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gascony

gascony

gascony Sentence Examples

  • If it be true, as Bishop Alcock of Ely affirms, that Lydgate wrote a poem on the loss of France and Gascony, it seems necessary to suppose that he lived two years longer, and thus indications point to the year 1451, or thereabouts, as the date of his death.

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  • The great governments were: Alsace, Saintonge and Angoumois, Anjou, Artois, Aunis, Auvergne, Beam and Navarre, Berry, Bourbonnais, Bourgogne (Burgundy), Bretagne (Brittany),, Champagne, DauphinC, Flandre, Foix, Franche-Comt, Guienne and Gascogne (Gascony), Ile-de-France, Languedoc, Limousin, Lorraine, Lyonnais.

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  • Sir John Howard served in Edward II.'s wars in Scotland and Gascony, was sheriff of Norfolk and Suffolk and governor of Norwich Castle.

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  • His pupils were drawn not only from France and Normandy, but also from Gascony, Flanders, Germany and Italy.

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  • At the instance of Euric's son, Alaric II., an examination was made of the Roman laws in use among Romans in his dominions, and the resulting compilation was approved in 506 at an assembly at Aire, in Gascony, and is known as the Breviary of Alaric, and sometimes as the Liber Aniani, from the fact that the authentic copies bear the signature of the referendarius Anian.

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  • In company, therefore, with the earl of Norfolk he refused to render foreign service in Gascony, on the plea that they were only bound to serve with the king, who was himself bound for Flanders.

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  • When Philip's court pronounced that the king of England had forfeited Gascony, Edmund renounced his homage to Philip and withdrew with his wife to England.

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  • He was appointed lieutenant of Gascony in 1296, but died in the same year, leaving a son Thomas to succeed him in his English possessions.

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  • ARMAGNAC, formerly a province of France and the most important fief of Gascony, now wholly comprised in the department of Gers.

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  • In Roman Gaul this territory formed part of the diocese of Auch (civitas Ausciorum), which corresponded roughly with the later duchy of Gascony.

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  • In 1789 Armagnac was a province forming part of the Gouvernement-general of Guienne and Gascony; it was divided into two parts, High or White Armagnac, with Auch for capital, and Low or Black Armagnac. At the Revolution the whole of the original Armagnac was included in the department of Gers.

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  • This quality has remained to it in southern Italy, in Spain and Gascony.

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  • CAGOTS, a people found in the Basque provinces, Beam, Gascony and Brittany.

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  • Having in general shared the fortunes of Aquitaine during the Merovingian and Carolingian periods, Agenais next became an hereditary countship in the part of the country now called Gascony (Vasconia).

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  • The chief cause of this was the impossible situation which resulted from Edward's position as duke of Gascony.

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  • Other victories in Gascony and Brittany further emphasized his power.

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  • The former palace of the intendants of Gascony is now used as the prefecture.

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  • In the 18th century it was capital of Gascony, and seat of a generality.

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  • It was believed to be of English origin, and the long tenure of Gascony and Guienne by the English certainly provided abundant opportunity for the introduction of English colonists.

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  • It embraces the old countship of Foix, and a portion of Languedoc and Gascony.

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  • In 1268 he took the cross with his cousin Edward, who, however, sent him back from Sicily to pacify the unruly province of Gascony.

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  • In 1242 he led an expedition to Gascony which terminated disastrously with the defeat of Taillebourg; and hostilities with France were intermittently continued for seventeen years.

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  • (Paris, 1638 and 1656), a description of Gascony and Navarre.

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  • In 1152 by a marriage with Eleanor of Aquitaine, the divorced wife of the French king Louis VII., he acquired Poitou, Guienne and Gascony; but in doing so incurred the ill-will of his suzerain from which he suffered not a little in the future.

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  • In 1293 Edward refused to by obey a similar summons from the king of France, and in 1294 was fighting in Gascony.

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  • not only summoned English but Irish levies, and knights of Hainault, Bretagne, Gascony and Aquitaine crowded to his standard.

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  • The western coast region is well compared with the Landes of Gascony.

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  • Abdallah subdued Munisa, crossed the mountains and penetrated into Gascony by the valley of Roncesvalles.

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  • Then Poitou was thoroughly subdued, and another truce was made in 1208, little more than southern Saintonge and Gascony being left in the hands of John.

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  • In 1036 Geoffrey Martel had to liberate William the Fat, on payment of a heavy ransom, but the latter having died in 1038, and the second son of William the Great, Odo, duke of Gascony, having fallen in his turn at the siege of Mauze (loth of March 1039) Geoffrey made peace with his father in the autumn of 1039, and had his wife's two sons recognized as dukes.

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  • He was the eldest son, and his family was a good one, but, like most gentlemen of Gascony, he had to trust to his sword.

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  • of Castile, ceding Gascony to Edward, son of Henry III.

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  • But the connection with Gascony meant little compared with the now vanished connection with Normandy.

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  • He had taken advantage of his leisurely journey home to pacify the turbulent Gascony, and to visit Paris and make a treaty with King Philip III.

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  • of France; the trouble did not come from this direction, though there was the usual crop of feudal rebellions in Gascony.

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  • Gascony being, as usual, out of hand, he crossed to Bordeaux in 1286, and abode in Guienne for no less than three years, reducing the duchy to such order as it had never known before, settling all disputed border questions with the new king of France, Philip IV., founding many new towns, and issuing many useful statutes and ordinances.

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  • When called to account for the doings of his subjects, as well as for certain disputes in Gascony, the English king promised redress, and, on the suggestion of Philip, surrendered, as a formal act of apology, the six chief fortresses of Guienne, which were to be restored when reparation had been made.

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  • This he accomplished in the next spring, but meanwhile hardly a foothold remained to him in Gascony.

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  • Edward was voted liberal grants by the laity, though the clergy gave less than he had hoped; but enough money was obtained to fit out two armies, one destined for the invasion of Scotland, the other for that of Gascony.

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  • The French expedition, which was led by the kings brother Edmund, earl of Lancaster, failed to recover Gascony, and came to an ignominious end.

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  • was something more ambitious than a mere attempt to recover Bordeaux; succours were to go to Gascony, but he Disputes himself and the main army were to invade France from with the the north with the aid of the count of Flanders.

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  • Norfolk, who had been designated to lead the expedition to Guienne, declared that though he was ready to follow his master to Flanders in his capacity of marshal, he would not be drafted off to Gascony against his own will.

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  • Gascony.

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  • Piers was given the royal title of earl of Cornwall, and married to the kings niece; when Edward went over to France to do homage for Gascony, he even made his friend regent during his absence, in preference to any of his kinsmen.

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  • When France had grown strong, under Philip Augustus, the house of Plantagenet still retained a broad territory in Gascony and Guienne, and the house of Capet could not but covet the possession of the largest surviving feudal appanage which marred the solidarity of their kingdom.

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  • He lent an army to Ferdinand for the invasion of Gascony, and landed himself at Calais with 25,000 men, to beat up the northern border of France.

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  • He fought in the naval fight off Sluys and in the one off Winchelsea in 1350; he led armies into Scotland, Gascony and Normandy, his exploits in Gascony in 1345 and 1346 being especially successful; he served frequently under Edward III.

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  • The climate of the department is mild and it has an abundant rainfall, partly due to the west wind which drives the clouds from the gulf of Gascony.

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  • In Gascony he apparently met the king of England (Edward I.) at a place which seems to be Bordeaux, but of which he speaks as the capital of Alanguitar (i.e.

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  • Beyond these again stretched provinces practically impenetrable to royal influence: Brittany, Gascony, Toulouse, Septimania and the Spanish March.

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  • small pains procured him the succession of Amaury de Montfort, and the Languedoc of the counts of Toulouse, if not the whole of Gascony.

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  • had given Guienne in fief, provoked the nobles of Gascony to complain to Charles V.

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  • Cited before the court of Paris, the Black Prince refused to attend, and war broke out in Gascony, Poitou and Normandy, but with fresh tactics (1369).

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  • There were three principal theatres of war: in the north Normandy and the valley of the Loire, where Orleans, the general centre of reform, ensured communications between the south and Germany; in the south-west Gascony and Guienne; in the south-east Lyonnais and Vivarais.

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  • In 1636 the Croquants ravaged Limousin, Poitou, Angoumois, Gascony and Prigord; in 1639 it needed an army to subdue the Va-nu-pieds (bare-feet) in Normandy.

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  • BERTRAND BARERE DE VIEUZAC (1755-1841), one of the most notorious members of the French National Convention, was born at Tarbes in Gascony on the 10th of September 1755.

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  • If it be true, as Bishop Alcock of Ely affirms, that Lydgate wrote a poem on the loss of France and Gascony, it seems necessary to suppose that he lived two years longer, and thus indications point to the year 1451, or thereabouts, as the date of his death.

    0
    0
  • The great governments were: Alsace, Saintonge and Angoumois, Anjou, Artois, Aunis, Auvergne, Beam and Navarre, Berry, Bourbonnais, Bourgogne (Burgundy), Bretagne (Brittany),, Champagne, DauphinC, Flandre, Foix, Franche-Comt, Guienne and Gascogne (Gascony), Ile-de-France, Languedoc, Limousin, Lorraine, Lyonnais.

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  • Sir John Howard served in Edward II.'s wars in Scotland and Gascony, was sheriff of Norfolk and Suffolk and governor of Norwich Castle.

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  • Commission (Appendix, pp. 379-397), contains numerous letters from various popes, from the king, a correspondence dealing with the affairs of the university of Oxford, another with the province of Gascony, beside some harangues and letters evidently kept as models to be used on various occasions.

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  • His pupils were drawn not only from France and Normandy, but also from Gascony, Flanders, Germany and Italy.

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  • At the instance of Euric's son, Alaric II., an examination was made of the Roman laws in use among Romans in his dominions, and the resulting compilation was approved in 506 at an assembly at Aire, in Gascony, and is known as the Breviary of Alaric, and sometimes as the Liber Aniani, from the fact that the authentic copies bear the signature of the referendarius Anian.

    0
    0
  • In company, therefore, with the earl of Norfolk he refused to render foreign service in Gascony, on the plea that they were only bound to serve with the king, who was himself bound for Flanders.

    0
    0
  • When Philip's court pronounced that the king of England had forfeited Gascony, Edmund renounced his homage to Philip and withdrew with his wife to England.

    0
    0
  • He was appointed lieutenant of Gascony in 1296, but died in the same year, leaving a son Thomas to succeed him in his English possessions.

    0
    0
  • ARMAGNAC, formerly a province of France and the most important fief of Gascony, now wholly comprised in the department of Gers.

    0
    0
  • In Roman Gaul this territory formed part of the diocese of Auch (civitas Ausciorum), which corresponded roughly with the later duchy of Gascony.

    0
    0
  • In 1789 Armagnac was a province forming part of the Gouvernement-general of Guienne and Gascony; it was divided into two parts, High or White Armagnac, with Auch for capital, and Low or Black Armagnac. At the Revolution the whole of the original Armagnac was included in the department of Gers.

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    0
  • This quality has remained to it in southern Italy, in Spain and Gascony.

    0
    0
  • CAGOTS, a people found in the Basque provinces, Beam, Gascony and Brittany.

    0
    0
  • Having in general shared the fortunes of Aquitaine during the Merovingian and Carolingian periods, Agenais next became an hereditary countship in the part of the country now called Gascony (Vasconia).

    0
    0
  • The chief cause of this was the impossible situation which resulted from Edward's position as duke of Gascony.

    0
    0
  • Other victories in Gascony and Brittany further emphasized his power.

    0
    0
  • The former palace of the intendants of Gascony is now used as the prefecture.

    0
    0
  • In the 18th century it was capital of Gascony, and seat of a generality.

    0
    0
  • It was believed to be of English origin, and the long tenure of Gascony and Guienne by the English certainly provided abundant opportunity for the introduction of English colonists.

    0
    0
  • It embraces the old countship of Foix, and a portion of Languedoc and Gascony.

    0
    0
  • In 1268 he took the cross with his cousin Edward, who, however, sent him back from Sicily to pacify the unruly province of Gascony.

    0
    0
  • In 1242 he led an expedition to Gascony which terminated disastrously with the defeat of Taillebourg; and hostilities with France were intermittently continued for seventeen years.

    0
    0
  • (Paris, 1638 and 1656), a description of Gascony and Navarre.

    0
    0
  • In 1152 by a marriage with Eleanor of Aquitaine, the divorced wife of the French king Louis VII., he acquired Poitou, Guienne and Gascony; but in doing so incurred the ill-will of his suzerain from which he suffered not a little in the future.

    0
    0
  • In 1293 Edward refused to by obey a similar summons from the king of France, and in 1294 was fighting in Gascony.

    0
    0
  • not only summoned English but Irish levies, and knights of Hainault, Bretagne, Gascony and Aquitaine crowded to his standard.

    0
    0
  • The western coast region is well compared with the Landes of Gascony.

    0
    0
  • Abdallah subdued Munisa, crossed the mountains and penetrated into Gascony by the valley of Roncesvalles.

    0
    0
  • Then Poitou was thoroughly subdued, and another truce was made in 1208, little more than southern Saintonge and Gascony being left in the hands of John.

    0
    0
  • In 1036 Geoffrey Martel had to liberate William the Fat, on payment of a heavy ransom, but the latter having died in 1038, and the second son of William the Great, Odo, duke of Gascony, having fallen in his turn at the siege of Mauze (loth of March 1039) Geoffrey made peace with his father in the autumn of 1039, and had his wife's two sons recognized as dukes.

    0
    0
  • He was the eldest son, and his family was a good one, but, like most gentlemen of Gascony, he had to trust to his sword.

    0
    0
  • of Castile, ceding Gascony to Edward, son of Henry III.

    0
    0
  • But the connection with Gascony meant little compared with the now vanished connection with Normandy.

    0
    0
  • He had taken advantage of his leisurely journey home to pacify the turbulent Gascony, and to visit Paris and make a treaty with King Philip III.

    0
    0
  • of France; the trouble did not come from this direction, though there was the usual crop of feudal rebellions in Gascony.

    0
    0
  • Gascony being, as usual, out of hand, he crossed to Bordeaux in 1286, and abode in Guienne for no less than three years, reducing the duchy to such order as it had never known before, settling all disputed border questions with the new king of France, Philip IV., founding many new towns, and issuing many useful statutes and ordinances.

    0
    0
  • When called to account for the doings of his subjects, as well as for certain disputes in Gascony, the English king promised redress, and, on the suggestion of Philip, surrendered, as a formal act of apology, the six chief fortresses of Guienne, which were to be restored when reparation had been made.

    0
    0
  • This he accomplished in the next spring, but meanwhile hardly a foothold remained to him in Gascony.

    0
    0
  • Edward was voted liberal grants by the laity, though the clergy gave less than he had hoped; but enough money was obtained to fit out two armies, one destined for the invasion of Scotland, the other for that of Gascony.

    0
    0
  • The French expedition, which was led by the kings brother Edmund, earl of Lancaster, failed to recover Gascony, and came to an ignominious end.

    0
    0
  • was something more ambitious than a mere attempt to recover Bordeaux; succours were to go to Gascony, but he Disputes himself and the main army were to invade France from with the the north with the aid of the count of Flanders.

    0
    0
  • Norfolk, who had been designated to lead the expedition to Guienne, declared that though he was ready to follow his master to Flanders in his capacity of marshal, he would not be drafted off to Gascony against his own will.

    0
    0
  • Piers was given the royal title of earl of Cornwall, and married to the kings niece; when Edward went over to France to do homage for Gascony, he even made his friend regent during his absence, in preference to any of his kinsmen.

    0
    0
  • When France had grown strong, under Philip Augustus, the house of Plantagenet still retained a broad territory in Gascony and Guienne, and the house of Capet could not but covet the possession of the largest surviving feudal appanage which marred the solidarity of their kingdom.

    0
    0
  • He lent an army to Ferdinand for the invasion of Gascony, and landed himself at Calais with 25,000 men, to beat up the northern border of France.

    0
    0
  • He fought in the naval fight off Sluys and in the one off Winchelsea in 1350; he led armies into Scotland, Gascony and Normandy, his exploits in Gascony in 1345 and 1346 being especially successful; he served frequently under Edward III.

    0
    0
  • The climate of the department is mild and it has an abundant rainfall, partly due to the west wind which drives the clouds from the gulf of Gascony.

    0
    0
  • In Gascony he apparently met the king of England (Edward I.) at a place which seems to be Bordeaux, but of which he speaks as the capital of Alanguitar (i.e.

    0
    0
  • Beyond these again stretched provinces practically impenetrable to royal influence: Brittany, Gascony, Toulouse, Septimania and the Spanish March.

    0
    0
  • small pains procured him the succession of Amaury de Montfort, and the Languedoc of the counts of Toulouse, if not the whole of Gascony.

    0
    0
  • had given Guienne in fief, provoked the nobles of Gascony to complain to Charles V.

    0
    0
  • Cited before the court of Paris, the Black Prince refused to attend, and war broke out in Gascony, Poitou and Normandy, but with fresh tactics (1369).

    0
    0
  • There were three principal theatres of war: in the north Normandy and the valley of the Loire, where Orleans, the general centre of reform, ensured communications between the south and Germany; in the south-west Gascony and Guienne; in the south-east Lyonnais and Vivarais.

    0
    0
  • In 1636 the Croquants ravaged Limousin, Poitou, Angoumois, Gascony and Prigord; in 1639 it needed an army to subdue the Va-nu-pieds (bare-feet) in Normandy.

    0
    0
  • BERTRAND BARERE DE VIEUZAC (1755-1841), one of the most notorious members of the French National Convention, was born at Tarbes in Gascony on the 10th of September 1755.

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