Genius sentence example

genius
  • No man ever followed his genius till it misled him.
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  • "Apparently, I'm not the medical genius people believe me to be," he added.
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  • Anatole is no genius, but he is an honest, goodhearted lad; an excellent son or kinsman.
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  • "Chance created the situation; genius utilized it," says history.
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  • It is spending the sweat of its laborers, the genius of its scientists, the houses of its children ...
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  • That a cultured medical genius found her inspiring was beyond flattering.
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  • I'm sorry if I seem in awe but might you tell me how you came to so genius a conclusion?
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  • This work was one of the most splendid monuments ever raised by the genius of a single individual.
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  • Napoleon, the man of genius, did this!
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  • Her confessor lent her the Genius of Christianity, and to this book she ascribes the first change in her religious views.
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  • But "genius" and "originality" are words we should not use lightly.
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  • But he was certainly not a man of genius, as has long been imagined, and his success was chiefly due to the support of the papacy; once his father was dead his career was at an end, and he could no longer play a prominent part in Italian affairs.
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  • It is true that a teacher with ten times Miss Sullivan's genius could not have made a pupil so remarkable as Helen Keller out of a child born dull and mentally deficient.
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  • He is generosity, mercy, justice, order, genius--that's what the Emperor is!
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  • Unlike Chinese art it has a genius for architecture and sculpture rather than painting.
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  • But somehow, I should prefer to see the originals in the place where Genius meant them to remain, not only as a hymn of praise to the gods, but also as a monument of the glory of Greece.
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  • It is doubtful whether even the genius of Valdemar would have proved equal to such a stupendous task.
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  • His essentially bold and practical genius sought at once the stormy political arena.
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  • He had inherited the military genius of his uncle, and his victories astonished contemporary Europe.
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  • Follow your genius closely enough, and it will not fail to show you a fresh prospect every hour.
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  • But those works of his which have come down to us show few traces of unusual ability; and the laudation of him as a universal genius by Sir Thomas Urquhart and Aldus Manutius requires to be discounted.
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  • It must be admitted that, in pursuance of his "system," Gertz displayed a genius for diplomacy which would have done honour to a Metternich or a Talleyrand.
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  • The spirit of syncretism manifests itself in this department of animism too; the immanent spirit of the earlier period becomes the presiding genius or local god of later times, and with the rise of the doctrine of separable souls we again reach the confines of animism pure and simple.
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  • With one of his pupils in particular, Theophrastus, who was born about 370 and therefore was some fifteen years younger than himself, he had a long and intimate connexion; and the work of the pupil bears so close a resemblance to that of his master, that, even when he questions Aristotle's opinions (as he often does), he seems to be writing in an Aristotelian atmosphere; while he shows the same acuteness in raising difficulties, and has caught something of the same encyclopaedic genius.
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  • The Romanesque churches, still reminiscent of antique models, had preserved all the simplicity of the ancient basilicas with much more than their grandeur; but the taste for religious symbolism which culminated in the 13th century, and the imaginative genius of the northern peoples, transformed them into the marvellous dreams in stone of the " Gothic " period.
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  • The noticeable barrenness of Italian literature at this period is referable to the fact that men of genius and talent devoted themselves to erudition and struggled to express their thoughts and feelings in a speech which was not natural.
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  • Some of his speeches in Great Britain, coming as they did from a French-Canadian, and revealing delicate appreciation of British sentiment and thorough comprehension of the genius of British institutions, excited great interest and enthusiasm, while one or two impassioned speeches in the Canadian parliament during the Boer war profoundly influenced opinion in Canada and had a pronounced effect throughout the empire.
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  • Remains of fine villas have been found about half a mile to the east of the modern town, and also the remains of a temple to the genius of Stabiae, which no doubt occupied the same site as it had done in Oscan times.
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  • He passed from the school at Kilkenny to Trinity College, Dublin (1700), where, owing to the peculiar subtlety of his mind and his determination to accept no doctrine on the evidence of authority or convention, he left the beaten track of study and was regarded by some as a dunce, by others as a genius.
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  • Only a statesman of genius could have mediated for twenty years, as he did, between the church and the schismatics without alienating the sympathies of either.
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  • Blacklock was among the first friends of Burns in Edinburgh, being one of the earliest to recognize his genius.
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  • He was regarded by his parents, and seems to have regarded himself, as a genius.
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  • By the young bloods of the "House" he was treated pleasantly as a raw outsider of genius.
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  • In 1838 (he was then nineteen) Mr Loudon wrote to the father, "Your son is the greatest natural genius that ever it has been my fortune to become acquainted with."
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  • But in our own age conscious statecraft is also at work, as in Canada, where the genius of statesmen is gradually endowing that dominion with all the attributes of independence and power.
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  • Realizing the superiority of European methods of warfare, he availed himself of the services of a Savoyard soldier of fortune, Benoit de Boigne, whose genius for military organization and command in the field was mainly instrumental in establishing the Mahratta power.
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  • Krochmal, under Hegelian influences, regarded the nationality of Israel as consisting in its religious genius, its spiritual gifts.
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  • Although reared as an ordinary farm lad, he proved to be a man of singular devotion and spiritual genius.
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  • From 1882 till 1887 his prime minister was Walter Murray Gibson (1823-1888), a singular and romantic genius, a visionary adventurer and a shrewd politician, who had been imprisoned by the Dutch government in Batavia in 1852 on a charge of inciting insurrection in Sumatra, and had arrived at Honolulu in 1861 with the intention of leading a Mormon colony to the East Indies.
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  • These great improvements, due to the genius of Galileo, of Bacon, of Descartes, are the fresh beginnings of modern thought, from which we dare not turn back without falling into obscurantism.
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  • He had not the genius to find a way out of the French entanglement or the skill to steer a constitutional monarchy between rival factions.
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  • Smith, writing in the Philosophical Transactions for 1683-1684, says of the Turks (p. 439), "They have no genius for Seavoyages, and consequently are very raw and unexperienced in the art of Navigation, scarce venturing to sail out of sight of land.
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  • The famines of the 'forties, with their subsequent political and economic difficulties, transferred to America millions of the Irish, whose genius for organization in politics has not fallen short of their zeal for religion.
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  • This I knew him to be before I had seen him; but the rare excellence of that divine genius no one can sufficiently feel who does not see his face, and hear him speak.
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  • But except for this single instance of oversight or perversity her defence was throughout a masterpiece of indomitable ingenuity, of delicate and steadfast courage, of womanly dignity and genius.
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  • He was, perhaps, the most universal genius of his age, and is said to have written upwards of a hundred different works, the chief part of which have remained unpublished.
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  • At the same time he marked the immutable conditions to which even genius must submit if it is to succeed in its appeal to our sympathies.
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  • He and Spinola found themselves once more at the head of the armies in the field, but the health of the stadholder was undermined, and his military genius was under a cloud.
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  • But William's military genius never shone so brightly as in the hour of defeat; he never knew what it was to be beaten, and in 1695 his recapture of Namur was a real triumph of skill and resolution.
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  • His principal works are, The Rise and Progress of Religion in the Soul (1745), which best illustrates his religious genius, and has been widely translated; The Family Expositor (6 vols., 1739-1756), Life of Colonel Gardiner (1747); and a Course of Lectures on Pneumatology, Ethics and Divinity (1763).
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  • The increased cost of government and the growing wealth of the middle class, rather than the avarice of the king and the genius of his ministers, were responsible for the genesis and direction of the new order.
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  • What were then called reports were rather appeals to the passions; in Saint-Just's hands they furnished the occasion for a display of fanatical daring, of gloomy eloquence, and of undoubted genius; and - with the shadow of Robespierre behind him - they served their turn.
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  • Like Flood, with whom he was on terms of friendship, he cultivated his natural genius for eloquence by study of good models, including Bolingbroke and Junius.
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  • Spirit of Swift, spirit of Molyneux, your genius has prevailed!
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  • Whether we look at his pure mathematical or at his physical researches we receive the same impression of Pascal; we see the strongest marks of a great original genius creating new ideas, and seizing upon, mastering, and pursuing farther everything that was fresh and unfamiliar in his time.
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  • The East India Company's great work, the Ganges canal, constructed between 1840 and 18J4 before there was a mile of railway open in India, still holds its place unsurpassed among later irrigation work for boldness of design and completeness of execution, a lasting monument to the genius of Sir Proby Cautley, an officer of the Bengal Artillery, but a born engineer.
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  • In the Madras presidency and in Mysore irrigation has long assumed a great importance, and the engineering works of the three great deltas of the Godavari, Kistna and Cauvery, the outcome of the genius and indefatigable enthusiasm of Sir Arthur Cotton, have always been quoted as showing what a boon irrigation is to a country.
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  • Laud was a prodigy of parts and learning over whose tomb Art and Genius still continued to weep. Hampden deserved no more honourable name than that of the "zealot of rebellion."
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  • It ought to be remembered, to the honour of Pope, that he joined heartily in the applause with which the appearance of a rival genius was welcomed.
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  • Warburton pronounced him a man of parts and genius; and the praise of Warburton was then no light thing.
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  • Many people had been surprised to see a man of his genius and learning stooping to every drudgery, and denying himself almost every comfort, for the purpose of supplying a silly, affected old woman with superfluities, which she accepted with but little gratitude.
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  • Julius was undoubtedly in energy and genius one of the greatest popes since Innocent III., and it is a misfortune of the Church that his temporal policy eclipsed his spiritual office.
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  • The secret of Fredericks great popularity was partly the national pride excited by his foreign achievements, partly the ascendance over other minds which his genius gave him, and partly the conviction that while he would forego nmrne of his rights he would demand from his vassals nothing more than was sanctioned by the laws of the Empire.
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  • This being thoroughly established it would have been hard, perhaps impossible, even for a sovereign of the greatest genius, to reassert in anything like its full extent the royal authority.
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  • Napoleon Bonaparte, to whose genius the triumph of France was mainly due, began separate negotiations with the states of the Empire at Rastadt; but, before terms could be agreed upon, war again began in 1799, Austria acting on this occasion as the ally of Great Britain and Russia.
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  • The word is also used for a man's evil genius, which drives him to sin without any provocation; a man so driven is sometimes called Alastor.
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  • It was at this very period - the close of the 15th and commencement of the 16th century - that the genius and daring of a Genoese mariner, Christopher Columbus, gave to Spain that new world, which might have become the possession of his native state, had Genoa been able to supply him with the ships and seamen which he so earnestly entreated her to furnish.
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  • The most remarkable of these was Percy Bysshe Shelley, who in the glowing dawn of his genius turned to Godwin as his teacher and guide.
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  • His time marks the growth of a new form of local Sicilian genius.
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  • His "more stately genius," as Mr John Morley calls it, was already making him the undisputed master of the feelings of his audiences.
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  • Lundy was then publishing in Baltimore a small monthly paper, entitled The Genius of Universal Emancipation, and he resolved to go to Bennington and invite Garrison to join him in the editorship. With this object in view he walked from Boston to Bennington, through the frost and snow of a New England winter, a distance of 125 m.
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  • In pursuance of this plan he went to Baltimore in the autumn of 1829, and thenceforth the Genius was published weekly, under the joint editorship of the two men.
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  • The Genius, now that it had become a vehicle for this dangerous doctrine, was a paper to be feared and intensely hated.
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  • In his private life Ranjit Singh was selfish, avaricious, drunken and immoral, but he had a genius for command and was the only man the Sikhs ever produced strong enough to bind them together.
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  • His military genius showed itself not so much in actual generalship as in the organization of his plans, the selection of his generals and his ministers, the tenacity of his purpose and the soundness of his judgment.
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  • In the earliest existing monument of the Hellenic genius, the Homeric poems, one may already observe that regulative sense of form and proportion, which shaped the later achievements of the race in the intellectual and artistic spheres.
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  • In Athens the Hellenic genius was focussed, its tendencies drawn together and combined; nor was it a circumstance of small moment that the Attic dialect attained, for prose, a classical authority; for if Hellenism was to be propagated in the world at large, it was obviously convenient that it should have some one definite form of speech to be its medium.
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  • His genius so raised the fame of the university of Leiden, especially as a school of medicine, that it became a resort of strangers from every part of Europe.
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  • Although the whole conception of the work implies that confusion of the provinces of poetry and history which was perpetuated by later writers, and especially by Lucan and Silius Italicus, yet it was a true instinct of genius to discern in the idea of the national destiny the only possible motive of a Roman epic. The execution of the poem (to judge from the fragments, amounting to about six hundred lines), although rough, unequal and often prosaic, seems to have combined the realistic fidelity and freshness of feeling of a contemporary chronicle with the vivifying and idealizing power of genius.
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  • Men of genius were not wanting in the long history of Egypt; two doctors, Imhotp (Imuthes), the architect of Zoser, in the, Ilird Dynasty, and Amenophis (Amenhotp), son of Hap, the wise scribe under Amenophis III.
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  • His original verse tends chiefly to show that with all his sarcastic and cynical wit his genius had also its tender, serious and sentimental side.
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  • Count Auersperg's first publication, a collection of lyrics, Bleitter der Liebe (1830), showed little originality; but his second production, Der letzte Ritter (1830), brought his genius to light.
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  • Something of course must be allowed for the superior and altogether extraordinary genius of the great princes of the house of Vasa; yet the causes of the decline of Denmark lay far deeper than this.
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  • Both these men held high posts in the church, one being bishop of Fiinen and the other of Ribe; but Brorson was much inferior to Kingo in genius.
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  • The number of writers of some talent was very great, but genius was wanting.
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  • On the threshold of the romantic movement occurs the name of Jens Baggesen (q.v.; 1764-1826), a man of great genius, whose work was entirely independent of the influences around him.
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  • The retirement of Ohlenschlfiger comparatively early in life, left the way open for the development of his younger contemporaries, among whom several had genius little inferior to his own.
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  • His real genius, however, did not lie in the direction of verse; and his first signal success was with a story, A Village Sexton's Diary, in 1824, which was rapidly followed by other tales, descriptive of village life in Jutland, for the next twelve years.
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  • He possessed, however, a strong and fluent genius, which eventually made itself heard in a multitude of volumes, poems, dramas and novels.
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  • A learned philosophical writer, not to be compared, however, for genius or originality to Kierkegaard, was Frederik Christian Sibbern (1785-1872).
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  • He acknowledged the genius of the astronomer, and had not approved of the action of the Inquisition in 1616; but subsequently, believing himself to have been caricatured in the Dialogo, he permitted the Inquisition to have its way and to compel an abjuration (1633).
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  • Schepss showed that many of the additions to the text are to be traced not to Alfred himself, but to the glosses and commentaries which he used, still there is much in the work which is solely Alfred's and highly characteristic of his genius.
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  • The nation was proud of his genius, and displayed something of his energy in all departments of life.
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  • He was rescued at last from this monkish idleness by his inborn genius, which, not being able to give free vent to its poetical inspirations under the crushing weight of bigotry, claimed a greater share in the legitimate enjoyments of life and the appreciation of the beauties of nature, as well as a more enlightened faith of tolerance, benevolence, and liberality.
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  • Although the Makhzan is mainly devoted to philosophic meditations, the propensity of Nizämi's genius to purely epic poetry, which was soon to assert itself in a more independent form, makes itself felt even here, all the twenty chapters being interspersed with short tales illustrative of the maxims set forth in each.
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  • It is the Latin volume which we now call the Digest (Digesta) or Pandects (IICAEKrat) and which is by far the most precious monument of the legal genius of the Romans, and indeed, whether one regards the intrinsic merits of its substance or the prodigious influence it has exerted and still exerts, the most remarkable law-book that the world has seen.
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  • Alexander, dazzled by Napoleon's genius and overwhelmed by his apparent generosity, was completely won.
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  • The very proclamations which denounced Napoleon as " the genius of evil," denounced him in the name of " liberty," and of " enlightenment."
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  • The genius of Albrecht Diirer cannot be rightly estimated without taking into account the position which the arts of engraving on metal and on wood thus held in the culture of this time.
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  • The "Melancolia," numbered "1" as though intended to be the first of a series, with its brooding winged genius sitting dejectedly amidst a litter of scientific instruments and symbols, is hard to interpret in detail, but impossible not to recognize in general terms as an embodiment of the spirit of intellectual research (the student's "temperament" was supposed to be one with the melancholic), resting sadly from its labours in a mood of lassitude and defeat.
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  • A far more successful and attractive effort of his genius in the same service is to be found in the marginal decorations done by him in pen for the emperor's prayer-book.
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  • Like Leonardo, but with much less than Leonardo's genius for scientific speculation and divination, Diirer was a confirmed reasoner and theorist on the laws of nature and natural appearances.
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  • Coleridge seemed to him to be ineffectual as a philosopher, and personally to be a melancholy instance of genius running to waste.
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  • He was determined not to abandon his vocation as a man of genius by following the lower though more profitable paths to literary success, and expected that his wife should partake the necessary sacrifice of comfort.
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  • Mill, though not an intellectual disciple, was a very warm admirer of his friend's genius.
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  • During Carlyle's later years the antagonism roused by his attacks upon popular opinions had subsided; and upon his death general expression was given to the emotions natural upon the loss of a remarkable man of genius.
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  • The result was that Carlyle was too often judged by his defects, and regarded as a selfish and eccentric misanthrope with flashes of genius, rather than as a man with many of the highest qualities of mind and character clouded by constitutional infirmities.
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  • The Malcolm genius of Shakespeare, in his Macbeth, based on Canmore.
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  • The court of session was the most valuable and permanent of James's innovations, and his poem " The King's Quhair " attests his real genius.
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  • Henceforth, for lack of a commander of Dundee's genius, there was no real danger from the clans, and absolutely no chance of a rising of the lowland Jacobites in their support.
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  • The greater poets who represent this type are Robert Henryson, William Dunbar, Gavin Douglas, and, to a large extent, Sir David Lyndsay - whose united genius has given high literary reputation to the so-called Golden Age.
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  • It was he who drew up the reply to the malcontents on this occasion, for the first time demonstrating his many-sided ability and his genius for sustained hard work.
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  • The day of his burial was a day of national mourning, and rightly so, for Baross had dedicated his whole time and genius to the promotion of his country's prosperity.
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  • The theory of evolution is supported by a great range of evidence, much of which was first collected by Darwin, and which has been enormously increased by subsequent workers excited by his genius.
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  • Throughout his writings we see the impress, not only of his distinctive genius and of his extraordinary gifts, but also of his special views, aims and aspirations.
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  • As far as the diction itself is concerned, the lyric outbursts of the chorus gave Schiller's genius an opportunity of which he was not slow to avail himself.
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  • In this process of transformation of the idea, which has become of importance for the history of the world, is revealed probably the genius of Paul, or at any rate, that of the young Christianity which was breaking its ties with Judaism and establishing itself in the world of the Roman empire.
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  • The Romans made two attempts to avenge themselves, one by the Western emperor, Majorianus, in 460, and the other by the Eastern emperor, Leo I., eight years later; but both enterprises failed, owing principally to the genius of Gaiseric. Continuing his course on the sea the king brought Sicily, Sardinia, Corsica and the Balearic Islands under his rule, and even extended his conquests into Thrace, Egypt and Asia Minor.
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  • He was, however, opposed to the new method of pronouncing the language introduced by Sir John Cheke, and wrote letters to him and Sir Thomas Smith upon the subject, in which, according to Ascham, his opponents showed themselves the better critics, but he the superior genius.
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  • Pichegru's campaigns of 1794 are marked by traits of an audacious genius which would not have disgraced Napoleon.
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  • It was, in his judgment, quite in accordance with the genius of the Catholic Church that she should continuously assimilate all that is worthy in the civilization around.
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  • Ganymede was afterwards regarded as the genius of the fountains of the Nile, the life-giving and fertilizing river, and identified by astronomers with the Aquarius of the zodiac. Thus the divinity that distributed drink to the gods in heaven became the genius who presided over the due supply of water on earth.
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  • Thus the name which once denoted the good genius who bestowed the precious gift of water upon man was adopted to this use in vulgar Latin under the form Catamitus.
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  • Veckenstedt (Ganymedes, Libau, 1881) endeavours to prove that Ganymede is the genius of intoxicating drink (thOv, mead, for which he postulates a form pi bos), whose original home was Phrygia.
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  • Those who are said to have genius have acquired some special aptitude by which they render the general shapes of the nation their own work, one in one point, another in another.
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  • The best elements in Goethe's genius came from his mother's side; of a lively, impulsive disposition, and gifted with remarkable imaginative power, Frau Rat was the ideal mother of a poet; moreover, being hardly eighteen at the time of her son's birth, she was herself able to be the companion of his childhood.
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  • The exuberance of the young poet's genius is also to be seen in the many unfinished fragments of this period; at one time we find him occupied with dramas on Caesar and Mahomet, at another with an epic on Der ewige Jude, and again with a tragedy on Prometheus, of which a magnificent fragment has passed into his works.
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  • But the latter, although himself a mere stripling, had implicit faith in Goethe, and a firm conviction that his genius could be utilized in other fields besides literature.
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  • He himself regarded it as a kind of climax to his life; never before had he attained such complete understanding of his genius and mission in the world; it afforded him a vantage-ground from which he could renew the past and make plans for the future.
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  • The calm beauty of Greek tragedy is seen in the new iambic version of Iphigenie auf Tauris (1787); the classicism of the Renaissance gives the ground-tone to the wonderful drama of Torquato Tasso (1790), in which the conflict of poetic genius with the prosaic world is transmuted into imperishable poetry.
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  • Prose works like the Unterhaltungen deutscher Ausgewanderten (1795) were unworthy of the poet's genius, and the translation of Benvenuto Cellini's Life (1796-1797) was only a translation.
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  • Goethe has here taken a simple story of village life, mirrored in it the most pregnant ideas of his time, and presented it with a skill which may well be called Homeric; but he has discriminated with the insight of genius between the Homeric method of reproducing the heroic life of primitive Greece and the same method as adapted to the commonplace happenings of 18th-century Germany.
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  • This many-sided activity is a tribute to the greatness of Goethe's mind and personality; we may regard him merely as the embodiment of his particular age, or as a poet "for all time"; but with one opinion all who have felt the power of Goethe's genius are in agreement - the opinion which was condensed in Napoleon's often cited words, uttered after the meeting at Erfurt: Voila un hommel Of all modern men, Goethe is the most universal type of genius.
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  • On the contrary, there were many who prematurely congratulated themselves on the fact that Sweden had now no disturbing genius, but an economical, God-fearing, commonplace monarch to deal with.
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  • Luther was the greatest religious genius which the 16th century produced, and the roots of the movement in which he was the central figure must be sought for in the popular religious life of the last decades of the 15th and opening decades of the i 6th centuries - a field which has been neglected by almost all his biographers.
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  • Himself a Roman Catholic of birth and genius, unfairly kept back in the race of life, he devoted his heart and soul to the cause, and his character and antecedents made him the champion who ultimately assured its triumph.
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  • The result, unquestionably, was almost wholly due to the energy and genius of a single man, though the Catholic question would have been settled, in all probability, in the course of time; and it must be added that O'Connell's triumph, which showed what agitation could effect in Ireland, was far from doing his country unmixed good.
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  • Thus the inspirations of genius, appropriated by those who imperfectly appreciate their subtle beauty and quality, become hackneyed and lose their charm and interest.
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  • In particular he allows that " there was at any rate enough of charlatanism in Protagoras and Hippias to prevent any ardour for their historical reputation," that the sophists generally " had in their lifetime more success than they deserved," that it was " antagonism to their teaching which developed the genius of Socrates," and, above all, that, " in his anxiety to do justice to the Sophist, Grote laid more stress than is at all necessary on the partisanship of Plato."
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  • Nor is it possible to accept the statements that " the splendid genius, the lasting influence, and the reiterated polemics of Plato have stamped the name sophist upon the men against whom he wrote as if it were their recognized, legitimate and peculiar designation," and that " Plato not only stole the name out of general circulation,.
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  • While he emphasizes in the later sophists the consequences of the fundamental error of sophistry - its indifference to truth - he does honour to the genius and the originality of the leaders of the movement.
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  • But he was no soldier, and he was destined in that sphere to encounter the " heaven-born genius " of Clive.
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  • All looked peaceful until Lord Auckland, prompted by his evil genius, attempted by force to place Shah Shuja upon the throne of Kabul, an attempt which ended in gross mismanagement and the annihilation of the British garrison in that city.
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  • In 1844 Lord Ellenborough was recalled by the court of directors, who differed from him on many points of administration, and distrusted his erratic genius.
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  • The fame of these instruments was rapidly spread by the brilliant discoveries which their maker's genius and perseverance accomplished by their aid.
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  • A court-martial, assembled by order of a friendly admiralty, and presided over by a warm partisan, "most honourably acquitted" him on the charge "that, on the 12th of April, the enemy's ships being then on fire, and the signal having been made that they could be destroyed, he did, for a considerable time, neglect or delay taking effectual measures for destroying them"; but this decision was in reality nothing more than a party statement of the fact that a commander-in-chief, a supporter of the government, is not to be condemned or broken for not being a person of brilliant genius or dauntless resolution.
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  • Henry Clay, contrasting him with Jefferson, said that Jefferson had more genius, Madison more judgment and common sense; that Jefferson was a visionary and a theorist; Madison cool, dispassionate, practical, and safe.'
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  • As it happened this deductive tendency helped the development of logic. The obscurer premises of analogy and induction, together with the paucity of experience and the backward state of physical science in Aristotle's time would have baffled even his analytical genius.
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  • In short, the comprehensive genius of Bacon widened logic into a general science of inference.
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  • There is no place for a reformed Aristotelian logic, though the genius of Zabarella was there to attempt it.
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  • In all the literary work which has been mentioned, the originality and freshness of the French genius are no less conspicuous than its saturation with the new learning and with Italian studies.
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  • But the natural vigour of the English genius resisted influences alien to itself, and showed a robust capacity for digesting the varied diet offered to it.
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  • It would be impossible to prove that Cadmon was not the author, though the production of such a work by the herdsman of Streanashalch would certainly deserve to rank among the miracles of genius.
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  • The parallels, however, though very interesting, are only such as might be expected to occur between two poets of kindred genius working on what was essentially the same body of traditional material.
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  • In 1831 Faraday began the investigations on electromagnetic induction which proved more fertile in far-reaching practical consequences than any of those which even his genius gave to the world.
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  • It can be shown, however, that Newton was not ignorant of Bacon's works, and Dr Fowler explains his silence with regard to them on three grounds: (1) that Bacon's reputation was so well established that any definite mention was unnecessary, (2) that it was not customary at the time to acknowledge indebtedness to contemporary and recent writers, and (3) that Newton's genius was so strongly mathematical (whereas Bacon's great weakness was in mathematics) that he had no special reason to refer to Bacon's experimental principles.
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  • The Old Bailey revelations removed all doubt as to the essential unhealthiness of his personal influence; but his literary genius was none the less remarkable, and his plays were perhaps the most original contributions to English dramatic writing during the period.
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  • $ Havelock Ellis, A Study of British Genius (London, 1904, p. 80), "Even if we compare the church with the other professions with which it is most usually classed, we find that the eminent children of the clergy considerably outnumber those of lawyers, doctors and army officers put together."
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  • Sivaji was an extraordinary man, showing a genius both for war and for peaceful administration; but he always preferred to attain his ends by fraud rather than by force.
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  • At each step disintegration was arrested, but not Jewish genius; and the domination of the Law in Judaism did not as a matter of fact have the petrifying results which might have been anticipated.
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  • 2 The Finns ascribed a haltia or genius to each object, which could, however, guard other individuals of the same species.
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  • Each Roman householder had his Genius, the women their Junones.
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  • The fravashi or ideal type, the genius of both men and gods in the Zend Avesta (possibly connected originally with the cultus of the dead "), rises in successive ranks from the worshipper's own person through the household, the village, the district and the province, up to the throne of Ahura himself.'
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  • 2 The Chinese Shin were similarly organized; so (less elaborately) were the Japanese Kami;" and the Roman lares, the old local land-gods, found their highest co-ordinating term in the Lares Augusti, just as the Genius was extended to the legion and the colony, and finally to Rome itself.
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  • Two children were born of this marriage, a son, Robert, who died in 1889, after showing in experimental physics indications of his father's genius, and a daughter, who married a son of Werner von Siemens.
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  • In vain did he watch for any sign of recognition of his philosophic genius.
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  • So precarious was the position Gustavus L, genius p p 1523-1560.
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  • The Renaissance scarcely made itself felt in Scandinavia, and even the Reformation failed to waken the genius of the country.
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  • He was a genius in all the known branches of learning; at twenty-three his physiological discoveries had made him famous throughout Europe.
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  • He stole from England and France, but with the plagiarism of a man of genius; and his multifarious labours raised Sweden to a level with the other literary countries of Europe.
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  • In science Linnaeus, or Karl von Linne (1707-1778), was the name of greatest genius in the whole century; but he wrote almost entirely in Latin.
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  • The same may be said about that marvellous and many-sided genius, Emanuel Swedenborg (1688-1772), who, though the son of a Swedish poet, preferred to prophesy to the world in Latin.
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  • Second only to Tegner in genius, the brief life and mysterious death of Erik Johan Stagnelius (1793-1823) have given a romantic interest to all that is connected with his name.
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  • Among the Phosphorists Atterbom was the man of most genius.
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  • It is regrettable, for its own sake, that the Swedish Academy, which in earlier generations had identified itself with the manifestations of original literary genius, has closed its doors to the new writers with an almost vindictive pertinacity.
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  • There exists, however, a body of thought which is the product of the peculiar genius of the Swedish people, namely, the development of the individual soul in accordance with a coherent social order and a strong religious spirit.
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  • In the person of his son, the throne was occupied by a soldier and stateiman of genius, saturated with Greek culture and Greek thought, and intolerant of every goal but the highest.
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  • Ashraf tried to escape to Kandahar almost alone, but was murdered by a party of Baluch robbers; and thus, by the genius of Nadir, his native land was delivered from the terrible Afghan invaders.
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  • This rich genius gave also the first impulse to romantic, didactic and mystic poetry; and even his own age produced powerful co-operators in these three most conspicuous departments of Persian literature.
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  • His patriotism is as indisputable as his genius.
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  • Some compositions in English poetry, written at sixteen, and not without a touch of genius, give evidence of the influence which Bowles, whose poems were then in vogue, had over his mind at this time.
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  • The supernatural has never received such treatment as in these two wonderful productions of his genius, and though the first of them remains a torso, it is the loveliest torso in the gallery of English literature.
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  • The vast spaces of the veld, the silence of the solitudes, the marvellous, varied and abundant animal life, the savage, half-weird character of the natives and the wild adventure of the early colonists have been caught with a true spirit of genius.
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  • Unfortunately his genius never had full scope, and his opportunity came too late.
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  • But some of his methods were remarkably erratic; he was anxious, for instance, to abolish verse, as unsuited tO the genius of the French.
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  • Still better is Saint-Simon's portrait of Fenelon as he appeared about the time of his appointment to Cambrai - tall, thin, well-built, exceedingly pale, with a great nose, eyes from which fire and genius poured in torrents, a face curious and unlike any other, yet so striking and attractive that, once seen, it could not be forgotten.
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  • Tacitus belonged to the highest official and senatorial class, Juvenal apparently to the middle class and to that of the struggling men of letters; and this difference in position had much influence in determining the different bent of their genius, and in forming one to be a great national historian, the other to be a great social satirist.
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  • He has little, if anything at all, of the high imaginative mood - the mood of reverence and noble admiration - which made Ennius, Lucretius and Virgil the truest poetical representatives of the genius of Rome.
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  • If we could imagine the elder Cato living under Domitian, cut off from all share in public life, and finding no outlet for his combative energy except in literature, we should perhaps understand the motives of Juvenal's satire and the place which is his due as a representative of the genius of his country.
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  • The transcendent genius of its author, the vitality and romantic fortunes of his doctrine, claim our warmest sympathies for Platonism.
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  • Then followed the flash of genius: this varying tension of the one substance everywhere present, a purely physical fact, accounts for the diverse destinies of all innumerable particular things., it is the veritable cause of the flux and process of the universe.
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  • Works by Galton bearing on eugenics are: Hereditary Genius (2nd ed., 1892), Human Faculty (1883), Natural Inheritance (1889), Huxley Lecture of the Anthropol.
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  • The Claridades de Sul of Gomes Leal, a militant anti-Christian, at times recall Baudelaire, and flashes of genius run through AntiChristo, which is alive with the instinct of revolt.
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  • The military genius of Judas made this the most stirring chapter in Israelitish history.
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  • His genius tended naturally in the direction of burlesque and satire.
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  • It is scarcely too much to say that, in the general opinion of his contemporaries, the whole glory of these years was due to his single genius; his alone was the mind that planned, and his the spirit that animated the brilliant achievements of the British arms in all the four quarters of the globe.
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  • Posterity, indeed, has been able to recognize more fully the independent genius of those who carried out his purposes.
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  • He had personally less to do with the successes in India than with the other great enterprises that shed an undying lustre on his administration; but his generous praise in parliament stimulated the genius of Clive, and the forces that acted at the close of the struggle were animated by his indomitable spirit.
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  • If he lacks the genius of Claudian, he also lacks his overloaded gaudiness and his large exaggeration, and the directness of Rutilius shines by comparison with the laboured complexity of Ausonius.
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  • Falck was called in Holland the king's good genius, but William I.
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  • The monument, which cost £200,000, is surmounted by an equestrian statue of the emperor in a martial cloak, his right hand resting on a field marshal's baton, reining in his charger, which is led by a female genius of peace.
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  • It is as matter-of-fact and comparative as Dante, without a touch of Dante's genius.
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  • The theological genius of the East was different from that of the West.
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  • He is distinguished from the two men who alone can be compared with him in character of work and force of genius combined - Lucian and Swift - by very marked characteristics.
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  • But the history is a work of genius.
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  • In 1869 appeared his Hereditary Genius, its Laws and Consequences, a work which excited much interest in scientific and medical circles.
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  • He was not a creative genius like Origen or Augustine.
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  • Littre, however, takes the word to be Old Celtic, and meaning "genius," and states that it occurs in such forms as sulfa, sylfi, &c., in inscriptions, or latinized as sulevae or suleviae.
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  • His chief counsellor was Dyveke's mother Sigbrit, a born administrator and a commercial genius of the first order.
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  • Nowhere else could the youth of genius who was destined to impress a cosmopolitan stamp on medieval culture and to begin the modern era have grown up under conditions more favourable to his task.
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  • For him there was no schism between Rome and Galilee, between classical genius and sacred inspiration.
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  • Whether we regard him as a priest who published poem after poem in praise of an adored mistress, as a plebeian man of letters who conversed on equal terms with kings and princes, as a solitary dedicated to the love of nature, as an amateur diplomatist treating affairs of state with pompous eloquence in missives sent to popes and emperors, or again as a traveller eager for change of scene, ready to climb mountains for the enjoyment of broad prospects over spreading champaigns; in all these divers manifestations of his peculiar genius we trace some contrast with the manners of the, 4th century, some emphatic anticipation of the 16th.
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  • His campaign there is the finest proof of his genius as a general, although he was repeatedly defeated by the English under Wellington, for his soldiers were but raw conscripts, while those of Wellington were the veterans of many campaigns.
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  • History the art, in so far as it is conditioned upon genius, has no single traceable line of development.
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  • The story of the pagan past slipped out of mind, and in its place was set, by the genius of Eusebius, the story of the world force which had superseded it, Christianity, and of that small fraction of antiquity from which it sprang, - the Jews.
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  • Diocletian, the organizing genius, became a bloodthirsty monster, and Constantine, the murderer, a saint.
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  • The machinery of research, invented by the genius of men like Mabillon, was perfected and set going in all the archives of Europe.
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  • It substituted the work of the genius for the miraculous intervention of Providence, but, apart from certain abstract formulae such as Truth and Right, knew nothing of why or how.
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  • The prosperity and great population of the Pennine region date from the discovery that pit-coal could smelt iron as well as charcoal; and this source of power once discovered, the people bred in the dales developed a remarkable genius for mechanical invention and commercial enterprise, which revolutionized the economic life of the world and changed England from an agricultural to an industrial country.
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  • This broad comprehensiveness, which to outsiders looks like ecclesiastical anarchy, is the characteristic note of the Church of England; it may be, and has been, defended as consonant with Christian charity and suited to the genius of a people not remarkable for logical consistency; but it makes it all the more difficult to say what the religion of Englishmen actually is, even within the English Church.
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  • "The comfort of meeting such men of genius as these," he wrote, "is that they talk sincerely."
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  • "The genius which preserves and guides the human race indicates itself by a small excess of good, a small balance in brute facts always favourable to the side of reason."
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  • His verse, though in form inferior to his prose, was perhaps a truer expression of his genius.
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  • But the genius from which it came - the swift faculty of perception, the lofty imagination, the idealizing spirit enamoured of reality - was the secret source of all Emerson's greatness as a speaker and as a writer.
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  • Of certified and accepted paintings produced by the young genius, whether during his apprentice or his independent years at Florence (about 1470-1482), very few are extant, and the two most important are incomplete.
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  • Pacioli was equally amazed and delighted at Leonardo's two great achievements in sculpture and painting, and still more at the genius for mathematical, physical and anatomical research shown in the collections of MS. notes which the master laid before him.
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  • Leonardo's own native Florentine manner had at first been not a little modified by that of the Milanese school as he found it represented in the works of such men as Bramantino, Borgognone and Zenale; but his genius had in its turn reacted far more strongly upon the younger members of the school, and exercised, now or later, a transforming and dominating influence not only upon his immediate pupils, but upon men like Luini, Giampetrino, Bazzi, Cesare da Sesto and indeed the whole Lombard school in the early 15th century.
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  • The importunate expectations of a masterpiece or masterpieces in painting or sculpture, which beset him on all hands in Florence, inclined him to take service again with some princely patron, if possible of a genius commensurate with his own, who would give him scope to carry out engineering schemes on a vast scale.
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  • Neither Leonardo's genius nor his noble manners could soften the rude and taunting temper of the younger man, whose style as an artist, nevertheless, in subjects both of tenderness and terror, underwent at this time a profound modification from Leonardo's example.
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  • Florence had had other sons of comprehensive genius, artistic and mechanical, Leon Battista Alberti perhaps the chief.
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  • Of things communicable he was at the same time, as we have said, communicative - a genial companion, a generous and loyal friend, ready and eloquent of discourse, impressing all with whom he was brought in contact by the power and the charm of genius, and inspiring fervent devotion and attachment in friends and pupils.
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  • The first class comprehends those upon which his fame chiefly rests; for although he did not possess the genius of D'Anville, he may be regarded as the creator of modern Statistical Geography.
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  • Hence the familiarity of the poet's well-known "cooling-card" to the budding genius of his kinsman Jonathan: "Cousin Swift, you will never be a poet."
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  • The patronage of his uncle galled him: he was dull and unhappy We find in Swift few signs of precocious genius.
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  • The stress which Swift thus laid upon his character as an assertor of liberty has hardly been ratified by posterity, which has apparently neglected the patriot for the genius and the wit.
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  • Few men of so much mental force have had so little genius for speculation, and he is constantly dominated by fierce instincts which he mistakes for reasons.
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  • Longfellow's genius, in its choice of subjects, always oscillated between America and Europe, between the colonial period of American history and the Middle and Romantic Ages of European feeling.
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  • Cuthbert on "The Spirit and Genius of the Franciscan Friars," in The Friars and how they came to England (1903); see also the earlier chapters of Emil Gebhard's Italie mystique (1899).
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  • The genius of Michael " the Brave " (1593-1601) secured Walachia for a time a place in universal history.
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  • He was the founder of the first political and literary review, and he had a genius for discovering talent, and the merit of assisting it.
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  • The severe training through which he had passed had given him such an experimental knowledge of all the modes of religious melancholy as he could never have gathered from books; and his vigorous genius, animated by a fervent spirit of devotion, enabled him not only to exercise a great influence over the vulgar, but even to extort the half-contemptuous admiration of scholars.
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  • In puritanical circles, from which plays and novels were strictly excluded, that effect was such as no work of genius, though it were superior to the Iliad, to Don Quixote or to Othello, can ever produce on a mind accustomed to indulge in literary luxury.
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  • But the peculiar glory of Bunyan is that those who most hated his doctrines have tried to borrow the help of his genius.
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  • Producing, as he certainly has produced, work which classes him with the greatest names in literature, he has also signed an extraordinary quantity of verse which has not merely the defects of genius, irregularity, extravagance, bizarrete, but the faults which we are apt to regard as exclusively belonging to those who lack genius, to wit, the dulness, and tediousness of mediocrity.
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  • On the English stage the liberty 01 unrestricted incident and complicated action, the power of multiplying characters and introducing prose scenes, would have exactly suited his somewhat intermittent genius, both by covering defects and by giving greater scope for the exhibition of power.
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  • It was, however, some time before his genius came to perfection.
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  • His mathematical genius gained for him a high place in the 'esteem of Jean Bernoulli, who was at that time one of the first mathematicians in Europe, as well as of his sons Daniel and Nicolas Bernoulli.
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  • It was in these circumstances that he dictated to his servant, a tailor's apprentice, who was absolutely devoid of mathematical knowledge, his Anleitung zur Algebra (1770), a work which, though purely elementary, displays the mathematical genius of its author, and is still reckoned one of the best works of its class.
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  • Euler's genius was great and his industry still greater.
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  • In fiction, Olive Schreiner (Mrs CronwrightSchreiner) produced, while still in her teens, the Story of an African Farm, a work which gave great promise of original literary genius.
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  • Worsted, mainly through the genius of Marlborough, in his efforts to secure the whole of the great Spanish monarchy for his grandson, Philip, duke of Anjou, Louis XIV.
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  • In referring to this code, Sir Henry Maine spoke of Livingston as "the first legal genius of modern times" (Cambridge Essays, 1856, p.17).
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  • His life was one of incessant eager questioning of nature on all sides, and his many and varied works all bear the stamp of a fresh and original genius, capable of stating and solving problems in all departments of science - at one time finding the true explanation of "ducks and drakes" (formerly attributed to the elasticity of water) and at another helping to lay the foundations of our modern vulcanology and meteorology.
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  • It would be unjust to consider Whittier's genius from an academic point of view.
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  • Barrow did this on the 31st of July 1669, but kept the name of the author a secret, and merely told Collins that he was a friend staying at Cambridge, who had a powerful genius for such matters.
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  • In a subsequent letter on the 10th of August, Barrow expressed his pleasure at hearing the favourable opinion which Collins had formed of the paper, and added, " the name of the author is Newton, a fellow of our college, and a young man, who is only in his second year since he took the degree of master of arts, and who, with an unparalleled genius (eximio quo est acumine), has made very great progress in this branch of mathematics."
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  • He may be allowed a talent for religious matters, but he possessed not the genius which Buddha undoubtedly had..
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  • His genius and the dauphins murderous act of folly at Montereau conspired to make the incredible almost possible.
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  • He was lucky too in having no adversary of genius of the type of Owen Glendower.
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  • But the Commons feared his commanding genius too much to let him go free.
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  • It found a chief of supreme military and diplomatic genius in the duke of Marlborough.
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  • The duke of Newcastle, who succeeded his brother, looked on the work of corruption with absolute Engels pleasure, and regarded genius and ability as an castle.
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  • Lecky and Creighton are almost as dispassionate as Gardiner, but are more definitely committed to particular points of views, while democratic fervour pervades the fascinating pages of J.R.Green, and an intellectual secularism, which is almost religious in its intensity and idealism, inspired the genius of Maitland.
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  • In the deathless volume of Chatiments, which appeared in 1853, his indignation, his genius, and his faith found such utterance and such expression as must recall to the student alternately the lyric inspiration of Coleridge and Shelley, the prophetic inspiration of Dante and Isaiah, the satiric inspiration of Juvenal and Dryden.
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  • It was undertaken with the simple design of furnishing a preface to his younger son's translation of Shakespeare; a monument of perfect scholarship, of indefatigable devotion, and of literary genius, which eclipses even Urquhart's Rabelais - its only possible competitor; and to which the translator's father prefixed a brief and admirable note of introduction in the year after the publication of the volume which had grown under his hand into the bulk and the magnificence of an epic poem in prose.
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  • Like others who have gone through the conventional course of instruction, he kept a place in his memory for the various charms of Virgil and Horace, of Tacitus and Ovid; but the master whose page by night and by day he turned with devout hand, was the copious, energetic, flexible, diversified and brilliant genius of the declamations for Archias the poet and for Milo, against Catiline and against Antony, the author of the disputations at Tusculum and the orations against Verres.
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  • He may have anticipated with something of remorse the reflection of a modern historian, that the absenteeism of her landlords has been less of a curse to Ireland 'than the absenteeism of her men of genius.
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  • "I would not talk to him of the Rockingham party," he used to say, "but I love his knowledge, his genius, his diffusion and affluence of conversation."
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  • No eminent man has ever done more than Burke to justify the definition of genius as the consummation of the faculty of taking pains.
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  • If the king or queen could either have had the political genius of Frederick the Great, or could have had the good fortune to find a minister with that genius, and the good sense and good faith to trust and stand by him against mobs of aristocrats and mobs of democrats; if the army had been sound and the states-general had been convoked at Bourges or Tours instead of at Paris, then the type of French monarchy and French society might have been modernized without convulsion.
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  • But no art of discovery, such as Bacon anticipated, follows, for "invention, sagacity, genius" are needed at each step. He analyses induction into three steps: - (I) the selection of the (fundamental) idea, such as space, number, cause or likeness; (2) the formation of the conception, or more special modification of those ideas, as a circle, a uniform force, &c.; and (3) the determination of magnitudes.
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  • From the part played by Asmodeus in this story, he has been often familiarly called the genius of matrimonial unhappiness or jealousy, and as such may be compared with Lilith.
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  • He is often accompanied by Telesphorus, the boy genius of healing, and his daughter Hygieia, the goddess of health.
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  • The germs were Jewish; but, transported to a new soil, and watered with a new enthusiasm, they assumed new forms. These cannot claim the merit of correctness, but they are works of religious genius.
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  • He was also genius and scholar and churchman, transmitting uncriticized the dogmas of Athanasianism and the philosophy of ancient Greece, according to his understanding of them.
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  • Goodwin, John Goodwin (an early Arminian); for learning, John Lightfoot; for genius, John Milton; for literary and devotional power, John Bunyanalways admirable except when he talks Puritan dogma.
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  • He belonged essentially to the centre, and lacked both the genius and the temperament which would secure for him a commanding place in a revolutionary era.
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  • " Of all the events of Constantine's life," says Dean Stanley, " this choice is the most convincing and enduring proof of his real genius."
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  • None of the family was akin to Benjamin for genius and character, except Sarah, to whom he was deeply indebted for a wise, unswerving and sympathetic devotion, when, in his earlier days, he needed it most.
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  • One of Disraeli's first friends in the world of fashion and genius was Sir Edward Lytton Bulwer.
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  • Meanwhile, consciously and unconsciously, as is the way with men of genius, his mind was working upon problems of government, the magnitude, the relations and the natural developments of which he was more sensible of than any known politician of his time.
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  • At about the same time his political genius directed him to open a resolute critical campaign against the Conservatism of the party he proposed to thrive in, and he could but obey.
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  • Look for declining statesmanship, inferior aptitude, genius dying off.
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  • Lamarck's penetrating genius is chiefly responsible for the shrinkage of the word Insecta, since it was he who, forty years after Linnaeus's death, set up and named the two great classes Crustacea and Arachnida (included by Linnaeus under Insecta as the order " Aptera "), assigning to them equal rank with the remaining Insecta of Linnaeus, for which he proposed the very appropriate class-name " Hexapoda."
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  • Whether even he could have controlled the Revolution is highly doubtful; but his letters and minutes drawn up for the king form the most striking monument of his genius (see Mirabeau and Montmorin De Saint-Herem).
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  • We observe, again, the value that Plutarch attaches, not merely to the sustainment and consolation of rational religion, but to the supernatural communications vouchsafed by the divinity to certain human beings in dreams, through oracles, or by special warnings, like those of the genius of Socrates.
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  • Filelfo deserves commemoration among the greatest humanists of the Italian Renaissance, not for the beauty of his style, not for the elevation of his genius, not for the accuracy of his learning, but for his energy, and for his complete adaptation to the times in which he lived.
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  • His imagination is lively, his descriptions graphic, but the impetuosity of his genius cannot find adequate words to express itself, and then he creates new words of which the meaning is not always clear.
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  • The younger man's genius supplied what was wanting to his predecessor.
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  • They were accordingly taken up anew by a band of continental inquirers, primarily by three men of untiring energy and vivid genius, Leonhard Euler, Alexis Clairault, and Jean le Rond d'Alembert.
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  • The high excellence of the s sle data collected by them was a combined result of their skill, and of the vast improvement in refracting telescopes due to the genius of Joseph Fraunhofer (1787-1826).
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  • But it was the K synthetic genius of Gustav Kirchhoff which first gave unity to the scattered phenomena, and finally reconciled what was appendages to the sun disclosed by it were such as eclipses.
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  • Calvin was of middle stature; his complexion was somewhat pallid and dark; his eyes, to the latest clear and lustrous, bespoke the acumen of his genius.
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  • Thus the critical period passed by unused, and when the tempests had finally dispersed the defeated remnants of the Great Armada the Dutch had found a general, in the youthful Maurice of Nassau,worthy to be the rival in military genius even of Alexander of Parma.
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  • Since the Spanish conquest their huacas have been opened and rifled, and many of the larger masses of ruins have been extensively mined in search of treasure, but enough still remains to impress upon the observer the magnitude of the city and the genius of the people who built it.
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  • His evil genius, Sifka, Sibicho or Bicci, brings about the death of his three sons.
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  • The orator in whom artistic genius was united, more perfectly than in any other man, with moral enthusiasm and with intel-.
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  • The Syntagma is thus an essentially unsystematic work, and clearly exhibits the main characteristics of Gassendi's genius.
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  • Partly under the influence of Mazzini, the freedom of Italy became his ruling motive in life, - its emancipation, not only from foreign masters, but from modes of thought alien to its genius, and detrimental to its European authority.
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  • Not the equal of Caesar or Augustus in genius or in the lastingness of his work, he yet recalls them in his capitularies, his periodic courts, his official hierarchy, his royal emissaries, his ministers, his sole right of coinage, his great public works, his campaigns against barbarism and heathenry, his zeal for learning and literature, and his divinity as emperor.
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  • From 1431 to 1454 the struggle against the English went on energetically; and the king, relieved in 1433 of his evil genius, La Trmoille, then became a man once more, playing a kingly part under the guidance of Dunois, Richemont, La Hire and Saintrailles, leaders of worth on the field of battle.
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  • He was not a financier of genius; but he administered the public moneys with the same probity and exactitude which he used in managing his own, retrieving alienated property, straightening accounts, balancing expenditure and receipts, and amassing a reserve in the Bastille.
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  • Every on~ had to bend before this harsh genius, who insisted on uniformity in obedience.
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  • But the art and literature expressed by the genius of the masters, reflected in the tastes of society, and to be taken by Europe as a model throughout a whole century, are no criterion of the social and political order of the day.
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  • The Bavarian dream dissipated, victories gained in Flanders by Marshal Saxe, another adventurer of genius, at Fontenoy, Raucoux and Lawfeld (1745-1747), were hailed with joy as continuing those of Louis XIV.; even though they resulted in the loss of Germany and the doubling of English armaments.
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  • His genius, assisted by the impoverishment of two generations, was like the oak which admits beneath its shade none but the smallest of saplings.
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  • In the middle ages there was a communism in learning, but if Rashi used some of the stones quarried and drafted by others, it was to his genius that the finished edifice was due.
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  • The passage of this KansasNebraska Bill, one of the most momentous in its consequences ever passed by the Federal Congress, was largely a personal triumph for Douglas, who showed marvellous energy, adroitness and resourcefulness, and a genius for leadership. There was great indignation throughout the free states; and even in Chicago Douglas was unable to win for himself a hearing before a public meeting.
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  • A lesson in geometry, given by Ostilio Ricci to the pages of the grand-ducal court, chanced, tradition avers, to have Galileo for an unseen listener; his attention was riveted, his dormant genius was roused, and he threw all his energies into the new pursuit thus unexpectedly presented to him.
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  • But the fire of his genius was not even yet extinct.
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  • With the sure instinct of genius, he seized the characteristic features of the phenomena presented to his attention, and his inferences, except when distorted by polemical exigencies, have been strikingly confirmed by modern investigations.
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  • Nevertheless, the task which he so effectually accomplished demanded the highest and rarest quality of genius.
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  • The expansion is attributed chiefly to the second half of the 3rd century B.C., and to the genius of the Carthaginian statesman, Hamilcar Barca, who, seeing his country deprived by Rome of her trading dominion in Sicily and Sardinia, used Spain, not only~ as a source of commercial wealth, but as an inexhaustible supply of warlike troops to serve in.
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  • What the genius of Napoleon had failed to accomplish through years of titanic effort, Angoulme seemed to have achieved in a few weeks.
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  • For these last in ii there exists a plural formation which is more in accordance with the genius of the language, and consists in the suppression of the s before the 1; from aquest, for example, we have now side by side the two plurals aquestos, in the Castilian manner, and aquets.
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  • Politically moribund, it succumbed to the attacks of its virile southern neighbours, who, having emerged from foreign tutelage, developed according to the natural laws of their own genius and environment.
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  • For excepting Philae, which belongs as much to Egypt as to Ethiopia, Abu Simbel is the only temple which can be ranked among first rate products of Egyptian genius.
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  • In private life his loyalty to his friends, and his "genius for friendship" (as John Morley said) made a curious contrast to his capacity for arousing the bitterest political hostility.
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  • The Board of Trade was set to work to produce fiscal Blue-books, and hum-drum politicians who had never shown any genius for figures suddenly blossomed out into arithmeticians of the deepest dye.
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  • On the opening title track he does everything to draw attention to his alleged musical genius short of hiring a fairground barker.
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  • Having one of those strong wills which know no obstacles, he obeyed the behests of his genius and entered Bouchardon's studio.
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  • At last Debbie has done something constructive for Home Farm: she has sent a footballing genius.
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  • Their conversation is abruptly curtailed by the entrance of Harry, a child genius who wants to know the address of the student house.
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  • Its not often that true genius graces this firmament that we call Earth.
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  • Thereby fulfilling the great aim of every literary genius.
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  • This is aided with tech genius Marshall's super cool gadgets, an array of which you have to use.
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  • I gottan LP coming out on Head Heritage called Floored Genius 3 all unreleased and a stoned gasser.
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  • Use of wines and sauces French gastronomy is distinguished not only by the genius of its chefs but also by well-established culinary practice.
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  • Or it could be the fact that its songwriting genius is pretty much untouchable.
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  • The presiding genius of their crew is the one-legged pirate turned sea cook, Long John Silver.
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  • The artist as a rebel battling against society, a tortured and misunderstood genius, has a powerful hold on our collective imagination.
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  • They exist today only because a cat-lover who recognized pure genius was thoughtful enough to save them for posterity.
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  • Britain's industrial future depends on transforming our inventive genius into manufacturing strength.
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  • All six episodes from this series are pure genius.
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  • I hope these films haven't turned Hitler into some unreal, mad genius.
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  • Plan B " tactical genius Sven has a plan in case Crouch gets injured, " says Martin Myers.
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  • Here are all the latest facts about the footballing genius.
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  • According to British chess grandmaster Nigel Short, the reclusive and eccentric chess genius Bobby Fischer is actively playing chess online.
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  • If you are not six sigma trained then this book is no good for you unless you are a maths genius.
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  • Or maybe you're a budding comedy genius with an idea for a comedy show?
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  • Also, there are some genuine flashes of pop genius here, albeit somewhat melancholy ones.
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  • Is he the village idiot or a genius in disguise?
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  • The book looks to redress the imbalance of Paul being second fiddle to Lennon's genius.
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  • His own claim, that he has become a genius with no effort or enthusiasm at all is totally implausible.
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  • Michael Tippett, Benjamin Britten and Peter Maxwell Davies are among those who have expressed indebtedness to Purcell's musical genius.
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  • A Britain that succeeds globally because working together we build on our scientific genius and are outward looking, internationalist and European.
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  • The house was designed in 1680 by Robert Hooke the genius inventor, who developed the constant velocity joint among many other innovations.
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  • Me thinks that Jim is a genius and was just pretending 2 b irish.
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  • The military genius A 19 th century lithograph, showing Napoleon peering through a telescope.
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  • But it would be sad to think, to quote another