Geneva sentence example

geneva
  • At Geneva the mountain was in former days named the Montagne 1Vlaudite, but the present name seems to have been always used locally.
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  • Leaving the service after the war, he studied jurisprudence at Heidelberg, Göttingen and Jena, and in 1819 went for a while to Geneva to complete his studies.
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  • Geneva has a public library, a city hospital and hygienic institute.
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  • It is the seat of the New York State Agricultural Experiment Station and of Hobart College (nonsectarian), which was first planned in 1812, was founded in 1822 (the majority of its incorporators being members of the Protestant Episcopal church) as successor to Geneva Academy, received a full charter as Geneva College in 1825, and was renamed Hobart Free College in 1852 and Hobart College in 1860, in honour of Bishop John Henry Hobart.
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  • A co-ordinate woman's college, the William Smith school for women, opened in 1908, was endowed in 1906 by William Smith of Geneva, who at the same time provided for a Hall of Science and for further instruction in science, especially in biology and psychology.
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  • In 1888 the Smith Observatory was built at Geneva, being maintained by William Smith, and placed in charge of Dr William Robert Brooks, professor of astronomy in Hobart College.
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  • Geneva was first settled about 1787 almost on the site of the Indian village of Kanadasega, which was destroyed in 1779 during Gen.
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  • Court formed the design of writing a history of Protestantism, and made large collections for the purpose, which have been preserved in the Public Library of Geneva; but this he did not live to carry out.
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  • In Germany a few Cartesian lecturers taught at Leipzig and Halle, but the system took no root, any more than in Switzerland, where it had a brief reign at Geneva after 1669.
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  • When John Knox visited Calvin at Geneva one Sunday, it is said that he discovered him engaged in a game; and John Aylmer (1521-1594), though bishop of London, enjoyed a game of a Sunday afternoon, but used such language "as justly exposed his character to reproach."
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  • The work of Farel, previous to his coming to Geneva, was almost entirely evangelistic, and his first work in Geneva was of a similar character.
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  • Calvin, at Farel's invitation, settled in Geneva (1536) the work of reformation became more constructive.
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  • Owing to certain circumstances in its past history, Geneva was notoriously immoral.
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  • Even the nuns of Geneva were notorious for their conduct."
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  • It was on this subject of keeping pure the Lord's Table that the controversy arose between the ministers and the town councillors which ended in the banishment of Calvin, Farel and Conrad from Geneva.
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  • In 1538 the ministers took upon themselves to refuse to administer the Lord's Supper in Geneva because the city, as represented by its council, declined to submit to church discipline.
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  • One party threatened to return to Romanism; another threatened to sacrifice the independence of Geneva and submit to Berne.
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  • "Calvin," says Principal Lindsay, "did three things for Geneva all of which went far beyond its walls.
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  • One hundred and twenty-seven pastors had been sent to France from Geneva before 1567.
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  • Their ecclesiastical polity came much more from Paris than from Geneva."2 To trace the history of Presbyterianism in France for the next thirty years would be to write the history of France itself during that period.
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  • He was educated at Zurich and at Saumur (where he graduated), studied theology at Orleans under Claude Pajon, at Paris under Jean Claude and at Geneva under Louis Tronchin, and was ordained to the ministry in his native place in 1683.
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  • The Lake of Geneva, which forms 32 m.
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  • The son was brought up in Utica, studied in1824-1825at Geneva Academy (afterwards Hobart College), and then at a military school in Middletown, Conn., and was admitted to the bar in 1832.
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  • In 1816 he visited the continent, and first at Geneva and afterwards in Montauban (1817) he lectured and interviewed large numbers of theological students with remarkable effect; among them were Malan, Monod and Merle d'Aubigne.
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  • His papers were mostly published in the Bibliotheque universelle of Geneva.
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  • The re-erection of a wayside cross in Annemasse, at the gates of Geneva, amid an enormous concourse of converts, an event which closed the three years of his apostolate, led to the composition of the Defense ...
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  • At this time he was nominated to the pope as coadjutor of Geneva,' and after a visit to Rome he assisted Bishop de Granier in the administration of the newly converted countries and of the diocese at large.
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  • Thury, professor of physics at Geneva, who was also convinced of the operation of an unknown force.
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  • Flournoy, Des Indes a la Planete Mars (Geneva, 1900; there is an English translation published in London); Proceedings of the Society for Psychical Research, passim.
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  • 2 Voltaire was at Geneva, Rousseau at Montmorency, and Buffon he neglected to visit; but so congenial did he find the society for which his education had so well prepared him, and into which some literary reputation had already preceded him, that he declared, " Had I been rich and independent, I should have prolonged and perhaps have fixed my residence at Paris."
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  • He was educated in Rome and Paris, and, after teaching classics for some years in Geneva, held chairs of philosophy in various colleges in France, and subsequently was professor in Strassburg and in Paris.
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  • On the return journey he halted at Geneva, then at a crisis of political and religious strife.
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  • Reaching Geneva in October 1532, Farel (described in a contemporary monastic chronicle as "un chetif malheureux predicant, nomme maistre Guillaume") at once began to preach in a room of his lodging, and soon attracted "un grand nombre de gens qui estoient advertis de sa venue et déjà infects de son heresie."
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  • Through the intervention of the government of Bern, liberty of worship was granted on the 28th of March 1533 to the Reformation party in Geneva.
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  • Calvin, on his way to Basel for a life of study, touched at Geneva, and by the importunity of Farel was there detained to become the leader of the Genevan Reformation.
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  • When (1541) Calvin was recalled to Geneva, Farel also returned; but in 1542 he went to Metz to support the Reformation there.
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  • Their chief towns were Vienna (Vienne), Genava (Geneva) and Cularo (afterwards Gratianopolis, whence Grenoble).
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  • His three chief objects were the conquest of Geneva, of Saluzzo and of Monferrato.
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  • He now meditated a further enterprise against Geneva; but his attempt to capture the city by treachery and with the help of Spain (the famous escalade) in 1602 failed completely.
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  • They are first heard of in Savoy in the year 1258, and more than two centuries later they went to Geneva (151o), united with Calvin in his opposition to Rome, and associated their fortunes with those of the little Swiss city.
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  • Here they remained, and with one or two other great families governed Geneva, and sent forth many representatives to seek their fortune and win distinction in the service of foreign princes, both as soldiers and ministers.
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  • On the eve of the French Revolution the Gallatins were still in Geneva, occupying the same position which they had held for two hundred years.
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  • He was thoroughly educated at the schools of Geneva, and graduated with honour from the college or academy there in 1779.
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  • His grandmother then wished him to enter the army of the landgrave of Hesse, but he declined to serve "a tyrant," and a year later slipped away from Geneva and embarked for the United States.
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  • Peace was his reward; on the 24th of December 1814 the treaty was signed; and after visiting Geneva for the first time since his boyhood, and assisting in negotiating a commercial convention (1815) with England by which all discriminating duties were abolished, Gallatin in July 1815 returned to America.
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  • A pantograph armed with cutting-files a which carve the relief out of a block of gypsum, was employed in1893-1900by C. Perron of Geneva, in producing his relief map of Switzerland on a scale of 1: ioo,000.
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  • At Geneva are three large collections - Augustin Pyrame de Candolle's, containing the typical specimens of the Prodromus, a large series of monographs of the families of flowering plants, Benjamin Delessert's fine series at the Botanic Garden, and the Boissier Herbarium, which is rich in Mediterranean and Oriental plants.
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  • She was a young lady of twenty, decidedly unconventional and original in character, but the daughter of a Bavarian diplomatist then resident at Geneva, who would have nothing to do with Lassalle.
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  • At the Carouge, a suburb of Geneva, the meeting took place on the morning of August 28, 1864, when Lassalle was mortally wounded, and he died on the 31st of August.
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  • At the third Congress in 1905 it led to the formation of two parties, the Bolsheviks meeting in London, and the Mensheviks in Geneva.
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  • 1914, in his organ published at Geneva, " it is impossible, from the point of view of the international proletariat, to say which would be the lesser evil for Socialism, an Austro-German defeat or a Franco-Russo-English defeat.
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  • During part of the next few years they resided at Coppet, her father's estate on the Lake of Geneva, which she herself made famous.
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  • In the two winters of 1814-1816 he ministered to the English congregation at Geneva, and from 1816 to 1821 was curate of Highclere, Hampshire.
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  • The bishop's see of Geneva was transferred hither in 1535, after the Reformation, but suppressed in 1801, though revived in 1822.
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  • After seventeen months he resumed his former religion, and, to avoid persecution, fled to Geneva, where he became acquainted with Cartesianism.
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  • Voltaire published his Le Cafe, ou l'Ecossaise (1760), Londres (really Geneva), as a translation from the work of Mr Hume, described as Pasteur de l'eglise d'Edimbourg, but Home seems to have taken no notice of the mystification.
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  • In the "Reformed" Churches the minister wears the black "Geneva" gown with bands.
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  • The outcome has been that in the Church of England, and in many of her daughter Churches, there exists a bewildering variety of "uses," varying from that of Sarum and that of Rome down to the closest possible approximation to the Geneva model.
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  • On leaving the university, the two brothers travelled abroad, visiting Lyons and Geneva, and residing for some while at Augsburg.
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  • In the summer of 1660 he left England for France, where he lived in seclusion under the name of John Clarke, subsequently removing elsewhere, either (for the accounts differ) to Spain, to Italy, or to Geneva.
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  • He was educated at Geneva, but, preferring an army career to a clerical one, went to Lisbon and enlisted.
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  • Then, after a short time in Liebig's laboratory at Giessen, and in the Sevres porcelain factory, he became in 1841 professor of chemistry in the academy of Geneva.
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  • He died at Geneva on the 15th of April 1894.
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  • In 1686 his famous allegory of Rome and Geneva, slightly disguised as the rival princesses Mreo and Eenegu, in the Relation de file de Borneo, gave proof of his daring in religious matters.
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  • Gaullieur in the same review in 1857, and all the available material is utilized in a monograph on her and her work by P. Godet, Madame de Charriere et ses amis (2 vols., Geneva, 1906).
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  • On his way to his post he married, in 1823, at Geneva a young English lady, Marianne Birch, who had both money and beauty, and in the same year his Nouvelles meditations poetiques appeared.
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  • He acted as president of the International Congress held at Geneva in 1892 for revising the nomenclature of the fatty acid series.
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  • In the summer he went to Plombieres, and after returning to Colmar for some time journeyed in the beginning of winter to Lyons, and thence in the middle of December to Geneva.
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  • He was here practically at the meeting-point of four distinct jurisdictions - Geneva, the canton Vaud, Sardinia and France, while other cantons were within easy reach; and he bought other houses dotted about these territories, so as never to be without a refuge close at hand in case of sudden storms. At Les Delices he set up a considerable establishment, which his great wealth made him able easily to afford.
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  • He kept open house for visitors; he had printers close at hand in Geneva; he fitted up a private theatre in which he could enjoy what was perhaps the greatest pleasure of his whole life - acting in a play of his own, stage-managed by himself.
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  • Geneva had a law expressly forbidding theatrical performances in any circumstances whatever.
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  • Voltaire had infringed this law already as far as private performances went, and he had thought of building a regular theatre, not indeed at Geneva but at Lausanne.
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  • As for himself, he looked about for a place where he could combine the social liberty of France with the political liberty of Geneva, and he found one.
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  • At the end of 1758 he bought the considerable property of Ferney, on the shore of the lake, about four miles from Geneva, and on French soil.
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  • In 1768 he entered into controversy with the bishop of the diocese; he had differences with the superior landlord of part of his estate, the president De Brosses; and he engaged in a long and tedious return match with the republic of Geneva.
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  • They turned the tables on the pope by engaging Hawkwood, and although the Bretons by order of Cardinal Robert of Geneva (afterwards the anti-pope Clement VII.) committed frightful atrocities in Romagna, their captains were bribed by the republic not to molest its territory.
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  • His opposition to 'the philosophes had its strongest expressions in Fanatisme des philosophes (Geneva and Paris, 1764) and Histoire des revolutions de l'empire romain (Paris, 1766-1768).
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  • In 1582 he went to Geneva, studied there awhile under Theodore Beza, but had soon, owing to his active advocacy of the Ramist philosophy, to remove to Basel.
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  • Arminius, fresh from Geneva, familiar with the dialectics of Beza, appeared to many the man able to speak the needed word, and so, in 1589, he was simultaneously invited by the ecclesiastical court of Amsterdam to refute Coornhert, and by Martin Lydius, professor at Franeker, to combat the two infralapsarian ministers of Delft.
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  • He afterwards studied divinity at Geneva under Calvin, and Hebrew at Paris under Jean Mercier.
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  • Ochino escaped to Geneva, and Vermigli to Zurich, thence to Basel, and finally to Strassburg, where, with Bucer's support, he was appointed professor of theology and married his first wife, Catherine Dammartin of Metz.
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  • He was invited to Geneva in 1.557, and to England again in 1561, but declined both invitations, maintaining, however, a constant correspondence with Jewel and other English prelates and reformers until his death at Zurich on the 12th of November 1562.
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  • He spent eight years of his early youth with his father in Paris and Geneva, and in 1850 graduated at New York University.
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  • From 1728 to 1734 a Bibliotheque italique, and towards the end of the century the Bibliotheque britannique (1796-1815), dealing with agriculture, literature, and science, in three separate series, were published at Geneva.
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  • In Geneva under Calvin, while the Consistoire, or ecclesiastical court, could inflict only spiritual penalties, yet the medieval idea of the duty of the state to co-operate with the church to maintain the religious purity of the community in matters of belief as well as of conduct so far survived that the civil authority was sure to punish those whom the ecclesiastical had censured.
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  • Early in 1774, on the advice of his friend Charles Victor de Bonstetten, he gave up this post and became tutor in the Tronchin family at Geneva.
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  • But in 1775 he resigned this position also, and passed his time with various friends in Geneva and Vaud, engaged in carrying his historical scheme into effect.
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  • On his return to Geneva (1783) he accepted the post of reader to the brother of his old patron, Tronchin, and occupied himself with remodelling his published work of 1780.
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  • A French translation of the German edition (as above) appeared, in 18 vols., at Paris and Geneva (1837-1851).
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  • Geneva College (Reformed Presbyterian, co-educational), established in 1849 at Northwood, Logan county, Ohio, was removed in 1880 to the borough of College Hill (pop. in 1900, 899), 1 m.
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  • The founder of the house of Savoy is Umberto Biancamano (Humbert the White-handed), a feudal lord of uncertain but probably Teutonic descent, who in 1003 was count of Salmourenc in the Viennois, in 1017 of Nyon on the Lake of Geneva, and in 1024 of the Val d'Aosta on the 4 eastern slope of the Western Alps.
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  • Thomas, who reigned until 1222, was a Ghibelline in politics and greatly increased the importance of Savoy, for he was created Imperial Vicar and acquired important extensions of territory in the Bugey, Vaud and Romont to the west of the Alps, and Carignano, Pinerolo, Moncalieri and Vigone to the east; he also exercised sway over Geneva, Albenga, Savona and Saluzzo.
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  • He fought in many campaigns against the dauphins of Viennois, the counts of Genevois, the people of Sion and Geneva, the marquesses of Saluzzo and Montferrat, and the barons of Faucigny.
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  • In 1434 he retired to the hermitage of Ripaille on the Lake of Geneva, but continued to conduct the chief affairs of the state and to mediate between foreign Powers, leaving matters of less importance to his son Louis.
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  • Although the duke strove after peace at almost any price, he was nearly always involved in war and l o st many possessions, including Geneva and Vaud.
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  • It refutes article by article the confession of Cyril Lucaris, which appeared in Latin at Geneva in 1629, and in Greek, with the addition of four "questions," in 1633.
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  • In 1769 a French translation of the whole of Shaftesbury's works, including the Letters, was published at Geneva.
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  • He took part in the various expeditions against the kingdom of Burgundy, and in 534 received as his share of the spoils of that kingdom the towns of Macon, Geneva and Lyons.
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  • In 1676 he visited Geneva on his way to France, and subsequently travelled to England and Holland.
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  • While at Geneva he taught a blind girl several branches of science, and also how to write; and this led him to publish A Method of Teaching Mathematics to the Blind.
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  • After some hesitation he escaped across the Alps to Geneva.
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  • In addition to the books already named, he wrote Italian expositions of Romans (Geneva, 1545) and Galatians (Augsburg, 1546).
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  • He travelled by Geneva, all through Switzerland, to Botzen, where he found the emperor.
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  • Servetus at Geneva makes Villanueva his birthplace, assigning it to the adjoining diocese of Lerida.
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  • An isolated passage of the Geneva testimony may be cited in favour of 1509.
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  • He left Quintana, visited Lyons and Geneva, repaired to Oecolampadius at Basel, and pushed on to Bucer and Capito at Strassburg.
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  • Late in 1545, or very early in 1546, he opened a fatal correspondence with Calvin, forwarding the manuscript of a much-enlarged revision of his theological tracts and expressing a wish to visit Geneva.
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  • On the same day he wrote to Guillaume Farel, " si venerit, modo valeat mea autoritas, vivum exire nunquam patiar," and to Pierre Viret in the same terms. Evidently Servetus had warning that if he went to Geneva it was at his peril.
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  • On Saturday the 12th of August he rode into Louyset, a village on the French side of Geneva.
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  • Next morning, having sold his horse, he walked into Geneva, put up at " the Rose," and asked for a boat to take him towards Zurich on his way to Naples.
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  • The fifteen condemnatory clauses, prefacing the sentence at Geneva, set forth in detail that he was guilty of heresies, blasphemously expressed, against the foundation of the Christian religion.
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  • No law, current in Geneva, has ever been adduced as enacting the capital sentence.
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  • Claude Rigot, the procureur-general, put it to Servetus that his legal education must have warned him of the provisions of the code of Justinian to this effect; but in 1535 all the old laws on the subject of religion had been set aside at Geneva; the only civil penalty recognized by the edicts of 1 543 being banishment.
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  • His story has been dramatized by Max Ring, Die Genfer (1850), by Jose Echegaray, La Muerte en los Labios (1880), by Albert Hamann, Servet (1881), and by Prof. Shields, The Reformer of Geneva (1897).
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  • He was disgusted with the brutality of English manners, which he paints in no flattering colours, and he found pedantry and superstition as rampant in Oxford as in Geneva.
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  • The second process is one patented by Fritz Ullmann of Geneva, who utilizes chromic acid to oxidize the phosphuretted and sulphuretted hydrogen and absorb the ammonia, and this method of purification has proved the most successful in practice, the chromic acid being absorbed by kieselgiihr and the material sold under the name of "Heratol."
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  • At the Geneva conference for the settlement of the "Alabama" claims in 1871-1872 he was one of the counsel for the United States.
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  • With him in France were his grandsons, William Temple Franklin, William Franklin's natural son, who acted as private secretary to his grandfather, and Benjamin Franklin Bache (1769-1798), Sarah's son, whom he sent to Geneva to be educated, for whom he later asked public office of Washington, and who became editor of the Aurora, one of the leading journals in the Republican attacks on Washington.
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  • The American firm assisted in funding the national debt at the time of the resumption of specie payments, and the London house were fiscal agents of the United States government in 1873-1884, and as such received the $15,50o,000 awarded by the Geneva Arbitration Court in settlement of the "Alabama Claims" against Great Britain.
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  • John Knox, who, after a chequered career, had come under the influence of Calvin at Geneva, returned to Scotland for a few months in 1 555, and shortly after (1557) that part of the Scottish nobility which had been won over to the new faith formed their first " covenant " for mutual protection.
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  • When Francis died little had been done, in spite of the government's cruelty, to check Protestantism, while a potent organ of evangelical propaganda had been developing just beyond the confines of France in the town of Geneva.
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  • In its long struggle with its bishops and with the dukes of Savoy, Geneva had turned to her neighbours for aid, especially to Bern, with which an alliance was concluded Geneva in 1526.
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  • William Farel, one of the group of Meaux, who had fled to Switzerland and had been active in the conversion of Bern, went to Geneva in 1531.
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  • After a public disputation in which the Catholics were weakly represented, and a popular demonstration in favour of the new doctrines, the council of Geneva rather reluctantly sanctioned the abolition of the Mass.
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  • Meanwhile Bern had declared war on the duke of Savoy, and had not only conquered a great part of the Pays de Vaud, including the important town of Lausanne, but had enabled Geneva to win its complete independence.
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  • As there proved to be a large number in the town councils who did not sympathize with the plans of organization recommended by Calvin and his colleagues, the town preachers were, after a year and a half of unsatisfactory labour, forced to leave Geneva.
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  • In 1541 he was induced with great difficulty to surrender once more his hopes of leading the quiet life of a scholar, and to return again to Geneva (September 1541), where he spent the remaining twenty-three years of his life.
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  • Thus " we ought," as Lindsay says, " to see in the disciplinary powers and punishments of the Consistory of Geneva not an exhibition of the working of the Church organized on the principles of Calvin, but the ordinary procedure of the town council of a medieval city.
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  • Geneva, however, with its most distinguished of Protestant theologians, became a school of Protestantism, which sent its trained men into the Netherlands, England and Scotland, and especially across the border into France.
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  • It appears to have been from France rather than from Geneva that the Presbyterian churches of Holland, Scotland and the United States derived their form of government.
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  • This was found so difficult that the remnant of the Vaudois, to the number of 2600, were at last allowed to withdraw to Geneva.
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  • Columbia University and Cornell University (q.v.), are: Union University (1795, non-sectarian), at Schenectady; Hamilton College (1812, non-sectarian), at Clinton; Colgate University (1819, non-sectarian), at Hamilton; Hobart College (1822, non-sectarian), at Geneva: Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (1824, non-sectarian), at Troy; New York University (1832, non-sectarian), in New York City; Alfred University (1836, non-sectarian), at Alfred; Fordham University (1841, Roman Catholic), in New York City; College of St Francis Xavier (1847, Roman Catholic), in New York City; College of the City of New York (1849, city); University of Rochester (1850, Baptist), at Rochester; Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn (1854, non-sectarian), at Brooklyn; Niagara University (1856, Roman Catholic), at Niagara Falls; St Lawrence University (1858, non-sectarian), at Canton; St Bonaventure's College (1859, Roman Catholic), at St Bonaventure; St Stephen's College (1860, Protestant Episcopal), at Annandale; Manhattan College (1863, Roman Catholic), at New York City; St John's College (1870, Roman Catholic), at Brooklyn; Canisius College (1870, Roman Catholic), at Buffalo; Syracuse University (1871, Methodist Episcopal), at Syracuse; Adelphi College (1896, non-sectarian), at Brooklyn; and Clarkson School of Technology (1896, non-sectarian), at Potsdam.
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  • His father, Jean Etienne Say, was of a Protestant family which had originally belonged to Nimes, but had removed to Geneva for some time in consequence of the revocation of the edict of Nantes.
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  • The principal groups are those in the Lakes of Bourget, Geneva, Neuchatel, Bienne, Zurich and Constance lying to the north of the Alps, and in the Lakes Maggiore, Varese, Iseo and Garda lying to the south of that mountain range.
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  • Fifty are enumerated in the Lake of Neuchatel, thirty-two in the Lake of Constance, twentyfour in the Lake of Geneva, and twenty in the Lake of Bienne.
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  • The settlement at Morges, one of the largest in the Lake of Geneva, is 1200 ft.
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  • When the boy was ten years old his father got entangled in a dispute with a fellow-citizen, and being condemned to a short term of imprisonment abandoned Geneva and took refuge at Lyons.
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  • During a visit to Geneva in 1754 Rousseau saw his old friend and love Madame de Warens (now reduced in circumstances and having lost all her charms), while after abjuring his abjuration of Protestantism he was enabled to take up his freedom as citizen of Geneva, to which his birth entitled him and of which he was proud.
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  • His articles on music in the Encyclopedic deal very superficially with the subject; and his Dictionnaire de musique (Geneva, 1767), though admirably written, is not trustworthy, either as a record of facts or as a collection of critical essays.
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  • The council of Geneva had joined in the condemnation of Emile, and Rousseau first solemnly renounced his citizenship, and then, in the Lettres de la montagne (1763), attacked the council and the Genevan constitution unsparingly.
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  • The Confessions and Reveries, which, read in private, had given much umbrage to persons concerned, and which the author did not intend to be published until the end of the century, appeared in Geneva in 1782.
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  • In the end the Geneva tribunal made an award requiring the payment by Great Britain to the United States of a sum of about £3,000,000.
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  • Two Roman armies had been destroyed near the Lake of Geneva, and it seemed as if a repetition of the disaster of the Allia and the capture of Rome itself might not be impossible.
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  • From 1659 to 1662 he visited the universities of Basel, Tubingen and Geneva, and commenced the study of heraldry, which he pursued throughout his life.
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  • In Geneva especially his religious views and tendencies were turned in the direction of mysticism.
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  • Having studied at Geneva, he returned to France in 1679, and was chosen minister of Venterol in Dauphine, whence he afterwards removed to the church of Vinsobres.
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  • Geneva has always been a favourite residence of foreigners, though few can ever have expected to hear that the "protestant Rome" has now a Romanist majority as regards its inhabitants.
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  • The Christian Catholic Church is also "established" at Geneva (since 1873) and is governed by the conseil superieur, composed of 25 lay members and 5 clerics.
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  • No other religious denominations are "established" at Geneva.
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  • The fairs of Geneva (held 4 times a year) are mentioned as early as 1262, and attained the height of their prosperity about Industry.
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  • Nowadays the best known industry at Geneva is that of watchmaking, which was introduced in 1587 by Charles Cusin of Autun, and two years later regulations as to the trade were issued.
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  • Of recent years its prosperity has diminished greatly, so that the watchmaking and jewelry trades in 1902 numbered respectively but 38 and 32 of the 394 establishments in Geneva which were subject to the factory laws.
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  • The local commerce of Geneva is much aided by the fact that the city is nearly entirely surrounded by "free zones," in which no customs duties are levied, though the districts are politically French: this privilege was given to Gex in 1814, and to the Savoyard districts in 1860, when they were also neutralized.
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  • Considering the small size of Geneva, till recently,it is surprising how many celebrated persons have been connected with it as natives or as residents.
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  • At that period, and in the 19th century, Geneva was a centre of light, especially in the case of various of the physical sciences.
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  • The city of Geneva is situated at the south-western extremity of the beautiful lake of the same name, whence the "arrowy Rhone" flows westwards under the seven bridges by which the two halves of the town communicate with each other.
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  • But, while lacking the medieval appearance of Fribourg or Bern, or Sion or Coire, the great number of modern fine buildings in Geneva, hotels, villas, &c., gives it an air of prosperity and comfort that attracts many visitors, though on others modern French architecture produces a blinding glare.
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  • At present the museums of various kinds at Geneva are widely dispersed, but a huge new building in course of construction (1906) will ultimately house most of them.
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  • Geneva boasts also of a fine observatory and of a number of technical schools (watchmaking, chemistry, medicine, commerce, fine arts, &c.), some of which are really annexes of the university, which in June 1906 was attended by 1158 matriculated students, of whom 903 The city and its buildings.
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  • Geneva is well supplied with charitable institutions, hospitals, &c. Among other remarkable sights of the city may be mentioned the great hydraulic establishment (built 1882-1899) of the Forces Motrices du Rhone (turbines), the singular monument set up to the memory of the late duke of Brunswick who left his fortune to the city in 1873, and the tie Jean-Jacques Rousseau now connected with the Pont des Bergues.
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  • But Geneva and Gebenna are of later date.
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  • It is possible that there may be some ground for the local tradition that Christianity was introduced into this region by Dionysius and Paracodus, who successively occupied the see of Vienne, but another tradition that the first bishop was named St Nazarius rests on a confusion, as that saint belongs to Genoa and not to Geneva.
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  • But Geneva was in no sense one of the great cities of the region, though it is mentioned in the Antonine Itinerary and in the Peutinger Table (both 4th century A.D.), no doubt owing to its important position on the bank of the Rhone, which then rose to the foot of the hill on which the original city stood.
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  • In 1032, with the rest of the kingdom of Burgundy or Arles, it reverted to the emperor Conrad II.,who was crowned king at Payerne in 1033, and in 1034 was recognized as such at Geneva by a great assembly of nobles from Germany, Burgundy and Italy, this rather unwilling surrender signifying the union of those 3 kingdoms. It is said that Conrad granted the temporal sovereignty of the city to the bishop, who, in 1162, was raised to the rank of a prince of the Holy Roman Empire, being elected, from 1215, by the chapter, but, after 1418, named directly by the pope himself.
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  • Like many other prince-bishops, the ruler of Geneva had to defend his rights: without against powerful neighbours, and within against the rising power of the citizens.
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  • These struggles constitute the entire political history of Geneva up to about 1535, when a new epoch of unrest opens with the adoption of Protestantism.
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  • The first foe without was the family of the counts of the Genevois (the region south of the city and in the neighbourhood of Annecy), who were also "protectors" (advocati) of the church of Geneva, and are first heard of in the 11th and 12th centuries.
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  • In 1250 the counts of Savoy first appear in connexion with Geneva, being mortgagees of the Genevois family, and, in 1263, practically their heirs as "protectors" of the city.
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  • One of that bishop's successors, Adhemar Fabri (1385-1388) codified and confirmed all the franchises, rights and privileges of the citizens (1387), this grant being the Magna Carta of the city of Geneva.
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  • Geneva was now surrounded on all sides by the dominions of the house of Savoy.
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  • For the most part of this period he resided in Geneva.
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  • Most probably Geneva would soon have become an integral part of the realms of the house of Savoy had it not been for the appearance of a new protector on the scene - the Swiss confederation.
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  • In the early 15th century the town of Fribourg made an alliance with Geneva for commercial purposes (the cloth warehouses of Fribourg at Geneva being enlarged in 1432 and 1465), as the cloth manufactured at Fribourg found a market in the fairs of Geneva (which are mentioned as early as 1262, and were at the height of their prosperity about 1450).
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  • The duke, however, was no better inclined towards the Swiss than towards Geneva.
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  • This nearly ruined Geneva, which, too, in 1477 had to pay a large indemnity to the Swiss army that, after the defeat of Charles the Bold, duke of Burgundy, advanced to take vengeance on the dominions of his ally, Yolande, dowager duchess of Savoy and sister of Louis XI., as well as on the bishop of Geneva, her brother-in-law.
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  • (1504-1553), to secure Geneva for his family, at first with the help of his bastard cousin John (1513-1522), the last of his house to hold the see.
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  • The two towns also, by the decision given as arbitrators at Payerne (30th December 1530), upheld their alliance with Geneva, condemned the duke to pay all the expenses of the war, and confirmed the clause as to their right to occupy Vaud; they also surrounding the exercise of the powers of vidomne by the duke with so many restrictions that in 1532 the duke, after much resistance, formally agreed to recognize the alliance of Geneva with the two towns and not to annoy the Genevese any more.
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  • Thus 1530 marks the date at which Geneva became its own mistress within, while allied externally with the Swiss confederation.
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  • In 1532 William Farel, a Protestant preacher from Dauphine, who had converted Vaud, &c., to the new belief, first came to Geneva and settled there in 1533.
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  • But although Bern supported the Reform, Fribourg did not, and in 1534 withdrew from its alliance with Geneva, while directly afterwards the duke of Savoy made a fresh attempt to seize the city.
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  • On the 10th of August 1 535 the Protestant faith was formally adopted by Geneva, but an offer of help from France having been refused, as the city was unwilling to give up any of its sovereign rights, the duke's party continued its intrigues.
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  • In July 1536 a French refugee, John Calvin, came to Geneva for a night, but was detained by Farel who found in him a powerful helper.
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  • The opposition party of the Libertins succeeded in getting them both exiled in 1538, but, in September 1541, Calvin was recalled (Farel spending the rest of his life at Neuchatel, where he died 1565) to Geneva.
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  • The strict rule of Calvin drove out many old Genevese families, while he caused to be received as citizens many French, Italian and English refugees, so that Geneva.
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  • The Bernese often interfered with the internal affairs of Geneva (while Calvin, a Frenchman, naturally looked towards France), and refused to allow the city to conclude any alliances save with itself.
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  • Gex, the Genevois and the Chablais, Geneva being thus once more placed amid the dominions of the duke; though by the same treaty (that of Lausanne, October 156 4, Calvin having died the preceding May) the alliance of Bern with Geneva was maintained.
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  • In 1579 Geneva was included in the alliance concluded by France with Bern and Soleure, while in 1584 Zurich joined Bern in another alliance with Geneva.
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  • The struggle widened as Geneva became a pawn in the great attempt of the duke of Savoy to bring back his subjects to the old faith, his efforts being seconded by Francois de Sales, the "apostle of the Chablais."
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  • In December 1602 Francois de Sales was consecrated bishop of Geneva (since 1535 the bishops had lived at Annecy), and a few days later the duke of Savoy made a final attempt to get hold of the city by a surprise attack in the night of 11-12th December 1602 (Old Style), known in history as the "Escalade," as ladders were used to scale the city walls.
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  • The peace of St Julien (2 ist of July 1603) marked the final defeat of the duke of Savoy in the long struggle waged (since 1290) by his house against thecity of Geneva.
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  • During the 17th and 18th centuries, while the Romanist majority of the Swiss cantons steadily refused to accept Geneva as even a subordinate member of the Confederation, the city itself was distracted on several occasions by attempts of the citizens, as a whole, to gain some share in the aristocratic government of the town, though these attempts were only partially successful.
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  • But the last half of the 18th century marks the most brilliant period in the literary history of Geneva, whether as regards natives or resident foreigners, while in the succeeding half century the number of Genevese scientific celebrities is remarkable.
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  • But in 1798 the city was annexed to France and became the capital of the French department of Leman (to be carefully distinguished from the Swiss canton of Leman, that is Vaud, of the Helvetic Republic, also set up in 1798), while in 1802, by the Concordat, the ancient bishopric of Geneva was suppressed.
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  • In 1819 the canton (the new portions of which were inhabited mainly by Romanists) was annexed to the bishopric of Lausanne, the bishop in 1821 being authorized to add "and of Geneva" to his episcopal style.
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  • When Geneva recovered its political independence in 1814 a new constitution was drawn up, but it was very reactionary, for there is no mention in it of the sovereignty of the people.
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  • This was a period of religious strife, due to the irritation caused by the Vatican council, and the pope's attempt to revive the bishopric of Geneva.
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  • Gaspard Mermillod (1824-1891) was named in 1864 cure of Geneva, and made bishop of Hebron in partibus, acting as the helper of the bishop of Lausanne.
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  • Early in 1873 the pope named him "vicar apostolic of Geneva," but he was expelled a few weeks later from Switzerland, not returning till 1883, when he became bishop of Lausanne, being made cardinal in 1890.
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  • The Radical government enacted severe laws as to the Romanists in Geneva, and gave privileges to the Christian Catholic Church, which, organized in 1874 in Switzerland, had absorbed the community founded at Geneva by Pere Hyacinthe, an ex-Carmelite friar.
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  • Pfleghart, Die schweizerische Uhrenindustrie (Leipzig, 1908); Regeste genevois avant 1312 (Geneva, 1866); Registres du conseil de Geneve, vols.
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  • He continued to show the same zeal and severity as before, and with so much success that Lord Clarendon, writing in his praise, expressed the opinion that "if Bancroft had lived, he would quickly have extinguished all that fire in England which had been kindled at Geneva."
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  • There he met other Swiss, among them Marat and Etienne Dumont, but their schemes for a new Geneva in Ireland - which the government favoured - were given up when Necker came to power in France, and Claviere, with most of his comrades, went to Paris.
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  • Nearly two years were passed in Geneva; visiting Italy in 1641, he remained during the winter of that year in Florence, studying the "paradoxes of the great star-gazer" Galileo, who died within a league of the city early in 1642.
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  • An incomplete and unauthorized edition of Boyle's works was published at Geneva in 1677, but the first complete edition was that of Thomas Birch, with a life, published in 1744, in five folio volumes, a second edition appearing in 1772 in six volumes, 4to.
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  • There is more than one meaning of Geneva discussed in the 1911 Encyclopedia.
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  • After spending some time at Geneva and Frankfort-on-Main, he became professor of belles-lettres in the French school of Berlin.
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  • In 1872 he visited Switzerland, and became a member of the International Workingmen's Association at Geneva.
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  • Perhaps the most important of all early editions were those of Robert Etienne, or Stephanus, of Paris and afterwards of Geneva.
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  • A fourth edition (in 16mo) published at Geneva in 1551 is remarkable for giving the division of the text into verses which has since been generally adopted.
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  • 1510 he succeeded his uncle, who had educated him, as prior of the Cluniac priory of St Victor, close to Geneva.
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  • He naturally, therefore, opposed the attempts of the duke of Savoy, aided by his relative, the bishop of the city, to maintain his rights as lord of Geneva.
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  • He had been imprisoned for political reasons, for he did not become a Protestant till after his release, and then found that his priory had been destroyed in 1534 He obtained a pension from Geneva, and was four times married, but owing to his extravagances was always in debt.
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  • He was officially entrusted in 1542 with the task of compiling a history of Geneva from the earliest times.
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  • Thus, the Revised French Geneva Bible of 1588, which was issued in folio, quarto and octavo, and became a standard text, bears the following note on the verso of the title: "Les frais de cet ouvrage, imprime en trois diuerses formes en mesme temps, pour la commodite et contentement de toutes sortes de personnes, ont este liberalemet fournis par quelques gens de bien, qui n' ont cherche gagner pour leur particulier, mais seulement de servir a Dieu et a son Eglise."
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  • He accepted, and resigned his professorship. He went abroad with his pupil in February 1764; they remained only a few days at Paris and then settled at Toulouse, at that time the seat of a parlement, where they spent eighteen months in the best society of the place, afterwards making a tour in the south of France and passing two months at Geneva.
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  • In this same year (1537) John Calvin at Geneva published his catechism for children.
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  • In Scotland both Calvin's Geneva Catechism and then the Heidelberg Catechism were translated by order of the General Assembly and annotated.
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  • With this he marched to Geneva, destroyed the bridge over the Rhone, fortified the left bank of the river, and forced the Helvetii to follow the right bank.
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  • Other prominent reformers, amongst them Coverdale, sought refuge in Geneva, the town of Calvin and Beza, where they employed their enforced leisure in planning and carrying out a new revision of the Bible.
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  • This edition was mainly due to the combined efforts of William Whittingham, Anthony Gilby and Thomas Sampson, and the expenses towards printing and publication were borne by members of the congregation at Geneva.
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  • He had begun his career as a clerk in the French Home Office, but at the outbreak of the Franco-German War he was editing Les Droits de l'homme at Montpellier, and had to take refuge at Geneva in 1871 from a prosecution instituted on account of articles which had appeared in his paper in defence of the Commune.
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  • He studied theology under Calvin and Beza at Geneva and, returning to the Netherlands in 1560, threw himself energetically into the cause of the Reformation, taking an active part in the compromise of the nobles in 1565 and the assembly of St Trond.
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  • Grece et Rome (Geneva, 1838); Greenidge, Roman Public Life, p. 65 foll., 102, 238 foil.
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  • For a long time he had been taken up with a history of the Reformation, but only one part of it, dealing with the Reformation at Geneva.
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  • 193-228; Kessler, Mani (2 vols., Berlin, 1889, 1903); Ernest Rochat, Essai sur Mani et sa doctrine (Geneva, 1897); Recherches sur le manicheisme: I.
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  • The university was opened in 1871, when the faculty and students of Genesee College (1850) removed from Lima (New York) to Syracuse - a court-ruling made it impossible for the corporation to remove; in 1872 the Geneva medical college (1835) removed to Syracuse and became a college of the university.
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  • The Aldine (Venice, 1516) was unfortunately based on a very corrupt MS. The first substantial improvements in the text were due to Casaubon (Geneva, 1587; Paris, 1620), whose text remained the basis of subsequent editions till that of Coraes (Paris, 1815-1819), who removed many corruptions.
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  • Many shallow lakes have been completely filled with alluvium and their sites are now occupied by fertile plains; this process may be seen in operation almost anywhere; a good illustration is the delta of the Rhone in Lake Geneva.
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  • His guardian sent him to Geneva, where he studied for a considerable time under the direction of Beza.
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  • In September 1620 its author was compelled to take refuge in Geneva, where he found a secure retreat for the last ten years of his life, though the hatred of the French court showed itself in procuring a sentence of death to be recorded against him more than once.
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  • He died at Geneva on the 29th of April 1630.
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  • In 1589 he obtained in Geneva and Berne sums sufficient to raise an army of mercenaries for Henry III., partly by the sale of jewels, among them the "Sancy" diamond which in 1835 found its way to the Russian imperial treasure, and partly by leading the Swiss to suppose that the troops were intended for serious war against Savoy.
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  • A severe illness wrought a change; he married his mistress, Claude Desnoz, and joined the church of Calvin at Geneva (October 1548).
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  • In 1558 he became professor in the Geneva academy, where his career was brilliant.
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  • His editions and Latin versions of the New Testament had a marked influence on the English versions of Geneva (1557 and 1560) and London (1611).
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  • After a residence of three years, however, political troubles compelled him to leave France, and he went to Geneva, where he was welcomed by Theodore Beza, at whose instigation he was appointed to the chair of humanity in the academy of Geneva.
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  • In addition to his teaching, however, he also applied himself to studies in Oriental literature, and in particular acquired from Cornelius Bertram, one of his brother professors, a knowledge of Syriac. While he resided at Geneva the massacre of St Bartholomew in 1572 drove an immense number of Protestant refugees to that city, including several of the most distinguished French men of letters of the time.
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  • Lombard, Pauliciens, Bulgares et Bons-hommes (Geneva, 1879); Episcopul Melchisedek, Lipovenismul, pp. 265 sqq.
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  • It is the junction of the railway lines from Geneva, from Brieg and the Simplon, from Fribourg and Bern, and from Vallorbe (for Paris).
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  • A funicular railway connects the upper town with the central railway station and with Ouchy, the port of Lausanne on the lake of Geneva.
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  • The bishop of Lausanne resided after 1663 at Fribourg, while from 1821 onwards he added "and of Geneva" to his title.
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  • In 1852 he quitted Geneva for London, where he settled for some years.
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  • In 1864 he returned to Geneva, and of ter some time went to Paris, where he died on the 21st of January 1870.
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  • A volume of posthumous works, in Russian, was published at Geneva in 1870.
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  • He studied theology at Geneva, and after finishing his course was appointed minister to the French community at Berlin.
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  • In1678-1679he spent some time at Grenoble as tutor in a private family; on his return to Geneva he passed his examinations and received ordination.
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  • A last attempt to live at Geneva, made at the request of relatives there, satisfied him that the theological atmosphere was uncongenial, and in 1684 he finally settled at Amsterdam, first as a moderately successful preacher, until ecclesiastical jealousy shut him out from that career, and afterwards as professor of philosophy, belles-lettres and Hebrew in the Remonstrant seminary.
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  • In 1377 it was sacked by Cardinal Robert of Geneva (afterwards Clement VII., antipope).
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  • In 1843 he was appointed to a professorship in the Ecole Evangelique at Geneva, but the development of his opinions in favour of the Liberal movement in Protestant theology led to his resigning the post six years later.
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  • Congregations were formed in Geneva, at Lausanne, where most of the Methodist and other dissenters joined the Brethren, at Vevey and elsewhere in Vaud.
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  • These are the Klippen, and they are especially important in the Chablais and between the Lakes of Geneva and Thun.
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  • The chief task of this branch was the defence of the Catholic faith, especially against the Protestantism of Geneva.
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  • Again, in1616-1618appeared a reissue of the folio German edition of 1603, and finally in 1658 came the Geneva Latin version, in three volumes folio, edited by Bitiskius.
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  • He studied at Geneva, Leyden and Paris, before becoming (1700) professor of philosophy and mathematics at the academy of Lausanne, of which he was four times rector before 1724, when the theological disputes connected with the Consensus led him to accept a chair of philosophy and mathematics at Groningen.
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  • It rises at the upper or eastern extremity of the Swiss canton of the Valais, flows between the Bernese Alps (N.) and the Lepontine and Pennine Alps (S.) till it expands into the Lake of Geneva, winds round the southernmost spurs of the Jura range, receives at Lyons its principal tributary, the Saline, and then turns southward through France till, by many mouths, it enters that part of the Mediterranean which is rightly called the Golfe du Lion (sometimes wrongly the Gulf of Lyons).
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  • (of which the Lake of Geneva claims 45 m.), while its total drainage area in 37,798 sq.
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  • Its course (excluding the Lake of Geneva, q.v.) naturally falls into three divisions: (r) from its source to the Lake of Geneva, (2) from Geneva to Lyons, and (3) from Lyons to the Mediterranean.
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  • Beyond, the river enters the wide alluvial plain, formerly occupied by the south-eastern arm of the Lake of Geneva, but now marshy and requiring frequent "correction."
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  • It passes by the hamlet of Port Valais, once on the shore of the lake, before expanding into the Lake of Geneva, between Villeneuve (right) and St Gingolph (left).
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  • But about half a mile below Geneva this limpidity is disturbed by the pouring in of the turbid torrent of the Arve (left), descending from the glaciers of the Mont Blanc range, the two currents for some distance refusing to mix.
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  • The distance from Geneva to Lyons by the tortuous course of the Rhone is about 124 m., the fall being only about 689 ft.
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  • In fact, up to Lyons, the Rhone (save when it expands into the Lake of Geneva) is a huge and very unruly mountain torrent rather than a great European river.
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  • Benoit Turretin (1588-1631), the son of Francesco Turretini, a native of Lucca, who settled in Geneva in 1579, was born at Zurich on the 9th of November 1588.
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  • He was ordained a pastor in Geneva in 1612, and became professor of theology in 1618.
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  • In 1620 he represented the Genevan Church at the national synod of Alais, when the decrees of the synod of Dort were introduced into France; and in 1621 he was sent on a successful mission to the states-general of Holland, and to the authorities of the Hanseatic towns, with reference to the defence of Geneva against the threatened attacks of the duke of Savoy.
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  • Francois Turretin (1623-1687), son of the preceding, was born at Geneva on the 17th of October 1623.
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  • After studying theology in Geneva, Leiden and France, he became pastor of the Italian congregation in Geneva in 1647; after a brief pastorate at Lyons he again returned to Geneva as professor of theology in 1653, having modestly declined a professorship of philosophy in 1650.
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  • His Institutio theologicae elencticae (3 vols., Geneva 1680-1683) has passed through frequent editions, the last reprint having been made in Edinburgh in 1847-1848.
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  • He was also the author of volumes entitled De satisfactione Christi disputationes (Geneva, 1666) and De necessaria secessione nostra ab ecclesia romana (Geneva, 1687).
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  • Jean Alphonse Turretin (1671-1737), son of the preceding, was born at Geneva on the 13th of August 1671.
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  • Tronchin, and after travelling in Holland, England and France was received into the "Venerable Compagnie des Pasteurs" of Geneva in 1693.
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  • During the next forty years of his life he enjoyed great influence in Geneva as the advocate of a more liberal theology than had prevailed under the preceding generation, and it was largely through his instrumentality that the rule obliging ministers to subscribe to the Formula Consensus Helvetica was abolished in 1706, and the Consensus itself renounced in 1725.
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  • He also wrote and laboured for the promotion of union between the Reformed and Lutheran Churches, his most important work in this connexion being Nubes testium pro moderato et pacifico de rebus theologicis judicio, et instituenda inter Protestantes concordia (Geneva, 1729).
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  • Besides this he wrote Cogitationes et dissertationes theologicae, on the principles of natural and revealed religion (2 vols., Geneva, 1737; in French, Traite de la verite de la religion chretienne) and commentaries on Thessalonians and Romans.
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  • There remained the Bernese, who had occupied some of the duke's territories in Savoy and Vaud, and in Geneva, over which he claimed certain rights.
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  • Duke Charles had died at Geneva in 1873, and as both brothers were childless the succession went to the duke of Cumberland as head of the younger branch of the house of Brunswick-Luneburg.
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  • Whilst by many the movements were ascribed to the agency of spirits, two investigators - count de Gasparin and Professor Thury of Geneva - conducted a careful series of experiments by which they claimed to have demonstrated that the movements of the table were due to a physical force emanating from the bodies of the sitters, for which they proposed the name "ectenic force."
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  • Lombard, Pauliciens bulgares et Bons-Hommes (Geneva, 1879); Fredericq, Corpus documentorum haer.
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  • Its introduction into France was forbidden in 1779; the book was burned by the public executioner, and an order was given for the arrest of the author, whose name had not appeared in the first edition, but was printed on the title page of the Geneva edition of 1780.
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  • The principal imports are cotton goods (nearly all from the United Kingdom), and in the southern region spirits - gin and geneva - almost wholly from Holland and Germany, salt, rice and other provisions, tobacco, hardware, cutlery and building material, &c., mostly from the United Kingdom.
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  • For two years his brother and he lived as fugitives in the mountains of the Cevennes, but they at last reached Geneva, where their mother afterwards joined them on escaping from the imprisonment in which she was held from the time of their flight.
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  • He was profoundly influenced by Robert Haldane, the Scottish missionary and preacher who visited Geneva.
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  • The Evangelical Society had been founded with the idea of promoting evangelical Christianity in Geneva and elsewhere, but it was found that there was also needed a theological school for the training of pastors.
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  • His principal works are - Discours sur l'etude de l'histoire de Christianisme (Geneva, 1832); Le Lutheranisme et la Reforme (Paris, 1844); Germany, England and Scotland, or Recollections of a Swiss Pastor (London, 1848); Trois siecles de lutte en Ecosse, on deux rois et deux royaumes; Le Protecteur on la republique d'Angleterre aux jours de Cromwell (Paris, 1848); Le Concile et l'infaillibilite (1870); Histoire de la Reformation au X VIt me siecle (Paris, 1835-1853; new ed., 1861-1862, in 5 vols.); and Histoire de la Reformation en Europe au temps de Calvin (8 vols., 1862-1877).
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  • The Board of Charities also had supervision of the State Training School for (delinquent) Girls (1893) at Geneva, and of the St Charles School for (delinquent) Boys (1901) at St Charles.
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  • He embraced the reformed religion, and in 1579 left Paris, where his abilities and connexions promised a brilliant career, to establish himself at Geneva.
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  • His eldest SOn, Theodore Godefroy (1580-1649), was born at Geneva on the 14th of July 1580.
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  • The second son of Denis, Jacques Godefroy (1587-1652), jurist, was born at Geneva on the 13th of September 1587.
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  • He remained faithful to the Calvinist persuasion, and soon returned to Geneva, where he became active in public affairs.
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  • He was a member of the Imperial War Cabinet and Imperial War Conference, 1918; Canadian Government representative at the International Labour Conference at Washington, 1919; and a Canadian delegate to the first assembly of the League of Nations at Geneva, 1920.
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  • He died on the 14th of July 1904 at Clarens, near Vevey, on the shores of the Lake of Geneva, whither he had gone for the sake of his health.
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  • In youth he travelled, studying at Venice and Padua, and at Geneva coming under the influence of the reformed faith as represented by Calvin.
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  • He spent the last days of his life abroad and died at Geneva, after forty-eight years of active service.
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  • He studied classical languages at Saumur and afterwards theology at Geneva.
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  • Boissier, Documents assyriens relatifs aux presages (Paris, 1894-1897); and his Choix de textes relatifs a la divination assyrobabylonienne (Geneva, 1905-1906); Ch.
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  • Almost nothing can, it seems, be learned of Argand's private life, except that in all probability he was born at Geneva in 1768.
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  • The analogy between treaty-making and legislation is striking when a congress agrees upon general principles which are afterwards accepted by a large number of states, as, for instance, in the case of the Geneva conventions for improving the treatment of the wounded.
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  • Thus the declaration of Paris, 1856 (to which, however, the United States, Venezuela and Bolivia have not yet formally acceded), prohibits the use of privateers and protects the commerce of neutrals; the Geneva conventions, 1864 and 1906, give protection to the wounded and to those in attendance upon them; the St Petersburg declaration, 1868, prohibits the employment of explosive bullets weighing less than 400 grammes; and the three Hague declarations of 1899 prohibit respectively (I) the launching of projectiles from balloons, (2) the use of projectiles for spreading harmful gases, and (3) the use of expanding bullets.
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  • The second Hague conference, of 1907, besides revising the convention made by the first conference, of 18 99, as to the laws of war on land, produced new conventions, dealing respectively with the opening of hostilities; neutral rights and duties in land warfare; the status of enemy merchant ships at the outbreak of war; the conversion of merchant ships into ships of war; submarine mines; bombardment by naval forces; the application of the Geneva principles to naval warfare; the rights of maritime capture; the establishment of an international prize court; and neutral rights and duties in maritime warfare.
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  • In point of population it is exceeded in Switzerland by Zurich, Basel and Geneva, though the number of inhabitants has risen from 27,558 in 1850 and 43,197 in 1880 to 64,227 in 1900.
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  • After figuring for some years at the principal provincial theatres of France and Holland, he became director of the playhouse at Geneva.
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  • Five years (1835-1840) were spent in Switzerland and Italy, in semi-retirement in the company of Madame la comtesse d'Agoult (George Sand's friend and would-be rival, known in literary circles as " Daniel Stern," by whom Liszt had three children, one of them afterwards Frau Cosima Wagner): these years were devoted to further study in playing and composition, and were interrupted only by occasional appearances at Geneva, Milan, Florence and Rome, and by annual visits to Paris, when a famous contest with Thalberg took place in 1837.
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  • They spent one year at Paris, and two at Geneva, whence they removed to Heidelberg.
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  • The First Book of Discipline set forth the whole of the proposed religious and educational constitution, and this book speaks of " the order of Geneva which is now in use in some of our churches."
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  • The type of religion found in these documents is that of Geneva, the unit being the self-governing congregation, and the great aim of the system the pure preaching of the Word.
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  • He brought with him from Geneva, where he had been the colleague of Beza, a fervent hatred of ecclesiastical tyranny and a clear grasp of the Presbyterian church system.
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  • Theodore Beza from Geneva and Peter Martyr Vermigli from Zurich appeared at the colloquy; the German theologians to whom invitations had been despatched only arrived in Paris after the discussion was broken off.
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  • Voltaire, in his Siècle de Louis XIV (1751), told the story of the mysterious masked prisoner with many graphic details; and, under the heading of "Ana" in the Questions sur l'encyclopedie (Geneva, 1771), he asserted that he was a bastard brother of Louis XIV., son of Mazarin and Anne of Austria.
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  • Alphonse de Candolle (Geographic botanique, p. 798) informs us that several botanists of Paris, Geneva, and especially of Montpellier, have sown the seeds of many hundreds of species of exotic hardy plants, in what appeared to be the most favourable situations, but that in hardly a single case has any one of them become naturalized.
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  • On the 20th of September they elected at Fondi the Cardinal Robert of Geneva, who called himself Clement VII.
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  • At Geneva he found a more congenial pastorate.
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  • The chief places where it is carried on are in the neighbourhood of the Rhine, on the Lake of Geneva and in Tirol.
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  • Amongst places in the Rhine and its vicinity may be mentioned Kreuznach, Neustadt, Riidesheim and St Goar; on the Lake of Geneva are Montreux and Vevey; and in Tirol Gries and Meran.
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  • The massacre of St Bartholomew - occurring as he was about to accompany the bishop of Valence on an embassy to Poland - induced him with other Huguenots to retire to Geneva, where he was received with open arms, and was appointed a professor in the academy.
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  • In 1920 he was made an Imperial Privy Councillor and the same year was a member of the Canadian delegation to the first assembly of the League of Nations at Geneva.
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  • - SOCrates' History has been edited by Stephanus (Paris, 1544; Geneva, 1612), Valesius (Paris, 1659 sqq.), Reading (Cambridge, 1720), Hussey (Oxford, 1853, reissued by Bright, 1878).
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  • He studied at Geneva, Groningen and Leiden, and after visiting France and England was in 1642 appointed professor of church history in his native town.
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  • In Geneva horse-chestnuts are largely consumed by grazing stock, a single sheep receiving 2 lb.
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  • By way of compromise John Knox and other ministers drew up a new liturgy based upon earlier Continental Reformed Services, which was not deemed satisfactory, but which on his removal to Geneva he published in 1556 for the use of the English congregations in that city.
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  • The Geneva book made its way to Scotland, and was used here and there by Reformed congregations.
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  • "The rubrics as retained from the Book of Geneva made provision for an extempore prayer before the sermon, and allowed the minister some latitude in the other two prayers.
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  • The rubrics of the Scottish portion of the book are somewhat stricter, and, indeed, one or two of the Geneva rubrics were made more absolute in the Scottish emendations; but no doubt the ` Book of Common Order' is best described as a discretionary liturgy."
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  • This (with the exception of the bracketed words) was taken over from the Book of Geneva.
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  • The first meeting of the tribunal took place on the 15th of December 1871 in the Hotel de Ville, Geneva.
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  • Gautier (Geneva, 1878); the great work, Ihya ul-` Ulum (" Revival of the sciences") (Bulaq, 1872; Cairo, 1889); see a commentary by al-Murtada called the Ithaf, published in 13 vols.
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  • Then he went to Rome and Naples and visited Vesuvius and Pompeii, called on Volta at Milan, spent the summer in Geneva, and returning to Rome occupied the winter with an inquiry into the composition of ancient colours.
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  • On the 10th of February 1829 he suffered a second attack of paralysis which rendered his right side quite powerless, but under the care of his brother, Dr John Davy (1791-1868), he rallied sufficiently to be removed to Geneva, where he died on the 29th of May.
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  • Favre, Recherches geologiques dans la partie centrale de la chafne du Caucase (Geneva, 18 75); Batsevich, Simonovich and others, Mat.
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  • After withdrawing to Fondi to reconsider the election, the cardinals finally resolved to regard Urban as an intruder and the Holy See as still vacant, and an almost unanimous vote was given in favour of Robert of Geneva (loth of September 1378), who took the name of Clement VII.
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  • Another argument is that of Professor von Morlot, based on a railway section through a conical accumulation of gravel and alluvium, which the torrent of the Tiniere has gradually built up where it enters the Lake of Geneva near Villeneuve.
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  • He then moved to Veytaux, on the shore of the Lake of Geneva, where he continued to reside till the fall of the empire.
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  • At the age of twenty-one he was nominated professor of Hebrew at Geneva on the recommendation of Theodor Beza.
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  • In 1606 he became professor of theology, in 1608 pastor, or parish minister, at Geneva, and in the following year he succeeded Beza as professor of theology.
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  • He held a high place among the reformers of Geneva, by whom he was sent on a mission to France in 1614.
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  • In 1645 he resigned his professorship, and died at Geneva on the 3rd of October 1649.
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  • On the evening of the 9th of September 1881, after the military demonstration in Abdin Square, Riaz was dismissed; broken in health he went to Europe, remaining at Geneva until the fall of Arabi.
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  • He was the son of Charles Gaspard de la Rive (1770-1834), who studied medicine at Edinburgh, and after practising for a few years in London, became professor of pharmaceutical chemistry at the academy of Geneva in 1802 and rector in 1823.
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  • After a brilliant career as a student, he was appointed at the age of twenty-two to the chair of natural philosophy in the academy of Geneva.
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  • In 1860, when the annexation of Savoy and Nice had led the Genevese to fear French aggression, de la Rive was sent by his fellow-citizens on a special embassy to England, and succeeded in securing a declaration from the English government, which was communicated privately to that of France, that any attack upon Geneva would be regarded as a cases belli.
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  • His son, Lucien De La Rive, born at Geneva on the 3rd of April 1834, published papers on various mathematical and physical subjects, and with Edouard Sarasin carried out investigations on the propagation of electric waves.
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  • After wandering under an assumed name for three months through Modena, Milan and Turin, he at last reached Geneva, where he enjoyed the friendship of the most distinguished citizens, and was on excellent terms with the great publishing firms. But in an evil hour he was induced to visit a Catholic village within Sardinian territory in order to hear mass on Easter day, where he was kidnapped by the agents of the Sardinian government, conveyed to the castle of Miolans and thence successively transferred to Ceva and Turin.
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  • He was educated at Paris and Geneva, and began his life-work in 1825 as founder and pastor of a Protestant church in Naples, whence he removed in 1827 to Lyons.
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  • (At the Geneva arbitration conference these " national claims " were abandoned.) Under pressure from the president, on the ground that Sumner was no longer on speaking terms with the secretary of state, he was deposed on the 10th of March 1871 from the chairmanship of the committee on foreign relations, in which he had served with great distinction and effectiveness throughout the critical years since 1861.
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  • He afterwards spent a year in Geneva, and was powerfully influenced by the strict moral life and rigid ecclesiastical discipline prevalent there, and also by the preaching and the piety of the Waldensian professor, Antoine Leger, and the converted Jesuit preacher, Jean de Labadie.
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  • Of a retiring, meditative disposition, Jacobi associated himself at Geneva mainly with the literary and scientific circle of which the most prominent member was Lesage.
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  • The average annual temperature of the state for seventeen years preceding 1903 was 54.3° F., the warmest mean being 56-0°,the Elwood Minden Geneva Wilber N Beaver City, .
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  • In the course of 1872 the arbitrators met at Geneva.
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  • - In addition to the copious authorities mentioned in the text above, see Gabriel Cramer, Introduction a l'analyse des lignes courbes alge'briques (Geneva, 1750).
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  • In 1847 he became professor of zoology at Giessen, and in 1852 professor of geology and afterwards also of zoology at Geneva, where he died on the 5th of May 1895.
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  • Published under the cover, of a pseudonym at Geneva in 1667, it was supposed to be addressed by a gentleman of Verona, Severinus de Monzambano, to his brother Laelius.
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  • Many of them are famous as summer resorts, notably Lake Geneva, Green Lake, the lakes in Waukesha county and the famous "four lakes" near Madison.
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  • Historically, great issues have hung upon the dislike by which High Lutheranism and High Anglicanism, those two midway fortresses between Rome and Geneva, have been estranged from each other.
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  • This council has held biennial sessions in London, Amsterdam, Geneva and Boston.
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  • By Limborch he was introduced to Le Clerc, the youthful representative of letters and philosophy in Limborch's college, who had escaped from Geneva and Calvinism to the milder atmosphere of Holland and the Remonstrants.
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  • He lived with his uncle and attended as an out-student the College de la Marche, at that time under the regency of Mathurin Cordier, a man of character, learning and repute as a teacher, who in later days followed his pupil to Switzerland, taught at Neuchatel, and died in Geneva in 1564.
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  • The syndics of Geneva address him in a letter written in 1540, and still preserved, as "Docteur Caulvin."
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  • In Geneva his progress was arrested, and his resolution to pursue the quiet path of studious research was dispelled by what he calls the "formidable obtestation" of Guillaume Fare1.2
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  • Calvin at first declined, alleging as an excuse his need of securing more time for personal improvement, but ultimately, believing that he was divinely called to this task and that "God had stretched forth His hand upon me from on high to arrest me," he consented to remain at Geneva.
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  • He hurried to Basel, transacted some business, and returned to Geneva in August 1536.
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  • Calvin was in his twenty-eighth year when he was thus constrained to settle at Geneva; and in this city the rest of his life, with the exception of a brief interval, was spent.
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  • Though the people of Geneva had cast off the obedience of Rome, it was largely a political revolt against the duke of Savoy, and they were still (says Beza) "but very imperfectly enlightened in divine knowledge; they had as yet hardly emerged from the filth of the papacy."
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  • Caroli brought a counter-charge against the Geneva divines of Sabellianism and Arianism, because they would not enforce the Athanasian creed, and had not used the words "Trinity" and "Person" in the confession they had drawn up. It was a struggle between the thoroughgoing humanistic reformer who drew his creed solely from the "word of God" and the merely semi-Protestant reformer who looked on the old creed as a priceless heritage.
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  • In a synod held at Bern the matter was fully discussed, when a verdict was given in favour of the Geneva divines, and Caroli deposed from his office and banished.
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  • These Calvin regarded as matters of indifference, provided the magistrates did not make them of importance, by seeking to enforce them; and he was the more willing to concede them, because he hoped thereby to meet the wishes of the Bernese brethren whose ritual was less simple than that established by Farel at Geneva.
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  • During Calvin's absence disorder and irreligion had prevailed in Geneva.
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  • An attempt was made by Cardinal Jacopo Sadoleto (1477-1547), bishop of Carpentras, to take advantage of this so as to restore the papal supremacy in that district; but this design Calvin, at the request of the Bernese authorities, who had been consulted by those of Geneva, completely frustrated, by writing such a reply to the letter which the bishop had addressed to the Genevese, as constrained him to desist from all further efforts.
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  • He seems also to have kept up his connexion with Geneva by addressing letters of counsel and comfort to the faithful there who continued to regard him with affection.
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  • It was whilst he was still at Strassburg that there appeared at Geneva a translation of the Bible into French, bearing Calvin's name, but in reality only revised and corrected by him from the version of Olivetan.
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  • He now became the sole directive spirit in the church at Geneva.
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  • It is only necessary here to sketch the leading events of Calvin's life after his return to Geneva.
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  • In the end Bolsec was banished from Geneva; he ultimately rejoined the Roman communion and in 1577 avenged himself by a particularly slanderous biography of Calvin.
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  • After many wanderings, and after having been condemned to death for heresy at Vienne, whence he was fortunate enough to make his escape, Servetus arrived in August 1553 at Geneva on his way to Naples.
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  • In addition to these controversies on points of faith, he was for many years greatly disquieted, and sometimes even endangered, by the opposition offered by the libertine party in Geneva to the ecclesiastical discipline which he had established there.
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  • The men whom he trained at Geneva carried his principles into almost every country in Europe, and in varying degree these principles did much for the cause of civil liberty.
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  • Thence he went to Geneva, where he came into intercourse with Mazzini; but, unlike most of the German exiles, he was already an adherent of the socialist creed, which at that time was more strongly held in France.
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  • 'AUSTIN PHELPS - (1820-1890), American Congregational minister and educationalist, was born on the 7th of January 1820 at West Brookfield, Massachusetts, son of Eliakim Phelps,' a clergyman, who, during the boyhood of his son was principal of a girls' school in Pittsfield, Massachusetts, and later pastor of a Presbyterian church in Geneva, New York.
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  • With her remaining child she wandered, under the name of duchesse de Saint-Leu, from Geneva to Aix, Carlsruhe and Augsburg.
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  • Collecting an army, Conrad marched into Burgundy in 1033, was chosen and crowned king of Peterlingen, and after driving his rival from the land was again crowned at Geneva in 1034.
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  • He was at Geneva in December 1558, and is said to have participated in the preparation of the Geneva version of the Bible.
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  • Most of the fresh evidence is given in La Notion de l'&re supreme chez les peuples non-civilises, by Rene Hoffmann (Geneva, 1907).
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  • By his alliance with the Grisons (1603) he guaranteed the integrity of the Valtellina, the natural approach to Lombardy for the imperial forces; and by his intimate union with Geneva he controlled the routes by which the Spaniards could reach their hereditary possessions in Franche-Comt and the Low Countries from Italy.
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  • Disappointed in his early hope of entering the navy, he became apprentice to an apothecary in his native town; but seeing little prospect of advancement in that calling, he soon moved to Geneva (in 1816).
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  • His father was a native of Custrin in Pomerania, and had, after the publication of some works on international law, been elected as professor of public law at Geneva, of which he became a citizen.
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  • But while on a visit to Geneva, Madame de Vermenou met Suzanne Curchod, the daughter of a pastor near Lausanne, to whom Gibbon had been engaged, and brought her back as her companion to Paris in 1764.
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  • Meanwhile he had made interest with the French government by lending it money, and was appointed resident at Paris by the republic of Geneva.
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  • Not without difficulty he reached Coppet, near Geneva, an estate he had bought in 1784.
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  • The more important lakes are Van, 5100 ft., about twice the size of the Lake of Geneva, and Urmia, 4000 ft., both salt; Gokcha or Sevan, 5870 ft., discharging into the Aras; and Chaldir, into the Kars Chai.
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