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garden

garden

garden Sentence Examples

  • Today, I have a vegetable garden in my backyard.

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  • They usually spent the morning hours in the garden and the afternoon at the pool.

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  • Somewhere I can have a garden and maybe a horse.

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  • Alice was a geranium Cynthia had lovingly rescued from certain death by frost last September when the rest of their first year garden succumbed to the advancing seasons.

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  • The gardener answered: A year ago, as I was spading in my garden, I saw something fall at the foot of a palm tree.

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  • The garden needed weeding anyway.

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  • It's only a garden snake.

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  • She returned to the garden and sat down on the grass at the foot of the slope by the pond, where no one could see her.

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  • We plow them under so we can plant a garden and then spend half our time pulling them out of it so we can grow something to eat.

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  • The garden was beginning to look weathered.

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  • He was himself always occupied: writing his memoirs, solving problems in higher mathematics, turning snuffboxes on a lathe, working in the garden, or superintending the building that was always going on at his estate.

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  • While the majority of the Thysanoptera are thus vegetarian in their diet, and are frequently injurious in farm and garden, some species, at least occasionally, adopt a predaceous habit, killing aphids and small mites (so-called "red-spiders") and sucking their juices.

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  • From the garden it looked like an arbour.

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  • She was a veritable garden of indecision.

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  • Sarah talked endlessly about her flower garden, the weather and anything else that came to her mind.

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  • She ran out sobbing into the garden and as far as the pond, along the avenues of young lime trees Prince Andrew had planted.

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  • If she left from Ashley, she would arrive in time to plant a garden at the ranch.

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  • They held an estate from the king consisting of house, garden, field, stock and a salary, on condition of personal service on the king's errand.

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  • Martha suggested an appropriate burial for the tiny remains she dubbed "Pinkie" and services were conducted in the back garden, next to Mrs. Lincoln's last winter mouse-victim.

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  • She couldn't make out what was in the garden, but she heard the sounds of fountains and saw the dark green blur of a forest in the distance.

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  • When I walk out in my garden I cannot see the beautiful flowers but I know that they are all around me; for is not the air sweet with their fragrance?

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  • Wynn lounged in his seat at the garden table, an empty wine glass before him.

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  • And in the garden, Henry saw a turnip.

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  • Princess Mary murmured, pacing the garden with hurried steps and pressing her hands to her bosom which heaved with convulsive sobs.

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  • Gabe emerged into the garden next to a southern style mansion.

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  • It was further enjoined that any one playing bowls outside of his own garden or orchard was liable to a penalty of 6s.

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  • We almost live in the garden, where everything is growing and blooming and glowing.

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  • All that I could say, then, with respect to farming on a large scale--I have always cultivated a garden--was, that I had had my seeds ready.

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  • Its old-fashioned garden was the paradise of my childhood.

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  • Alex hired someone to till the garden, refusing to let Carmen do it.

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  • Spring's arrival suggested a garden and Betsy embraced the idea whole heartedly.

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  • He led her through the stronghold and into the courtyard and garden area between the walls and the fortress.

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  • Someone spoke her name in a soft and tender voice from the garden and kissed her head.

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  • Great Britain has been the last to fall in, but the predominance of the low pitch, introduced at Covent Garden Opera since 1880, is assured.

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  • Aside from a wasted 20 minutes searching for gas in New Brunswick and a missed exit on the Garden State Parkway, the trip was uneventful.

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  • A quick shower later, she joined him in the garden once more in a tank top and jeans.

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  • In the garden of the church of S.

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  • Alice was a geranium Cynthia had lovingly rescued from certain death by frost last September when the rest of the couple's first-year garden succumbed to the advancing seasons.

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  • "We shall throw you three people into the Garden of the Twining Vines," said the Princess, "and they will soon crush you and devour your bodies to make themselves grow bigger.

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  • Rome is an exception to the former rule and imports garden produce largely from the neighborhood of Naples and from Sardinia.

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  • Additionally, we had a five-acre garden where we grew everything you can grow in East Texas.

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  • Her heart pounding, she took his hand and led him off the verandah into the garden where they could speak privately.

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  • Of the squares, the principal is the Friedrich-Wilhelmplatz, on which lies the Elisenbrunnen with its colonnade and garden, the chief resort of visitors taking the baths and waters.

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  • Never again would she be startled by his sudden appearance in the garden, nor laugh at his gentle frolicking with the twins.

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  • He had then to assign her the income of field, or garden, as well as goods, to maintain herself and children until they grew up. She then shared equally with them in the allowance (and apparently in his estate at his death) and was free to marry again.

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  • I had found a few early violets in the garden and brought them to my teacher.

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  • Round the house was a garden newly laid out.

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  • There are a farm, a large truck garden, an orchard, and a bakery and canning factory.

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  • Deidre paced through the garden, not really interested in the blooming flowers, statuary or neat rows of hedges.

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  • Among the imported flora are tea, Siberian coffee, cocoa, Ceara rubber (which has not done well), Manila hemp, teak, cocoanut and a number of ornamental trees, fruit-trees, vegetables and garden plants.

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  • " the Garden Bath "),"), with Racha monastery close by; and in the neighbourhood is Dobrinye, the home of the Obrenovich family, with a church built by Milosh Obrenovich, called " the Liberator of Servia " (1818-1839)

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  • I build a house and lay out a garden, and you build hospitals.

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  • Howie, according to his morning coffee verbal sermons was enthralled with his property, especially his inherited garden, started by the previous tenant and lovingly cared for by him.

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  • Like the fruit of a garden I will give thee offspring."

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  • "Now, Princess," exclaimed the Wizard, "those of your advisors who wished to throw us into the Garden of Clinging Vines must step within this circle of light.

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  • Then he went to live in the leafy pool at the end of the garden, where he made the summer nights musical with his quaint love-song.

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  • Cultivate poverty like a garden herb, like sage.

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  • I think I'll work in the garden for a while, after I get my chores done.

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  • Andre took her to the garden the morning before, and that's where she went this time.

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  • The aquarium, the property of the corporation, contains an excellent marine collection, but is also used as a concert hall and winter garden, and a garden is laid out on its roof.

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  • Next summer Mildred will go out in the garden with me and pick the big sweet strawberries and then she will be very happy.

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  • Little sister and I would take you out into the garden, and pick the delicious raspberries and a few strawberries for you.

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  • I looked round and saw Brother A. standing on the fence and pointing me to a broad avenue and garden, and in the garden was a large and beautiful building.

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  • A tree in the garden snapped with the frost, and then all was again perfectly silent.

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  • But the Emperor and Balashev passed out into the illuminated garden without noticing Arakcheev who, holding his sword and glancing wrathfully around, followed some twenty paces behind them.

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  • In the figure in which he had to choose two ladies, he whispered to Helene that he meant to choose Countess Potocka who, he thought, had gone out onto the veranda, and glided over the parquet to the door opening into the garden, where, seeing Balashev and the Emperor returning to the veranda, he stood still.

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  • The old man was still sitting in the ornamental garden, like a fly impassive on the face of a loved one who is dead, tapping the last on which he was making the bast shoe, and two little girls, running out from the hot house carrying in their skirts plums they had plucked from the trees there, came upon Prince Andrew.

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  • The growth of the oak is slow, though it varies greatly in different trees; Loudon states that an oak, raised from the acorn in a garden at Sheffield Place, Sussex, became in seventy years 12 ft.

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  • There is a piazza in front, covered with vines that grow so luxuriantly that you have to part them to see the garden beyond.

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  • When he had ridden about two miles and had passed the last of the Russian troops, he saw, near a kitchen garden with a ditch round it, two men on horseback facing the ditch.

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  • "If you noticed some disorder in the garden," said Alpatych, "it was impossible to prevent it.

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  • But it was now impossible for any German to control the Garden of the Empire.

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  • The public buildings include the palace of the governor-general, situated in a spacious botanical and zoological garden, the large military hospital, the cathedral of St Joseph, the Paul Bert college, and the theatre.

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  • Everyone and everything around them had frozen in mid-movement, like an eerie sculpture garden.

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  • She closed her eyes against the sunlight and took another two steps into the garden.

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  • He and the other prisoners were taken to the right side of the Virgin's Field, to a large white house with an immense garden not far from the convent.

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  • The bare twigs in the garden were hung with transparent drops which fell on the freshly fallen leaves.

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  • The earth in the kitchen garden looked wet and black and glistened like poppy seed and at a short distance merged into the dull, moist veil of mist.

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  • Another borzoi, a dog, catching sight of his master from the garden path, arched his back and, rushing headlong toward the porch with lifted tail, began rubbing himself against his legs.

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  • An old peasant whom Prince Andrew in his childhood had often seen at the gate was sitting on a green garden seat, plaiting a bast shoe.

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  • Princess Mary saw him walk out of the house in his uniform wearing all his orders and go down the garden to review his armed peasants and domestic serfs.

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  • Somewhere in the garden a bee buzzed and someone shuffled their feet.

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  • The beds remain in bearing for six or eight months, and then the spent manure is taken to the surface again for garden and field purposes.

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  • in diameter, and bear in the axil a solitary, stalked, white flower, about the size and shape of the garden anemone, with six or more petals and twice as many hypogynous stamens.

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  • The status of the apothecary, as subordinate to the physician in the time of Henry VIII., is evident from the following, out of 2 1 rules laid down by a prominent apothecary, who was a cousin of Anne Boleyn: " His garden must be at hand, with plenty of herbs and seeds and roots.

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  • The parks are the Domain, with a botanical garden, the Albert Park near the harbour, with a bronze statue of Queen Victoria, the extensive grounds at One Tree.

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  • But it is worthy of special attention that the mere chemical composition of agricultural and garden soils is, as a rule, the least important feature about them, popular opinion to the contrary notwithstanding.

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  • The beautiful creature passed her hands over her eyes an instant, tucked in a stray lock of hair that had become disarranged, and after a look around the garden made those present a gracious bow and said, in a sweet but even toned voice:

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  • Once they came near to the enclosed Garden of the Clinging Vines, and walking high into the air looked down upon it with much interest.

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  • His special pride was the big garden where, it was said, he raised the finest watermelons and strawberries in the county; and to me he brought the first ripe grapes and the choicest berries.

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  • I felt my way to the end of the garden, knowing that the mimosa tree was near the fence, at the turn of the path.

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  • Sometimes I rose at dawn and stole into the garden while the heavy dew lay on the grass and flowers.

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  • Oh, it was a lovely and delicate doll! but the little girl's brother, a tall lad, had taken the doll, and set it up in a high tree in the garden, and had run away.

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  • An elderly dame, too, dwells in my neighborhood, invisible to most persons, in whose odorous herb garden I love to stroll sometimes, gathering simples and listening to her fables; for she has a genius of unequalled fertility, and her memory runs back farther than mythology, and she can tell me the original of every fable, and on what fact every one is founded, for the incidents occurred when she was young.

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  • Little did the dusky children think that the puny slip with its two eyes only, which they stuck in the ground in the shadow of the house and daily watered, would root itself so, and outlive them, and house itself in the rear that shaded it, and grown man's garden and orchard, and tell their story faintly to the lone wanderer a half-century after they had grown up and died--blossoming as fair, and smelling as sweet, as in that first spring.

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  • "Uncle" dismounted at the porch of his little wooden house which stood in the midst of an overgrown garden and, after a glance at his retainers, shouted authoritatively that the superfluous ones should take themselves off and that all necessary preparations should be made to receive the guests and the visitors.

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  • While they drove past the garden the shadows of the bare trees often fell across the road and hid the brilliant moonlight, but as soon as they were past the fence, the snowy plain bathed in moonlight and motionless spread out before them glittering like diamonds and dappled with bluish shadows.

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  • Grass had already begun to grow on the garden paths, and horses and calves were straying in the English park.

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  • The xerophytic characters being present, it is not surprising that many marsh plants, like Juncus effusus and Iris pseudacorus, are able to survive in dry situations, such as banks and even garden rockeries.

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  • Tobacco, vegetables and other garden produce are much cultivated; cotton could probably be grown with profit.

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  • The principal districts are the Fairmont (or Upper Monongahela) and the Elk Garden (or Upper Potomac) in the northern, and the Pocahontas (or Flat Top) and the New and Kanawha rivers districts in the southern part of the state.

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  • Carmen abandoned the garden and followed him into the house.

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  • As April slipped into May and the last threat of frost passed, she began planting them in the garden.

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  • In the middle of the circle was a large teardrop-shaped flower garden.

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  • I need someone to take care of Tammy and help Mom with the house and garden.

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  • The place smelled like a mossy garden.

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  • Quinn and Martha perpetually had their hands full with their baby and Betsy stayed home, content to have extra time with our expanding garden.

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  • I heard you talking from the garden.

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  • Her dress was a half a step above the rag she used to polish the furniture and her hair had longer roots than Elmer Fudd's garden.

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  • If it isn't the skunks and opossum killing the chickens, it's the weeds taking over the garden.

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  • She shook the ugly thoughts from her head and straightened, leaning on the hoe as she glanced around the garden.

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  • It was getting close to noon when Carmen finished weeding in her garden.

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  • I was headed over to my house to mow the lawn and check the garden.

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  • Carmen left the house and strolled down the pathway to the garden.

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  • It looks like a storm is building and I need to get some work done in the garden.

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  • At the house she grabbed the hoe and started for the garden.

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  • She glanced around and saw Clarissa's date sitting alone near the entrance to the garden.

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  • Megan stepped off the verandah onto a walkway that led through the garden.

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  • 25), is to be seen at the south-west corner of the city; it is an enormous excavation in the rock with drains in its sides, at the bottom of which there is now a flourishing orange garden.

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  • In 1640 Lord Coventry died, and Cooper then lived with his brother-in-law at Dorchester House in Covent Garden.

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  • In the time of the Arabs these were the chief canals, and the cuts from the main channels of the Nahr `Isa, Nahr Sarsar, Nahr Malk (or Nahr Malcha), and Nahr Kutha, reticulating the entire country between the rivers, converted it into a continuous and luxuriant garden.

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  • In front of the palace is the public garden or Alexander Park.

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  • The avifauna of this region is very rich; it includes all the forest and garden birds known in W.

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  • Like Perseus, he first applies to the Nymphs, who help him to learn where the garden is.

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  • The golden apples, the gift of Aphrodite to Hippomenes before his race with Atalanta, were also plucked from the garden of the Hesperides.

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  • It was cultivated in England in the 17th century, and the name C. lusitanica was given by Philip Miller, the curator of the Chelsea Physick garden, in 1768, in reference to its supposed Portuguese origin.

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  • Lawsoniana, the Port Orford cedar, a native of south Oregon and north California, where it attains a height of Too ft., was introduced into Scotland in 1854; it is much grown for ornamental purposes in Britain, a large number of varieties of garden origin being distinguished by differences in habit and by colour of foliage.

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  • A garden of four acres had been laid out by the taste of M.

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  • Deyverdun: from the garden a rich scenery of meadows and vineyards descends to the Leman Lake, and the prospect far beyond the lake is crowned by the stupendous mountains of Savoy."

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  • The feelings with which he brought his labours to a close must be described in his own inimitable words: " It was on the day, or rather night, of the 27th of June 1787, between the hours of eleven and twelve, that I wrote the last lines of the last page in a summer house in my garden.

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  • At the request of Mir `Alishirr, himself a distinguished statesman and writer, Mirkhond began about 1474, in the quiet convent of Khilasiyah, which his patron had founded in Herat as a house of retreat for literary men of merit, his great work on universal history, Rauzat-ussafa fi sirat-ulanbia walmuluk walkhulafa or Garden of Purity on the Biography of Prophets, Kings and Caliphs.

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  • The fortress built in 1364 by Cardinal Albornoz has been converted into a public garden.

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  • garden, called Bagh i Shah (garden of the Shah), with ruined palaces and baths.

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  • The destruction of pine forests to meet the demands for naval stores, and the introduction and increased use of the refrigerator car, resulted in much attention to the growth of garden produce for Northern markets.

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  • mould and bacterial growths, and causing the appearance, on the surface of their " mushroom garden," of numerous small white bodies formed by swollen ends of the fungus hyphae.

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  • Other ants, such as the British black garden species (L.

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  • The place was without importance until 1612, when Shah Abbas began building and laying out the palaces and gardens in the neighbourhood now collectively known as Bagh i Shah (the garden of the shah).

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  • north of the town is the Safi-abad garden, with a palace built by Shah Safi (1629-1642) for his daughter.

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  • By a singular contrast, the neighbouring thoroughfare of Hatton Garden, leading north from Holborn Circus, is a centre of the diamond trade.

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  • The property was acquired by Sir Christopher Hatton, Lord Chancellor under Queen Elizabeth, after whom Hatton Garden is named; though the bishopric kept some hold upon it until the 18th century.

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  • On account of its fertility it has been called the "Garden of Southern India."

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  • His prose idylls, The Garden that I love and In Veronica's Garden, are full of a pleasant, open-air flavour, which is also the outstanding feature of his English Lyrics.

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  • Connected with it are a library of 150,000 volumes and Boo MSS., a chemical laboratory, a zoological museum, a gynaecological institute, an ophthalmological school, a botanical garden and at Eldena (a seaside resort on the Baltic) an agricultural school.

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  • Walking with him into the garden, I found it dark with the shade of ancient trees.

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  • Below the villeins in the social scale came the cottiers possessing smaller holdings, sometimes only a garden, and no oxen.

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  • In the first edition of the Improver Improved no mention is made of clover, nor in the second of turnips, but in the third, clover is treated of at some length, and turnips are recommended as an excellent cattle crop, the culture of which should be extended from the kitchen garden to the field.

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  • The dipterous garden pests, such as the onion fly, carrot fly and celery fly, can best be kept in check by the use of paraffin emulsions and the treatment of the soil with gas-lime after the crop is lifted.

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  • Three of the seven poets were drinking in a garden when Firdousi approached, and wishing to get rid of him without rudeness, they informed him who they were, and told him that it was their custom to admit none to their society but such as could give proof of poetical talent.

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  • Being apprised by one of the nobles of the court of what had taken place, Firdousi passed the night in great anxiety; but passing in the morning by the gate that led from his own apartments into the palace, he met the sultan in his private garden, and succeeded by humble apologies in appeasing his wrath.

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  • On the 12th of July 1789 Camille, leaping upon a table outside one of the cafes in the garden of the_ Palais Royal, announced to the crowd the dismissal of their favourite.

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  • The beautiful Public Garden and the finest residential quarter of the city - the Back Bay, so called from that inner harbour from whose waters it was reclaimed (1856-1886) - stand on what was once the narrowest, but to-day is the widest and fairest portion of the original site.

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  • Adjoining it is the Public Garden of 24 acres (1859), part of the made area of the city.

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  • Commonwealth Avenue, one of the Back Bay streets running from the foot of the Public Garden, is one of the finest residence streets of the country.

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  • Among the memorials to men of Massachusetts (a large part of them Bostonians) commemorated by monuments in the Common, the Public Garden, the grounds of the state house, the city hall, and other public places of the city, are statues of Charles Sumner, Josiah Quincy and John A.

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  • Perfect orbicular webs are made by many genera of Argyopidae (Zilla, Meta, Gasteracantha), the best-known example being that of the common garden spider of England, Aranea or Epeira diademata; but these webs are not associated with any tubular retreat except such as are made under an adjoining leaf or in some nook hard by.

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  • Compensation was given to market gardeners for unexhausted improvements by the Market Gardeners' Compensation Act 1895 and by the Agricultural Holdings Act 1906 for improvements effected before the commencement of that act on a holding cultivated to the knowledge of the landlord as a market garden, if the landlord had not dissented in writing to the improvements.

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  • In 1907-8, according to the State Department of Agriculture, the total value of vegetable and garden products was $3,928,657.

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  • Zannoni, Scavi della Certosa, Bologna, 1876), and others in the public garden and on the Arnoaldi Veli property (Notizie degli Scavi, indite 1876-1900, s.v.- "Bologna").

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  • Originally a nature goddess (like Venus the garden goddess, with whom she was sometimes identified), she represented at first the hope of fruitful gardens and fields, then of abundant offspring, and lastly of prosperity to come and good fortune in general, being hence invoked on birthdays and at weddings.

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  • Wissowa, Religion and Kultus der Romer (1902), according to whom Spes was originally not a garden goddess, but simply the divinity to whom one prayed for the fulfilment of one's desires.

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  • The reservoir is supplied by a conduit of 6th-century tiles connected with an early stone aqueduct, the course of which is traceable beneath the Dionysiac theatre and the royal garden in the direction of the Upper Ilissus.

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  • Like the Academy, it was an enclosure with a gymnasium and garden; it lay to the east of the city beyond the Diocharean Gate.

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  • It contains several squares and boulevards, a large public garden, and many handsome public and private edifices.

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  • The royal palace, designed by Friedrich von Gartner (1792-1847), is a tasteless structure; attached to it is a beautiful garden laid out by Queen Amalia, which contains a well-preserved mosaic floor of the Roman period.

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  • In the public garden is the Zappeion, a large building with a Corinthian portico, intended for the display of Greek industries; here also is a monument to Byron, erected in 1896.

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  • After this Wagner resided permanently at Bayreuth, in a house named Wahnfried, in the garden of which he built his tomb.

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  • 3) occurs as a garden escape in waste ground.

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  • Heliotrope or cherry-pie (Heliotropium peruvianum) is a well-known garden plant.

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  • Garden, New York; a fact proving that the show is as popular in America as it is in the United Kingdom, the home of the movement.

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  • Even in the best equipped botanical garden it is impossible to have, at one and the same time, more than a very small percentage of the representatives of the flora of any given region or of any large group of plants.

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  • At Geneva are three large collections - Augustin Pyrame de Candolle's, containing the typical specimens of the Prodromus, a large series of monographs of the families of flowering plants, Benjamin Delessert's fine series at the Botanic Garden, and the Boissier Herbarium, which is rich in Mediterranean and Oriental plants.

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  • Of those in the United States of America, the chief, formed by Asa Gray, is the property of Harvard university; there is also a large one at the New York Botanical Garden.

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  • The herbarium at Melbourne, Australia, under Baron Muller, attained large proportions; and that of the Botanical Garden of Calcutta is noteworthy as the repository of numerous specimens described by writers on Indian botany.

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  • LUMBINI, the name of the garden or grove in which Gotama, the Buddha, was born.

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  • Levi Coffin (1798-1877), a native of North Carolina (whose cousin, Vestal Coffin, had established before 1819 a "station" of the Underground near what is now Guilford College, North Carolina), in 1826 settled in Wayne County, Ohio; his home at New Garden (now Fountain City) was the meeting point of three "lines" from Kentucky; and in 1847 he removed to Cincinnati, where his labours in bringing slaves out of the South were even more successful.

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  • Garden trucking 1s :eery slightly developed, but has been successful where it has been tried.

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  • In connexion with the university is a botanical garden; with the national sanitary service, a biological laboratory, and special services for small-pox, glanders and yellow fever.

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  • The city is laid out regularly, with broad streets, a large central plaza and a public garden, or promenade, called the prado.

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  • Wade), in which are a zoological garden and a lake.

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  • There is also a public library, with 20,000 volumes, and various scientific collections, and a public garden, with a statue of the chemist Berthollet (1748-1822), who was born not far off.

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  • At Umanak (70° 40' N.) is the most northern garden in the world.

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  • The city owned in 1905 about 290 acres of parks and "open spaces," the chief being Roath Park of Too acres (including a botanical garden of 15 acres), Llandaff fields of 70 acres, and Cathays Park of 60 acres, which was acquired in 1900 mainly with the view of placing in it the chief public buildings of the town.

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  • Several times during summer the trees ought to be regularly examined, and the young shoots respectively topped or thinned out; those that remain are to be nailed to the wall, or braced in with pieces of slender twigs, and the trees ought occasionally to be washed with the garden engine or thoroughly syringed, especially during very hot summers.

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  • After the fruit has set, the foliage should be refreshed and cleansed by the daily use of the syringe or garden engine.

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  • In 1885 he published, after long indecision, his volume of poems, A Child's Garden of Verses, an inferior story, The Body Snatcher, and that admirable romance, Prince Otto, in which the peculiar quality of Stevenson's style was displayed at its highest.

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  • Honolulu has other parks, a fine Botanical Garden, created by the Bureau of Agriculture, several public squares, several hospitals, a maternity home, the Lunalilo Home for aged Hawaiians, an asylum for the insane, several schools of high rank both public and private - notably Oahu College on the E.

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  • Home wisely resigned his charge in 1757, after a visit to London, where Douglas was brought out at Covent Garden on the 14th of March.

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  • among its 40,000 volumes, and a botanical garden, rich in specimens of the Balkan flora.

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  • plants, many of which, such as wallflower, stock, mustard, cabbage, radish and others, are well-known garden or field-plants.

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  • Lepidium sativum (garden cress).

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  • There is also a considerable trade in corn and garden produce.

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  • The grounds form a public garden.

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  • The garden pansies or heartseases are derivatives from V.

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  • The principal exports are Portland stone, bricks and tiles and provisions, and the imports are coal, timber, garden and dairy produce and wine.

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  • He was one of the clerks at the Westminster Assembly, one of Cromwell's chaplains and a "trier," and held livings at Stoke Newington (1645) and St Paul's, Covent Garden (1656).

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  • As garden plants the aconites are very ornamental, hardy perennials.

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  • They thrive well in any ordinary garden soil, and will grow beneath the shade of trees.

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  • Deir itself is a thrifty and rising town, having considerable traffic; it is singularly European in appearance, with macadamized streets and a public garden.

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  • The use of tramways for the transportation of passengers in cities dates from 1868, when the first section of the Botanical Garden line of Rio de Janeiro was opened to traffic. The line was completed with its surplus earnings and continued under the control of the American company which built it until 1882, when it was sold to a Brazilian company.

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  • Now, however, many plants were imported not only from Guiana but from India and Africa, cultivated in the Royal Botanic Garden, and thence distributed.

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  • To the north of the Water of Leith lie Inverleith Park, the Arboretum and the Royal Botanical Garden.

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  • The south-eastern sides of the mountains are in part covered with heavy timber, while the semi-tropical luxuriance of the coast belt has earned for Natal the title of " the garden colony."

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  • Russell, The Garden Colony.

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  • He died in his house at Wimbledon on the 18th of March 1812, and his body was buried with that of his mother at Ealing, the tomb which he had prepared in the garden attached to his house at Wimbledon being found unsuitable for the interment.

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  • He begged the countess to obtain a secret interview for him with the queen, and a meeting took place in August 1784 in a grove in the garden at Versailles between him and a lady whom the cardinal believed to be the queen herself.

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  • Anatomy and the study of animal mechanism, animal physics and animal chemistry, all of which form part of a true zoology, were excluded from the usual definition of the word by the mere accident that the zoologist had his museum but not his garden of living specimens as the botanist had; 1 and, whilst the zoologist was thus deprived of the means of anatomical and physiological study - only later supplied by the method of preserving animal bodies in alcohol - the demands of medicine for a knowledge of the structure of the human animal brought into existence a separate and special study of human anatomy and physiology.

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  • These crocuses of the flower garden are mostly horticultural varieties of C. vernus, C. versicolor and C. aureus (Dutch crocus), the two former yielding the white, purple and striped, and the latter the yellow varieties.

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  • The crocus succeeds in any fairly good garden soil, and is usually planted near the edges of beds or borders in the flower garden, or in broadish patches at intervals along the mixed borders.

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  • They require the same culture as the more familiar garden varieties; but, as some of them are apt to suffer from excess of moisture, it is advisable to plant them in prepared soil in a raised pit, where they are brought nearer to the eye, and where they can be sheltered when necessary by glazed sashes, which, however, should not be closed except when the plants are at rest, or during inclement weather in order to protect the blossoms, especially in the case of winter flowering species.

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  • The account of Christ's flesh is torn out of the Key, but it is affirmed that it was at the baptism that "he put on that primal raiment of light which Adam lost in the garden."

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  • The " breastplate of judgment " was set with twelve jewels engraved with the names of the tribes; the foreordained covering of the semidivine being in the garden of the gods bore the same number of stones (Ezek.

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  • Besides other open spaces there is Burger's park, originally planned, during the first British occupation, as a botanical garden.

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  • Gainesville is a trading centre and market for the surrounding country, in which cotton, grains, garden truck, fruit and alfalfa are grown and live-stock is raised; and a wholesale distributing point for the neighbouring region in Texas and Oklahoma.

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  • St James's Park was transformed from marshy land into a deer park, bowling green and tennis court by Henry VIII., extended and laid out as a pleasure garden by Charles II., and rearranged according to the designs of John Nash in 1827-1829.

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  • Covent Garden, again, took its name from a convent garden belonging to Westminster.

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  • The Covent Garden theatre is the principal home of grand opera; the building, though spacious, suffers by comparison with the magnificence of opera houses in some other capitals, but during the opera season the scene within the theatre is brilliant.

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  • Covent Garden, the great mart in the west of London for flowers, fruit and vegetables, is in the hands of private owners.

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  • The Metropolitan police courts are fourteen in number, namely - Bow Street, Covent Garden; Clerkenwell; Great Marlborough Street (Westminster); Greenwich and Woolwich; Lambeth; Marylebone; North London, Stoke Newington Road; Southwark; South Western, Lavender Hill (Battersea); Thames, Arbour Street East (Stepney); West Ham; West London, Vernon Street (Fulham); Westminster, Vincent Square; Worship Street (Shoreditch).

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  • On Norden's map,' however, we find the gardens of Paris Garden, the bearhouse and the playhouse.

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  • St Giles's was literally a village in the fields; Piccadilly was " the waye to Redinge," Oxford Street " the way to Uxbridge," Covent Garden an open field or garden, and Leicester Fields lammas land.

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  • Stubbs denounced suburban gardens and garden houses in his Anatomy of Abuses, and another writer observed " how happy were cities if they had no suburbs."

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  • Another of the favourite haunts of the people was the garden of Gray's Inn, where the choicest society was to be met.

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  • The great square or piazza of Covent Garden was formed from the designs of Inigo Jones about 1632.

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  • The first great emigration of the London merchants westward was about the middle of the 18th century, but only those who had already secured large fortunes ventured so far as Hatton Garden.

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  • Again, besides narrating the Temptation in the Wilderness and the Agony in the Garden, this evangelist gives a saying which implies that Jesus had undergone many temptations, or rather a life of temptation (xxii.

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  • Other crops which are grown in the province, especially in Upper Burma, comprise maize, tilseed, sugar-cane, cotton, tobacco, wheat, millet, other food grains including pulse, condiments and spices, tea, barley, sago, linseed and other oil-seeds, various fibres, indigo and other dye crops, besides orchards and garden produce.

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  • There are also some vineyards of old date, and much garden cultivation.

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  • Later on he chose Mer y for his residence, and was the owner of a house and garden there.

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  • 4, &c.), the garden of Eden.

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  • It overlooks the Jardin de la Isla, a beautiful garden laid out for Philip II.

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  • There are also a theatre, an institute of music, a library, a museum, a zoological garden, and numerous scientific societies.

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  • Coutances is a quiet town with winding streets and pleasant boulevards bordering it on the east; on the western slope of the hill there is a public garden.

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  • Generally speaking, soils containing from 30 to 50% of clay and 50 to 60% of sand with an adequate amount of vegetable residues prove the most useful for ordinary farm and garden crops; such blends are known as " loams," those in which clay predominates being termed clay loalns, and those in which the sand predominates sandy roams. " Stiff clays " contain over 50% of clay; " light sands " have less than to %.

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  • guanos, bone-meal and all other organic materials, which are spread over or dug or ploughed into the land for the benefit of farm and' garden crops, is bound up with the action of these minute living beings.

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  • Experiments show that pure cultures, when mixed with garden soil constantly moistened short of saturation and kept in the dark at a temperature of 14° C., will retain their vitality for more than ten months; from moist soil kept at 26° C. they die out in about two months; from moist soil at 30° C. in seventeen days; and in dry soil at the same temperature within a week.

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  • South Beveland is sometimes called the "granary" and Walcheren the "garden" of Zeeland.

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  • Moly, an old garden plant with bright yellow flowers, and A.

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  • it is the most important crop. Jebel Haraz, of which Manakha, a small town of 3000 inhabitants is the chief place, is described by Glaser as one vast coffee garden.

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  • The blackbird feeds chiefly on fruits, worms, the larvae of insects and snails, extracting the last from their shells by dexterously chipping them on stones; and though it is generally regarded as an enemy of the garden, it is probable that the amount of damage by it to the fruit is largely compensated for by its undoubted services as a vermin-killer.

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  • Near the university, and separated from the Ring by a garden, stands the votive church in Alsergrund, completed in 1879, and erected to commemorate the emperor's escape from assassination in 1853, one of the most elaborate and successful of modern Gothic churches (Ferstel).

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  • Its botanic collection contains the famous Vienna herbarium, while to the university is attached a fine botanical garden.

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  • The city possesses also an academy of the fine arts, with a gallery of paintings; and the university a library of 120,000 volumes, a natural history museum, botanical garden and agricultural schools.

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  • It is an account of a little garden that he used to tend with his own hands, and is largely made up of descriptions of the various herbs he grows there and their medicinal and other uses.

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  • At the Oxford botanic garden he conducted numerous experiments upon the effect of changes in soil, light and the composition of the atmosphere upon vegetation.

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  • The English garden (Englischer Garten), to the north-east of the town, is 600 acres in extent, and was laid out by Count Rumford in imitation of an English park.

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  • The botanical garden, with its large palm-house, the Hofgarten, surrounded with arcades containing frescoes of Greek landscapes by Rottmann, and the Maximilian park to the east of the Isar, complete the list of public parks.

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  • The plant grows freely in good garden soil, preferring a deep welldrained loam, and is all the better for a top-dressing of manure as it approaches the flowering stage.

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  • Streams from the Pisidian mountains make the land on the south-west and south of the city a garden; but on the east and north-east a great part of the naturally fertile soil is uncultivated.

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  • The cloister garden was too small for the crowds attending his lectures, and on the 1st of August 1490 he gave his first sermon in the church of St Mark.

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  • There is also a botanical garden.

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  • As nearly every house is surrounded by a courtyard or garden, the town covers an unusually large area for the number of its inhabitants.

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  • All these grow well in good garden soil, and blossom from March onwards, coming in very early in genial seasons.

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  • Weathers, Practical Guide to Garden Plants (1901).

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  • In addition to the park in the south-western district, Frankfort possesses two delightful pleasure grounds, which attract large numbers of visitors, the Palmengarten in the west and the zoological garden in the east of the city.

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  • Thus the red pine (aka-matsu or pinus densiflora), which is the favorite garden tree, has to be subjected twice a year to a process of spraydressing which involves the careful removal of every weak or aged needle.

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  • Flowers are cultivated, but for their own sakes, not as a feature of the Jandscape garden.

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  • Indeed, of this porcelain it may be said that, from the monster pieces of blue-and-white manufactured at Setovases six feet high and garden pillar-lamps half as tall again do not dismay the BishU ceramistto tiny coffee-cups decorated in Tokyo, with theil delicate miniatures of birds, flowers, insects, fishes and so forth, everything indicates the death of the old severe aestheticism.

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  • Sometimes he fixes the decoration himself, employing for that purpose a small kiln which stands in his back garden; sometimes he entrusts this part of the work to a factory.

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  • Among the most representative are: the Popular Science Monthly, New York; the monthly Boston Journal of Education; the quarterly American Journal of Mathematics, Baltimore; the monthly Cassier's Magazine (1891), New York; the monthly American Engineer (1893), New York; the monthly House and Garden, Philadelphia; the monthly Astrophysical Journal, commenced as Sidereal Messenger (1882), Chicago; the monthly American Chemical Journal, Baltimore; the monthly American Naturalist, Boston; the monthly American Journal of the Medical Sciences, Philadelphia; the monthly Outing, New York; the weekly American Agriculturist, New York; the quarterly Metaphysical Magazine (1895) New York; the bi-monthly American Journal of Sociology, Chicago; the bi-monthly American Law Review, St Louis; the monthly Banker's Magazine, New York; the quarterly American Journal of Philology (1880), Baltimore; the monthly Library Journal (1876), New York; the monthly Public Libraries, Chicago; Harper's.

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  • Amongst the finest of his classical pictures were - "Syracusan Bride leading Wild Beasts in Procession to the Temple of Diana" (1866), "Venus disrobing for the Bath" (1867), "Electra at the Tomb of Agamemnon," and "Helios and Rhodos" (1869), "Hercules wrestling with Death for the Body of Alcestis" (1871), "Clytemnestra" (1874), "The Daphnephoria" (1876), "Nausicaa" (1878), "An Idyll" (1881), two lovers under a spreading oak listening to the piping of a shepherd and gazing on the rich plain below; "Phryne" (1882), a nude figure standing in the sun; "Cymon and Iphigenia" (1884), "Captive Andromache" (1888), now in the Manchester Art Gallery; with the "Last Watch of Hero" (1887), "The Bath of Psyche" (1890), now in the Chantrey Bequest collection; "The Garden of the Hesperides" (1892), "Perseus and Andromeda" and "The Return of Persephone," now in the Leeds Gallery (1891); and "Clytie," his last work (1896).

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  • He compiled the Garden of the Soul (1740 ?), which continues to be the most popular manual of devotion among English-speaking Roman Catholics, and he revised an edition of the Douai version of the Scriptures (1749-1750), correcting the language and orthography, which in many places had become obsolete.

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  • In the governor's garden, in Quebec, there is also a monument to the memory of Wolfe and his gallant opponent Montcalm, who survived him only a few hours, with the inscription " Wolfe and Montcalm.

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  • There can be little doubt that his physical condition was much improved by his habit of cultivating plants in garden and conservatory.

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  • The city also has a school of arts, a public library, and a public garden.

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  • There are here a cathedral and a botanical garden.

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  • wall was discovered and may be seen in the garden of the Liceo Volta, 88 ft.

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  • The Camoens grotto, where the exiled poet found leisure to celebrate the achievements of his ungrateful country, lies in a secluded spot to the north of the town, which has been partly left in its native wildness strewn with huge granite boulders and partly transformed into a fine botanical garden.

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  • Though most of the land is under garden cultivation, the mass of the people is dependent more or less directly on mercantile pursuits; for, while the exclusive policy both of Chinese and Portuguese which prevented Macao becoming a free port till1845-1846allowed what was once the great emporium of European commerce in eastern Asia to be outstripped by its younger and more liberal rivals, the local, though not the foreign, trade of the place is still of very considerable extent.

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  • As garden plants the Phyllocacti are amongst the most ornamental of the whole family, being of easy culture, free blooming and remarkably showy, the colour of the flowers ranging from rich crimson, through rosepink to creamy white.

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  • Both these species are extensively cultivated for their fruit in Southern Europe, the Canaries and northern Africa; and the fruits are not unfrequently to be seen in Covent Garden Market and in the shops of the leading fruiterers of the metropolis.

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  • Both these books have been translated into English; Paradiesglirtlein with the title the Garden of Paradise.

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  • Millet, born near Cherbourg, stands in the public garden, and there is an equestrian statue of Napoleon I.

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  • The district is not unjustly termed "the garden of New Zealand."

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  • Among the public institutions of the city should be mentioned the public library, picture gallery, botanical garden, and the institute for the making of stained glass.

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  • Buitenzorg is the usual residence of the governor-general of the Dutch East Indies, and is further remarkable on account of its splendid botanical garden and for its popularity as a health !resort.

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  • Between this and 1880 a museum, a school of agriculture, and a culture garden were added, and since then library, botanical, chemical, and pharmacological laboratories, and a herbarium have been established.

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  • Besides a good picture gallery in the Ratshof, and the 13thcentury church of St John, Yuriev possesses a university, with an observatory, an art museum, a botanical garden and a library of 250,000 volumes, which are housed in a restored portion of the cathedral, burned down in 1624.

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  • His fortune was now made, and while the managers of Covent Garden and Drury Lane resorted to the law to make Giffard, the manager of Goodman's Fields, close his little theatre, Garrick was engaged by Fleetwood for Drury Lane for the season of 1742.

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  • In 1746-1747 he fulfilled a short engagement with Rich at Covent Garden, his last series of performances under a management not his own.

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  • The fame of Erasmus Darwin as a poet rests upon his Botanic Garden, though he also wrote The Temple of Nature, or the Origin of Society, a Poem, with Philosophical Notes (1803), and The Shrine of Nature (posthumously published).

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  • The Botanic Garden (the second part of which - The Loves of the Plants - was published anonymously in 1789, and the whole of which appeared in 1791) is a long poem in the decasyllabic rhymed couplet.

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  • But dissensions having arisen in the cabinet, he resigned a few months later, and retired into private life, cultivating his beautiful garden at Waseda near T6kyo.

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  • He was learned in the science of botany, and formed a magnificent collection and a botanic garden at Luton Hoo, where Robert Adam built for him a splendid residence.

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  • Connected with the university are a valuable library, occupying the palace built for Louis Bonaparte, king of Holland, in 1807 and containing upwards of 200,000 volumes and MSS.; a museum of natural history; an ophthalmic institute; physical and chemical laboratories; a veterinary school; a botanic garden; and an observatory.

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  • It is chiefly distinguished for its mathematical and philosophical studies, and possesses a famous observatory, established in 1811 by Frederick William Bessel, a library of about 240,000 volumes, a zoological museum, a botanical garden, laboratories and valuable mathematical and other scientific collections.

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  • There are two pretty public parks, one in the Hufen, with a zoological garden attached, another the Luisenwahl which commemorates the sojourn of Queen Louisa of Prussia in the town in the disastrous year 1806.

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  • The Alameda, or public garden, 2 m.

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  • The Indian habitation was made up of this composite abode, with whatever out-structures and garden plots were needed.

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  • The archaeologist recovers his specimens from waste places, cave deposits, abandoned villages, caches, shell-heaps, refuse-heaps, enclosures, mounds, hut rings, earthworks, garden beds, quarries� and workshops, petroglyphs, trails, graves and cemeteries, cliff and cavate dwellings, ancient pueblos, ruined stone dwellings, forts and temples, canals or reservoirs.

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  • Walls for buildings, garden terraces and aqueducts were straight or sloping.

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  • Just outside the borders of the park, beyond the Ilm, is the "garden house," a simple wooden cottage with a high-pitched roof, in which Goethe used to pass the greater part of the summer.

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  • Portions of the vicarage date from the 14th century, and in its garden there is a stone dovecote of great age.

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  • It attains its greatest perfection under cultivation, and, as it flowers throughout the summer, is used with good effect for garden borders; a variety, M.

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  • From the landing stage a short street leads into the broad Avenue Jules Ferry or de la Marine running east to west and ending in the Place de la Residence, on the north side of which is the Roman Catholic cathedral and on the south side the palace of the French resident-general, with a large garden.

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  • in 1811, and the endowments were diverted four years later to the support of an athenaeum, and afterwards of a gymnasium, with which a physiological cabinet and a botanical garden are connected.

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  • Bringing the golden apples from the garden of the Hesperides.

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  • The valley and delta of the Vistula are very fertile, and produce good crops of wheat and pasturage for horses, cattle and sheep. Besides cereals, the chief crops are potatoes, hay, tobacco, garden produce, fruit and sugar-beet.

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  • (s) The two nobles, Joseph of Arimathaea and Nicodemus, bind the dead body in a winding sheet with one hundred pounds of precious spices, and place it in a new monument in a near garden, since the sabbath is at hand.

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  • In the garden Jesus here Himself goes forth to meet His captors, and these fall back upon the ground, on His revealing Himself as Jesus of Nazareth.

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  • In the Synoptists, Jesus " grows in favour with God and man," passes through true human experiences and trials, prays alone on the mountain-side, and dies with a cry of desolation; here the Logos' watchword is " I am," He has deliberately to stir up emotion in Himself, never prays for Himself, and in the garden and on the cross shows but power and self-possession.

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  • It has a number of admirable public buildings, while, among several parks and recreation grounds, mention must be made of the fine botanical garden, 750 acres in extent, where, in Lake Wendouree, pisciculture is carried on with great success.

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  • Benton Harbor has a large trade in fruit (peaches, grapes, pears, cherries, strawberries, raspberries and apples) and other market garden produce raised in the vicinity.

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  • And Yahweh-Elohim planted a garden s in Eden, east ward; and there he put the man whom he had formed."

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  • 6, II) only "the tree in the midst of the garden" is spoken of, but in ii.

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  • The garden of Eden is referred to in Isa.

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  • The extensive gardens which occupy the hillside behind the palace are adorned with fountains and cascades; the botanical garden contains manytrees from northern climates.

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  • The chief periodicals are the Vegetarian (weekly), the Herald of the Golden Age (monthly), the Vegetarian Messenger (monthly), the Vegetarian (American monthly), the Children's Garden (monthly).

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  • Kishinev is the seat of the archbishop of Bessarabia, and has a cathedral, an ecclesiastical seminary with Boo students, a college, and a gardening school, a museum, a public library, a botanic garden, and a sanatorium with sulphur springs.

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  • The first botanic garden was established at Padua in 1545, and was followed by that of Pisa.

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  • The garden at Leiden dates from 1577, that at Leipzig from 1579.

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  • The Montpellier garden was founded in 1592, that of Giessen in 1605, of Strassburg in 1620, of Altdorf in 1625, and of Jena in 1629.

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  • The Jardin des Plantes at Paris was established in 1626, and the Upsala garden in 1627.

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  • The botanic garden at Oxford was founded in 1632.

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  • The garden at Edinburgh was founded by Sir Andrew Balfour and Sir Robert Sibbald in 1670, and, under the name of the Physic Garden, was placed under the superintendence of James Sutherland, afterwards professor of botany in the university.

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  • The garden at Kew dates from about 1730, when Frederick, prince of Wales, obtained a long lease of Kew House and its gardens from the Capel family.

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  • After his death in 1751 his widow, Princess Augusta of Saxe-Gotha, showed great interest in their scientific development, and in 1759 engaged William Aiton to establish a Physic Garden.

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  • The garden of the Royal Dublin Society at Glasnevin was opened about 1796; that of Trinity College, Dublin, in 1807; and that of Glasgow 1 Morison, Praeludia Botanica (1672); Plantarum Historia Universalis (1680).

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  • The Madrid garden dates from 1763, and that of Coimbra from 1773.

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  • His uncle, Bernard de Jussieu, had adopted the principles of Linnaeus's Fragmenta in his arrangement of the plants in the royal garden at the Trianon.

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  • Being called upon to arrange the plants in the garden, he necessarily had to consider the best method of doing so, and, following the lines already suggested by his uncle, adopted a system founded in a certain degree on that of Ray, in which he embraced all the discoveries in organography, adopted the simplicity of the Linnean definitions, and displayed the natural affinities of plants.

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  • The curious oak pulpit representing Adam and Eve expelled from the Garden of Eden came originally from the Jesuit church at Louvain, and is considered the masterpiece of Verbruggen.

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  • In the rue de la Regence are the new picture gallery, a fine building with an exceedingly good collection of pictures, the palace of the count of Flanders, and the garden of the Petit Sablon, which contains statues of Egmont and Horn, and a large number of statuettes representing the various gilds and handicrafts.

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  • Immediately above this garden is the Palais d'Arenberg.

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  • candidum, the Xdpiov of the Greeks, was one of the commonest garden flowers of antiquity, appearing in the poets from Homer downwards side by side with the rose and the violet.

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  • tigrinum, and its varieties Fortunei, splendidum and flore-pleno, are amongst the best species for the flower garden; L.

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  • tenuifolium make up, with those already mentioned, a series of the finest hardy flowers of the summer garden.

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  • Tulips flourish in any good garden soil that has been deeply dug or trenched and manured the previous season.

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  • Gardens and parks abound; the palace garden is exceptionally fine, and in the same neighbourhood are the public gardens with the place of amusement known as the Chateau des Fleurs.

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  • According to Captain Stanley Flower, director of the Zoological Gardens at Giza, Cairo, Egypt, the ancient Egyptians kept various species of wild animals in captivity, but the first Zoological Garden of which there is definite knowledge was founded in China by the first emperor of the Chou dynasty, who reigned about iioo B.C. This was called the "Intelligence Park," and appears to have had a scientific and educational object.

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  • There are many small collections in different parts of Asia, but the only garden of great interest is at Alipore, Calcutta, supported chiefly by gate-money and a contribution from government, and managed by an honorary committee.

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  • The garden and large menagerie of the Royal Zoological Society of Antwerp were founded in 1843, and have been maintained at a very high level.

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  • The Society is not assisted by the state or the municipality, but derives its revenue from the subscriptions of Fellows, gate-money, Garden receipts and so forth.

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  • The garden at Rotterdam is also of high interest.

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  • His home is Alaka in Mount Kailasa, and his garden, the world's treasure-house, is Chaitraratha, on Mount Mandara.

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  • The principal buildings are the palace of the prince of Reuss-Greiz, surrounded by a fine park, the old château on a rocky hill overlooking the town, the summer palace with a fine garden, the old town church dating from 1225 and possessing a beautiful tower, the town hall, the governmental buildings and statues of the emperor William I.

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  • 849), had a genuine gift for Latin poetry, a gift agreeably exemplified in his poem on the plants in the monastic garden.

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  • Outside the town to the west is a public garden in which are several Roman tombs with inscriptions.

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  • JOHN LINDLEY (1799-1865), English botanist, was born on the 5th of February 1799 at Catton, near Norwich, where his father, George Lindley, author of A Guide to the Orchard and Kitchen Garden, owned a nursery garden.

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  • Other leading works are - in Munich, the "Virgin" sinking on her knees in adoration of the Divine Infant, who is lying in a garden within a rose trellis; in the Borghese gallery, Rome, a Peter Martyr; in Bologna, the frescoes in the church of St Cecilia, illustrating the life of the saint, all of them from the design of Raibolini, but not all executed by himself.

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  • The founder, George Rapp, after livingwith his would-be primitive Christian followers at Harmony, Butler county, Pennsylvania, in 1803-1814, and in 1815-1824 in New Harmony, Indiana, which he then sold to Robert Owen, settled here in 1824 and rapidly built up a village, in which each family received a house and garden.

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  • Some of the garden varieties of the woodbine are very beautiful, and are held in high esteem for their delicious fragrance, even the wild plant, with its pale flowers, compensating for its sickly looks " with never-cloying odours."

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  • tatarica, of similar habit, both European, are amongst the oldest English garden shrubs, and bear axillary flowers of various colours, occur Honeysuckle.

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  • Another plant of the same family (Leguminosae) Hedysarum coronarium, a very handsome hardy biennial often seen in old-fashioned collections of garden plants, is commonly called the French honeysuckle.

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  • Honeysuckles (Lonicera) flourish in any ordinary garden soil, but are usually sadly neglected in regard to pruning.

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  • The acreage of other vegetables in 1899 was 26,780 and the value of the market garden produce, including small fruits, which was sold, increased from $187,049 in 1889 to $394,283 in 1899 or 110.8%.

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  • In the garden of the château are two ancient towers, probably the remains of the Benedictine convent, but ascribed by local tradition to the knight Kolostuj, the legendary discoverer of the springs.

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  • The College Park and Fellows' Garden are of considerable beauty.

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  • A normal climatological station was established in the Fellows' Garden in 1904.

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  • The botanic garden is at Ball's Bridge, 1 m.

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  • Here, besides the viceregal demesne and lodge and the magazine, are a zoological garden, a people's garden, the Wellington monument, two barracks, the Hibernian military school, the "Fifteen Acres," a natural amphitheatre (of much greater extent than its name implies) used as a review ground, and a racecourse.

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  • In England the tree grows well in warm situations, but suffers much in severe winters - its graceful form rendering it ornamental in the park or garden, where it sometimes grows 30 or 40 ft.

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  • The infirmary for sick monks, with the physician's house and physic garden, lies to the east.

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  • Garden.

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  • Physic garden.

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  • The "residence of the physicians" (S) stands contiguous to the infirmary, and the physic garden (T) at the north-east corner of the monastery.

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  • In the same way the physic garden presents the names of the medicinal herbs, and the cemetery (p) those of the trees, apple, pear, plum, quince, &c., planted there.

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  • and terminating in the alameda, or public garden.

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  • The seed branch of the department of agriculture was established in 1900 for the purpose of encouraging the production and use of seeds of superior quality, thereby improving all kinds of field and garden crops grown in Canada.

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  • She was buried in the garden of the palace at Charlottenburg, where a mausoleum, containing a fine recumbent statue by Rauch, was built over her grave.

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  • He lectured in a garden called the Lacydeum, which was presented to him by Attalus I.

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  • pendula are elegant trees for the garden.

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  • Garden >>

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  • There is one lake within the urban limits, the Lagoa de Rodrigo de Freitas, near the Botanical Garden, separated from the sea by a narrow sand beach, which is being gradually filled in.

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  • This section during the past century has extended southward along the bay shore in a string of suburbs known as the Cattete and Botafogo, with that of Larangeiras behind the Cattete in a pretty valley of the same name, and thence on or near the Atlantic coast as Largo dos Leoes, Copacabana and Gavea, the last including the Botanical Garden.

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  • The public parks and gardens are numerous and include the Botanical Garden with its famous avenue of royal palms (Oreodoxa regia); the Passeio Publico (dating from 1783), a small garden on the water-front facing the harbour entrance; the Jardim d'Acclamacao, forming part of the Praca da Republica (once known as the Campo de Sant' Anna) with its artistic walks and masses of shrubbery; the Praca Tiradentes (the old Largo do Rocio, afterwards rechristened Praca da Constituicao) with its magnificent equestrian statue of Dom Pedro I.

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  • Among other educational institutions are a conservatory of music, school of fine arts, normal school, a national library with upwards of 260,000 volumes and a large number of manuscripts, maps, medals and coins, the national observatory on Castle Hill, the national museum now domiciled in the Sao Christovao palace in the midst of a pretty park, a zoological garden in the suburb of Villa Isabel, and the famous Botanical Garden founded by Dom Joao VI.

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  • The first coffee tree planted in Brazil was in a convent garden of Rio de Janeiro.

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  • A botanic garden was opened in 1880.

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  • The fosse has been planted, and part of it used as an experimental garden.

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  • Near the château is the zoological garden, formed in 1860, and excellently arranged.

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  • he was four the family removed to a house on Herne Hill, then a country village, with a garden and rural surroundings.

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  • This half-success in a subordinate sphere was, however, so far from coinciding with his aspirations that he had again, in the winter of 1821, begun to turn his attention towards missionary labour in the East, when the possibility of fulfilling the dream of his life was suddenly revealed to him by an invitation from the Caledonian church, Hatton Garden, London, to "make trial and proof" of his gifts before the "remnant of the congregation which held together."

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  • William Roper, husband of More's eldest daughter, mentions one of these visits, when the king after dinner walked in the garden by the space of an hour holding his arm round More's neck.

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  • The peaks of the mountain are irregular, abrupt and broken; its sides are deeply furrowed by gorges and ravines; the shore plain is broken by ridges and by broad and deep valleys; no other island of the group is so well watered on all sides by large mountain streams; and it is called " garden isle."

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  • It is worthy of remark that Homer names, as adorning the garden of Alcinous, seven plants only - wild olive, oil olive, pear, pomegranate, apple, fig and vine.

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  • It is a well-known garden plant, and several other species of the genus are cultivated in the open air and as greenhouse plants.

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  • They are detached houses, standing each in its own garden, and not forming terraces or rows.

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  • An academy of agriculture, with a natural history museum and botanic garden attached, is established in the palace of Clemensruhe at Poppelsdorf, which is reached by a fine avenue about a mile long, bordered on both sides by a double row of chestnut trees.

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  • along the western slope stretches a series of villages, each white-washed house with its own garden and orchard.

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  • Each occupied a small detached cottage, standing by itself in a small garden surrounded by high walls and connected by a common corridor or cloister.

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  • To the north of the church, beyond the sacristy (L), and the side chapels (M), we find the cell of the sub-prior (a), with its garden.

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  • The superior had free access to this corridor, and through open niches was able to inspect the garden without being seen.

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  • H is the garden, cultivated by the occupant of the cell.

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  • Prior's garden.

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  • Garden of do.

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  • garden, stand the cells; low-built two-storied cottages, of two or three rooms on the ground-floor, lighted by a larger and a smaller window to the side, and provided with a doorway to the court, and one at the back, opposite to one in the outer wall, through which the monk may have conveyed the sweepings of his cell and the refuse of his garden to the "eremus" beyond.

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  • He was afterwards (1662) preferred to the rectory of-St Paul's, Covent Garden, London, where he continued to labour during the plague.

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  • It has a military school, a first-class meteorological station and a botanical garden.

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  • In Rome he studied botany in the garden of the aged Antonius Castor (xxv.

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  • Tradition also connects Laraish with the garden of the Hesperides, `Arasi being the Arabic for "pleasure-gardens," and the "golden apples" perhaps the familiar oranges.

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  • high), is the garden of Oman.

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  • That night the whole city was shaken out of sleep by an explosion of gunpowder which shattered to fragments the building in which he should have slept and perished;and the next morning the bodies of Darnley and a page were found strangled in a garden adjoining it, whither they had apparently escaped over a wall, to be despatched by the hands of Bothwell's attendant confederates.

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  • The finest of the modern thoroughfares of Milan is the Via Dante, constructed in 1888; it runs from the Piazza de' Mercanti to the spacious Foro Bonaparte, and thence to the Parco Nuovo, the great public garden in which stands the Castello Sforzesco.

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  • From this period also date the irrigation works which render the Lombard plain a fertile garden.

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  • hortus, a garden), the art and science of the cultivation of garden plants, whether for utilitarian or for decorative purposes.

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  • The subject naturally divides itself into two sections, which we here propose to treat separately, commencing with the science, and passing on to the practice of the cultivation of flowers, fruits and vegetables as applicable to the home garden.

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  • Part I.-Principles Or Science Of Horticulture Horticulture, apart from the mechanical details connected with the maintenance of a garden and its appurtenances, may be considered as the application of the principles of plant physiology to the cultivation of plants from all parts of the globe, and from various altitudes, soils and situations.

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  • From a careful series of experiments made in the Horticultural Society's Garden at Chiswick, it was found that where the soil is loamy, or light and slightly enriched with decayed vegetable matter, the apple succeeds best on the doucin stock, and the pear on the quince; and where it is chalky it is preferable to graft the apple on the crab, and the pear on the wild pear.

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  • Many garden varieties of flowers and fruits have thus originated.

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  • This is the case with many of our roses, dahlias, begonias, pelargoniums, orchids and other long or widely cultivated garden plants.

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  • Many garden plants have originated solely by selection; and much has been done to improve our breeds of vegetables, flowers and fruit by systematic selection.

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  • We shall therefore first treat of these under four headings: formation and preparation of the garden, garden structures and edifices, garden materials and appliances, and garden operations.

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  • Formation and Preparation of the Garden.

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  • - The site chosen for the mansion will more or less determine that of the garden, the pleasure grounds and flower garden being placed so as to surround or lie contiguous to it, while the fruit and vegetable gardens, either together or separate, should be placed on one side or in the rear, according to fitness as regards the nature of the soil and subsoil, the slope of the surface or the general features of the park scenery.

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  • The almost universal practice is to have the fruit and vegetable gardens combined; and the flower garden may sometimes be conveniently placed in juxtaposition with them.

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  • Ground possessing a gentle inclination towards the south is desirable for a garden.

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  • It is well also to have an open exposure towards the east and west, so that the garden may enjoy the full benefit of the morning and evening sun, especially the latter; but shelter is desirable on the north and north-east, or in any direction in which the particular locality may happen to be exposed.

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  • A hazel-coloured loam, moderately light in texture, is well adapted for most garden crops, whether of fruits or vegetables, especially a good warm deep loam resting upon chalk; and if such a soil occurs naturally in the selected site, but little will be required in the way of preparation.

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  • It is advantageous to possess a variety of soils; and if the garden be on a slope it will often be practicable to render the upper part light and dry, while the lower remains of a heavier and damper nature.

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  • These are unfitted for garden purposes until improved by draining, liming, trenching and the addition of porous materials, such as ashes, burnt ballast or sand, but when thoroughly improved they are very fertile and less liable to become exhausted than most other soils.

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  • Such soils properly drained and prepared are very suitable for orchards, and when the proportion of clay is smaller (20-30%) they form excellent garden soils, in which the better sort of fruit trees luxuriate.

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  • The clay marls are, like clay soils, too stiff for garden purposes until well worked and heavily manured; but loamy marls are fertile and well suited to fruit trees, and sandy marls are adapted for producing early crops.

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  • Vegetable soils or moulds, or humus soils, contain a considerable percentage (more than 5) of humus, and embrace both the rich productive garden moulds and those known as peaty soils.

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  • In laying out the garden, the plan should be prepared in minute detail before commencing operations.

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  • The form of the kitchen and fruit garden should be square or oblong, rather than curvilinear, since the working and cropping of the ground can thus be more easily carried out.

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  • This access is especially desirable as regards the store-yards and framing ground, where fermenting manures and tree leaves for making up hot beds, coals or wood for fuel and ingredients for composts, together with flower-pots and the many necessaries of garden culture, have to be accommodated.

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  • A considerable portion of the north wall is usually covered in front with the glazed structures called forcing-houses, and to these the houses for ornamental plants are sometimes attached; but a more appropriate site for the latter is the flower garden, when that forms a separate department.

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  • The frame ground, including melon and pine pits, should occupy some well-sheltered spot in the slips, or on one side of the garden, and adjoining to this may be found a suitable site for the compost ground, in which the various kinds of soils are kept in store, and in which also composts may be prepared.

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  • In the warmer parts of the country the wall on the north side of the garden should be so placed as to face the sun at about an hour before noon, or a little to the east of south; in less favoured localities it should be made to face direct south, and in still more unfavourable districts it should face the sun an hour after noon, or a little west of south.

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  • Fig, i represents a garden of one acre and admits of nearly double the number of trees on the south aspect as compared with the east and west; it allows a greater number of espalier or pyramid trees to face the south; and it admits of being divided into equal principal compartments, each of which forms nearly a square.

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  • - Plan of Garden an acre in area.

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  • Care should be taken, however, not to hem in the garden by crowded plantations, shelter from the prevailing strong winds being all that is required, while the more open it is in other directions the better.

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  • Although water is one of the most important elements in plant life, we do not find one garden in twenty where even ordinary precautions have been taken to secure a competent supply.

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  • Iron pipes are the best conductors; they should lead to a capacious open reservoir placed outside the garden, and at the highest convenient level, in order to secure sufficient pressure for effective distribution, and so that the wall trees also may be effectually washed.

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  • Stand-pipes should be placed at intervals beside the walks and in other convenient places, from which water may at all times be drawn; and to which a garden hose can be attached, so as to permit of the whole garden being readily watered.

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  • In fact, every part of the garden, including the working sheds and offices, should have water supplied without stint.

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  • Although the interior garden receives its form from the walls, the ring fence and plantations may be adapted to the shape and surface of the ground.

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  • In smaller country gardens the enclosure or outer fence is often a hedge, and there is possibly no space enclosed by walls, but some divisional wall having a suitable aspect is utilized for the growth of peaches, apricots, &c., and the hedge merely separates the garden from a paddock used for grazing.

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  • The best material for the construction of garden walks is good binding gravel.

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  • They give an old-fashioned and restful appearance to a garden, and in the interstices charming little plants like thyme, Ionopsidium acaule, &c., are allowed to grow.

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  • Garden Structures.

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  • - The position to be given to the garden walls has been already referred to.

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  • will generally be sufficient for the walls of a garden, but for the training of fruit trees it is found that an average height of 12 ft.

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  • As brick is more easily built hollow than stone, it is to be preferred for garden walls.

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  • Bricks cannot be too well burnt for garden walls; the harder they are the less moisture will they absorb.

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  • The coping of garden walls is important, both for the preservation of the walls and for throwing the rain-water off their surfaces.

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  • The botanist Jungermann had plant houses at Altdorf in Switzerland; those of Loader, a London merchant, and the conservatory in the Apothecaries' Botanic Garden at Chelsea, were among the first structures of the kind erected in British gardens.

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  • The conservatory may also with great propriety be placed in the flower garden, where it may occupy an elevated terrace, and form the termination of one of the more important walks.

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  • These, or a portion of them, especially the vineries and peacheries, are frequently brought together into a range along the principal interior or south wall of the garden, where they are well exposed to sun and light, an ornamental plant house being some-;° FIG.

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  • Pits and frames of various kinds are frequently used for the cultivation of cucumbers and melons, as well as hot beds covered by ordinary garden frames.

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  • The orchard house is among the most generally useful of all garden structures.

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  • long are of convenient size for garden lights of this character.

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  • Span-roof garden frame (fig.

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  • A lean-to against the north side of the garden wall will be found suitable for the purpose, though a span-roofed form may also be adopted, especially if the building stands apart.

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  • Garden Materials and Appliances.

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  • For garden purposes loam should be rather unctuous or soapy to the touch when moderately dry, not too clinging nor adhesive, and should readily crumble when a compressed handful is thrown on the ground.

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  • This manure is best fitted for garden use when in a moderately fermented state.

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  • Horse dung is generally the principal ingredient in all hot bed manure; and, in its partially decomposed state, as afforded by exhausted hot beds, it is well adapted for garden use.

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  • Lime in the caustic state is beneficially applied to soils which contain an excess of inert vegetable matter, and hence may be used for the improvement of old garden soils saturated with humus, or of peaty soils not thoroughly reclaimed.

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  • At the rate of from 6 to to bushels to the acre it may be used on garden lawns to prevent worm casts.

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  • Garden Tools, &c. - Most of these are so well known that we shall not discuss them here.

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  • Garden Operations.

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  • Whatever the seeds, the ground should be made tolerably firm both beneath and above them; this may be done by treading in the case of most kitchen garden crops, which are also better sown in drills, this admitting the more readily of the ground being kept clear from weeds by hoeing.

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  • Nowadays, however, quite large trees, chiefly of an ornamental character, and perhaps weighing several tons, are lifted with a large ball of soil attached to the roots, by means of a special tree-lifting machine, and are readily transferred from one part of the garden to another, or even for a distance of several miles, without serious injury.

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  • In transplanting smaller subjects, such as plants for the flower garden, much less effort is required.

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  • For moving small plants the garden trowel is a very convenient tool, but we are inclined to give the preference to the hand-fork.

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  • Garden pots are made with a comparatively large hole in the bottom, and those of the largest size have also holes at the side near the bottom; these openings are to prevent the soil becoming saturated or soured with superabundant water.

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  • The bottom crock is made from a piece of a broken garden pot, and is laid with the convex side upwards; then comes a layer of irregular pieces of crock of various sizes, about i in.

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  • When plants are required to stand in ornamental china pots or vases, it is better, both for the plants and for avoiding risk of breakage, to grow them in ordinary garden pots of a size that will drop into the more valuable vessels.

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  • Various other contrivances take the place of garden pots for special purposes.

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  • Pruning is a very important operation in the fruit garden, its object being twofold - (i) to give form to the tree, and (2) to induce the free production of flower buds as the precursors of a plentiful crop of fruit.

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  • If a young seedling or cutting of any soft-wooded plant is to be bushy, it must have [[[Garden Operations]] its top nipped out by the thumb-nail or pruning-scissors at a very early stage, and this stopping must be repeated frequently.

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  • Flower Garden and Pleasure Grounds.

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  • - Wherever there is a flower garden of considerable magnitude, and in a separate situation, it should be constructed on principles of its own.

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  • When the flower garden is to be seen from the windows, or any other elevated point of view, the former is to be preferred; but where the surface is irregular, and the situation more remote, and especially where the beauty of flowers is mainly looked to, the choice should probably fall on the latter.

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  • The flower garden may include several different compartments..

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  • Thus, for example, there is the " Rock Garden," which should consist of variously grouped masses of large stones, those which are remarkable for being figured by water-wearing, or containing petrifactions or impressions, or showing something of natural stratification, being generally preferred.

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  • A moist or rather a shady border, or a section of the pleasure ground supplied with bog earth, may be devoted to what is called the " American Garden," which, as it includes.

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  • the gorgeous rhododendrons and azaleas, forms one of the grandest features of the establishment during the early summer, while if properly selected the plants are effective as a garden of evergreens at all seasons.

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  • The number of variegated and various-coloured hardy shrubs is now so great that a most pleasant plot for a " Winter Garden " may be arrayed with plants.

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  • of this class, with which may be associated hardy subjects which flower during that season or very early spring, as the Christmas rose, and amongst bulbs the crocus and snowdrop. Later the spring garden department is a scene of great attraction; and some of the gardens of this character, as those of Cliveden and Belvoir, are among the most fascinating examples of horticultural art.

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  • The old-fashioned stereotyped flower garden that one met with almost everywhere is rapidly becoming a thing of the past, and grounds are now laid out more in accordance with their natural disposition, their climatic conditions and their suitability for certain kinds of plants.

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  • They are useful in the mixed garden, for though in some cases they are of short duration, many of them are possessed of much beauty of hue and elegance of form.

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  • The number of biennials is not large, but a few very desirable garden plants, such as the following, occur amongst them: Agrostemma coronaria (Rose Campion): hardy, I ft., bright rose-purple or rose and white.

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  • To obviate this defect, it has been recommended that ornamental plants should be formed into four or five separate suites of flowering, to be distributed over the garden.

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  • These compartments should be so intermingled that no particular class may be entirely absent from any one quarter of the garden.

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  • The flower-gardener should have a small nursery, or reserve garden, for the propagation of the finer plants, to be transferred into the borders as often as is required.

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  • Light rich garden soil.

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  • maritima is sometimes planted as an edging for garden walks; there are three varieties, the common pale pink, the deep rose, and the white, the last two being the most desirable.

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  • Handsome liliaceous plants, with fleshy roots, erect stems, and showy flowers, thriving in any good garden soil.

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  • Good garden soil.

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  • C. majalis, the lily of the valley, a well-known sweet-scented favourite spring flower, growing freely in rich garden soil; its spikes, 6 to 9 in.

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  • Effective composite plants, thriving in good garden soil.

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  • C. auriculata, 2 to 3 ft., has yellow and brown flowers in July and August; C. lanceolata, 2 to 3 ft., bright yellow, in August; next to the biennial C. grandiflora it is the best garden plant.

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  • Interesting and elegant plants, mostly tuberous, growing in good garden soil.

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  • Chiefly rock plants with handsome and fragrant flowers, the smaller sorts growing in light sandy soil, and the larger border plants in rich garden earth.

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  • purpurea, or foxglove, 3 to 5 ft., with its dense racemes of purple flowers, spotted inside, is very showy, but is surpassed by the garden varieties that have been raised.

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  • It is really a biennial, but grows itself so freely as to become perennial in the garden.

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  • Good garden soil, and frequent renewal from seeds.

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  • Good ordinary garden soil.

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  • albo-marginata, i 5 in., has the leaves edged with white, and the flowers lilac. Rich garden soil.

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  • Showy composite plants, thriving in good garden soil.

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  • Light garden soil; not long-lived.

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  • They flourish in any garden soil.

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  • matronalis, I to 2 ft., is the old garden Rocket, of which some double forms with white and purplish blossoms are amongst the choicest of border flowers.

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  • Ordinary garden soil.

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  • flowers, thriving in good deep garden soil.

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  • luteus and its many garden forms, i to I z ft., are variously coloured and often richly spotted; and M.

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