beauty having been sacrificed to more practical considerations; the magnetic observatory is also in the grounds, but is overshadowed by some of the more recent erections.
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  • During this period his leisure time was devoted to a study of the geology and archaeology of the island.
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  • In 1856 he became master of King Edward's grammar school at Lichfield, in 1858 warden and professor of classical literature and geology in Queen's College, Birmingham, in 1862 rector of Mellis, in Suffolk, and in 1867 vicar of St John's, Bethnal Green, London.
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  • The object of this section is to give a physical description of England and Wales according to natural regions, which usually follow the geology of the country very closely; although the relationship of configuration and geology is not so simple or so clearly marked as in Scotland.
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  • Further details of the geology are given under the heads of the counties.
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  • Bancroft, Alaska 1730-1885, pp. 59560 9; and various other bibliographies in titles mentioned below, especially in Brooke's The Geography and Geology of Alaska.
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  • Loewinson-Lessing has an account of the geology of the district along the military road from Vladikavkaz to Tiflis in the Guide des Excursions du VII' Congrks geol.
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  • Sociology and the science of culture are concerned with the origin and development of arts and sciences, opinions, beliefs, customs, laws and institutions generally among mankind within historic time; while beyond the historical limit the study is continued by inferences from relics of early ages and remote districts, to interpret which is the task of pre-historic archaeology and geology.
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  • In both schools, the ancient doctrine of the contemporaneous appearance on earth of all species of animals having been abandoned under the positive evidence of geology, it is admitted that the animal kingdom, past and present, includes a vast series of successive forms, whose appearances and disappearances have taken place at intervals during an immense lapse of ages.
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  • The link by which they are connected is of a higher and immaterial nature; and their connexion is to be sought in the view of the Creator himself, whose aim in forming the earth, in allowing it to undergo the successive changes which geology has pointed out, and in creating successively all the different types of animals which have passed away, was to introduce man upon the surface of our globe.
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  • Geology has made it manifest that our earth must have been the seat of vegetable and animal life for an immense period of time; while the first appearance of man, though comparatively recent, is positively so remote, that an estimate between twenty and a hundred thousand years may fairly be taken as a minimum.
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  • Blanford in 1870 the geology has received little attention from travellers.
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  • Blanford, Observations on the Geology and Zoology of Abyssinia (London, 1870); C. Futterer, "Beitrage zur Kenntniss des Jura in Ost-Afrika," Zeit.
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  • In 1865 he was appointed professor of geology and palaeontology in the Berlin University, where he was eminently successful as a teacher; and when the Prussian Geological Survey was instituted in 1873 he was appointed co-director with Wilhelm Hauchecorne (1828-1900).
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  • The geology of Colombia is very imperfectly known, and it is only by a comparison with the neighbouring regions that it is possible to fmrm any clear idea of the geological structure and succession.
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  • For resources, industries, &c., consult the Reports of the Chief of the Bureau of Statistics of Indiana (biennial, Indianapolis, 1886 to date), Annual Report of the Department of Geology and Natural Resources (Indianapolis, 1869 to date), and Reports of the State Agricultural Society.
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  • In geology, a fold is a bend or curvature in the stratified rocks of the earth's crust, whereby they have been made to take up less horizontal space.
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  • In 1847 he became professor of zoology at Giessen, and in 1852 professor of geology and afterwards also of zoology at Geneva, where he died on the 5th of May 1895.
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  • Proceeding afterwards to Emmanuel College, Cambridge, he came under the spell of Sedgwick, and henceforth devoted all his leisure time to geology.
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  • For physical description and natural resources see the Reports (biennial) and the Bulletins (Madison) of the Wisconsin Geological and Natural History Survey, especially important for economic geology, hydrography and agriculture, and the Annual Reports of the Wisconsin State Board of Agriculture; the Reports (biennial) of the State Forester, the Reports of the U.S. Census, and the Mineral Resources of the United States, published annually by the U.S. Geological Survey.
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  • About 1833, through meeting Sedgwick at Barmouth and joining him in several excursions, he became intensely interested in geology.
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  • Thereafter, in papers published by the Cambridge Philosophical Society and the Geological Society of London, he entered largely into mathematical inquiries connected with geology, dealing with the effects which an elevatory force acting from below would produce on a portion of the earth's crust, in fissures, faults, &c. In this way he discussed the elevation and denudation of the Lake district, the Wealden area, and the Bas Boulonnais.
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  • In 1807 he became assistant keeper, and in 1813 he was appointed keeper, of the department of natural history in the British Museum, and afterwards of geology and mineralogy, retaining the post until the close of his life.
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  • In geography and geology porvaldr Thoroddsen has acquired a European fame for his researches and travels in Iceland, especially in the rarely-visited interior.
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  • - See the Biennial Reports (Guthrie, 1904 sqq.) of the Oklahoma Department of Geology and Natural History; the Oklahoma Geological Survey, Bulletin No.
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  • Gould, Geology and Water Resources of Oklahoma (Washington, 1905), being Water Supply and Irrigation Paper, No.
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  • He was appointed professor of geology and palaeontology in Owens College, Manchester, in 1874.
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  • The two most important points of contrast between the geology of Ireland and that of England are, firstly, the great exposure of `Carboniferous rocks in Ireland, Mesozoic strata being almost absent; and, secondly, the presence of volcanic rocks in place of the marine Eocene of England.
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  • The effect of the structure of these folds on the courses of rivers in the south of Ireland is discussed in the paragraphs dealing with the geology of county Cork.
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  • From Permian times onward, in fact, the Irish area lay on the western margin of the seas that played so large a part in determining the geology of Europe.
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  • Many others exist in other parts of the island (see § Geology).
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  • It must be remembered that the geology of Madagascar is still only known in its broad features.'
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  • The chief mining districts have been already indicated (see under Geology).
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  • Geology In shape and general geological structure Africa bears a close resemblance to India.
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  • Other uses, more or less technical, of the word are, in leather-dressing, for the whole untrimmed hide; in mining and geology, for the "outcrop" or appearance at the surface of a vein or stratum and, particularly in tin mining, of the best part of the ore produced after dressing.
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  • Condra, Geology and Water Resources of the Republican River Valley and Adjacent Areas (Washington, 1907), being Water Supply and Irrigation Paper No.
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  • As with the geology and the flora, certain phases of the fauna of the islands have been extensively reported.
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  • In the latter year he was appointed to the chair of chemistry, mineralogy and geology in the university of North Carolina.
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  • Johnston's Systematic Account of the Geology of Tasmania, which gives a bibliography up to that date.
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  • The American Tertiary flora is so large, and the geology of the deposits is so intricate, that it is out of the question to discuss them more fully within the limits of this article.
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  • This location is superb for its geology but also for its cretaceous ammonites and other fossils.
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  • My major is in forensic anthropology with a minor in Geology.
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  • During the second week, students are based on Praslin, where they study aspects of geology, marine biodiversity and ecotourism.
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  • In geology, the cement of breccias and conglomerates is usually silica, iron oxides or calcite (mineral calcium carbonate ).
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  • GeoRef is the most comprehensive database on geology and geophysics and also includes cosmogony.
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  • A trail map that explores the dale 's geology.
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  • The drift geology map for the LCA also highlights the extensive alluvial deposits associated with the present-day floodplain of the lagan.
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  • This series contains the great whin sill, an intrusive quartz dolerite, which is one of the interesting features of local geology.
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  • On the narrow plateau areas the geology is plateau and river-terrace drift.
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  • To prepare a graduate geologist and, or, engineer for professional practice in engineering geology and, or, geotechnical engineering.
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  • There follows a description of the psychometric powers of the wife of a professor of geology, who possessed the faculty in marked degree.
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  • At school he was taught geology by Dr. Mabel Tomlinson, a great amateur geologist.
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  • The range of rock types examined will reflect the geology of the region.
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  • In some cases students obtain an industrial placement and work on a technical project relevant to applied geology.
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  • The book vividly describes the geology of Essex from the deeply buried Paleozoic rocks to the soft sands and clays of the Ice Age.
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  • This survey provides insights into the local variability of the surficial geology that cannot be obtained from the regional studies.
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  • The underlying geology is volcanic lava flows, which outcrop in some areas.
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  • The site contains links to other educational materials relating to glacial geology and geomorphology, and related links.
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  • Physical properties provide critical interpretive links between geophysical measurements and evaluation of subsurface geology and state conditions.
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  • I am a lecturer in structural geology at Glasgow University.
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  • The distribution of this element in stream sediments is controlled by the underlying bedrock geology.
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  • The Journal of petroleum Science and Engineering covers the fields of petroleum geology, exploration, and engineering in its broadest possible sense.
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  • Along the northwestern margin of the LCA, the drift geology map also shows a limited expanse of glaciofluvial deposits.
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  • Malham Tarn is a natural lake, internationally important for its rare lime-rich waters which are a result of the local limestone geology.
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  • Students will gain an appreciation of the role of engineering geology in the development of the built environment.
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  • Having gained a degree in geology at Durham in 1958, Walter Holmes moved to Imperial College, London to study geophysics.
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  • The School is fully committed to mainstream geology (with emphasis on the applied aspects) in addition to the marine geosciences.
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  • The drift geology map also highlights spreads of alluvial deposits associated with the floodplains of the rivers that form the headwaters of the Lagan.
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  • To show that an understanding of ground behavior comes from a combined knowledge of soil and rock mechanics, engineering geology and groundwater hydraulics.
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  • The underlying geology is a gray shaly metamorphosed limestone, perhaps turbidite, interbedded with sandstone; sands and gravels fill the valleys.
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  • The geology of much of the western half of Leicestershire is dominated by the red mudstones of the Triassic aged Mercia Mudstone Group.
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  • The solid, mainly chalk geology of the Yorkshire Wolds is the most northerly outcrop of chalk in Britain.
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  • Students studying structural geology in one term and metamorphic petrology in the next are able to synthesize information they obtain from both courses.
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  • The geology map shows the Arley seam outcropping all along this ridge, which would be very attractive to early prospectors.
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  • The Geology Gallery has the best display of Jurassic marine reptiles in Britain, outside of London.
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  • They result from topography and geology, following the chalk scarp and the river valleys.
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  • Solid Geology The bulk of the basement rock on either side of Loch Ness is classified as metamorphic, mostly schists.
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  • Another third comprise a development of geological skills including sedimentology, structural geology and plate tectonics.
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  • The glossary contains a broad collection of terms that cover most aspects of earthquake phenomena including seismology, geophysics and structural geology.
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  • These two micas can be readily obtained for a nominal sum from geology suppliers.
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  • The Underground Cities of Cappadocia: Turkish region whose geology - soft volcanic tuffs - favored carved underground dwellings.
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  • He gave a detailed report on the geology and soil types of the Link Road.
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  • A foundation that was firmly underpinned by its geology collections.
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  • Wildlife and geology = biodiversity Teignbridge has a wonderful wealth of wildlife and surprisingly varied geology.
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  • The geology of the earth actually is a beautiful mosaic of rock formations that confirm the historical veracity of Noah's Flood.
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  • Hence the general stratigraphical geology can be most conveniently summarized for each state separately, dealing here with the geological history of Australia as a whole.
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  • The rest of the southern coast west as far as 124° E., with the exception of the southern projection of Eyre Peninsula, which receives from 10 to 20 in., belongs to the 1 The literature of the geology of Australia is enumerated, to 1884, in the bibliography by Etheridge and Jack.
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  • We must content ourselves by referring to the progress of physical (including chemical) theory, which has led to the great generalization of the conservation of energy; to the discovery of the fundamental chemical identity of the matter of our planet and of other celestial bodies, and of the chemical relations of organic and inorganic bodies; to the advance of astronomical speculation respecting the origin of the solar system, &c.; to the growth of the science of geology which has necessitated the conception of vast and unimaginable periods of time in the past history of our globe, and to the rapid march of the biological sciences which has made us familiar with the simplest types and elements of organism; finally, to the development of the science of anthropology (including comparative psychology, philology, &c.), and to the vast extension and improvement of all branches of historical study.
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  • Geography is a synthetic science, dependent for the data with which it deals on the results of specialized sciences such as astronomy, geology, oceanography, meteorology, biology and anthropology, as well as on topographical description.
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  • The science of geography, passed on from antiquity by Ptolemy, re-established by Varenius and Newton, and systematized by Kant, included within itself definite aspects of all those terrestrial phenomena which are now treated exhaustively under the heads of geology, meteorology, oceanography and anthropology; and the inclusion of the requisite portions of the perfected results of these sciences in geography is simply the gathering in of fruit matured from the seed scattered by geography itself.
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  • It occupies a campus of iio acres, has an adjoining farm of 325 acres, and 18 buildings devoted to instruction, 2 dormitories, and a library containing (1906) 67,709 volumes, besides excellent museums of geology, zoology, botany and archaeology and history, the last being owned jointly by the university and by the state archaeological and historical society.
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  • Geology.-Little is known of the geology of Uruguay.
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  • The results of his observations were embodied in his Treatise on Primary Geology (1834), a work of considerable merit in regard to the older crystalline and igneous rocks and the subject of mineral veins.
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  • The science of geology came into existence, and the whole panorama of successive stages of the earth's history, each with its distinct population of strange animals and plants, unlike those of the present day and simpler in proportion as they recede into the past, was revealed by Cuvier, Agassiz and others.
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  • The geological structure of the country is comparatively simple, consisting in the main of plateaus formed of sedimentary rocks, resting on a platform of granitic and metamorphic rocks (see Natal: Geology).
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  • These are the three physiographic provinces of the state (see also United States, section Geology, ad fin., for details of structure).
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  • The glacial geology, with a summary of the literature thereon, is described by the same writer in the Quarterly Journal of the Geological Society, 1904, vol.
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  • The doctrine of Uniformitarianism, as propounded by Lyell, served to establish geology on a firmer and more rational basis than it had previously possessed; but latterly the tendency has been to modify the Lyellian view by an admission of the probability of a more intense action of groups of forces at certain stages of the earth's history.
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  • Be able to find your way through the modern literature jungle in the field of sedimentary geology.
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  • It is a strategy to produce standard systematic models of the subsurface geology for Britain.
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  • The contribution of effective dose from terrestrial gamma radiation and from airborne radon and thoron daughter products depends on the local geology.
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  • The drift geology map for this LCA shows a landscape that is largely underlain by Late Midlandian till.
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  • Topsoil depth can depend on many things, from underlying geology to what the ground is used for.
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  • The geology of the earth actually is a beautiful mosaic of rock formations that confirm the historical veracity of Noah 's Flood.
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  • You can customize a map from all kinds of data like election results, geology, crime, and economy, to name a few.
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  • Among the specific courses offered are options in botany, finite math, calculus, astronomy, geology, classics, and political science.
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  • With the appropriate soil, geology, climate, and water supply, a dedicated farmer can harvest this perennial crop for well over a hundred years.
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  • Understanding regional geology can help create that firm foundation.
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  • While not "real" as in formed through geology, these stones are far less expensive and just as beautiful as natural diamonds.
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  • Other brilliant gems from the park have been mounted in luxurious jewelry, presented as gifts to governors and presidents, and have become display pieces around the state to exhibit the unusual geology of Arkansas.
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  • Are the spirits of former patients watching from the shadows as Ohio University geology professors go quietly about their work in the newly converted offices of the former Ridges?
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  • The first president of the institution (from 1873 to 1881) was the distinguished geologist, Edward Orton (1829-1899), who was professor of geology from 1873 to 1899.
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  • Geology unknown or unexplored shown thus Jurassic Trias & Permo-Trial r 'i ' Quaternary :.
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  • When Leland Stanford, Jr., University was opened in 1891 he entered with the first class and specialized in geology and engineering, supporting himself by working at various jobs in free hours.
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  • Among institutions there are a specially fine public library, museums of geology and natural history and antiquities, mining and science schools, the West Cornwall Infirmary and a meteorological station.
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  • See Sir Joseph Prestwich, Geology (1888); Sir John Evans, Ancient Stone Implements of Great Britain, p. 512; Report on the Cave, Phil.
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  • This formation, one of the most widely spread in polar lands, though the most local in Greenland, is also the best known feature in its geology.
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  • In 1823 he was selected along with Dufrenoy by Brochant de Villiers, the professor of geology in the Ecole des Mines, to accompany him on a scientific tour to England and Scotland, in order to inspect the mining and metallurgical establishments of the country, and to study the principles on which Greenough's geological map of England (1820) had been prepared, with a view to the construction of a similar map of France.
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  • In 1835 he was appointed professor of geology at the Ecole des Mines, in succession to Brochant de Villiers, whose assistant he had been in the duties of the chair since 1827.
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  • Having attended at the Ecole des Mines in Paris, he assisted Elie de Beaumont in the chair of geology at the College de France from 1855 until he succeeded him in 1874.
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  • The geology is still very imperfectly known.
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  • The principal contributors to the " Transactions " of this section of the academy were--for anatomy and physiology, Coloman Balogh, Eugene Jendrassik, Joseph Lenhossek and Lewis Thanhoffer; for zoology, John Frivaldszky, John Kriesch and Theodore Margo; for botany, Frederick Hazslinszky, Lewis Juranyi and Julius Klein; for mineralogy and geology, Joseph Szabo, Max Hantken, Joseph Krenner, Anthony Koch and Charles Hoffman; for physics, Baron Lorando Eotviis, Coloman Szily and Joseph Sztoczek; for chemistry, Charles Than and Vincent Wartha; for meteorology, Guido Schenzl.
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  • The he Board of Education directly administers the following educational institutions - the Victoria and Albert Museum, South Kensington, with its branch at Bethnal Green, from both of which objects are lent to various institutions for educational purposes; the Royal College of Science, South Kensington, with which is incorporated the Royal School of Mines; the Geological Survey of the United Kingdom and the Museum of Practical Geology, Jermyn Street; the Solar Physics Observatory, South Kensington; and the Royal College of Art, South Kensington.
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  • Other museums are Sir John Soane's collection in Lincoln's Inn Fields and the Museum of Practical Geology in Jermyn Street, while the scientific societies have libraries and in some cases collections of a specialized character, such as the museums of the Royal College of Surgeons, the Royal Architectural Society, and the Society of Art and the Parkes Museum of the Sanitar y Institute.
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  • A student of mining must receive thorough instruction in geology; he must study mining as practised in different countries, and the metallurgical and mechanical treatment of minerals; and he should have an engineering education, especially on mechanical and electrical lines.
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  • These miners' schools (Bergschule, ecoles des mineurs) give elementary instruction in chemistry, physics, mechanics, mineralogy, geology and mathematics and drawing, as well as in such details of the art of mining as will best supplement the practical information already acquired in underground work.
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  • He afterwards made many journeys through the ancient Campania to illustrate its geology, and published in 1798 his Topografia fisica della Campania, which contains the results of much accurate observation.
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  • New Caledonia is part of the Australasian Festoon, and in its general characters resembles the geology of New Zealand.
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  • 1 The basis of knowledge of the geology of New Caledonia was laid by Garnier, Ann.
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  • Forbes was also interested in geology, and published memoirs on the thermal springs of the Pyrenees, on the extinct volcanoes of the Vivarais (Ardeche), on the geology of the Cuchullin and Eildon hills, &c. In addition to about 150 scientific papers, he wrote Travels through the Alps of Savoy and Other Parts of the Pennine Chain, with Observations on the Phenomena of Glaciers (1843); Norway and its Glaciers (1853); Occasional Papers on the Theory of Glaciers (1859); A Tour of Mont Blanc and Monte Rosa (1855).
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  • In 1837 he visited the United States, and acquired there the materials for papers on the thermal springs and the geology of North America, read in 1838 before the Ashmolean Society and the British Association.
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  • Geology.'--The Eastern Cordillera., which, however, is but little known, appears to consist, as in Bolivia, chiefly of Palaeozoic rocks; the western ranges of the Andes are formed of Mesozoic beds, together with recent volcanic lavas and ashes; and the lower hills near the coast are composed of granite, syenite and other crystalline rocks, sometimes accompanied by limestones and sandstones, which are probably of Lower Cretaceous age, and often covered by marine Tertiary deposits.
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  • Shaler, Geology of Nantucket (Washington, 1889), being U.S. Geological Survey Bulletin, No.
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  • This authority sums up the geology of Japan briefly and succinctly as follows (in Things Japanese, by Professor Chamberlain): The backbone of the country consists of primitive gneiss and schists.
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  • He dealt also with the geology and mineralogy of New Brunswick and Prince Edward's Island.
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  • Devoting himself to the economic side of geology in various parts of North America, he was enabled to bring out in 1861 A Practical Treatise on Coal, Petroleum and other Distilled Oils.
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  • The formation is noted for its regularity as regards both the thickness and the gold-tenor of the ore-bearing reefs, in which respect it is unparalleled in the geology of the auriferous formations.
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  • (For geological details, see United States, section Geology, ad fin.) Flora and Fauna.
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  • The geology of the rest of New Guinea is imperfectly known.
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  • The time question is one of geology.
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  • The question is one of geology, simply to decide whether those recovered at Trenton are ancient.
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  • At, the head of the scientific institutions of Haarlem may be placed the Dutch Society of Sciences (Hollandsche Maatschappij van Wetenschappen), founded in 1752, which possesses valuable collections in botany, natural history and geology.
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  • He also wrote essays and prepared maps on the geology of Seine et Marne and Seine et Oise for the Geological Survey of France (1844).
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  • Fullest information about the geology of New Zealand is given in the Reports of Geological Explorations issued by the Geological Survey of New Zealand, and the Annual Reports of the mines department.
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  • America, he made observations on the geology, published by the Geological Society in 1860.
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  • C. Sorby; and he became one of the pioneers of this branch of geology, preparing his own rock-sections with remarkable skill.
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  • In 1800 he was appointed professor of geology at Coimbra, and soon after inspector-general of the Portuguese mines; and in 1812 he was made perpetual secretary of the Academy of Lisbon.
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  • Fordescriptionsof physical featuresand accounts of natural resources see Reports of the Kentucky Geological Survey, the Biennial Reports of the Bureau of Agriculture, Labor and Statistics, the Reports of the United States Census and various publications of the U.S. Geological Survey, and other publications listed in Bulletin 301 (Bibliography and Index of North American Geology for 1901-1905) and other bibliographies of the Survey.
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  • Palaeontology both borrows from and sheds light upon geology and other branches of the physical history of the earth, each of which, such as palaeogeography or palaeometeorology, is the more fascinating because of the large element of the unknown, the need for constructive imagination, the appeal to other branches of biological and physical investigation for supplementary evidence, and the necessity of constant comparison with the present aspects of nature.
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  • Progress in the science also depends upon the pursuit of palaeontology as zoology and not as geology, because it was a mere accident of birth which connected palaeontology so closely with geology.
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  • This includes modules in structural geology and exploration geophysics, and classes in geophysical topics such as signal processing.
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  • The new movement began actively ology of with James Hutton in the later years of the 18th century, and was forwarded by the studies of William Smith in England and of Cuvier in France; but the really efficient champion of the conception that the earth is very old was Sir Charles Lyell, who published the first edition of his epoch-making Principles of Geology only a few years before Queen Victoria came to the throne.
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  • (d) Irrigation, agriculture, geology, &c.: Despatch from Sir Evelyn Baring enclosing Report on the Condition of the Agricultural Population in Egypt (1888); Notes on Egyptian Crops (Cairo, 1896); Yaculi Artin Bey, La P,opriiti foncihre en Egypte (Bulak, 1885); Report on Perennial Irrigation and Flood Protection for Egypt, I vol.
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  • The natural history of Sokotra, unravelled by the study of its geology and biology, has been summarized by Professor Balfour as follows: "During the Carboniferous epoch there was in the region of Sokotra a shallow sea, in which was deposited, on the top of the fundamental gneisses of this spot, ...
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  • The maps of the Ordnance, Geological and Hydrographic Surveys delineate the configuration and geology of England and the adjacent seas with a completeness unsurpassed in any other country.
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  • The geology of New Mexico is fascinating.
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  • E Arabian Sea Ba Of G A L e Geological information incomplete Desert Deposits Quaternary Tertiary Mesozoic Palaeozoic Archaean and Metamorphic Younger Volcanic Rocks English Miles b iuHi iiiiuiiiiii after llargl,aua Geology The geology of Asia is so complex and over wide areas so little known that it is difficult to give a connected account of either the structure or the development of the continent, and only the broader features can be dealt with here.
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  • The geology of our campsite made it difficult to set up the tent.
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