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Garrick sentence examples

garrick
  • 1769, a celebration in honour of the poet was organized by David Garrick.

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  • She corresponded with Garrick, Dr Blair and Principal Robertson; and when in Edinburgh, where she was very well received, she arranged to entrust the education of her son to Principal Robertson.

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  • In this respect it reached its height in the second half of the 18th century, and is specially associated with Colley Cibber, Samuel Johnson, Cumberland the dramatist, David Garrick, Samuel Richardson, Sir Joshua Reynolds, Beau Nash, Miss Chudleigh and Mrs Thrale.

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  • He took it to London and submitted it to Garrick for representation at Drury Lane, but it was rejected as unsuitable for the stage.

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  • After five years' labour he completed his play, which he took to London for Garrick's opinion.

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  • Garrick produced Agis at Drury Lane on the 21st of February 1758.

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  • In 1760 his tragedy, The Siege of Aquileia, was put on the stage, Garrick taking the part of Aemilius.

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  • DAVID GARRICK (1717-1779), English actor and theatrical manager, was descended from a good French Protestant family named Garric or Garrique of Bordeaux, which had settled in England on the revocation of the Edict of Nantes.

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  • His father, Captain Peter Garrick, who had married Arabella Clough, the daughter of a vicar choral of Lichfield cathedral, was on a recruiting expedition when his famous third son was born at Hereford on the 19th of February 1717.

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  • Captain Garrick, who had made his home at Lichfield, where he had a large family, in 1731 rejoined his regiment at Gibraltar.

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  • This seminary was, however, closed in about six months, and on the 2nd of March 1736/7 both Johnson and Garrick left Lichfield for London - Johnson, as he afterwards said, " with twopence halfpenny in his pocket," and Garrick " with three-halfpence in his."

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  • Captain Garrick died about a month after David's arrival in London.

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  • The concern was not prosperous - though Samuel Foote's assertion that he had known Garrick with three quarts of vinegar in the cellar calling himself a wine merchant need not be taken literally - and before the end of 1741 he had spent nearly half of his capital.

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  • Garrick subsequently accompanied a party of players from the same theatre to Ipswich, where he played his first part as an actor under the name of Lyddal, in the character of Aboan (in Southerne's Oroonoko).

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  • Garrick's farce of The Lying Valet, in which he performed the part of Sharp, was at this time brought out with so much success that he ventured to send a copy to his brother.

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  • His fortune was now made, and while the managers of Covent Garden and Drury Lane resorted to the law to make Giffard, the manager of Goodman's Fields, close his little theatre, Garrick was engaged by Fleetwood for Drury Lane for the season of 1742.

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  • With the close of that season Fleetwood's patent for the management of Drury Lane expired, and Garrick, in conjunction with Lacy, purchased the property of the theatre, together with the renewal of the patent; contributing 8000 as two-thirds of the purchase-money.

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  • In September 1747 it was opened with a strong company of actors, Johnson's prologue being spoken by Garrick, while the epilogue, written by him, was spoken by Mrs Woffington.

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  • The negotiations involved Garrick in a bitter quarrel with Macklin, who appears to have had a real grievance in the matter.

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  • Garrick took no part himself till his performance of Archer in the Beaux' Stratagem, a month after the opening.

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  • For a time at least " the drama's patrons " were content with the higher entertainment furnished them; in the end Garrick had to " please " them, like most other managers, by gratifying their love of show.

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  • Garrick was surrounded by many players of eminence, and he had the art, as he was told by Mrs Clive, " of contradicting the proverb that one cannot make bricks without straw, by doing what is infinitely more difficult, making actors and actresses without genius."

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  • To be " pleased with nature " was, as Churchill wrote, in the Rosciad (1761),1 to be pleased with Garrick.

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  • For the stately declamation, the sonorous, and beyond a doubt impressive, chant of Quin and his fellows, Garrick substituted rapid changes of passion and humour in both voice and gesture, which held his audiences spellbound.

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  • " It seemed," wrote Richard Cumberland, " as if a whole century had been stepped over in the passage of a single scene; old things were done away, and a new order at once brought forward, 1 In the subsequent Apology addressed to the Critical Reviewers, Churchill revenged himself for the slight which he supposed Garrick to have put upon him, by some spiteful lines, which, however, Garrick requited by good-humoured kindness.

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  • Garrick's French descent and his education may have contributed to give him the vivacity and versatility which distinguished him as an actor; and nature had given him an eye, if not a stature, to command, and a mimic power of wonderful variety.

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  • On the other hand, Tate Wilkinson says that Garrick's production of Hamlet in 1773 was well received at Drury Lane even by the galleries, " though without their favourite acquaintances the gravediggers."

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  • Few sins of omission can be charged against Garrick as a manager, but he refused Home's Douglas, and made the wrong choice between False Delicacy and The Good Natur'd Man.

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  • Garrick, who called her " the best of women and wives," lived most happily with her in his villa at Hampton, acquired by him in 1754, whither he was glad to escape from his house in Southampton Street.

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  • To this period belongs Garrick's quarrel with Barry, the only actor who even temporarily rivalled him in the favour of the public. In 1763 Garrick and his wife visited Paris, where they were cordially received and made the acquaintance of Diderot and others at the house of the baron d'Holbach.

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  • It was about this time that Grimm extolled Garrick as the first and only actor who came up to the demands of his imagination; and it was in a reply to a pamphlet occasioned by Garrick's visit that Diderot first gave expression to the views expounded in his Paradoxe sur le comedien.

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  • After some months spent in Italy, where Garrick fell seriously ill, they returned to Paris in the autumn of 1764 and made more friends, reaching London in April 1765.

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  • Their union was childless, and Mrs Garrick survived her husband until 1822.

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  • Garrick practically ceased to act in 1766, but he continued the management of Drury Lane, and in 1769 organized the Shakespeare celebrations at Stratford-on-Avon, an undertaking which ended in dismal failure, though he composed an " Ode upon dedicating a building and erecting a Statue to Shakespeare " on the occasion.

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  • In person, Garrick was a little below middle height; in his later years he seems to have inclined to stoutness.

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  • Johnson, of whose various and often merely churlish remarks on Garrick and his doings many are scattered through the pages of Boswell, spoke warmly of the elegance and sprightliness of his friend's conversation, as well as of his liberality and kindness of heart; while to the great actor's art he paid the exquisite tribute of describing Garrick's sudden death as having " eclipsed the gaiety of nations, and impoverished the public stock of harmless pleasure."

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  • But the most discriminating character of Garrick, slightly tinged with satire, is that drawn by Goldsmith in his poem of Retaliation.

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  • Garrick was often happy in his epigrams and occasional verse, including his numerous prologues and epilogues.

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  • The excellent farce, High Life below Stairs, appears to have been wrongly attributed to Garrick, and to be by James Townley.

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  • Garrick's Private Correspondence (published in 1831-1832 with a short memoir by Boaden, in 2 vols.

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  • A collection of unprinted Garrick letters is in the Forster library at South Kensington.

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  • A list of publications of all kinds for and against Garrick will be found in R.

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  • The earlier biographies of Garrick are by Arthur Murphy (2 vols., 1801) and by the bookseller Tom Davies (2 vols., 4th ed., 1805), the latter a work of some merit, but occasionally inaccurate and confused as to dates; and a searching if not altogether sympathetic survey of his verses is furnished by Joseph Knight's valuable Life (1894).

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  • Cain) at Paris in 1846; and an Italian Biografia di Davide Garrick was published by C. Blasis at Milan in 1840.

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  • See also for a very valuable survey of Garrick's labours as an actor, with a bibliography, C. Gaehde, David Garrick als Shakespeare-Darsteller, &c. (Berlin, 1904).

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  • Mrs Parsons' Garrick, and his Circle and Some unpublished Correspondence of David Garrick, ed.

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  • There is also a Life by James Smyth, David Garrick (1887).

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  • Robertson's play David Garrick, first acted by Sothern, and later associated with Sir Charles Wyndham, is of course mere fiction.

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  • As to the portraits of Garrick, see W.

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  • That by Gainsborough at Stratford-onAvon was preferred by Mrs Garrick to all others.

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  • The portraits by Reynolds include the celebrated " Garrick between Tragedy and Comedy."

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  • Roubiliac's statue of Shakespeare, for which Garrick sat, and for which he paid the sculptor three hundred guineas, was originally placed in a small temple at Hampton, and is now in the entrance hall at the British Museum.

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  • Possessed of easy means and being of hospitable disposition, he kept open house for Helvetius, D'Alembert, Diderot, Condillac, Turgot, Buffon, Grimm, Hume, Garrick, Wilkes, Sterne, and for a time J.

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  • David Garrick, who was one of thepupils, used, many years later, to throw the best company of London into convulsions of laughter by mimicking the master and his lady.

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  • A few days after the publication of this poem, his tragedy of Irene, begun many years before, was brought on the stage by his old pupil, David Garrick, now manager of Drury Lane Theatre.

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  • Sudden prosperity had turned Garrick's head.

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  • Garrick brought to the meetings his inexhaustible pleasantry, his incomparable mimicry, and his consummate knowledge of stage effect.

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  • "'Tis comme a Londres," he wrote to Garrick from Paris; "I have just now a fortnight's dinners and suppers upon my hands."

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  • But Mr Garrick's genius.

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  • He was one of the commanding figures at the club at the Turk's Head, with Reynolds and Garrick, Goldsmith and Johnson.

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  • In 1769 and again in 1774 he resided for some time in England and his Briefe aus England (1776-1778), with admirable descriptions of Garrick's acting, are the most attractive of his writings.

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  • Naturally, as a Hampton resident Garrick was noticed by Walpole who rather disparaged his social standing as a wine merchant turned actor.

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  • The theater and the Garrick Head Hotel are connected by a passageway, the purpose of which is unknown.

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  • Malone appears to have thought that it was a mere subterfuge to instance the death of Garrick as a reason for not electing him.

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  • The church of St Nicholas has ancient portions, and in the churchyard is the tomb of William Hogarth the painter, with commemorative lines by David Garrick.

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  • Among the audience was Macklin, whose performance of Shylock, early in the same year, had pointed the way along which Garrick was so rapidly to pass in triumph.

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  • After escaping from the chains of his passion for the beautiful but reckless Mrs Woffington, Garrick had in 1749 married Mademoiselle Violette (Eva Maria Veigel), a German lady who had attracted admiration at Florence or at Vienna as a dancer, and had come to England early in 1746, where her modest grace and the rumours which surrounded her created a furore, and where she found enthusiastic patrons in the earl and countess of Burlington.

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  • (See, inter alia, Garrick's Vagary, or England Run Mad; with particulars of the Stratford Jubilee, 1769.) Of his best supporters on the stage, Mrs Cibber, with whom he had been reconciled, died in 1766, and Mrs (Kitty) Clive retired in 1769; but Garrick contrived to maintain the success of his theatre.

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  • A memoir of Garrick is included in a volume of French Memoirs of Mlle Clairon and others, published by Levain (H.

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  • Several remain from the hand of Hogarth, including the famous picture of Garrick as Richard III.

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  • Among them were Hogarth, Garrick, Wilkes, Bubb Doddington and many other celebrities.

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  • Johnson saw with more envy than became so great a man the villa, the plate, the china, the Brussels carpet, which the little mimic had got by repeating, with grimaces and gesticulations, what wiser men had written; and the exquisitely sensitive vanity of Garrick was galled by the thought that, while all the rest of the world was applauding him, he could obtain from one morose cynic, whose opinion it was impossible to despise, scarcely any compliment not acidulated with scorn.

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  • Garrick now brought Irene out, with alterations sufficient to displease the author, yet not sufficient to make the piece pleasing to the audience.

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  • The Garrick 's Head pub was once the home of Beau Nash, Bath 's uncrowned king of the 1700s.

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