General sentence example

general
  • She chose a trail that appeared to head in the general direction she wanted to go and began walking.
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  • Life in general was going down hill for her then.
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  • "Is that general advice or forecasting?" she asked, frowning.
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  • In general, when you have such a salesperson, the information is useful.
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  • From the third room came sounds of laughter, the shouting of familiar voices, the growling of a bear, and general commotion.
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  • The general is paging me.
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  • Kutuzov was saying to a general who stood beside him, not taking his eye from the battlefield.
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  • "No more lunatic rages or attempts to blast himself to the moon or whatever he was doing last week," General Greene added with a shake of his head.
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  • "I'm having trouble with memories in general," she admitted.
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  • "It's the least of my concerns," the general mumbled, jabbing at the keypad.
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  • As I sounded through the ice I could determine the shape of the bottom with greater accuracy than is possible in surveying harbors which do not freeze over, and I was surprised at its general regularity.
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  • General Loring kindly showed me a copy of one of the wonderful bronze doors of the Baptistry of Florence, and I felt of the graceful pillars, resting on the backs of fierce lions.
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  • She twisted in her seat to face General Greene, one of the three people on the compound authorized by the manic commander to be present in the command hub alone.
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  • The commander of the regiment was an elderly, choleric, stout, and thick-set general with grizzled eyebrows and whiskers, and wider from chest to back than across the shoulders.
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  • In general, the learned consensus dubbed the whole business with indifference.
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  • She sat in the general manager's office of the fast food joint where she'd worked for six months.
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  • General Greene's gruff voice held a tense note.
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  • The general looked the captain up and down as he came up panting, slackening his pace as he approached.
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  • We dined at a small Mexican restaurant and spent the meal discussing general topics.
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  • When the eager but misrepeated words had reached their destination in a cry of: "The general to the third company," the missing officer appeared from behind his company and, though he was a middle-aged man and not in the habit of running, trotted awkwardly stumbling on his toes toward the general.
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  • Having reached the left flank, instead of going to the front where the firing was, he began to look for the general and his staff where they could not possibly be, and so did not deliver the order.
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  • He gave the question some thought before responding with an illusive and general answer.
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  • He'd served as Damian's executioner for thousands of years, a position he found fitting for his general dislike of the human capacity for evil.
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  • His second-in-command is General Greene, a war hero worth his pay.
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  • I'll probably have to stay with Arnie if the general isn't around.
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  • "We'll have to post guards with the security system inoperable," General Greene muttered as he stepped through the hole in the door.
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  • General Greene asked from his position at a small planning table in the corner.
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  • In general, we don't have the people we need to permanently fix the East Coast.
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  • General Greene asked, his voice muffled over the communications system.
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  • "Yes," said the soldier; "but I shaved them off long ago, and since then I have risen from a private to be the Chief General of the Royal Armies."
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  • A member of the Hofkriegsrath from Vienna had come to Kutuzov the day before with proposals and demands for him to join up with the army of the Archduke Ferdinand and Mack, and Kutuzov, not considering this junction advisable, meant, among other arguments in support of his view, to show the Austrian general the wretched state in which the troops arrived from Russia.
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  • The general became silent, angrily pulling down his tight scarf.
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  • Bagration had sent Zherkov to the general commanding that left flank with orders to retreat immediately.
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  • Besides, in the actions of a statesman one has to distinguish between his acts as a private person, as a general, and as an emperor.
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  • Everything was similar: the ladies' subtle talk, the cards, the general raising his voice at the card table, and the samovar and the tea cakes; only one thing was lacking that he had always seen at the evening parties he wished to imitate.
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  • That sounded general enough, but her strange response set him back a beat.
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  • Then it would suddenly seem to him that it was not she but he was so unusually beautiful, and that that was why they all looked so at him, and flattered by this general admiration he would expand his chest, raise his head, and rejoice at his good fortune.
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  • This general, hating Barclay, rode to visit a friend of his own, a corps commander, and, having spent the day with him, returned to Barclay and condemned, as unsuitable from every point of view, the battleground he had not seen.
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  • Well, good-by, General, he added, and rode into the yard past Prince Andrew and Denisov.
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  • The next stop on his list was visiting Ms. Lydia Larkin, deputy sheriff, whose presentation of a speeding ticket and general attitude still pissed him off, just remembering it.
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  • General Greene is headed down there this morning.
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  • So they welcomed Coriolanus very kindly and made him the general of their army.
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  • "You know," said the princess in the same tone of voice and still in French, turning to a general, "my husband is deserting me?
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  • Amid the general rumble, the groans and voices of the wounded were more distinctly heard than any other sound in the darkness of the night.
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  • "My mistress, daughter of General in Chief Prince Nicholas Bolkonski who died on the fifteenth of this month, finding herself in difficulties owing to the boorishness of these people"--he pointed to the peasants--"asks you to come up to the house....
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  • Not being a military man I can't say I have understood it fully, but I understand the general position.
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  • The chitchat roamed from details of Friday's luncheon to views on crime and punishment, which, as the booze went down, became more and more general.
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  • I know this is far-fetched and I'm probably only fantasizing because I'm so pissed off at that son of a bitch Fitzgerald in general.
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  • Or killing in general.
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  • She watched General Greene stride towards the command hub.
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  • General Greene was the first to recommend his removal, and a voice in her mind whispered that maybe Arnie had figured something out he shouldn't have, too.
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  • General Greene hadn't acted surprised about the missing keypads.
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  • They turned to see the tall five-star general stride towards them, right arm still at his side while his other swung.
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  • "General Theodore Greene," he said, offering his left hand.
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  • General Greene motioned them forward, slowing when he saw Dan limp.
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  • General Greene asked as they walked.
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  • "Wait," the general said at his movement.
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  • "It's a dangerous toy is what it is," General Greene responded.
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  • How bad is it out there? the general asked.
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  • "Turn that off, Lana," the general ordered in a softer tone as he glanced towards a woman manning the screen on the left.
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  • "Elise, you're taking your men out to the west side for supplies tonight," the general replied.
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  • "You're in the dungeon next week," the general muttered.
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  • "Happy?" the general called after her.
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  • "C'mon, boys," the general said, ushering them towards the doors.
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  • "Lana, walk with us," the general added.
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  • Let her know what you and your men need, the general instructed them.
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  • Both Lana and the general turned icy, less-than-impressed looks on him, and for once, Brady was glad he couldn't speak.
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  • "On second thought, you can join Elise's men," the general replied in a clipped tone.
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  • "What's wrong?" the general demanded.
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  • The general was quiet as he escorted them to one of the squat buildings and inside.
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  • He lowered Dan into a chair outside the doctor's quarters and was about to sit for a breather when the general slapped him on the arm.
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  • The general's stride quickened as he exited the medical facilities towards the direction both women had gone.
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  • The general motioned to a greenpod, and they squeezed into the small vehicle.
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  • "Arnie," General Greene said at last.
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  • "Let her go!" the general bellowed.
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  • "Move, Elise," the general snapped, pushing the guard commander away.
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  • "Good girl," the general said with a satisfied smile as he took it.
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  • "He's at peace now," General Greene responded.
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  • The general's jaw clenched, but he said nothing.
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  • She accepted it and activated her channel on the net, not surprised when she heard the general's voice.
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  • Lana made her way through them to the general and followed his gaze.
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  • "We have a security breach," the general said, his voice unsteady.
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  • There were messages from Mr. Tim mixed in with messages from General Greene.
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  • General Greene is leading the Western insurgency.
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  • Her gaze went to the general, who held tears in his eyes.
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  • General Greene's messages, however, made her sick to her stomach.
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  • She stared for a long moment at the net code indicating that the receiver of the general's messages was located in the West Control Center.
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  • General Greene spoke finally, his voice jarring her out of her thoughts.
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  • I want to know what this is, where it came from, the general ordered.
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  • Lana looked up at the scenes on the screens then at the general.
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  • "Tell me you know where the rest of those keypads are," General Greene said.
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  • She looked at her micro and read another of General Greene's messages.
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  • Her hand shaking, she checked the log to see it had last been accessed by General Greene twenty-five hours ago.
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  • Lana checked the general's location, not surprised to find him at the west wall.
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  • An uneasy instinct filled her, the same that warned her about General Greene.
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  • We think General Greene and a few others got away.
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  • His instincts warned him there was no stopping someone like General Greene, once he set out to find someone.
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  • "We'll start with how to break some general holds," Elise said.
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  • She'd never thought to open the supply points for the general public.
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  • He suspected General Greene had issued one lookout and Tim the other.
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  • She'd been safe for ten days on her own; maybe hacking into the fed system to change her profile was enough to draw the attention of someone working for General Greene.
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  • I gave him a general overview and he picked the times, unless something hot was cooking.
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  • There's no advance notice except the general area.
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  • The least they could have done was issue a general descrip­tion.
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  • A family out fishing had the catch of the day, in the same general area where Billie had bobbed to light.
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  • Fred sulked while Dean felt guilty for treating the old man's efforts so cavalierly but was too pissed in general to jump up and apologize.
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  • It was general knowledge that Lori had been promiscuous in her youth.
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  • Everything was a struggle, and life in general wasn't heading towards her goal.
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  • Alex liked to be in control — not of her, but of life in general.
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  • The woman's features were flushed, the man gesturing in Taran's general direction.
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  • That was the general idea.
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  • The two books mentioned remained unnoticed by the reading public, and Lotze first became known to a larger circle through a series of works which aimed at establishing in the study of the physical and mental phenomena of the human organism in its normal and diseased states the same general principles which had been adopted in the investigation of inorganic phenomena.
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  • The herds, which are led by females, appear in general to be family parties; and although commonly restricted to from thirty to fifty, may occasionally include as many as one hundred head.
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  • As regards general form, the most distinctive feature is the great relative length of the tail, which reaches the hocks, and is donkey-like rather than deer-like in form.
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  • Although new-born fawns are spotted, the adults are in the main uniformly coloured; the general tint of the coat at all seasons being reddish tawny with a more or less marked tendency to grey.
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  • In a variety of ways it does a great deal of social service similar to that of gilds of help. Its administration has always been in the hands of laymen, and it works through local "conferences" or branches, the general council having been suspended because it declined to accept a cardinal as its official head.
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  • This is found to be a general rule.
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  • Of more general interest, however, are his labours in pure mathematics, which appear for the most part in Crelle's Journal from 1828 to 1858.
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  • From July to October the level of the Senegal shows a series of fluctuations, with, however, a general increase till the end of August or beginning of September, when the maximum occurs.
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  • The following is the general idea derived from these researches.
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  • Tables towards the wider, more general and more humane jus gentium.
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  • Having once formulated his idea, he made it more general in order to apply it to the history of all nations.
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  • General Grant had served two terms (1869-1877), and the unwritten law of custom condemned his being given another.
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  • In the United Kingdom the employment of brewery yeasts selected from a single cell has not come into general use; it may probably be accounted for in a great measure by conservatism and the wrong application of Hansen's theories.
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  • This view, however, has not met with general acceptance.
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  • The anatomical construction of these plants presents many peculiarities which have given rise to discussion as to the allocation of the order among the dicotyledons or among the monocotyledons, the general balance of opinion being in favour of the former view.
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  • In 1798, when the French occupied Rome, Consalvi was imprisoned in the castle of St Angelo, together with other papal officials, in retaliation for the murder of General Duphot; a proposal to whip him through the streets was defeated by the French general in command, but, after three months' confinement, he was deported with a crowd of galley slaves to Naples, and his property was confiscated as that of "an enemy of the Roman republic."
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  • Meaning in general the "king's court," it is difficult to define the curia regis with precision, but it is important and interesting because it is the germ from which the higher courts of law, the privy council and the cabinet, have sprung.
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  • The retreat of the British force gave Chauncey time to complete this vessel, the "General Pike," which was so far superior to anything under Yeo's command that she was said to be equal in effective strength to the whole of the British flotilla.
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  • Its three main objects, the peace of Christendom, the crusade and the reform of the church, could be secured only by general agreement among the powers, and Leo or the council failed to secure such agreement.
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  • He was the son of a general officer in the Sardinian army who was killed at the battle of Mondovi in 1796.
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  • Before applying the solution to a mathematical investigation of the present question, it may be well to consider the matter for a few moments from a more general point of view.
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  • The observed facts as to polarization are thus readily explained, and the general law connecting the intensity of the scattered light with the wave-length follows almost as easily from considerations of dimensions.
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  • The general conclusion would appear to be that, while as seen from the earth's surface much of the light from the sky is due to comparatively gross suspended matter, yet an appreciable proportion is attributable to the molecules of air themselves, and that at high elevations where the blue is purer, the latter part may become predominant.
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  • Archimedes died at the capture of Syracuse by Marcellus, 212 B.C. In the general massacre which followed the fall of the city, Archimedes, while engaged in drawing a mathematical figure on the sand, was run through the body by a Roman soldier.
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  • In 1627 he commanded the large forces assembled at the siege of La Rochelle; and some years after in 1635, during the Thirty Years' War, he was general of the French army in Lorraine.
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  • Liberated by an amnesty, Garibaldi returned once more to Caprera amidst general sympathy.
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  • On the 3rd of July he defeated the Austrians at Monte Saello, on the 7th at Lodzone, on the 10th at Darso, on the 16th at Condino, on the 19th at Ampola, on the 21st at Bezzecca, but, when on the point of attacking Trent, he was ordered by General Lamarmora to retire.
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  • It is thus difficult to form a judgment as to what has most claim to acceptance as the general law, and what may be regarded as local or exceptional.
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  • In general, a + and a_ both tend to be less on cloudy than on bright days.
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  • These will suffice to give a general idea of the mean values met with.
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  • Much more evidence would be required to produce a general acceptance of any of the above periods.
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  • In the first, or general, prologue, Douglas claims a higher position for Virgil than for his master Chaucer, and attacks Caxton for his inadequate rendering of a French translation of the Aeneid.
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  • A part of the Afghan force was encamped on the west bank of the Kushk, and on the 29th of March General Komarov sent an ultimatum demanding their withdrawal.
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  • In general the richer western part is devoted to crops, and the eastern part to raising live-stock.
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  • On the other hand, a two-thirds majority of each house of the legislature may submit an amendment or amendments to popular vote at the next general election, when the approval of a majority of the qualified voters is necessary for ratification.
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  • The state revenue is derived mainly from a general property tax, licence taxes levied on various businesses and occupations, a collateral inheritance tax and a capitation tax.
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  • In 1 774 the governor of Virginia, Lord Dunmore, himself led a force over the mountains, and a body of militia under General Andrew Lewis dealt the Shawnee Indians under Cornstalk a crushing blow at Point Pleasant at the junction of the Kanawha and the Ohio rivers, but Indian attacks continued until after the War of Independence.
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  • There is a statue of General Louis Charles Desaix de Veygoux in the Place de Jaude.
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  • Loyal to American interests and devoted to General Washington, he was one of the most useful of the state executives during the War of Independence.
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  • It is impossible to make any general law which will work with every particular act and not fail in some circumstances.
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  • He was anxiously sensitive about the opinion of others, eager for their sympathy and regard, and, in general, impressionable to their influence.
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  • The general elevation in the south part of the state is much lower, and large areas bordering the Paraguay are swampy, partially submerged plains which the sluggish rivers are unable to drain.
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  • At La Carlota the Spanish government established a station for the study of the culture of sugar-cane; by the American government this has been converted into a general agricultural experiment station, known as "Government Farm."
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  • These "apparelled albs" (albae paratae) continued in general use in the Western Church till the 16th century, when a tendency to dispense with the parures began, Rome itself setting the example.
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  • The general construction of wooden screens is close panelling beneath, on which stands screen-work composed of slender turned balusters or regular wooden mullions, supporting tracery more or less rich with cornices, crestings, &c., and often painted in brilliant colours and gilded.
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  • Simple roofs in general use with a double slope are the " coupled rafter roofs," the rafters meeting at the highest point upon a horizontal ridge-piece which stiffens the framework and gives a level ridge-line.
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  • Hastings himself always regarded them as incidents in his general scheme of foreign policy.
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  • The council consisted of General Clavering and the Hon.
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  • From that time forth, though he could not always command an absolute majority in council, Hastings was never again subjected to gross insult, and his general policy was able to prevail.
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  • The understanding between Hastings and Francis, originating in this state of affairs, was for a short period extended to general policy.
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  • At the outbreak of the Civil War the city was abandoned, and the navy yard was burned by the Federals in April 1861; Norfolk was then occupied until the 9th of May 1862 by Virginia troops, first under General William Booth Taliaferro (1822-1898) and later under General Benjamin Huger (1806-1877).
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  • On the one hand the retributive principle itself has been very largely superseded by the protective and the reformative; on the other punishments involving bodily pain have become objectionable to the general sense of society.
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  • By arrangement with the Chinese government a branch of the Imperial maritime customs has been established there for the collection of duties upon goods coming from or going to the interior, in accordance with the general treaty tariff.
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  • At the general elections of 1881 after the fall of the Ferry cabinet he was returned to the chamber on a programme which included the separation of Church and State, a policy of decentralization, and the imposition of an income-tax.
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  • In July 1644 he went to Dorsetshire on military service, and on the 3rd of August received a commission as field-marshal general.
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  • He appears to have taken no part in the attempt to impeach Clarendon on a general charge of treason.
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  • This universal motive is further connected, as by Paley, through the will of God, with the "general good, the root where out all our rules of conduct and sentiments of honour are to branch."
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  • The General Assembly of Connecticut, in January 1774, erected the valley into the township of Westmoreland and attached it to Litchfield (disambiguation)|Litchfield county, and in October 1776 the same body erected it into Westmoreland county.
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  • He claimed to be recognized as guardian of his young son Philip and as regent of the Netherlands, but some of the states refused to agree to his demands and disorder was general.
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  • Some reforms were adopted, the public peace was proclaimed without any limitation of time and a general tax was levied.
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  • He soon took the field, but after his failure to capture Padua the league broke up; and his sole ally, the French king, joined him in calling a general council at Pisa to discuss the question of Church reform.
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  • The emperor's share in the work is not clear, but it seems certain that the general scheme and many of the incidents are due to him.
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  • Mr. Snowden made himself extremely unpopular during the World War owing to his pacifist opinions, and was one of the Socialist members of Parliament who lost their seats at the general election of 1918.
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  • In England his pathological work won general recognition.
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  • Turning to the tailless or so-called Manx cats, in which the tail should be represented merely by a tuft of hair without any remnant of bone, it seems that the strain is to be met with in many parts of Russia, and there is a very general opinion that it originally came from Japan or some other far eastern country.
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  • In the royal Siamese breed the head is rather long and pointed, the body also elongated with relatively slender limbs, the coat glossy and close, the eyes blue, and the general colour some shade of cream or pink, with the face, ears, feet, under-parts, and tail chocolate or seal-brown.
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  • The original land-holding aristocracy, which had probably initiated and for a time monopolized commerce, was partly supplanted by prosperous upstarts, and with the general increase of prosperity began to lose its hold upon the community of artisans.
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  • On the death of this general Descartes quitted the imperial service, and in July 1621 began a peaceful tour through Moravia, the borders of Poland, Pomerania, Brandenburg, Holstein and Friesland, from which he reappeared in February 1622 in Belgium, and betook himself directly to his father's home at Rennes in Brittany.
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  • In 1636 Descartes had resolved to publish some specimens of the fruits of his method, and some general observations on its 7 lb.
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  • The book will contain four essays, all in French, with the general title of Project of a Universal science, capable of raising our nature to its highest perfection; also Dioptrics, Meteors and Geometry, wherein the most curious matters which the author could select as a proof of the universal science which he proposes are explained in such a way that even the unlearned may understand them.'
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  • Thus Descartes gave to modern geometry that abstract and general character in which consists its superiority to the geometry of the ancients.
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  • In pure algebra Descartes expounded and illustrated the general methods of solving equations up to those of the fourth degree (and believed that his method could go beyond), stated the law which connects the positive and negative roots of an equation with the changes of sign in the consecutive terms, and introduced the method of indeterminate coefficients for the solution of equations.'
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  • He reappeared for a few months after General Pavia's coup d'Nat in January 1874, to join a coalition cabinet formed by Marshal Serrano, with Sagasta and Ulloa.
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  • Shortly afterwards Martos joined the dynastic Left organized by Marshal Serrano, General Lopez Dominguez, and Moret, Becerra, Balaguer, and other quondam revolutionaries.
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  • In general, Aquinas maintained in different senses the real existence of universals ante rem, in re and post rem.
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  • In 1560 both of them disappeared from the scene, Sylvester into a monastery at his own request, while Adashev died the same year, in honourable exile as a general in Livonia.
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  • On land their general Myronides beat off two Corinthian attacks on Megara, which had been further secured by long walls drawn between the capital and its port Nisaea, nearly a mile distant.
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  • If we now endeavour to give a general estimate of Pericles' character and achievements, it will be well to consider the many departments of his activity one by one.
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  • After Cimon's death he renounced the war against Persia, and the collapse of 447-445 had the effect of completing his change ' The general impression in Greece was that this decree was the proximate cause of the war.
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  • The term is used in this general sense in certain rubrics of the English Book of Common Prayer, in which it is applied equally to rectors and vicars as to perpetual curates.
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  • The end ditch within the limits of the space is, according to Scottish laws, regarded as part of the green, a regulation which prejudices the general acceptance of those laws.
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  • His father, Georg Karl Benjamin Ritschl (1783-1858), became in 1810 pastor at the church of St Mary in Berlin, and from 1827 to 1854 was general superintendent and evangelical bishop of Pomerania.
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  • Hegelianism attempts to squeeze all life into the categories of logic: Aristotelianism deals with "things in general" and ignores the radical distinction between nature and spirit.
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  • Army commanded by General Samsonov.
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  • Its general slope is from north-east, where the culminating point (930 ft.) is found, to south-west, though altitudes exceeding 750 ft.
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  • The climate is in general cold and humid, especially in the north-east.
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  • In 1799 Alkmaar gave its name to a convention signed by the duke of York and the French general Brune, in accordance with which the Russo-British army of 23,000 men, which was defeated at Bergen, evacuated Holland.
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  • This lowering tendency towards the low church pitch, and the final adoption of the latter as a general mean pitch throughout the 18th century, was no doubt influenced by the introduction of the violin, which would not bear the high tension to which the lutes and viols had been strained.
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  • Its long subjection to Turkey has left little trace of antiquity, and the most striking features in the general view are the minarets of the disused mosques (only four are now in use) and the Mahommedan burying-grounds.
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  • Bellamy's "system" of divinity was in general similar to that of Edwards.
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  • In 1745 he entered the 1 He succeeded his cousin, Solomon Van Rensselaer (1744-1852), who was in the regular army in 1792-1800, who had fought under General Anthony Wayne at Maumee Rapids in 1794 and under Stephen Van Rensselaer at Queenston Heights in 1812, and who was in the House of Representatives in 1819-1822.
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  • The remaining ten or twelve years of Avicenna's life were spent in the service of Abu Ya`far 'Ala Addaula, whom he accompanied as physician and general literary and scientific adviser, even in his numerous campaigns.
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  • To these seven groups, which are included under the general appellation of Malissori, or "highlanders," may be added the Malsia of Dibra, who extend to the west and north of that town, and form a large separate group; they are notorious for their fierce lawless character, and maintain themselves by plundering the Bulgarian peasants in their neighbourhood.
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  • In general the attitude of the Albanians in the north-eastern districts towards the Slavonic peasantry may be compared with that of the Kurds towards the Armenians.
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  • Fenwick Williams. In 1861 he became director-general of engineers at the War Office, assisting General Milutin in the reorganization of the army.
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  • Referred to the asymptotes as axes the general equation becomes xy 2 obviously the axes are oblique in the general hyperbola and rectangular in the rectangular hyperbola.
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  • Archbishop Longley said in his opening address, however, that they had no desire to assume "the functions of a general synod of all the churches:in full communion with the Church of England," but merely to "discuss matters of practical interest, and pronounce what we deem expedient in resolutions which may serve as safe guides to future action."
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  • In general they are characterized by a firm adherence to the fundamental articles of Catholic orthodoxy, tempered by a tolerant attitude towards those not of "the household of the faith."
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  • He rapidly overran Galatia, Phrygia and Asia, defeated the Roman armies, and ordered a general massacre of the Romans in Asia.
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  • Hitherto the large bill for electric energy has debarred the general use of electrical heating, in spite of its numerous advantages.
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  • In 1588 he was chosen by the presbytery of Edinburgh one of its commissioners to the General Assembly.
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  • The Rabdologia attracted more general attention than the logarithms, and as has been mentioned, there were several editions on the Continent.
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  • It was a long time before decimal arithmetic came into general use, and all through the 17th century exponential marks were in common use.
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  • The Annales, which are in seven books, deal with the history of Bavaria in conjunction with general history from the earliest times to 1460, and the author shows a strong sympathy for the Empire in its struggle with the Papacy.
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  • As early as 1839 Stanley had joined with Tait, the future archbishop, in advocating certain university reforms. From 1846 onwards Jowett threw himself into this movement, which in 1848 became general amongst the younger and more thoughtful fellows, until it took effect in the commission of 1850 and the act of 1854.
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  • Though higher in rank and larger than most presbyteries it is practically of less importance, not being, like the presbytery, a court of first instance, nor yet, like the general assembly, a court of final appeal.
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  • The synod hears appeals and references from presbyteries; and by its discussions and decisions business of various kinds, if not settled, is ripened for consideration and final settlement by the general assembly, the supreme court of the Church.
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  • The general assembly is representative of the whole Church, either, as in the Irish General Assembly, by a minister and elder sent direct to it from every congregation, or, as in the Scottish General Assemblies, by a proportion of dele- Assembly.
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  • The general assembly annually at its first meeting chooses one of its ministerial members as moderator.
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  • The general assembly reviews all the work of the Church; settles controversies; makes administrative laws; directs and stimulates missionary and other spiritual work; appoints professors of theology; admits to the ministry applicants from other churches; hears and decides complaints, references and appeals which have come up through the inferior courts; and takes cognizance of all matters connected with the Church's interests or with the general welfare of the people.
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  • The general assembly meets once a year at the time and place agreed upon and appointed by its predecessor.
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  • Proceedings of Seventh General Council of the Alliance of Reformed Churches holding the Presbyterian System (Washington, 1899).
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  • To share with the minister such general oversight is not regarded by intelligent and influential laymen as an incongruous or unworthy office; but to identify the duties of the eldership, even in theory, with those of the minister is a sure way of deterring from accepting office many whose counsel and influence in the eldership would be invaluable.'
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  • Over all was the general or national synod.
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  • In 1640 Henderson, Baillie, Blair and Gillespie came to London as commissioners from the General Assembly in Scotland, in response to a request from ministers in London who desired to see the Church of England more closely modelled after the Reformed type.
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  • In common with the general Presbyterianism of the British Isles, the Presbyterian Church of England has in recent years been readjusting its relation to the Westminster Confession of Faith.
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  • There were five presbyteries holding monthly meetings and annual visitations of all the congregations within their bounds, and coming together in general synod four times a year.
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  • In 1840 the Synod of Ulster and the Secession Synod united to form the General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church in Ireland.
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  • In 1864 the two associations or synods of North and South Wales were united in a general assembly.
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  • In 1782 the presbyteries of the Associate and Reformed churches united, forming the Associate and Reformed Synod of North America; but as there were a few dissenters in both bodies the older Associate and Reformed Presbyteries remained as separate units - the Associate Presbytery continued to exist under the same name until 1801, when it became the Associate Synod of North America; in 1818 it ceased to be subordinate to the Scotch General Synod.
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  • In 1801 a "plan of union" proposed by the General Association (Congregational) of Connecticut was accepted by the General Assembly, and the work of home missions in the western section of the country was prosecuted jointly.
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  • The general strictness of the church in its requirements for ministerial education occasioned it great loss in this period when the territory beyond the Appalachians was being settled so largely by Scotch-Irish and Presbyterians.
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  • 1 This agreement, proposed to the General Assembly in 1870 by the directors of Princeton and of Union, gave the Assembly a veto on the election and removal of professors.
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  • Of the Covenanter bodies the synod of the Reformed Presbyterian Church has a theological seminary in Allegheny (Pittsburg), established in 1856, and the general synod in 1887 organized a college at Cedarville, Ohio.
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  • The foreign missionary work of the General Assembly had been carried on after 1812 through the (Congregational) American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions (organized in 1810) until the separation of 1837, when the Old School Assembly established its own board of foreign missions; the New School continued to work through the American board; after the union of 1869 the separate board was perpetuated and the American board transferred to it, with the contributions made to the American board by the New School churches, the missions in Africa (1833), in Syria (1822), and in Persia (1835).
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  • - The Southern presbyteries of the Old School Assembly withdrew in 1861, and delegates from ten southern synods (47 presbyteries) met in Augusta, Georgia, in December, and organized as the General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church in the Confederate States of America, which included 700 ministers, 1000 churches and 75,000 communicants.
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  • At the close of the Civil War this Southern Church adopted the name of the General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church in the United States.
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  • Between 1870 and 1881 three presbyteries of the Reformed Presbyterian General Synod (New School) joined the northern General Assembly.
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  • Charles Augustus Briggs, tried for heresy for his inaugural address in 1891 as professor of biblical theology at Union Seminary, was acquitted by the presbytery of New York, but was declared guilty and was suspended from its ministry by the General Assembly of 1893.
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  • In 1896 McCormick Theological Seminary (which in 1858 as New Albany Theological Seminary had come under the control of the assembly) and Auburn Seminary refused to make the changes desired by the General Assembly; a satisfactory arrangement with McCormick was made.
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  • Presbyterians of different churches in the United States in 1906 numbered 1,830,555; of this total 322,542 were in Pennsylvania, where there were 248,335 members of the Presbyterian Church in the United States of America (the Northern Church), being more than one-fifth of its total membership; 56,587 members of the United Presbyterian Church of North America, being more than two-fifths of its total membership; 2709 members of the Synod of the Reformed Presbyterian Church of North America, three-tenths of its total membership; the entire membership of the Reformed Presbyterian Church in the United States and Canada (440), 3150 members of the Welsh Calvinistic Methodist Church, nearly one-fourth of its total membership; and 2065 members of the Reformed Presbyterian Church in North America, general synod, about five-ninths of its total membership. The strength of the Church in Pennsylvania is largely due to the Scotch-Irish settlements in that state.
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  • The "Reformed Presbyterian Church in North America, General Synod," had a membership of 3620.
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  • Thomas, and a monolithic shaft to the memory of General John Ellis Wool (1784-1869), who served with distinction in the War of 1812 and in the Mexican War, and in the Civil War commanded for a time the Department of Virginia.
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  • In 1777 General Philip Schuyler established his headquarters on Van Schaick's Island in the Mohawk and Hudson, then the principal rendezvous of the army which later met Burgoyne at Saratoga.
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  • He was merciful as a conqueror, stern as a disciplinarian, enterprising and wary as a general; while his courage, loyalty and forbearance seem to have been almost unsullied.
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  • The coastline is, in general, undefined and marshy, and broken into numerous bays and peninsulas.
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  • Much general comment on Moses Mendelssohn appeared in the press of the world on occasion of the centenary of the birth of the composer Mendelssohn in 1909.
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  • In the public gardens there is a statue of General Jean Marie Valhubert, killed at Austerlitz.
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  • The lakes of Argentina are exceptionally numerous, although comparatively few are large enough to merit a name on the ordinary general map.
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  • Buenos Aires has some excellent daily journals, but the tone of the press in general is sensational.
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  • On the 17th of June 1806 General William Beresford landed with a body of Effects of troo s from a British fleet under the command of Sir p Home Popham, and obtained possession of Buenos Aires.
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  • In July 1807 another British force of eight thousand men under General Whitelock endeavoured to regain possession of Buenos Aires, but strenuous preparations had been made for resistance, and after fierce street fighting the invading army, after suffering severe losses, was compelled to capitulate.
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  • Foremost among the leaders of the revolutionary armies were Manuel Belgrano, and after March 1812 General Jose de San Martin, an officer who had gained experience against the French in the Peninsular War.
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  • The combined forces of Buenos Aires and Chile defeated the Spaniards at Chacabuco in 1817, and at Maipu in 1818; and from Chile the victorious general Jose de San Martin led his troops into Peru, where on the 9th of July 1821, he made a triumphal entry into Lima, which had been the chief stronghold of the Spanish power, having from the time of its foundation by Pizarro been the seat of government of a viceroyalty which at one time extended to the river Plate.
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  • After the conclusion of the peace with Brazil, the Unitarians placed themselves under the leadership of General Juan de Lavalle, the victor of Ituzaingo.
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  • In 1835, with the title of governor and captain general, he acquired dictatorial powers, and all public authority passed into his hands.
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  • The rule of Rosas was now one of tyranny and almost incessant bloodshed in Buenos Aires, while his partisans, foremost amongst whom was General Ignacio Oribe, endeavoured to exterminate the Unitarians throughout the provinces.
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  • The battle ended in the disastrous defeat of the provincial forces; General Mitre used his victory in a spirit of moderation and sincere patriotism.
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  • General Mitre became commander-in-chief of the combined armies for the invasion of Paraguay and was absent for several years in the field.
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  • In 1868 the term of General Mitre came to an end, and Doctor Domingo Faustino Sarmiento, a native of San Juan, was quietly elected to succeed him.
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  • It was evident that the president intended to use all the influence which the party in power could exercise, to secure the return of General Julio Roca, who had distinguished himself in 1878 by a successful campaign against the warlike Indian tribes bordering on the Andes.
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  • On the 13th of February 1880, the minister of war, Dr Carlos Pellegrini, summoned the principal officers connected with the Tiro Nacional, General Bartolome Mitre, his brother Emilio, Colonel Julio Campos, Colonel Hilario Lagos and others, and warned them that as officers of the national army they owed obedience to the national government, and would be severely punished if concerned in any revolutionary outbreak against the constituted authorities.
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  • After several skirmishes, the national army commanded by General Roca, containing many troops seasoned in Indian campaigns, assaulted the portenos posted before Buenos Aires, and after two days' hard fighting (20th and 21st July) forced its way into the town.
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  • Hitherto General Roca had been regarded only in his capacity as a soldier, and not from the point of view of an administrator.
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  • Considering the circumstances in which General Roca assumed office, it must be admitted that he showed great moderation and used the practically absolute power that he possessed to establish a strong central government, and to initiate a national policy, which aimed at furthering the prosperity and development of the whole country.
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  • At first it was hoped that the influence of General Roca would serve to check any serious extravagance on the part of Celman.
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  • Celman, acting upon the advice of General Roca, who recognized the strength of public opinion in the outbreak, placed his resignation in the hands of congress on the 31st of.
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  • General Roca was induced to undertake the duties of minister of the interior, and his influence in the provinces was sufficient to check any attempts to stir up disturbances at Cordoba or elsewhere.
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  • Marine Ordovician rocks were deposited along the same general course.
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  • In a region so extensive very great varieties of climate are naturally to be expected, but it may be stated as a general law that the climate of Australia is milder than that of corresponding lands in the northern hemisphere.
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  • Several smaller forms of the same general appearance are known as wallabies, and are common everywhere.
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  • Instruction at state schools is either free or at merely nominal cost, and high schools, technical colleges and agricultural colleges are maintained by appropriations from the general revenues of the states.
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  • The low quotations which ruled for a number Copper of years had a depressing effect upon the industry, and many mines once profitably worked were temporarily closed, but in 1906 there was a general revival.
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  • Attempts have frequently been made to use the mineral for ordinary fuel purposes, but its inferior quality has prevented its general use.
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  • Excluding coal lines and other lines not open to general traffic, the length of railways in private hands is only 382 m.
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  • No word exists in their language for such general terms as tree, bird or fish; yet they have invented a name for every species of vegetable and animal they know.
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  • While the use of the bow and arrow does not seem to have occurred to them, the spear and axe are in general use, commonly made of hard-wood; the hatchets of stone, and the javelins pointed' with stone or bone.
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  • John (afterwards Sir John) Forrest was despatched by the Perth government with general instructions to obtain information regarding the immense tract of country out of which flow the rivers falling into the sea on the northern and western shores of Western Australia.
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  • Previous to the gold discoveries of 1851 they may be included, from 1839, in a general summary view.
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  • In the twelve years' rule of General Macquarie, closing with 1821, the colony made a substantial advance.
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  • Then came General Sir Richard Bourke, whose wise and liberal administration proved most beneficial.
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  • Before coming, however, to the history of federation, and the evolution of the Labour party, we must refer briefly to some other questions which have been of general interest very soon after the gold discoveries, the European miners objecting strongly to the presence of these aliens upon the diggings.
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  • In accordance with this general verdict of all the states, the colonial draft bill was submitted to the imperial government for legislation as an imperial act; and six delegates were sent to England to explain the measure and to pilot it through the cabinet and parliament.
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  • For elections to the Senate the governors of states, and for general elections of the House of Representatives the governor-general, would cause writs to be issued.
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  • 6d., stone-masons 1 is 6d., plasterers 12s., painters 11s., blacksmiths ros., and navvies and general labourers 8s., and work was very plentiful.
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  • Several attempts had been made by individuals belonging to the Labour party to enter the New South Wales parliament, but it was not until 1891 that the occurrence of a general election gave the party the looked-for opportunity for concerted action.
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  • This was called the " solidarity pledge," and, united under its sanction, what was left of the Labour party contested the general election of 1894.
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  • The general administration of the Factories and Shops Acts, to which the special boards owe their being, is vested in a chief inspector of factories, subject to the control of the minister of Labour in matters of policy.
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  • In the second of these notices he gives the general formulae without demonstrations.
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  • Smith, at the request of a member of the commission by which the prize was proposed, undertook in 1882 to write out the demonstration of his general theorems so far as was required to prove the results for the special case of five squares.
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  • Many of the propositions contained in his dissertation are general; but the demonstrations are not supplied for the case of seven squares.
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  • The chief grain crops are oats, rye and wheat, and the cultivation of potatoes is general.
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  • It was the general disaster produced by the speculative policy of his former guardians which first called forth his sterling qualities and hardened him into a premature manhood.
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  • He was the scholarly leader of the orthodox wing of the Presbyterian church in America, and was moderator of the General Assembly of 1891.
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  • Still more original and remarkable, however, was that part of his system, fully stated in his Laws of Thought, which formed a general symbolic method of logical inference.
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  • The second part of the Laws of Thought contained a corresponding attempt to discover a general method in probabilities, which should enable us from the given probabilities of any system of events to determine the consequent probability of any other event logically connected with the given events.
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  • The Gallo-Celtic tribes bore the general appellation of Belgae, and among these the Nervii, inhabiting the district between the Scheldt and the Sambre were at the date of Caesar's invasion, 57 B.C., the most warlike and important.
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  • The Romans, under an able general, Cerealis, took advantage of this, and Civilis, beaten in fight, retired to the island of the Batavians.
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  • But Charles, though a brave soldier and good military organizer, was neither a capable statesman nor a skilful general.
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  • The Netherlanders detested the Spaniards and everything Spanish, and this foreign mercenary force, together with the new bishops, was looked upon as part of a general plan for the gradual overthrow of their rights and liberties.
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  • He dissembled until such time as he could despatch his greatest general, the duke of Alva, to Brussels at the head of a picked force to crush all opposition.
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  • The prince of Orange, Don Requesens, who had now formally entered the Calvinist communion, governor- was inexorable in laying down three conditions as general.
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  • In June 1576 the long siege of Zierikzee, the capital of Schou.wen, ended in its surrender to the Spanish general Mondragon, after the failure of a gallant attempt by Admiral Boisot to break the leaguer, in which he lost The great his life.
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  • Don John of Austria becomes General.
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  • In him Orange was to find an adversary who was not only a great general but a statesman of insight and ability equal to his own.
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  • General history: For the early authorities consult Collections de chroniques Belges inedites, publ.
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  • It was his skill as an artillery officer which won for the Polish general Skrynecki the battle of Igany (March 8, 1831), and he distin guished himself at the indecisive battle of Ostrolenka (May 26).
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  • He was entrusted with the defence of Transylvania at the end of 1848, and in 1849, as the general of the Szeklers, he performed miracles with his little army, notably at the bridge of Piski (February 9), where, after fighting all day, he drove back an immense force of pursuers.
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  • After recovering Transylvania he was sent to drive the Austrian general Puchner out of the Banat of Temesvar.
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  • See Johann Czetz, Memoiren fiber Berns Feldzug (Hamburg, 1850); Kalman Deresenyi, General Bern's Winter Campaign in Transylvania, z8 4 8 - 18 49 (Hung.), (Budapest, 1896).
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  • It did not long remain French, for in 1521 the count of Nassau, Charles V.'s general, took it and added it to the Spanish provinces.
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  • The inspection of the liver for purposes of divination led to the study of the anatomy of the liver, and there are indeed good reasons for believing that hepatoscopy represents the startingpoint for the study of animal anatomy in general.
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    0
  • Though this industry has lapsed, there are brine baths, much used in cases of rheumatism, gout and general debility, and the former private mansion of Shrewbridge Hall is converted into a hotel with a spa.
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  • Vermont is a portion of the plateau-like New England upland, broken by mountain ranges, individual mountains and high hills, rising above the general upland surface, and by deep narrow valleys, cut below that surface.
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  • Railway transportation is supplied to Vermont by parallel lines crossing diagonally every part of the state at about equal intervals and running in general in a N.W.
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  • The commerce of the lake consists principally of coal, wood pulp and building material, besides general merchandise.
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  • The administrative officers of the state are a governor, a lieutenantgovernor, a secretary of state, a state treasurer, and an auditor of accounts, elected by popular vote, and an inspector of finance, a commissioner of taxes, a superintendent of education, a fish and game commissioner, three railroad commissioners, and various boards and commissions, of whom some are elected by the General Assembly and some are appointed by the governor with the advice and consent of the Senate.
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  • The judges of the supreme court are elected biennially by tine General Assembly, and all the other judicial officers are elected by the people.
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  • Sessions of the supreme court are held in each county once a year in addition to the general session which meets at some central place selected by the judges.
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  • The censors, being elected on a general ticket, were always more progressive than the convention, which was chosen on the principle of equal township representation.
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  • If they are again approved by a majority of each house in the next General Assembly, they are submitted finally to a direct popular vote, a majority of the votes cast being decisive.
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  • The public-school system is under the supervision of a state superintendent of education, elected biennially by the General Assembly, and local schools are under union superintendents and in a few cases under town superintendents.
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  • The revenues for educational purposes are derived mainly from a state tax of 8 on the general list, from local taxes, and from the interest on the permanent school fund, which (including the money paid to Vermont by the United States government when a portion of the treasury surplus was distributed among the states in 1837) amounted in 1908 to $1,120,218.
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  • The charitable and penal institutions of the state are controlled by separate boards of directors, but all are subject to the general supervision of a board of visitors composed of the governor, lieutenant-governor and speaker of the House of Representatives, and a woman appointed by the governor.
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  • There is no general property tax except a special levy of 8% on the general list for school purposes and 5% for the construction of roads.
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  • The banking institutions are supervised by an inspector of finance, who reports annually to the General Assembly.
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  • Ethan Allen (q.v.) and some of the other leaders seemed inclined to accept these overtures, but for various reasons, the chief of which was the general success of the American cause, the scheme was soon abandoned.
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  • Though considered fantastic by many, it had secured fairly general acceptance in Germany in 1912, and was followed by the generalized theory in 1915.
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  • It has been general since the 9th century.
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    0
  • The true Tapaculo (P. albicollis) has a general resemblance in plumage to the females of some of the smaller Shrikes (Lanius), and to a cursory observer its skin might pass for that of one; but its shortened wings and powerful feet would on closer inspection at once reveal the difference.
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  • The soil is in general very fertile, the principal products being rice, maize and pulse (kachang) in the lower grounds, and cinchona, coffee and tea, as well as cocoa, tobacco and fibrous plants in the hills.
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  • On the 4th of July in that year a French army under General de Bourmont attacked the city, which capitulated on the following day.
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  • The principal features of his reign were a struggle against his brother general, Thomas, who aimed at the throne (822-824); the conquest of Crete by the Saracens in 823; and the beginning of their attacks upon Sicily (827).
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  • Toward the end of his career at the bar, however, he changed from a general practitioner to a patent lawyer, and as such had a lucrative practice.
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    0
  • The lords and the Scots vehemently took Manchester's part; but the Commons eventually sided with Cromwell, appointed Sir Thomas Fairfax general of the New Model Army, and passed two self-denying ordinances, the second of which, ordering all members of both houses to lay down their commissions within forty days, was accepted by the lords on the 3rd of April 1645.
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    0
  • Meanwhile the failure to come to terms with Charles and provide a settlement appeared to threaten a general anarchy.
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    0
  • The estates of only twenty-four leaders of the defeated cause were forfeited by Cromwell, and the national church was left untouched though deprived of all powers of interference with the civil government, the general assembly being dissolved in 1653.
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  • He ordered Fox's liberation, and in November 1657 issued a general order directing that Quakers should be treated with leniency, and be discharged from confinement.
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    0
  • In general the toleration enjoyed under Cromwell was probably far larger than at any period since religion became the contending ground of political parties, and certainly greater than under his immediate successors.
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  • The hindrance, however, to the general development of trade which the act involved aroused at once loud complaints, tO which Cromwell turned a deaf ear, continuing to seize Dutch ships trading in forbidden goods.
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  • The major-generals were the object of general attack, while the special tax on the royalists was declared unjust, and the bill for its continuation rejected by a large majority.
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    0
  • An attempt at the assassination of Cromwell by Miles Sindercombe added to the general feeling of anxiety and unrest.
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    0
  • From the surface to 500 fathoms the general form of the isothermals remains the same, except that instead of an equatorial maximum belt there is a focus of maximum temperature off the eastern coast of the United States.
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  • He drew up two memorials representing that the landing of a considerable French force in Ireland would be followed by a general rising of the people, and giving a detailed account of the condition of the country.
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  • 181 letters of Theodoret have come down to us, partly in a separate collection, partly in the Acta of the councils, and partly in the Latin of Marius Mercator; they are of great value not only for the biography of the writer, but also for the history of his diocese and of the church in general.
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  • Mopsvestia 1 Roman Catholic writers vary greatly in their estimate of Theodoret's christology and of his general orthodoxy.
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  • Tetzel was selected as the most efficient salesman; he was appointed general sub-commissioner for indulgences, and was accompanied by a clerk of the Fuggers from whom Albrecht had borrowed the money to pay his first-fruits.
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  • Debts do not, as a general rule, carry interest, but such an obligation may arise either by agreement or by mercantile usage or by statute.
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  • Payment by a third person to the creditor is no discharge of a debt, as a general rule, unless the debtor subsequently ratifies the payment.
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  • It was well known during the middle ages, and was largely used by William, archbishop of Tyre, for the first six books of his Belli sacri historic. In modern times its historical value has been seriously impugned, but the verdict of the best scholarship seems to be that in general it forms a true record of the events of the first crusade, although containing some legendary matter.
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  • In several passages the interpretation is bound up with that of Mizraim, and depends in general upon the question whether Ethiopia at a given time enjoyed the prominence given to it.
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  • Plautus was a general favourite in the days of republican Rome.
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  • It has no general name, but in the south is called Agome.
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  • Its general elevation is between 2000 and 2500 ft.; on the north-west side of the range the country is table-land some boo to moo ft.
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  • Santerre was appointed marechal de camp on the 23rd of October 1792, and subsequently general of division.
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  • He was variously reported to have been wounded and killed in this affair, and the wits of the reactionary party circulated his epitaph: Ci-git le general Santerre Qui n'eut de Mars que la biere.
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  • He then gave in his resignation as general, and returned to commerce; but his brewery was ruined, and after many vicissitudes of fortune he died in poverty in Paris on the 6th of February 1809.
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  • The statement without the qualifying note was copied from book to book, and at last received general acceptance.
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  • This general law, known as the principle of the "dissipation of energy," was first adequately pointed out by Lord Kelvin in 1852; and was applied by him to some of the principal problems of cosmical physics.
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  • In all cases there is a general tendency for other forms of energy to be transformed into heat on account of the friction of rough surfaces, the resistance of conductors, or similar causes, and thus to lose availability.
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  • Fichte's general views on philosophy seem to have changed considerably as he advanced in years, and his influence has been impaired by certain inconsistencies and an appearance of eclecticism, which is strengthened by his predominantly historical treatment of problems, his desire to include divergent systems within his own, and his conciliatory tone.
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  • Watson continued to exert his pen with vigour, and in general to good purpose, denouncing the slave trade, advocating the union with Ireland, and offering financial suggestions to Pitt, who seems to have frequently consulted him.
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  • And as there is no branch of art in which mechanical improvements, and the consequent change in the nature of technical difficulties, bear so directly upon the possibilities and methods of external effect, it follows that an exclusive preponderance of this view is not without serious disadvantage from the standpoint of general musical culture.
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  • Our task is simply to furnish the general reader with an account of the types of instrumentation prevalent at various musical periods, and their relation to other branches of the art.
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  • Whether this justifies Wagner's successors and imitators in showing a constant preference for passages of which not even the general outline is practicable; whether it justifies a state of things in which the normal compass of every instrument in an advanced loth-century score would appear to be about a fifth higher than any player of that instrument will admit;, whether it proves that it is artistically desirable that when there.
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  • In front of the Royal Engineers' Institute is a statue (1890) of General Gordon, and near the railway station another (1888) to Thomas Waghorn, promoter of the overland route to India.
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  • Fort Pitt, which rises above the town to the west, was built in 1779, and is used as a general military hospital.
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  • The first method is in general use for steam cranes; it allows for a far greater range of power in the brake, but is not automatic, as is the second.
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  • Dock-side jib cranes for working general cargo are almost always made portable, in order to enable them to be placed in correct position in regard to the hatchways of the vessels which they serve.
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  • His general administration seems to have been thoroughly honest and able, in some respects beneficent.
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  • Four years later he was murdered at Vienne in Gaul, probably at the instigation of his Frankish general Arbogast, with whom he had quarrelled.
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  • Aurangzeb's death and the invasion of Nadir Shah led to a triple alliance among the three leading chiefs, which internal jealousy so weakened that the Mahrattas, having been called in by the Rahtors to aid them, took possession of Ajmere about 1756; thenceforward Rajputana became involved in the general disorganization of India.
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  • The Permian may be represented, but the Trias is absent, and in general the older Palaeozoic rocks are overlaid directly by the Rhaetic and Lias.
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  • In the aerial or overground system of land telegraphs the use of copper wire has become very general.
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  • The form in general use on the British postal lines is the " Cordeaux screw," but the " Varley double cup " is still employed, especially by the railway companies.
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  • There are three kinds of primary batteries in general use in the British Postal Telegraph Department, viz., the Daniell, the bichromate, and the Leclanche.
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  • The first to attain practical success was Edison, and his method with some modifications is still the one in most general use.
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  • 25, and indicates the general principle involved.
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  • The general graphy, principle Arms a and arrangement b, one at eachstation and d B, are connected to the line wire, and are made to rotate simultaneously over metallic segments, 3, 4, and I', 3', 4', at the two stations, so that when the arm a is on segment i at A, then b is on segment I' at B, and so on.
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  • In the undulator apparatus, which is similar in general principle to the " siphon recorder " used in submarine telegraphy, a spring or falling weight moves a paper strip beneath one end of a fine silver tube, the other end of which dips into a vessel containing ink.
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  • It is not a system likely to have general application.
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  • The general principle on which the instruments for working long submarine cables are based is that of making the moving parts very light and perfectly free to follow the comparatively slow rise and fall of the electric impulses or waves.
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  • A very much simpler form of siphon recorder, constructed by Dr Muirhead, is now in general use.
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  • The heavier cores, with the consequent advance in speed of working attainable, have necessitated the introduction of automatic sending, the instruments adopted being in general a modification of the Wheatstone transmitter adapted to the form of cable signals, while the regularity of transmission thus secured has caused its introduction even on circuits where the speed cannot exceed that of the ordinary operator's hand signalling.
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  • The committee was of opinion that the cable should be owned and worked by the governments interested, and that the general direction should be in the hands of a manager in London under the control of a small board at which the associated governments should be represented.
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  • Arrangements not very different in general principle were put into practice in the United States by Fessenden, de Forest and others.
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  • Pipeclay and china clay, from Kingsteighton, are shipped for the Staffordshire potteries, while coal and general goods are imported.
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  • While considering that a really efficient Post Office service would afford the best means for securing such competition, it recommended that general, immediate and effective competition should at once be undertaken either by the Post Office or by local authorities.
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  • In February the Postmaster-General applied for an injunction to restrain the company from opening any street or public road within the county of London without the consent of the Postmaster - General and the London County Council, which injunction was granted in July.
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  • Gaine, general manager of the company, stated before the Select Committee that in the view of the directors the bargain was a hard one, because it gave no consideration in respect of the goodwill of the great business, with its gross income of over £ 2,000,000 per annum and its net revenue of over £750,000, which the company had built up. The company had had to pay for all the experiments and mistakes which are inherent in the launching and development of any new industry.
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  • The circumstances under which, at an extraordinary general chapter convoked by him shortly after his return, he resigned the office of ministergeneral (September 1220) are explained in the article Franciscans: here, as illustrating the spirit of the man, it is in place to cite the words in which his abdication was couched: "Lord, I give Thee back this family which Thou didst entrust to me.
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  • For general information and references to the literature of the subject, see Otto ZOckler, Askese and Monchtum (1897), ii.
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  • By his condemnation of Gallicanism (1613) Paul angered France, and provoked the defiant declaration of the states general of 1614 that the king held his crown from God alone.
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  • Of the above the first is the best general sketch and is rich in notes; the second somewhat chauvinistic but excellently written; the third the best work for scholars; the seventh; eighth and eleventh are valuable as being by contemporaries.
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  • No such line of separation exists farther south, and the terms Central and Southern Italy, though in general use among geographers and convenient for descriptive purposes, do not correspond to any natural divisions.
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  • The great central mass of the Apennines, which has held its course throughout Central Italy, with a general direction from north-west to south-east, may be considered as continued in the same direction for about 100 m.
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  • Southern Italy indeed has in general a very different climate from the northern portion of the kingdom; and, though large tracts are still occupied by rugged mountains of sufficient elevation to retain the snow for a considerable part of the year, the districts adjoining the sea enjoy a climate similar to that of Greece and the southern provinces of Spain.
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  • Gorgonzola, which takes its name from a town in the province, has become general throughout the whole of Lombardy, in the eastern parts of the ancient provinces, and in the province of Cuneo.
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  • The principal reasons for the general decrease are the fall in prices through foreign competition and the closing of certain markets, the diseases of plants and the increased outlay required to combat them, and the growth of State and local taxation.
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  • Anchovy and sardine fishing (the products of which are reckoned among the general total) are also of considerable importance, especially along the Ligurian and Tuscan coasts.
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  • Pharmaceutical industries as distinguished from those above mentioned, have kept pace with the general development of Italian activity.
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  • The general improvement in sanitation has led to a corresponding improvement in the condition of the working classes, though much still remains to be done, especially in the south.
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  • Since 1901 there have been, more than once, general strikes at Milan and elsewhere, and one in the autumn of 1905 caused great inconvenience throughout the country, and led to no effective result.
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  • Although in some industrial centres the working-class movement has assumed an importance equal to that of other countries, there is no general working-class organization comparable to the English trade unions.
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  • Co-operation in general is most widely diffused, in proportion to population, in central Italy; less so in northern Italy, and much less so in the south and the islands.
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  • But the number of scholars has considerably increased, and shows a ratio superior to the general increase of the population.
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  • The law considers as charitable institutions (opere pie) all poorhouses, almshouses and institutes which partly or wholly give help to able-bodied or infirm paupers, or seek to improve their moral and economic condition; and also the Congregazioni di caritd (municipal charity boards existing in every commune, and composed of ~embers elected by the municipal council), which administer funds destined for the poor in general.
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  • Certain peculiarities introduced by St Ambrose distinguish the ritual of Milan from that of the general church.
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  • The number of electors (2,541,327) at the general election in 1904 was 29% of the male population over twenty-one years of age, and 7~6% of the total population exclusive of those temporarily disfranchised on account of military service; and of these 627% voted.
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  • The personnel of the navy consists of the following corps: (I) General staff; (2) naval engineers, chiefly employed in building and repairing war vessels; (3) sanitary corps; (4) commissariat corps, for supplies and account-keeping; (5) crews.
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  • The former apply principally to successions, stamps, registrations, mortgages, &c.; the latter to distilleries, breweries, explosives, native sugar and matches, though the customs revenue and octrois upon articles of general consumption, such as corn, wine, spirits, meat, flour, petroleum butter, tea, coffee and sugar, may be considered as belonging to thu class.
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  • Next to Milan, and from the point of view of general politics even more than Milan, Rome now claims attention.
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  • The tyrants general policy was to favor the multitude at the expense of his own caste.
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  • Humiliating to human nature in general as are the annals of the 18th-century campaigns in Europe, there is no point of view from which they appear in a light so tragi-comic as from that afforded by Italian history.
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  • Here we can attempt only a general survey of the events, political, civic and social, which heralded the Risorgimento in its first phase.
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  • The constitution was modelled on that of the French directory, and, lest there should be a majority of clerical or Jacobinical deputies, the French Republic through its general, Bonaparte, nominated and appointed the first deputies and administrators of the new government.
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  • Venice not only paid the costs of the war to the two chief belligerents, but her naval resources also helped to launch the young general on his career of eastern adventure.
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  • The French directory at once ordered its general, Berthier, to march to Rome: the Roman democrats proclaimed a republic on the 15th of February 1798, and on their invitation Berthier and his troops marched in.
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  • The liberators of Rome thereupon proceeded to plunder the city in a way which brought shame on their cause and disgrace (perhaps not wholly deserved) on the general left in command, Massna.
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  • The Neapolitan troops at first occupied Rome, but, being badly handled by their leader, the Austrian general, Mack, they were soon scattered in flight; and the Republican troops under General The Championnet, after crushing the stubborn resistance Parthenoof the lazzaroni, made their way into Naples and paean proclaimed the Parthenopaean Republic (January 23, Republic. 1799).
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  • That general, Championnets successor, had been compelled by these reverses and by the threatening pressure of Nelsons fleet to evacuate Naples and central Italy.
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  • A month later the ambitious young general, Joubert, who took over Moreaus command and raffled part of Macdonalds following, was utterly routed by the Austro-Russian army at Novi (August 15) with the loss of 12,000 men.
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  • The Austriai general, Melas, signed an armistice whereby he was to retir with his army beyond the river Mincio.
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  • Stuart, which beat off with heavy loss an attack imprudently delivered by General Rynier on.
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  • Thereupon the French general, Miollis, who still occupied Rome, caused the pope to be arrested and carried him away northwards into Tuscany, thence to Savona; finally he was taken, at Napoleons orders, to Fontainebleau.
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  • The Austrians, under General Bellegarde, entered Milan without resistance; and this event precluded the restoration of the old political order.
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  • The troops sent against them commanded by General Guglielmo Pepe, himself a Carbonaro, hesitated to act, and the king, finding that he could not count on the army, granted the constitution (July 13, 1820), and appointed his son Francis regent.
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  • The defeat of General Pepe by the Austrians at Rieti (March 7, 1821) and the re-establishment of King Ferdinands autocratic power under the protection of Austrian bayonets were the effective assertion of this principle.
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  • On the 12th of March 1849, he denounced the armistice, and, owing to the want of confidence in Piedmontese strategy after 1848, gave the chief command to the Polish General Chrzanowski.
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  • General Ramorino, disobeying his instructions, failed to prevent a corps of Austrians under Lieut.
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  • On the 25th of April General Roman Oudinot landed with 8000 men at Civitavecchia, and Republl4 on the 3oth attempted to capture Rome by suprise, but was completely defeated by Garibaldi, who might have driven the French into the sea, had Mazzini allowed him to leave the city.
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  • The Roman army (20,000 men) was commanded by General Rosselli, and included, besides Garibaldis red-shirted legionaries, volunteers from all parts of Italy, mostly very young men, many of them wealthy and of noble family.
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  • But afterlong negotiations Congress the treaty of alliance was signed in January 1855, and iris, while Austria remained neutral, a well-equipped Piedmontese force of 15,000 men, under General La Marmora, sailed for the Crimea.
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  • In Rome, after the restoration of the temporal power by the French troops, the pope paid no attention to Louis Napoleons advice to maintain some form of constitution, to grant a general amnesty, and to secularize the administration.
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  • But the king and Cavour were terribly upset by this move, which meant peace without Venetia; Cavour hurried to the kings headquarters at Monzambano Armistice and in excited, almost disrespectful, language implored ~0ranca~ him not to agree to peace and to continue the war alone, relying on the Piedmontese army and a general Italian revolution.
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  • ~ but al troops, under General Lamoricire, were I~reparing to too press it.
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  • ~er his immediate command, to operate on the ncio, while Cialdini with 80,000 men was to operate on the The Austrian southern army consisting of 95,000 men was amanded by the archduke Albert, with General von John chief of the staff.
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  • The secretary-general of the Italian foreign office, Baron Blanc, who had accompanied General Cadorna to Rome, was received almost daily by Cardinal Antonelli, papal secretary of state, in order to settle innumerable questions arising out of the Italian occupation.
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  • General Ricotti Magnani, minister of war, therefore framed an Army Reform Bill designed to bring the Italian army as nearly as possible up to the Prussian standard.
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  • While leaving intact the general houses of the various confraternities (except that of the Jesuits), the bill abolished the Religious corporate personality of religious orders, handed over Bill, their schools and hospitals to civil administrators, placed their churches at the disposal of the secular clergy, and provided pensions for nuns and monks, those who had families being sent to reside with their relatives, and those who by reason of age or bereavement had no home but their monasteries being allowed to end their days in religious houses specially set apart for the purpose.
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  • Simultaneously General Ricotti Magnani matured the army reform scheme which he had elaborated under the preceding administration.
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  • Besides the premiership, Depretis assumed the portfolio of finance; Nicot~a, an ex-Garibaldian of somewhat tarnished reputation, but a man of energetic ~~t~ and conservative temperament, was placed at the ministry of the interior; public works were entrusted to Zanardelli, a Radical doctrinaire of considerable juridical attainments; General Mezzacapo and Signor Brin replaced General Ricotti Magnani and Admiral Saint-B on at the war office and ministry of marine; while to Mancini and Coppino, prominent members of the Left, were allotted the portfolios of justice and public instruction.
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  • Considerations such as these could not be expected to appeal to the nation at large, which hailed the advent of the Left as the dawn of an era of unlimited popular sovereignty, diminished administrative pressure, reduction of taxation and general prosperity.
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  • The first general election under the Left (November 1876) had yielded the cabinet the overwhelming majority of 421 Ministerialists against 87 Conservatives, but the very size of the majority rendered it unmanageable.
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  • Depretis recalled Nigra from Paris and replaced him by General Cialdini, whose ardent plea for Italian intervention in favor of France in 1870, and whose comradeship with Marshal Macmahon in 1859, would, it was supposed, render him persona gratissima to the French government.
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  • Incensed by the elevation to the rank of embassies of the Italian legation in Paris and the French legation to the Quirinal, and by the introduction of the Italian bill against clerical abuses, the French Clerical party not only attacked Italy and her representative, General Cialdini, in the Chamber of Deputies, but promoted a monster petition against the Italian bill.
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  • Though the cabinet had no stable majority, it induced the Chamber to sanction a commercial treaty which had been negotiated with France and a general autonomous customs tariff.
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  • Though aware of Bismarcks hostility towards Italy, of the conclusion of the Austro-German alliance of 1879, and of the undisguised ill-will of France, Italy not only made no attempt to crush an agitation as mischievous as it was futile, but granted a state funeral to General Avezzana, president of the Irredentist League.
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