Gardens sentence example

gardens
  • Were the gardens where he was born and the beach where he played as a child still there?
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  • She began to sweat before reaching the door leading from the patio to the green blur that was the gardens over which the patio overlooked.
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  • She headed for the door in the wall that led from the gardens to the exterior of the compound.
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  • I didn't press her as we entered Lauritzen Gardens, and strolled the paths of public Botanical Park.
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  • Deidre's eyes were caught by the gardens but drifted to the pine trees beyond the walls.
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  • One note described in two sentences a Sunday trip to the Public Gardens while another mentioned three years had passed since the sisters had seen one another.
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  • A specimen in the Zoological Gardens of London had the back and tail dark grey, the tail tipped with black, and a rufous wash on the cheeks, shoulders, flanks and outer surface of the limbs, with the under surface white.
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  • Two miles from the town, amidst beautiful gardens and meadows, is Haddon Hall.
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  • At Bridlington Quay there is excellent sea-bathing, and the parade and ornamental gardens provide pleasant promenades.
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  • But the costume and physiognomy of the inhabitants, the narrow streets and flatroofed, whitewashed houses, and more than all, the thousands of palm-trees in its gardens and fields, give the place a strikingly Oriental aspect, and render it unique among the cities of Spain.
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  • I strolled a discrete distance from her side as we entered the gardens.
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  • She watched the men eating happily around the table and left the mansion for the gardens.
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  • Hurt, she fled into the cold night air, stopping only when she reached the center of the gardens.
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  • Deidre waited until the portal closed then bolted out of the gardens.
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  • She emerged in the gardens.
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  • He stepped through to a massive atrium with a marble floor, pillars, and water fountain surrounded by small gardens.
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  • In many gardens open-air tanks have been fitted up with hot-water pipes running through them to keep the water sufficiently warm in severe weather.
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  • The open-air water-lily tank in the Royal gardens, Kew, is one of the latest and most up-to-date in construction.
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  • Besides the Belt there are several parks and reserves, including botanical and acclimatization gardens, the so-called Ocean Beach, and two race-courses.
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  • He also made himself very popular in Paris by his large gifts to the poor in time of famine, and by throwing open the gardens of the Palais Royal to the people.
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  • When John Evelyn was in Paris in 1644 he saw it played in the gardens of the Luxembourg Palace.
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  • The palace of the khan, with its gardens and lake, itself formed an inner enclosure fronting the south.
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  • Since that year the ramparts have been levelled and their site occupied by public promenades and gardens.
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  • The Independencia Park, formerly called Calvario Park, which occupies a hill on the west side of the city, is the largest and most attractive of the public gardens.
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  • Here are the summer palace of the governor-general, many fine Moorish and French villas and luxurious hotels, all surrounded by beautiful gardens.
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  • The Neapolitans were ignominiously beaten in May and retired to the frontier; on the 1st of June Oudinot declared that he would attack Rome on the 4th, but by beginning operations on the 3rd, when no attack was expected, he captured an important position in the Pamphili gardens.
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  • Since then it has been discovered in other botanic gardens in various parts of Europe, its two most recent appearances being at Lyons (1901) and Munich (1905), occurring always in tanks in which the Victoria regia is cultivated, a fact which indicates that tropical South America is its original habitat.
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  • The city lies in a fertile valley shut in by vine-clad hills, and the picturesque red sandstone buildings of the old town are interspersed with orchards and gardens.
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  • Since then many others have been obtained, and one lived for several years in the gardens of the Zoological Society of London.
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  • The remaining 200 victims, who had escaped the bullets of the siege and survived the butchery of the river bank, were massacred afterwards and cast down the famous well of Cawnpore, which is now marked by a memorial and surrounded by gardens.
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  • The site, which is traceable, is surrounded by gardens.
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  • The memorial stands by the river above the church, and above again lie the Bancroft or Bank croft gardens where, in.
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  • Those of warmer countries cannot be cultivated in British gardens without protection from the rigours of winter; still less are they able to hold their own unaided in an unfavourable climate.
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  • Kampen is surrounded by beautiful gardens and promenades in the place of the old city walls, and has a fine river front.
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  • Though feeding largely on worms and insects they ravage gardens and fields, on which account they are detested by the colonists.
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  • Orchards and fruit gardens are well developed; the crown maintains two model gardens.
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  • S., is celebrated for its gardens.
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  • One good feature of the Russian primary school system, however, is that in many villages there are school gardens or fields; in nearly moo schools, bee-keeping, and in 300 silkworm culture is taught; while in some 900 schools the children receive instruction in various trades; and in 300 schools in slojd (a system of manual training originated in Finland).
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  • The other part comprehends inner Persis lying northwards; it enjoys a pleasant climate and has fertile and well-watered plains, gardens with trees of all kinds, rich pasturages and forests abounding with game; with the exception of the olive all fruits are produced in profusion, particularly the vine.
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  • The rose gardens cover several square miles.
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  • The industries of the town include cotton spinning and weaving, silk spinning, the manufacture of tobacco, ropes, metal-ware, furniture, &c. The market gardens of the neighbourhood are famous, and there is a considerable shipping trade by the river and the Ludwigskanal.
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  • Viewed from the walls Peking looks like a city of gardens.
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  • The estate is famous for its plantations and Dutch gardens, the pinetum containing the most representative collection of araucarias, deodars and other conifers in Europe.
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  • The place was without importance until 1612, when Shah Abbas began building and laying out the palaces and gardens in the neighbourhood now collectively known as Bagh i Shah (the garden of the shah).
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  • The palaces, completed in 1627, are now in ruins, but the gardens with their luxuriant vegetation and gigantic cypress and orange trees are well worth a visit.
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  • There were originally six separate gardens, all contained within one large wall but separated one from another by high walls.
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  • At Bankside were the Bear and the Paris Gardens, used for the popular sport of bear and bull baiting; and the Globe theatre, the scene of the production of many of Shakespeare's plays for fifteen years after its erection in 1599.
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  • The duke of York public gardens were opened in 1894.
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  • Mingrelia and Imeretia (valley of Rion) are the gardens of Caucasia, but the high valleys of Svanetia, farther north on the south slopes of the Caucasus mountains, are wild and difficult of access.
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  • The dwarf and pyramid trees, more usually planted in gardens, are obtained by grafting on the quince stock, the Portugal quince being the best; but this stock, from its surface-rooting habit, is most suitable for soils of a cold damp nature.
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  • The palace is surrounded by gardens and ornamental waters - to the north the Jardin de l'Orangerie, to the south the Jardin Anglais and the Parterre, between which extends the lake known as the Bassin des Carpes, containing carp in large numbers.
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  • Both elementary day schools and continuation schools are in many cases provided with gardens in which horticultural teaching is given.
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  • Ever active, he employed himself in the narrower sphere of repairing the castle and improving its domains and gardens, in shipbuilding on the Clyde, and in the exercise of the virtues of hospitality and charity.
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  • Numerous other firs are common in gardens and shrubberies, and some furnish valuable products in their native countries; but they are not yet of sufficient economic or general interest to demand mention here.
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  • The chief object of the author, who had been naturalist to the Niger Expedition, and curator to the Museum of the Zoological Society of London, was to figure the animals contained in its gardens or described in its Proceedings, which until the year 1848 were not illustrated.
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  • The publication of the Zoological Sketches of Joseph Wolf, from animals in the gardens of the Zoological Society of London, was Wolf.
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  • Bartlett, the superin tendent of the London Zoological Society's Gardens, and that, without his assistance, Blyth'sopportunities,slenderasthey were compared with those which others have enjoyed, must have been still smaller.
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  • Another attraction of the place is the gardens of Collodi.
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  • Of the shorter poems, besides the greeting to Pippin on his return from the campaign against the Avars (796), an epistle to David (Charlemagne) incidentally reveals a delightful picture of the poet living with his children in a house surrounded by pleasant gardens near the emperor's palace.
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  • Before that date Venetian shipping was built at the spot near the piazzetta, known as the terra nova, where the royal gardens now are.
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  • A special brick structure was erected in the public gardens to receive the works of contemporary artists, both Italian and foreign.
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  • Arab geographers and travellers of the middle ages speak in high terms of the gardens of Nisibis, and the magnificent returns obtained by the agriculturist.
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  • Shipley Hall, to the south of Heanor, is a mansion built on a hill, amidst fine gardens.
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  • Having served his apprenticeship as gardener from the age of fifteen, and himself constructed a large lake when gardener to Battlesden in 1821, he was in 1823 employed in the arboretum at Chiswick, the seat of the duke of Devonshire, and eventually became superintendent of the duke's gardens and grounds at Chatsworth, and manager of his Derbyshire estates.
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  • Originally a nature goddess (like Venus the garden goddess, with whom she was sometimes identified), she represented at first the hope of fruitful gardens and fields, then of abundant offspring, and lastly of prosperity to come and good fortune in general, being hence invoked on birthdays and at weddings.
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  • Of the total area 54.8% is occupied by arable land, 7% by meadows, 5.7% by pasturages, 1.2% by gardens, o.
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  • Such a wall would be required to protect the clusters of dwellings around the Acropolis as well as the springs issuing from the rock, while the gates opening in various directions would give access to the surrounding pastures and gardens.
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  • Besides completing the gigantic Olympieum he enlarged the circuit of the city walls to the east, enclosing the area now covered by the royal and the build- public gardens and the Constitution Square.
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  • This was the City of Hadrian (Hadrianapolis) or New Athens (Novae Athenae); a handsome suburb with numerous villas, baths and gardens; some traces remain of its walls, which, like those of Themistocles, were fortified with rectangular towers.
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  • Adjoining the governor's residence are the botanical gardens, where many European plants are tested with a view to acclimatization.
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  • There are extensive gardens and nurseries in the neighbourhood of Pontefract, and liquorice is largely grown for the manufacture of the celebrated Pomfret cakes.
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  • He is said to have built many great fire-temples, with large gardens and villages (Tabari).
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  • The artificial harbour, somewhat exposed, lies south of the ancient Hanseatic harbour, now filled up and covered with gardens.
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  • All this space is filled with villas, gardens and hotels, and is a favourite summer resort not only of Alexandrians but also of Cairenes.
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  • There are large herbaria at the British Museum and at the Royal Gardens, Kew, and smaller collections at the botanical institutions at the principal British universities.
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  • Herbaria are also associated with the more important botanic gardens and museums in other countries.
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  • Cosmo Gordon Lang, 1908 Next to the cathedral, the most interesting building in York is St Mary's Abbey, situated in Museum Gardens, founded for Benedictines by Alan, lord of Richmond, in 1078, its head having the rank of a mitred abbot with a seat in parliament.
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  • In the gardens is also the ambulatory of St Leonard's hospital, founded by King Aethelstan and rebuilt by Stephen.
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  • The residential château of the princes of Lippe-Detmold (1550), in the Renaissance style, is an imposing building, lying with its pretty gardens nearly in the centre of the town; whilst at the entrance to the large park on the south is the New Palace (1708-1718), enlarged in 1850, used as the dower-house.
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  • Leon is essentially a manufacturing and commercial city; it has a cathedral and a theatre, the latter one of the largest and finest in the republic. The city is regularly built, with wide streets and numerous shady parks and gardens.
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  • The portion of Nassau harbour known as the Sea Gardens exhibits an extraordinarily beautiful development of marine organisms.
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  • Apart from gardens and house-property,, all land was, according to this enactment, owned by the state;.
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  • The terminal circle, whose longest diameter is 300 ft., is somewhat difficult to make out, as it is broken by the houses and gardens of a little hamlet.
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  • A great portion of the ground within the wall lines is not occupied by buildings, especially in the north-western quarter; and even in the more populous parts of the city, near the river, a considerable space between the houses is occupied by gardens, where pomegr a nates, figs, oranges, lemons and date-palms grow in great abundance, so that the city, when seen at a distance, has the appearance of rising out of the midst of trees.
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  • Taraba, according to John Lewis Burckhardt, is a considerable town, surrounded by palm groves and gardens, and watered by numerous rivulets, and famous for its long resistance to Mehemet Ali's forces in 1815.
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  • There is a large brewery in the town, and extensive market gardens in the neighbourhood.
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  • Around the outer lake are grouped the suburbs Harvestehude and PBsseldorf on the western shore, and Uhlenhorst on the eastern, with park-like promenades and villas surrounded by well-kept gardens.
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  • Facing the botanical gardens a new central post-office, in the Renaissance style, was built in 1887.
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  • There must also be mentioned the fine public zoological gardens, Hagenbeck's private zoological gardens in the vicinity, the schools of music and navigation, and the school of commerce.
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  • Water is plentiful in the Elburz, and situated in well-watered valleys and gorges are innumerable flourishing villages, embosomed in gardens and orchards, with extensive cultivated fields and meadows, and at higher altitudes small plateaus, under snow until March or April, afford cool camping grounds to the nomads of the plains, and luxuriant grazing to their sheep and cattle during the summer.
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  • Behind the citadel, and along its glacis on the southern side, are the gardens of Kalemegdan, commanding a famous view across the river; behind Kalemegdan comes Belgrade itself, a city of white houses, among which a few great public buildings, like the high school, national bank, national theatre and the so-called New Palace, stand forth prominently.
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  • Only the multitude of small gardens, planted with limes, acacias and lilacs, and the bright costumes of the Servian or Hungarian peasants, remain to distinguish it from a western capital.
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  • The preacher had recourse to the Surrey Gardens music hall, where his congregation numbered from seven to ten thousand.
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  • Of the remainder, woods occupy 3 4.02%, gardens 1.99% and 4.93% is unproductive.
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  • Apart from the old quarter lying on the Mulde, the town is well built, is surrounded by pleasant gardens and contains many handsome streets and spacious squares.
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  • In the environs are the ducal villas of Georgium and Luisium, the gardens of which, as well as those of the neighbouring town of Worlitz, are much admired.
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  • Though not uncommonly frequenting gardens and orchards, in which as well as in woods it builds its nest, it is exceedingly shy in its habits, so as seldom to afford opportunities for observation.
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  • Other facilities for outdoor enjoyment are provided in Hesketh Park (presented to the town by the Rev. Charles Hesketh, formerly rector of North Meols, and one of the lords of the manor), the Botanic Gardens, Kew Gardens, South Marine Park, and the Winter Gardens.
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  • Berry-White, which is maintained by the government, to train hospital assistants for the tea gardens.
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  • Woods occupy 34.2%, gardens and meadows 13.1% and pastures 3.2%.
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  • To the south of the esplanade is a pier of stone on wooden piles, and the Alexandra and other public gardens are attractive.
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  • Many species of aconite are cultivated in gardens, some having blue and others yellow flowers.
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  • The staple crop is rice, but orchards and gardens are also common.
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  • Amasia has extensive orchards and fruit gardens still, as in Ibn Batuta's time, irrigated by water wheels turned by the current of the river; and there are steam flourmills.
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  • There are also the bull-ring, capable of accommodating 8000 spectators, the pelota court (el Trinquete) and several parks or gardens.
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  • The botanical gardens of Brazil are developing into permanent exhibitions of the flora of the regions in which they are located.
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  • The Recife was rebuilt and adorned with splendid residences and gardens and received from its founder the name of Mauritstad.
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  • In the centre is a bold rock, crowned by the castle, between which and the new town lies a ravine that once contained the Nor' Loch, but is now covered with the gardens of Princes Street.
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  • Of these by far the most remarkable is the Scott monument in East Princes Street Gardens, designed by George Meikle Kemp (1795-1844); it is in the form of a spiral Gothic cross with a central canopy beneath which is a seated statue of Scott with his dog " Maida " at his side, by Sir John Steell, the niches being occupied by characters in Sir Walter's writings.
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  • The older are Princes Street Gardens, covering the old Nor' Loch, Calton Hill, the Meadows and the Bruntsfield Links.
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  • Among these are Craigcrook Castle (where Lord Jeffrey spent many happy years, and the gardens of which are said to have given Scott a hint for Tullyveolan in Waverley), and Ravelston House, the home of the Keiths.
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  • Upon this street, which divides Princes Street and its gardens into east and west, and which received the title of the Mound, were erected the National Gallery and the Royal Institution.
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  • These mountains and the numerous gardens Kassala contains give to the place a picturesque appearance.
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  • The ordinary pelican, the Onocrotalus of the ancients, to whom it was well known, and the Pelecanus onocrotalus of ornithologists, is a very abundant bird in some districts of south-eastern Europe, south-western Asia and north-eastern Africa, occasionally straying, it is believed, into the northern parts of Germany and France; but the possibility of such wanderers having escaped from confinement is always to be regarded,' since few zoological gardens are without examples.
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  • Gardens extend for miles along the river, and the bazaars and khans are unusually large.
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  • The city proper occupies two indented tongues of land, having a water frontage on Port Jackson, and extending from Rushcutter's Bay on the east to Blackwattle Bay on the west, a distance of 8 m., nearly two miles of which is occupied by the Domain and the botanical gardens.
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  • Like most of the buildings at Sydney, the university is built of the excellent sandstone from the quarries of Pyrmont; it is 15th-century Gothic in style and stands at the top of a gentle slope, surrounded by gardens.
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  • Adjoining are two smaller parks, Cook Park and Philip Park, while north of these stretches the Domain and the botanical gardens.
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  • The botanical gardens on the southern shores of Farm Cove are the finest in the Commonwealth and are distinguished for their immense collection of exotics.
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  • The most characteristic members of the order are twining plants with generally smooth heart-shaped leaves and large showy white or purple flowers, as, for instance, the greater bindweed of English hedges, Calystegia sepium, and many species of the genus Ipomaea, the largest of the order, including the "convolvulus major" of gardens, and morning glory.
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  • Convolvulus arvensis (bindweed) is a pest in fields and gardens on account of its wide-spreading underground stem, and many of the dodders (Cuscuta) cause damage to crops.
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  • There are many beautiful private buildings, broad and well-paved streets, numerous squares and public gardens.
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  • The neighbouring gardens belong to the Royal Horticultural Society.
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  • From 1738 to 1776 Marylebone Gardens (which had existed under other names from the close of the 17th century) became one of the most favoured evening resorts in London.
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  • It contains the Zoological Gardens, one of the most noteworthy institutions of its kind, attracting numerous visitors to its splendid collections of living animals.
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  • Here are also the gardens of the Royal Botanic Society, incorporated in 1839.
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  • The Geestlande comprise the suburban districts encircling the city on the north and west; the Marschlande includes various islands in the Elbe and the fertile tract of land lying between the northern and southern arms of the Elbe, and with its pastures and market gardens supplying Hamburg with large quantities of country produce.
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  • In the Bergedorf district lies the Vierlande, or Four Districts (Neuengamme, Kirchwarder, Altengamme and Curslack), celebrated for its fruit gardens and the picturesque dress of the inhabitants.
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  • It stands in public gardens; there are several other small open spaces; and some 70 out of the 217 acres of Victoria Park are within the borough.
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  • Another account speaks of him as having left behind him gardens, to the extent of about twelve acres, close to the Appian Way.
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  • The town is without any architectural pretensions, but possesses fine public gardens.
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  • In the north of the town is the National Museum and adjacent are the Zoological Gardens.
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  • He amassed a large fortune, erected magnificent buildings and purchased the famous gardens of Maecenas.
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  • The town lies pleasantly upon a hill rising above a mere, which drains to the Waveney, having its banks laid out as public gardens.
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  • The northern enters the county in Hammersmith as Uxbridge Road, crosses Kensington and borders the north side of Kensington Gardens and Hyde Park as Bayswater Road.
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  • The southern highway enters Hammersmith, crosses the centre of Kensington as Kensington Road and High Street, borders Kensington Gardens and Hyde Park as Kensington Gore and Knightsbridge, with terraces of fine residences, and merges into Piccadilly.
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  • Open gardens fringe it in part on the landward side, and it is lined with fine public and private buildings.
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  • Kensington Gardens, originally attached to Kensington Palace, were subsequently much extended; they are magnificently timbered, and contain plantations of rare shrubs and flowering trees.
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  • The outlying parts of the county to east, south and north are not lacking in open spaces, but there is an extensive inner area where at most only small gardens and squares break the continuity of buildings, and where in some cases old churchyards serve as public grounds.
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  • The present London residence of the sovereign is Buckingham Palace, on the west side of St p James's Park, with beautiful gardens behind it.
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  • In Kensington (q.v.), on the west side of Kensington Gardens, is the palace acquired by William III.
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  • The Albert Memorial, Kensington Gardens, was erected (1872) by " Queen Victoria and her People to the memory of Albert, Prince Consort," from the designs of Sir Gilbert Scott, with a statue of the Prince (1876) by John Henry Foley beneath a huge ornate Gothic canopy.
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  • An entertainment of another form is recalled in the name of Spring Gardens, St James' Park, where at the time of James I.
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  • The Royal Botanic Society has private gardens in the midst of Regent's Park, where flower shows and general entertainments are held.
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  • The Royal Horticultural Society maintains gardens at Wisley, Surrey, and has an exhibition hall in Vincent Square, Westminster.
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  • The Zoological Society maintains a magnificent collection of living specimens in the Zoological Gardens, Regent's Park, a popular resort.
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  • In Amen Court, where the residences of canons of St Paul's and the later houses of the minor canons are situated, there stretches such a piece of wall, dividing the gardens of the Court from the Old Bailey.
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  • He speaks of its wealth, commerce, grandeur and magnificence - of the mildness of the climate, the beauty of the gardens, the sweet, clear and salubrious springs, the flowing streams, and the pleasant clack of the watermills.
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  • On Norden's map,' however, we find the gardens of Paris Garden, the bearhouse and the playhouse.
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  • Stubbs denounced suburban gardens and garden houses in his Anatomy of Abuses, and another writer observed " how happy were cities if they had no suburbs."
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  • The celebrated ape "Mafuka," which lived in the Dresden zoological gardens during 1875, and came from Loango, was apparently a member of this species, although it was at one time regarded as a hybrid between a chimpanzee and a gorilla.
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  • The town and its fine gardens and orchards straggle some 6 m.
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  • Coal, fireclay and blue and red brick clay are dug in the neighbourhood; and there are also market gardens.
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  • The town is laid out in rectangular blocks at the foot of low hills, from the summit of which (as in Queen's Gardens) a splendid panorama is seen, including the snow-clad Mount Ruapehu to the north-east.
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  • The district was the scene of conflicts with the natives in 1847, 1864 and 1868, and in the beautiful Moutoa gardens a monument commemorates the battle of that name (May 14th, 1864).
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  • Founded in 1854, it is well-built, provided with boulevards and surrounded by luxuriant gardens.
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  • Many of the tombs, which were built of crude brick, were provided with gardens, and there were shelves or altars on which were placed the offerings to the dead.
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  • The gardens and fields produce an abundance of flowers, which justify the city's title of la cittd dei fiori.
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  • The viali or boulevards form pleasant residential streets with gardens, and the system of building separate houses for each family (villini) instead of large blocks of flats is becoming more and more general.
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  • The more modern quarters are built with great regularity and the suburbs contain several substantial villas surrounded by gardens.
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  • Towards the west is the Si-hu or Western Lake, a beautiful sheet of water, with its banks and islands studded with villas, monuments and gardens, and its surface traversed by gaily-painted pleasure boats.
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  • Within these bays are beaches of white sand, called praias, such as the Praia da Icarahy, Praia das Flechas and Praia Grande, upon which face low tile-covered residences surrounded with gardens.
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  • The town with its gardens, surrounded by a mud wall, covers a space of 2 m.
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  • The town walls were strengthened, new wells dug, gardens planted, mosques and schools built.
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  • It stands on the eastern edge of the Syrian desert, on the north-eastern shore of a deep depression, formerly a sea, the Assyrium Stagnum of the old geographers, but in latter years drained and turned into gardens for the town.
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  • It is a fairly prosperous city, supplied with admirable water by an underground aqueduct from the Hindieh canal, a few miles to the north, which also serves to water the gardens in the deep dry bed of the former lake.
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  • These form nearly 60% of its total area, private gardens, parks and open spaces occupying a further 13%.
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  • Among the most popular resorts are the parks and gardens belonging to the imperial châteaux of Schönbrunn and Laxenburg.
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  • It has fine gardens, and its flowers and palms are especially famous: the former are largely exported, while the latter serve for the supply of palm branches for St Peter's at Rome and other churches on Palm Sunday.
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  • It is very abundant in the Zoological Gardens in London, where it occurs in conjunction with a much smaller imported species Phyllodromia germanica, which may also be seen in some of the cheaper restaurants.
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  • As early as the close of the 17th century Watertown was the chief horse and cattle market in New England and was known for its fertile gardens and fine estates.
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  • It can be grown in parks and gardens, and thrives well; but the young plants are unable to bear great variations of temperature.
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  • Several have been exhibited in the London Zoological Gardens, and some have grown gentle in captivity.
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  • There abound "beautifully laid out gardens, public and private, and solidly constructed roads, some of them bordered with bamboos and other delicately-fronded trees, and fringed with the luxuriant growth of semi-tropical vegetation."
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  • Trees grow nowhere except in the gardens near the city.
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  • Beyond the walls extended the gardens and villas of a prosperous Oriental population, especially on the south-west towards the suburb of Meram.
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  • The botanic gardens form a pleasant and favourite place of resort.
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  • Numerous broken granite columns in the gardens and vineyards that surround the town, with the number of ruined houses within the walls, testify to its former importance.
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  • At the foot of the castle stands the modern residence of the governor, built c. 1830, with several spacious courts and gardens.
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  • The so-called" new town" (Neustadt), added in 1333, extends to the Anlagen, the beautiful gardens and promenades laid out (1806-1812) on the site of the 17th century fortifications, of which they faithfully preserve the general ground plan.
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  • There is similar enthusiasm in the matter of gardens.
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  • Until 1886 Olmiitz was one of the strongest fortresses of Austria, but the fortifications have been removed, and their place is occupied by a town park, gardens and promenades.
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  • The gardens and orchards supply great abundance of fruits, especially almonds and walnuts; and bee-keeping is common throughout the country.
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  • The Indian rhinoceros (Rhinoceros unicornis), the largest of the Asiatic forms, is the most widely known, from its being exhibited in zoological gardens.
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  • The black rhinoceros is more rarely seen in menageries in Europe than either of the Asiatic species, but one lived in the gardens of the London Zoological Society from 1868-1891.
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  • Baths, lunch-rooms, restrooms, clubs, lectures, schools and kindergartens have been supplied, and the company has also cultivated domestic pride by offering prizes for the best-kept gardens, &c. From April to July 1901 there was a strike in the already thoroughly unionized factories; complaint was made of the hectoring of union men by a certain foreman, the use in toilet-rooms of towels laundered in non-union shops (the company replied by allowing the men to supply towels themselves), the use on doors of springs not union-made (these were removed by the company), and especially the discharge of four men whom the company refused to reinstate.
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  • About 19% is arable land, 12% pastures, 5.60% meadows, while 1.06% is occupied by gardens and 1.4% by vineyards which produce wine of a good quality.
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  • There are also flour mills, breweries, important printing works, vinegar works and, in the vicinity, nursery gardens.
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  • In Uyeno, too, are the Imperial Museum, the Imperial Library and the Zoological Gardens.
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  • Many Roman remains have been found in the gardens of the Kursaal.
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  • Derwent Isle, about six acres in extent, contains a handsome residence surrounded by lawns, gardens and timber of large growth.
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  • Peterhof is connected with Oranienbaum on the west and with Stryelna on the east by series of gardens and villas.
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  • The gardens and palace of Alcinous and the wonderful ships of the Phaeacian mariners were famous in antiquity.
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  • The farm colony at Hadleigh in Essex has a large acreage under cultivation, with fruit and market gardens and various industrial undertakings.
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  • Other educational establishments are Queen's University, replacing the old Queen's College (1849) under the Irish Universities Act 1908; the Presbyterian and the Methodist Colleges, occupying neighbouring sites close to the extensive botanical gardens, the Royal Academical Institution, and the Municipal Technical Institute.
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  • The fosse is laid out in vegetable gardens; public gardens have been constructed outside the walls; and artesian wells have been bored by the government.
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  • It had to wheel half-right in mass to bring it in the required direction, and then to advance till its rear was clear of the obstruction formed by the gardens of St Marie.
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  • They are much cultivated as ornamental plants, especially in public buildings and gardens, for their stiff, rugged habit.
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  • This word, applied in the form of KaKros by the ancient Greeks to some prickly plant, was adopted by Linnaeus as the name of a group of curious succulent or fleshy-stemmed plants, most of them prickly and leafless, some of which produce beautiful flowers, and are now so popular in our gardens that the name has become familiar.
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  • The locality, which is further enlivened by gardens and running streams, is named Gazir-gah, and is a favourite resort of the Heratis.
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  • The buildings are now in ruins, but the view from the pavilions, shaded by splendid plane trees on the terraced gardens formed on the slope of the mountain, is said to be very beautiful.
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  • Before the Crimean War of 1853-56 Sevastopol was a wellbuilt city, beautified by gardens, and had 43,000 inhabitants; but at the end of the siege it had not more than fourteen buildings which had not been badly injured.
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  • The process of natural evaporation in the salines or salt gardens of the margin of warm seas made the composition of sea-salt familiar at a very early time, and.
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  • At the same time her extravagance in dress, jewelry and amusements (including the gardens and theatricals at Trianon, of the cost of which such exaggerated reports were spread about) and her presence at horse-races and masked balls in Paris without the king, gave rise to great scandal, which was seized upon by her enemies, among whom were Mesdames, the count of Provence, and the duke of Orleans and the Palais Royal clique.
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  • Though goldfinches may occasionally be observed in the coldest weather, incomparably the largest number leave Britain in autumn, returning in spring, and resorting to gardens and orchards to breed, when the lively song of the cock, and the bright yellow wings of both sexes, quickly attract notice.
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  • The botanic gardens are among the finest in the world; they originally formed a part of the park attached to the palace of the governor-general, and were established in 1817.
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  • Adderley Street and the avenue make one straight road a mile long, and at its end are "the Gardens," as the suburbs built on the rising ground leading to Table Mountain are called.
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  • Government Avenue contains, on the east side, the Houses of Parliament, government house, a modernized Dutch building, and the Jewish synagogue; on the west side are the Anglican cathedral and grammar schools, the public library, botanic gardens, the museum and South African college.
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  • The botanic gardens cover 14 acres, contain over 8000 varieties of trees and plants, and afford a magnificent view of Table Mountain and its companion heights.
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  • In the gardens, in front of the library is a statue of Sir George Grey, governor of the Cape from 1854 to 1861.
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  • In Queen Victoria Street, which runs along the west side of the gardens, are the Cape University buildings (begun in 1906), the law courts, City club and Huguenot memorial hall.
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  • In the adjacent gardens an open rotunda encloses a marble bust of the philosopher Leibnitz, and near it is a monument to General Count von Alten, the commander of the Hanoverian troops at Waterloo.
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  • Close to it lies the famous Herrenhausen, the summer palace of the former kings of Hanover, with fine gardens, an open-air theatre, a museum and an orangery, and approached by a grand avenue over a mile in length.
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  • Tea gardens cover a considerable area, and the valley contains a colony of European tea planters.
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  • The line of the ancient ramparts, demolished in 1830, is now only marked by the Singel, or outer canal, which surrounds the oldest part of the city, with pleasant gardens and promenades laid out on the inside.
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  • The old fortifications, of which the Porte de Valenciennes (15th century) is the chief survival, have been demolished to make room for boulevards and public gardens.
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  • Lake Xochimilco, celebrated for its chinampas, or "floating gardens,", is supplied very largely by fresh-water springs opening within the lake itself, which the city has partially diverted for its own water supply.
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  • The neighbourhood abounds in market gardens and plantations of aromatic herbs for the manufacture of scents and essences.
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  • The orchards and gardens in which many villages are embosomed yield delicious fruits of almost every description, and great quantities, dried, are exported, principally to Russia.
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  • Gardens and promenades have taken the place of the old ramparts, and on the south the city is bounded by the Frederiks and the Flora parks, between which runs the fine avenue called the Dreef, leading to the Haarlemmer Hout or wood.
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  • The Echeveria of gardens is now included in this genus.
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  • Facing the sea there are gardens and promenades over 1 m.
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  • By later antiquarians Libitina was sometimes identified with Persephone, but more commonly (partly or completely) with Venus Lubentia or Lubentina, an Italian goddess of gardens.
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  • The corporation owns the Stray, and also the Spa concert rooms and grounds, Harlow Moor, Crescent Gardens, Royal Bath gardens and other large open spaces, as well as Royal Baths, Victoria Baths and Starbeck Baths.
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  • The surrounding territory is fertile and well cultivated, especially in fruit gardens and palmgroves.
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  • Tobacco is also grown, and over 32,000 acres are under vineyards, while gardens extend to some 15,500 acres in Crimea.
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  • The natives cultivate maize, plantains, bananas, pineapples, limes, pepper, cotton, &c., and live easily on the products of their gardens, with occasional help from fishing and hunting.
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  • In 33 he was chosen aedile and signalized his tenure of office by effecting great improvements in the city of Rome, restoring and building aqueducts, enlarging and cleansing the sewers, and constructing baths and porticos, and laying out gardens.
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  • Arable land and gardens occupy 55.6% of the area, meadows and pastures 12.9%, forests 21.7%, and the rest is mostly waste.
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  • This locality is generally known as the Cinnamon Gardens, as it was formerly a Dutch reserve for the cultivation of the cinnamon bush, many of which are still growing here.
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  • The surrounding gardens are adorned with fountains, cascades, lakes and grottos, the principal fountain sending up a jet of water 180 ft.
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  • Wauwatosa has important manufactures, including machinery, brick, lime, beer, chemicals and wooden-ware, and extensive market gardens and nurseries and valuable stone quarries.
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  • During the summer there are open-air theatres in several private parks or "gardens."
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  • The duchess of Kent had communicated her projects to Lord Melbourne, and they were known to many other statesmen, and to persons in society; but the gossip of drawing-rooms during the years 1837-38 continually represented that the young queen had fallen in love with Prince This or Lord That, and the more imaginative babblers hinted at post-chaises waiting outside Kensington Gardens in the night, private marriages and so forth.
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  • The castle, formerly the ducal residence, is in the Bergstadt, defended by moats, and surrounded by beautiful gardens.
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  • Market gardens are very numerous in the neighbourhood of London.
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  • The extensive gardens which occupy the hillside behind the palace are adorned with fountains and cascades; the botanical garden contains manytrees from northern climates.
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  • The foundation of botanic gardens during the 16th and 17th centuries did much in the way of advancing botany.
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  • Gardens also early existed at Florence and Bologna.
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  • The garden at Kew dates from about 1730, when Frederick, prince of Wales, obtained a long lease of Kew House and its gardens from the Capel family.
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  • Jean Gesner (1709-1790), a Swiss physician and botanist, states that at the end of the 18th century there were 1600 botanic gardens in Europe.
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  • Within this circuit there are various open areas - the spacious Ippodromo in front of the citadel, the public gardens in the north-east of the city, the Piazza Grande in front of the cathedral, and the Piazza Reale to the south of the palace.
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  • Market gardens, orchards, and vineyards occupy a large proportion of the soil (outside the city), the apparent fertility of which is largely due to the unremitting industry of the inhabitants.
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  • On the other hand, there are broad quays along the river, while public gardens afford grateful shade.
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  • About it Yakub Beg erected a commodious college, mosque and monastery, the whole being surrounded by rich orchards, fruit gardens and vineyards.
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  • Owing to the great beauty of the flowers they have been favourites in European gardens for two or three centuries, and have been crossed and recrossed till it has become almost impossible to refer the plants to their original types.
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  • Gardens and parks abound; the palace garden is exceptionally fine, and in the same neighbourhood are the public gardens with the place of amusement known as the Chateau des Fleurs.
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  • In the New Buildings, or the Lybed quarter, are the university and the botanical gardens.
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  • It was formerly the residence of the khans of Khokand, and has beautiful gardens and a large park in the middle of the town.
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  • According to Captain Stanley Flower, director of the Zoological Gardens at Giza, Cairo, Egypt, the ancient Egyptians kept various species of wild animals in captivity, but the first Zoological Garden of which there is definite knowledge was founded in China by the first emperor of the Chou dynasty, who reigned about iioo B.C. This was called the "Intelligence Park," and appears to have had a scientific and educational object.
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  • In later times royal persons and great feudal magnates frequently kept menageries of wild animals, aviaries and aquaria, and it is from these that modern public Gardens have taken their origin.
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  • In the New World, according to Prescott, King Nezahualcoyotl had zoological gardens at Tezcuco in Mexico in the middle of the 15th century, whilst in the next century Cortes found aviaries and fishponds at Iztapalapan.
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  • Most of the modern zoological gardens date from comparatively recent years, and there are a larger number stocked with a finer collection of animals, more suitably housed, than at any past time in the history of the world.
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  • According to a reference list compiled by Captain Stanley Flower, there were 102 actually existing public gardens or parks containing collections of wild animals in 1910, while there are also a considerable number of private collections.
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  • The Zoological Gardens at Giza, Cairo, are a government institution administered by the Public Works Department.
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  • The Khartum Zoological Gardens are free to the public and are under the control of the municipality, but the collection of animals is under the Game Preservation Department.
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  • The Transvaal Zoological Gardens at Pretoria are a government institution, and are associated with the Museum.
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  • The Zoological Gardens in Fairmount Park, Philadelphia, resemble the gardens of the Zoological Society of London, on which they were modelled.
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  • The Zoological Gardens at Buenos Aires are supported by the municipality, and contain many interesting animals, well housed in beautiful surroundings.
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  • There are Zoological Gardens at Melbourne (founded in 1857), Adelaide, Sydney and Perth, and small gardens at Wellington, New Zealand, supported partly by private societies and partly by the municipalities.
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  • There are a large number of zoological gardens in Europe, but those of real importance are not numerous.
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  • The public are admitted free to the greater part of the grounds, but the gardens and collection are the property of and are supported by the emperor of Austria.
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  • The annual sales of wild animals, held in the Gardens, chiefly surplus stock from various European Gardens, are famous.
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  • The Gardens of the Zoological Society of London in Regent's Park, founded in 1828, extend to only about 35 acres, but the collection, if species and rare animals be considered rather than the number of individuals, has always been the finest in existence.
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  • The Bath, Clifton and West of England Zoological Society owns small but extremely well-managed Zoological Gardens, well situated on the edge of Clifton Downs.
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  • At Lyons and at Marseilles in France there are beautifully situated Gardens with small collections, in each case owned and controlled by the municipalities.
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  • In Paris there are two well-known Gardens.
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  • Germany contained in 1910 nineteen Zoological Gardens in active existence whilst several others were in process of formation.
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  • The great Gardens at Berlin were founded in 1844, and belong to a private company, but owe much to the interest and beneficence of the Royal House.
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  • The Zoological Gardens at Breslau, founded in 1863 and owned by a private company, although not large, contain many fine buildings and are a notably well-managed institution.
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  • The beautiful Gardens at Cologne, founded in 1860, contain many interesting features and in particular one of the finest aviaries in Europe.
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  • The Gardens of the Zoological Society of Hamburg, founded in 1863, always contain a large and fine collection and display many ingenious devices for the housing of the animals.
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  • The chief gardens in Holland are at Amsterdam, owned by the society "Natura Artis Magistra."
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  • Certain general remarks may be made on the efficient management of the zoological gardens.
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  • In London, where rent, rates and taxes have all to be paid, precisely as if the gardens were a profit-distributing private institution, the annual expenditure under these headings amounts to about £ 2000.
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  • Many of the zoological gardens are owned by private companies and derive their income entirely from gate-money, menagerie sales, rent of refreshment rooms, concert-halls and other auxiliary public attractions, any profits being distributed amongst the members of the company.
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  • In other cases the gardens are assisted by public authorities, in return for which a certain number of free days are given.
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  • Some of the smaller gardens in Europe, and perhaps a majority of those in other parts of the world, pay much attention to this side, but the more important collections are as much as possible limited to natural species and wild animals.
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  • At one time London was able to supply many Continental gardens with giraffes, and Dublin and Antwerp have had great successes with lions, whilst antelopes, sheep and cattle, deer and equine animals are always to be found breeding in one collection or another.
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  • In the larger gardens, however, the greater part of the space is engaged by a few extensive enclosures for herds of herbivorous animals, and where no attempt is made to associate the function of a game reserve with that of a menagerie a smaller area is quite satisfactory.
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  • The older gardens have followed too closely the idea of small cages, designed to guard an animal securely rather than to display it in a fitting environment, but if exercise, light and air are provided, animals do better in a relatively small than in a relatively large enclosure.
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  • The delightful gardens of Denizli have obtained for it the name of the "Damascus of Anatolia."
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  • The zoological gardens occupy 60 acres and contain a notable collection of animals and birds.
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  • It is surrounded by orchards and gardens, and is about a mile from the right bank of the river, which here runs in two wide channels crossed by bridges.
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  • The roofs are laid out as gardens and preserved for the exclusive use of the women.
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  • It is not unlikely that Roman settlers may have been attracted to the spot by the presence of the warm springs which still rise in the heart of the town, and spread fertility in the surrounding gardens.
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  • The gardens belong exclusively to the Beni-Mzab.
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  • In the oceans alone there are estimated to be 1141 X 10 12 tons of sulphate, K 2 SO 4, but this inexhaustible store is not much drawn upon; and the "salt gardens" on the coast of France lost their industrial importance as potash-producers since the deposits at Stassfurt in Germany have come to be worked.
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  • The old bishop's palace is now the courthouse, and the old Jesuits' monastery with its fine gardens a higher-burgher school.
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  • In 1829 Lindley, who since 1822 had been assistant secretary to the Horticultural Society, was appointed to the chair of botany in University College, London, which he retained till 1860; he lectured also on botany from 1831 at the Royal Institution, and from 1836 at the Botanic Gardens, Chelsea.
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  • The palace of the former dukes of Nassau occupies a fine position on the river bank, and the shady gardens and groves attract large numbers of visitors during the summer.
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  • At Wotton he employed himself in improving his brother's property, making a fishpond, an island and other alterations in the gardens.
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  • The tsar did great damage to Evelyn's beautiful gardens, and, it is said, made it one of his amusements to ride in a wheelbarrow along a thick holly hedge planted especially by the owner.
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  • The house was subsequently used as a workhouse, and is now almshouses, the grounds having been converted into public gardens by Mr Evelyn in 1886.
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  • A count which was concluded at the end of February 1903, put the number of captive bisons at 1119, of which 969 were in parks and zoological gardens in the United States, 41 in Canada and 109 in Europe.
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  • On the south side of the town pleasant gardens extend along the old Singel, or outer canal, and there is a large open space, the Van der Werf Park, named after the burgomaster, Pieter Andriaanszoon van der Werf, who defended the town against the Spaniards in 1574 This open space was formed by the accidental explosion of a powdership in 1807, hundreds of houses being demolished, including that of the Elzevir family of printers.
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  • Close by, on an eminence above the river, lies the castle of Oranienstein, formerly a Benedictine nunnery and now a cadet school, with beautiful gardens.
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  • New Kuchan, and about 1000 remained in the ruined city in order to be near their vineyards and gardens.
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  • The Exhibition Buildings are situated on a hill in Carlton Gardens; they consist of a large cruciform hall surmounted by a dome and flanked by two annexes.
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  • The public gardens and parks of Melbourne are extensive.
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  • Within the city proper the Fitzroy Gardens are a network of avenues bordered with oak, elm and plane, with a " ferntree gully " in the centre; they are ornamented with casts of famous statues, and ponds, fountains and classic temples.
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  • The Treasury, Flagstaff and Carlton Gardens are of the same class.
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  • Around the city lie five great parks - Royal Park, in which are excellent zoological gardens; Yarra Park, which contains the leading cricket grounds; the Botanical Gardens, sloping down to the banks of the river; Albert Park, in which is situated a lake much used for boating; and Studley Park on the Yarra river, a favourite resort which has been left in a natural state.
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  • Besides these parks, each suburb has its public gardens, and at Flemington there is a fine race-course, on which the Melbourne cup races are run every November, an event which brings in a large influx of visitors from all parts of Australia.
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  • The old town forms a nucleus of narrow, winding streets surrounded by boulevards, beyond which lie modern quarters with regular thoroughfares and public gardens.
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  • Coxcoxtli used the help of the Aztecs against the Xochimilco people; but his own nation, horrified at their bloodthirsty sacrifice of prisoners, drove them out to the islands and swamps of the great salt lagoon, where they are said to have taken to making their chinampas or floating gardens of mud heaped on rafts of reeds and brush, which in later times were so remarkable a feature of Mexico.
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  • Till the 18th century the gigantic figures of Axayacatl and his son Montezuma were to be seen carved in the porphyry hill of Chapultepec, but these as well as the hanging gardens have been destroyed, and only the groves of ahuehuete (cypress) remain of the ancient beauties of the place.
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  • That in the palace gardens flowers from the tierra caliente were transplanted, and water-fowl bred near fresh and salt pools fit for each kind, that all kinds of birds and beasts were kept in well-appointed zoological gardens, where there were homes even for alligators and snakes - all this testifies to a cultivation of natural history which was really beyond the European level of the time.
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  • The tree, which is a native of China and Japan, was introduced into England in 1751 and is a favourite in parks and gardens.
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  • These three suburbs - as well as the little hamlet of Demirtash, containing about Soo houses all occupied by Bulgars - are all built in the native fashion; but the, fifth suburb, Karagatch, which is on the right bank of the Maritza, and occupies the region between the railway station and the city, is Western in its design, consisting of detached residences in gardens, many of them handsome villas, and all of modern European type.
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  • Ranking during the early centuries of its existence as one of the greatest cities of Islam, Marrakesh has long been in a state of grievous decay, but it is rendered attractive by the exceptional beauty of its situation, the luxuriant groves and gardens by which it is encompassed and interspersed, and the magnificent outlook which it enjoys towards the mountains.
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  • The environs are laid out in pretty and shady gardens and promenades, the finest being in the park which surrounds the château of Prince Clary-Aldringen, built in 1751.
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  • The magnetic observatory of Dublin was erected in the years 1837-1838 in the gardens attached to Trinity College, at the expense of the university.
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  • Clubs, which are numerous, are chiefly found in the neighbourhood of Sackville Street; and there should further be mentioned the Rotunda, at the corner of Great Britain Street and Sackville Street, a beautiful building of its kind, belonging to the adjacent hospital, and used for concerts and other entertainments, while its gardens are used for agricultural shows.
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  • Northward lies Clondalkin, with its round tower, marking the site of the important early see of Cluain Dolcain; Glasnevin, with famous botanical gardens; Finglas, with a ruined church of early foundation, and an Irish cross; and Clontarf, a favoured resort on the bay, with its modern castle and many residences of the wealthy classes in the vicinity.
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  • Of the total area 43% is occupied by arable land and gardens, 18% by meadows and pastures and 28% by forests.
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  • Much of the neighbouring plain is very fertile, and the town is surrounded with gardens and orchards, in which orange, lemon and citron come to great perfection.
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  • The wall is nearly encircled by a stream of water, artificially diverted from the small rivulets which flow through the precincts, furnishing the establishment with an abundant supply in every part, for the irrigation of the gardens and orchards, the sanitary requirements of the brotherhood and for the use of the offices and workshops.
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  • Still farther to the east, divided from the monastic buildings by a wall, were the vegetable gardens and orchards, and tank for fish.
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  • A mansion standing on the western flank of the present Kensington Gardens had been the seat of Heneage Finch, Lord Chancellor and afterwards Earl of Nottingham.
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  • In the palace died Mary, William's consort, William himself, Anne and George II., whose wife Caroline did much to beautify Kensington Gardens, and formed the beautiful lake called the Serpentine (1733).
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  • The formal gardens of Holland House are finely laid out, and the rooms of the house are both beautiful in themselves and enriched with collections of pictures, china and tapestries.
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  • In Kensington Gardens, near the upper end of Exhibition Road, which separates the two museums, was held the Great Exhibition of 1851, the hall of which is preserved as the Crystal Palace at Sydenham.
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  • The greater part of the gardens, however, with the Albert Memorial, erected by Queen Victoria in memory of Albert, prince consort, the Albert Hall, opposite to it, one of the principal concert-halls in London, and the Imperial Institute to the south, are actually within the city of Westminster, though commonly connected with Kensington.
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  • The gardens (275 acres) were laid out in the time of Queen Anne, and have always been a popular and fashionable place of recreation.
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  • The city is well built, with straight and well-paved streets, numerous plazas, public gardens and shady promenades.
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  • The fertile glens of the Alcaraz district are richly wooded, and often, from their multitude of fruit trees, resemble the huertas or gardens of Alicante; but broad tracts of land are destitute of trees, and suitable only for pasture.
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  • This is a magnificent palace, with gardens, a menagerie and a good library.
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  • The inner city is girdled on the south and east by the Kungspark, which contains Molin's famous group of statuary, the Belt-bucklers (Bdltespdnnare), and by the beautiful gardens of the Horticultural Society (Trddgardsforeningen).
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  • In the gardens is a chalybeate spring known as St Blaize's Well, which was in high repute before the Reformation.
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  • Good vineyards and market gardens are found in the neighbourhood of Pamiers in the north.
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  • The public parks and gardens are numerous and include the Botanical Garden with its famous avenue of royal palms (Oreodoxa regia); the Passeio Publico (dating from 1783), a small garden on the water-front facing the harbour entrance; the Jardim d'Acclamacao, forming part of the Praca da Republica (once known as the Campo de Sant' Anna) with its artistic walks and masses of shrubbery; the Praca Tiradentes (the old Largo do Rocio, afterwards rechristened Praca da Constituicao) with its magnificent equestrian statue of Dom Pedro I.
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  • There are several public squares and gardens, the more important being the Praca Harmonia, the Pra9a d'Alfandega, Pra9a da Independencia and the Parque, where an exposition was held in 1901.
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  • These houses, with gardens attached, also surround three sides of the cloister court, which lies north of the outer court.
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  • Some damage was also inflicted on it in 1813, when Napoleon made it the centre of his operations; one of the buttresses and two arches of the old bridge were then blown up. The dismantling of the fortifications had been begun by the French in, 810, and was gradually completed after 1817, the space occupied by them being appropriated to gardens and promenades.
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  • The library contains upwards of 250,000 volumes and 600 MSS., and among the other auxiliary establishments are an anatomical hall and museum and botanical gardens.
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  • Both slopes of the Caucasus are very fertile and well irrigated, with fine forests, fields of rice and other cereals, and flourishing gardens.
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  • Melbourne Hall, a building of the time of William III., surrounded by formal Dutch gardens, stands in a domain owned at an early date by the bishops of Carlisle, whose tithe barn remains near the church.
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  • There are extensive hop gardens, bleaching grounds and tanneries in the neighbourhood of the town.
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  • Among the public institutions are government botanical gardens, primary schools and a high school.
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  • Palms, mangos and other trees grow luxuriantly in the gardens and open spaces, and give the town a picturesque setting.
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  • C. Lamon, who built a cabin in the upper end of it in 1860 and planted gardens and orchards.
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  • Of the total area 49.4% is arable land, 34.2% is covered by fbrests, 6.2% by pasturages, while meadows occupy 5.8% and gardens 1.3%.
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  • A mass of gardens and orchards cover the slope down to the river on the S.W., but there are no suburbs outside the walls.
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  • Pop. (1905), 6500, of whom about four-fifths are Christian Albanians or Greeks, and onefifth Moslems. The town is surrounded by dense olive groves, and most of its houses stand in their own gardens.
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  • Eastward the Empire was overrun by the Turks; from the north Bulgarians and Vlachs descended unchecked to ravage the plains of Macedonia and Thrace; while Alexius squandered the public treasure on his palaces and gardens.
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  • Among the industries are manufactures of cotton, lace and embroidered muslins, and carriage-building, and there are also large market gardens, the district being famed especially for its apples, and some dairy-farming; but the prosperity of the town depends chiefly upon the coal and ironstone of the surrounding country, which is the richest mineral field in Scotland.
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  • Its only ornaments are the old market-place and the gardens formed by the purchase in 1825 of a seat called the Hof.
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  • There are brine baths supplied from wells near Middlesbrough, a pier, gardens and promenades.
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  • The greater part of the space thus enclosed is occupied by comparatively modern suburbs and gardens of almost tropical luxuriance, strongly contrasting with the huge factories and busy port of the original city in their midst.
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  • The walls of the moat were utilized for the cellars of the houses which soon occupied the site of the ramparts, and the ground, which had been covered by the citadel, was laid out in gardens.
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  • Smyth's record of this great family shows that, from the middle of the r3th century onwards, the lords were not only statesmen and warriors, but still more distinguished as gentlemen-farmers on a great scale, even selling fruit from the castle gardens, while their ladies would go round on tours of inspection from dairy to dairy.
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  • From a distance, the multitude of its gardens, and the turrets and metal-plated or gilded cupolas of its many churches give Bucharest a certain picturesqueness.
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