Garden sentence example

garden
  • Today, I have a vegetable garden in my backyard.

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  • They usually spent the morning hours in the garden and the afternoon at the pool.

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  • Somewhere I can have a garden and maybe a horse.

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  • The garden needed weeding anyway.

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  • Alice was a geranium Cynthia had lovingly rescued from certain death by frost last September when the rest of their first year garden succumbed to the advancing seasons.

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  • It's only a garden snake.

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  • The garden was beginning to look weathered.

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  • We plow them under so we can plant a garden and then spend half our time pulling them out of it so we can grow something to eat.

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  • She returned to the garden and sat down on the grass at the foot of the slope by the pond, where no one could see her.

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  • They held an estate from the king consisting of house, garden, field, stock and a salary, on condition of personal service on the king's errand.

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  • I heard you talking from the garden.

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  • From the garden it looked like an arbour.

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  • She ran out sobbing into the garden and as far as the pond, along the avenues of young lime trees Prince Andrew had planted.

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  • If she left from Ashley, she would arrive in time to plant a garden at the ranch.

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  • While the majority of the Thysanoptera are thus vegetarian in their diet, and are frequently injurious in farm and garden, some species, at least occasionally, adopt a predaceous habit, killing aphids and small mites (so-called "red-spiders") and sucking their juices.

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  • A botanic garden was opened in 1880.

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  • When I walk out in my garden I cannot see the beautiful flowers but I know that they are all around me; for is not the air sweet with their fragrance?

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  • Round the house was a garden newly laid out.

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  • Princess Mary murmured, pacing the garden with hurried steps and pressing her hands to her bosom which heaved with convulsive sobs.

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  • Alice was a geranium Cynthia had lovingly rescued from certain death by frost last September when the rest of the couple's first-year garden succumbed to the advancing seasons.

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  • Martha suggested an appropriate burial for the tiny remains she dubbed "Pinkie" and services were conducted in the back garden, next to Mrs. Lincoln's last winter mouse-victim.

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  • He led her through the stronghold and into the courtyard and garden area between the walls and the fortress.

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  • Gabe emerged into the garden next to a southern style mansion.

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  • It was further enjoined that any one playing bowls outside of his own garden or orchard was liable to a penalty of 6s.

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  • The garden and large menagerie of the Royal Zoological Society of Antwerp were founded in 1843, and have been maintained at a very high level.

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  • His home is Alaka in Mount Kailasa, and his garden, the world's treasure-house, is Chaitraratha, on Mount Mandara.

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  • The principal buildings are the palace of the prince of Reuss-Greiz, surrounded by a fine park, the old château on a rocky hill overlooking the town, the summer palace with a fine garden, the old town church dating from 1225 and possessing a beautiful tower, the town hall, the governmental buildings and statues of the emperor William I.

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  • Outside the town to the west is a public garden in which are several Roman tombs with inscriptions.

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  • The fosse has been planted, and part of it used as an experimental garden.

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  • Near the château is the zoological garden, formed in 1860, and excellently arranged.

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  • The peaks of the mountain are irregular, abrupt and broken; its sides are deeply furrowed by gorges and ravines; the shore plain is broken by ridges and by broad and deep valleys; no other island of the group is so well watered on all sides by large mountain streams; and it is called " garden isle."

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  • They are detached houses, standing each in its own garden, and not forming terraces or rows.

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  • An academy of agriculture, with a natural history museum and botanic garden attached, is established in the palace of Clemensruhe at Poppelsdorf, which is reached by a fine avenue about a mile long, bordered on both sides by a double row of chestnut trees.

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  • Many garden varieties of flowers and fruits have thus originated.

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  • The form of the kitchen and fruit garden should be square or oblong, rather than curvilinear, since the working and cropping of the ground can thus be more easily carried out.

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  • And in the garden, Henry saw a turnip.

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  • I had found a few early violets in the garden and brought them to my teacher.

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  • We almost live in the garden, where everything is growing and blooming and glowing.

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  • He and the other prisoners were taken to the right side of the Virgin's Field, to a large white house with an immense garden not far from the convent.

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  • The place smelled like a mossy garden.

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  • Of the squares, the principal is the Friedrich-Wilhelmplatz, on which lies the Elisenbrunnen with its colonnade and garden, the chief resort of visitors taking the baths and waters.

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  • This is the case with many of our roses, dahlias, begonias, pelargoniums, orchids and other long or widely cultivated garden plants.

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  • In the middle of the circle was a large teardrop-shaped flower garden.

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  • Quinn and Martha perpetually had their hands full with their baby and Betsy stayed home, content to have extra time with our expanding garden.

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  • Her dress was a half a step above the rag she used to polish the furniture and her hair had longer roots than Elmer Fudd's garden.

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  • If it isn't the skunks and opossum killing the chickens, it's the weeds taking over the garden.

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  • She shook the ugly thoughts from her head and straightened, leaning on the hoe as she glanced around the garden.

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  • It was getting close to noon when Carmen finished weeding in her garden.

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  • I was headed over to my house to mow the lawn and check the garden.

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  • In front of the palace is the public garden or Alexander Park.

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  • Like Perseus, he first applies to the Nymphs, who help him to learn where the garden is.

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  • The destruction of pine forests to meet the demands for naval stores, and the introduction and increased use of the refrigerator car, resulted in much attention to the growth of garden produce for Northern markets.

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  • The place was without importance until 1612, when Shah Abbas began building and laying out the palaces and gardens in the neighbourhood now collectively known as Bagh i Shah (the garden of the shah).

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  • By a singular contrast, the neighbouring thoroughfare of Hatton Garden, leading north from Holborn Circus, is a centre of the diamond trade.

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  • The property was acquired by Sir Christopher Hatton, Lord Chancellor under Queen Elizabeth, after whom Hatton Garden is named; though the bishopric kept some hold upon it until the 18th century.

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  • On account of its fertility it has been called the "Garden of Southern India."

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  • Connected with it are a library of 150,000 volumes and Boo MSS., a chemical laboratory, a zoological museum, a gynaecological institute, an ophthalmological school, a botanical garden and at Eldena (a seaside resort on the Baltic) an agricultural school.

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  • Walking with him into the garden, I found it dark with the shade of ancient trees.

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  • Below the villeins in the social scale came the cottiers possessing smaller holdings, sometimes only a garden, and no oxen.

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  • The dipterous garden pests, such as the onion fly, carrot fly and celery fly, can best be kept in check by the use of paraffin emulsions and the treatment of the soil with gas-lime after the crop is lifted.

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  • Three of the seven poets were drinking in a garden when Firdousi approached, and wishing to get rid of him without rudeness, they informed him who they were, and told him that it was their custom to admit none to their society but such as could give proof of poetical talent.

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  • Being apprised by one of the nobles of the court of what had taken place, Firdousi passed the night in great anxiety; but passing in the morning by the gate that led from his own apartments into the palace, he met the sultan in his private garden, and succeeded by humble apologies in appeasing his wrath.

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  • On the 12th of July 1789 Camille, leaping upon a table outside one of the cafes in the garden of the_ Palais Royal, announced to the crowd the dismissal of their favourite.

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  • Adjoining it is the Public Garden of 24 acres (1859), part of the made area of the city.

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  • Commonwealth Avenue, one of the Back Bay streets running from the foot of the Public Garden, is one of the finest residence streets of the country.

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  • Perfect orbicular webs are made by many genera of Argyopidae (Zilla, Meta, Gasteracantha), the best-known example being that of the common garden spider of England, Aranea or Epeira diademata; but these webs are not associated with any tubular retreat except such as are made under an adjoining leaf or in some nook hard by.

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  • Compensation was given to market gardeners for unexhausted improvements by the Market Gardeners' Compensation Act 1895 and by the Agricultural Holdings Act 1906 for improvements effected before the commencement of that act on a holding cultivated to the knowledge of the landlord as a market garden, if the landlord had not dissented in writing to the improvements.

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  • Originally a nature goddess (like Venus the garden goddess, with whom she was sometimes identified), she represented at first the hope of fruitful gardens and fields, then of abundant offspring, and lastly of prosperity to come and good fortune in general, being hence invoked on birthdays and at weddings.

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  • Like the Academy, it was an enclosure with a gymnasium and garden; it lay to the east of the city beyond the Diocharean Gate.

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  • The royal palace, designed by Friedrich von Gartner (1792-1847), is a tasteless structure; attached to it is a beautiful garden laid out by Queen Amalia, which contains a well-preserved mosaic floor of the Roman period.

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  • In the public garden is the Zappeion, a large building with a Corinthian portico, intended for the display of Greek industries; here also is a monument to Byron, erected in 1896.

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  • After this Wagner resided permanently at Bayreuth, in a house named Wahnfried, in the garden of which he built his tomb.

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  • Heliotrope or cherry-pie (Heliotropium peruvianum) is a well-known garden plant.

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  • Several times during summer the trees ought to be regularly examined, and the young shoots respectively topped or thinned out; those that remain are to be nailed to the wall, or braced in with pieces of slender twigs, and the trees ought occasionally to be washed with the garden engine or thoroughly syringed, especially during very hot summers.

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  • In 1885 he published, after long indecision, his volume of poems, A Child's Garden of Verses, an inferior story, The Body Snatcher, and that admirable romance, Prince Otto, in which the peculiar quality of Stevenson's style was displayed at its highest.

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  • The account of Christ's flesh is torn out of the Key, but it is affirmed that it was at the baptism that "he put on that primal raiment of light which Adam lost in the garden."

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  • St James's Park was transformed from marshy land into a deer park, bowling green and tennis court by Henry VIII., extended and laid out as a pleasure garden by Charles II., and rearranged according to the designs of John Nash in 1827-1829.

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  • Covent Garden, again, took its name from a convent garden belonging to Westminster.

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  • It overlooks the Jardin de la Isla, a beautiful garden laid out for Philip II.

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  • There are also a theatre, an institute of music, a library, a museum, a zoological garden, and numerous scientific societies.

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  • Coutances is a quiet town with winding streets and pleasant boulevards bordering it on the east; on the western slope of the hill there is a public garden.

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  • Generally speaking, soils containing from 30 to 50% of clay and 50 to 60% of sand with an adequate amount of vegetable residues prove the most useful for ordinary farm and garden crops; such blends are known as " loams," those in which clay predominates being termed clay loalns, and those in which the sand predominates sandy roams. " Stiff clays " contain over 50% of clay; " light sands " have less than to %.

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  • South Beveland is sometimes called the "granary" and Walcheren the "garden" of Zeeland.

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  • The blackbird feeds chiefly on fruits, worms, the larvae of insects and snails, extracting the last from their shells by dexterously chipping them on stones; and though it is generally regarded as an enemy of the garden, it is probable that the amount of damage by it to the fruit is largely compensated for by its undoubted services as a vermin-killer.

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  • Near the university, and separated from the Ring by a garden, stands the votive church in Alsergrund, completed in 1879, and erected to commemorate the emperor's escape from assassination in 1853, one of the most elaborate and successful of modern Gothic churches (Ferstel).

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  • Its botanic collection contains the famous Vienna herbarium, while to the university is attached a fine botanical garden.

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  • The city possesses also an academy of the fine arts, with a gallery of paintings; and the university a library of 120,000 volumes, a natural history museum, botanical garden and agricultural schools.

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  • It is an account of a little garden that he used to tend with his own hands, and is largely made up of descriptions of the various herbs he grows there and their medicinal and other uses.

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  • At the Oxford botanic garden he conducted numerous experiments upon the effect of changes in soil, light and the composition of the atmosphere upon vegetation.

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  • The English garden (Englischer Garten), to the north-east of the town, is 600 acres in extent, and was laid out by Count Rumford in imitation of an English park.

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  • The botanical garden, with its large palm-house, the Hofgarten, surrounded with arcades containing frescoes of Greek landscapes by Rottmann, and the Maximilian park to the east of the Isar, complete the list of public parks.

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  • The plant grows freely in good garden soil, preferring a deep welldrained loam, and is all the better for a top-dressing of manure as it approaches the flowering stage.

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  • Streams from the Pisidian mountains make the land on the south-west and south of the city a garden; but on the east and north-east a great part of the naturally fertile soil is uncultivated.

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  • As nearly every house is surrounded by a courtyard or garden, the town covers an unusually large area for the number of its inhabitants.

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  • All these grow well in good garden soil, and blossom from March onwards, coming in very early in genial seasons.

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  • Amongst the finest of his classical pictures were - "Syracusan Bride leading Wild Beasts in Procession to the Temple of Diana" (1866), "Venus disrobing for the Bath" (1867), "Electra at the Tomb of Agamemnon," and "Helios and Rhodos" (1869), "Hercules wrestling with Death for the Body of Alcestis" (1871), "Clytemnestra" (1874), "The Daphnephoria" (1876), "Nausicaa" (1878), "An Idyll" (1881), two lovers under a spreading oak listening to the piping of a shepherd and gazing on the rich plain below; "Phryne" (1882), a nude figure standing in the sun; "Cymon and Iphigenia" (1884), "Captive Andromache" (1888), now in the Manchester Art Gallery; with the "Last Watch of Hero" (1887), "The Bath of Psyche" (1890), now in the Chantrey Bequest collection; "The Garden of the Hesperides" (1892), "Perseus and Andromeda" and "The Return of Persephone," now in the Leeds Gallery (1891); and "Clytie," his last work (1896).

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  • He compiled the Garden of the Soul (1740 ?), which continues to be the most popular manual of devotion among English-speaking Roman Catholics, and he revised an edition of the Douai version of the Scriptures (1749-1750), correcting the language and orthography, which in many places had become obsolete.

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  • Buitenzorg is the usual residence of the governor-general of the Dutch East Indies, and is further remarkable on account of its splendid botanical garden and for its popularity as a health !resort.

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  • Between this and 1880 a museum, a school of agriculture, and a culture garden were added, and since then library, botanical, chemical, and pharmacological laboratories, and a herbarium have been established.

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  • Besides a good picture gallery in the Ratshof, and the 13thcentury church of St John, Yuriev possesses a university, with an observatory, an art museum, a botanical garden and a library of 250,000 volumes, which are housed in a restored portion of the cathedral, burned down in 1624.

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  • His fortune was now made, and while the managers of Covent Garden and Drury Lane resorted to the law to make Giffard, the manager of Goodman's Fields, close his little theatre, Garrick was engaged by Fleetwood for Drury Lane for the season of 1742.

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  • In 1746-1747 he fulfilled a short engagement with Rich at Covent Garden, his last series of performances under a management not his own.

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  • The fame of Erasmus Darwin as a poet rests upon his Botanic Garden, though he also wrote The Temple of Nature, or the Origin of Society, a Poem, with Philosophical Notes (1803), and The Shrine of Nature (posthumously published).

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  • The Botanic Garden (the second part of which - The Loves of the Plants - was published anonymously in 1789, and the whole of which appeared in 1791) is a long poem in the decasyllabic rhymed couplet.

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  • But dissensions having arisen in the cabinet, he resigned a few months later, and retired into private life, cultivating his beautiful garden at Waseda near T6kyo.

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  • He was learned in the science of botany, and formed a magnificent collection and a botanic garden at Luton Hoo, where Robert Adam built for him a splendid residence.

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  • Connected with the university are a valuable library, occupying the palace built for Louis Bonaparte, king of Holland, in 1807 and containing upwards of 200,000 volumes and MSS.; a museum of natural history; an ophthalmic institute; physical and chemical laboratories; a veterinary school; a botanic garden; and an observatory.

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  • It is chiefly distinguished for its mathematical and philosophical studies, and possesses a famous observatory, established in 1811 by Frederick William Bessel, a library of about 240,000 volumes, a zoological museum, a botanical garden, laboratories and valuable mathematical and other scientific collections.

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  • There are two pretty public parks, one in the Hufen, with a zoological garden attached, another the Luisenwahl which commemorates the sojourn of Queen Louisa of Prussia in the town in the disastrous year 1806.

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  • The Indian habitation was made up of this composite abode, with whatever out-structures and garden plots were needed.

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  • Walls for buildings, garden terraces and aqueducts were straight or sloping.

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  • Just outside the borders of the park, beyond the Ilm, is the "garden house," a simple wooden cottage with a high-pitched roof, in which Goethe used to pass the greater part of the summer.

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  • Portions of the vicarage date from the 14th century, and in its garden there is a stone dovecote of great age.

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  • From the landing stage a short street leads into the broad Avenue Jules Ferry or de la Marine running east to west and ending in the Place de la Residence, on the north side of which is the Roman Catholic cathedral and on the south side the palace of the French resident-general, with a large garden.

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  • The valley and delta of the Vistula are very fertile, and produce good crops of wheat and pasturage for horses, cattle and sheep. Besides cereals, the chief crops are potatoes, hay, tobacco, garden produce, fruit and sugar-beet.

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  • In the garden Jesus here Himself goes forth to meet His captors, and these fall back upon the ground, on His revealing Himself as Jesus of Nazareth.

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  • Benton Harbor has a large trade in fruit (peaches, grapes, pears, cherries, strawberries, raspberries and apples) and other market garden produce raised in the vicinity.

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  • And Yahweh-Elohim planted a garden s in Eden, east ward; and there he put the man whom he had formed."

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  • The garden of Eden is referred to in Isa.

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  • The extensive gardens which occupy the hillside behind the palace are adorned with fountains and cascades; the botanical garden contains manytrees from northern climates.

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  • The chief periodicals are the Vegetarian (weekly), the Herald of the Golden Age (monthly), the Vegetarian Messenger (monthly), the Vegetarian (American monthly), the Children's Garden (monthly).

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  • Kishinev is the seat of the archbishop of Bessarabia, and has a cathedral, an ecclesiastical seminary with Boo students, a college, and a gardening school, a museum, a public library, a botanic garden, and a sanatorium with sulphur springs.

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  • The first botanic garden was established at Padua in 1545, and was followed by that of Pisa.

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  • The Montpellier garden was founded in 1592, that of Giessen in 1605, of Strassburg in 1620, of Altdorf in 1625, and of Jena in 1629.

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  • The Jardin des Plantes at Paris was established in 1626, and the Upsala garden in 1627.

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  • The garden at Edinburgh was founded by Sir Andrew Balfour and Sir Robert Sibbald in 1670, and, under the name of the Physic Garden, was placed under the superintendence of James Sutherland, afterwards professor of botany in the university.

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  • The garden at Kew dates from about 1730, when Frederick, prince of Wales, obtained a long lease of Kew House and its gardens from the Capel family.

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  • After his death in 1751 his widow, Princess Augusta of Saxe-Gotha, showed great interest in their scientific development, and in 1759 engaged William Aiton to establish a Physic Garden.

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  • The garden of the Royal Dublin Society at Glasnevin was opened about 1796; that of Trinity College, Dublin, in 1807; and that of Glasgow 1 Morison, Praeludia Botanica (1672); Plantarum Historia Universalis (1680).

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  • His uncle, Bernard de Jussieu, had adopted the principles of Linnaeus's Fragmenta in his arrangement of the plants in the royal garden at the Trianon.

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  • Being called upon to arrange the plants in the garden, he necessarily had to consider the best method of doing so, and, following the lines already suggested by his uncle, adopted a system founded in a certain degree on that of Ray, in which he embraced all the discoveries in organography, adopted the simplicity of the Linnean definitions, and displayed the natural affinities of plants.

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  • The curious oak pulpit representing Adam and Eve expelled from the Garden of Eden came originally from the Jesuit church at Louvain, and is considered the masterpiece of Verbruggen.

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  • In the rue de la Regence are the new picture gallery, a fine building with an exceedingly good collection of pictures, the palace of the count of Flanders, and the garden of the Petit Sablon, which contains statues of Egmont and Horn, and a large number of statuettes representing the various gilds and handicrafts.

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  • Other leading works are - in Munich, the "Virgin" sinking on her knees in adoration of the Divine Infant, who is lying in a garden within a rose trellis; in the Borghese gallery, Rome, a Peter Martyr; in Bologna, the frescoes in the church of St Cecilia, illustrating the life of the saint, all of them from the design of Raibolini, but not all executed by himself.

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  • The founder, George Rapp, after livingwith his would-be primitive Christian followers at Harmony, Butler county, Pennsylvania, in 1803-1814, and in 1815-1824 in New Harmony, Indiana, which he then sold to Robert Owen, settled here in 1824 and rapidly built up a village, in which each family received a house and garden.

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  • Some of the garden varieties of the woodbine are very beautiful, and are held in high esteem for their delicious fragrance, even the wild plant, with its pale flowers, compensating for its sickly looks " with never-cloying odours."

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  • Another plant of the same family (Leguminosae) Hedysarum coronarium, a very handsome hardy biennial often seen in old-fashioned collections of garden plants, is commonly called the French honeysuckle.

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  • Honeysuckles (Lonicera) flourish in any ordinary garden soil, but are usually sadly neglected in regard to pruning.

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  • The acreage of other vegetables in 1899 was 26,780 and the value of the market garden produce, including small fruits, which was sold, increased from $187,049 in 1889 to $394,283 in 1899 or 110.8%.

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  • In the garden of the château are two ancient towers, probably the remains of the Benedictine convent, but ascribed by local tradition to the knight Kolostuj, the legendary discoverer of the springs.

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  • The College Park and Fellows' Garden are of considerable beauty.

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  • A normal climatological station was established in the Fellows' Garden in 1904.

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  • The botanic garden is at Ball's Bridge, 1 m.

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  • Here, besides the viceregal demesne and lodge and the magazine, are a zoological garden, a people's garden, the Wellington monument, two barracks, the Hibernian military school, the "Fifteen Acres," a natural amphitheatre (of much greater extent than its name implies) used as a review ground, and a racecourse.

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  • In England the tree grows well in warm situations, but suffers much in severe winters - its graceful form rendering it ornamental in the park or garden, where it sometimes grows 30 or 40 ft.

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  • The infirmary for sick monks, with the physician's house and physic garden, lies to the east.

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  • The "residence of the physicians" (S) stands contiguous to the infirmary, and the physic garden (T) at the north-east corner of the monastery.

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  • In the same way the physic garden presents the names of the medicinal herbs, and the cemetery (p) those of the trees, apple, pear, plum, quince, &c., planted there.

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  • The seed branch of the department of agriculture was established in 1900 for the purpose of encouraging the production and use of seeds of superior quality, thereby improving all kinds of field and garden crops grown in Canada.

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  • She was buried in the garden of the palace at Charlottenburg, where a mausoleum, containing a fine recumbent statue by Rauch, was built over her grave.

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  • He lectured in a garden called the Lacydeum, which was presented to him by Attalus I.

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  • There is one lake within the urban limits, the Lagoa de Rodrigo de Freitas, near the Botanical Garden, separated from the sea by a narrow sand beach, which is being gradually filled in.

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  • This section during the past century has extended southward along the bay shore in a string of suburbs known as the Cattete and Botafogo, with that of Larangeiras behind the Cattete in a pretty valley of the same name, and thence on or near the Atlantic coast as Largo dos Leoes, Copacabana and Gavea, the last including the Botanical Garden.

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  • The public parks and gardens are numerous and include the Botanical Garden with its famous avenue of royal palms (Oreodoxa regia); the Passeio Publico (dating from 1783), a small garden on the water-front facing the harbour entrance; the Jardim d'Acclamacao, forming part of the Praca da Republica (once known as the Campo de Sant' Anna) with its artistic walks and masses of shrubbery; the Praca Tiradentes (the old Largo do Rocio, afterwards rechristened Praca da Constituicao) with its magnificent equestrian statue of Dom Pedro I.

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  • Among other educational institutions are a conservatory of music, school of fine arts, normal school, a national library with upwards of 260,000 volumes and a large number of manuscripts, maps, medals and coins, the national observatory on Castle Hill, the national museum now domiciled in the Sao Christovao palace in the midst of a pretty park, a zoological garden in the suburb of Villa Isabel, and the famous Botanical Garden founded by Dom Joao VI.

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  • The first coffee tree planted in Brazil was in a convent garden of Rio de Janeiro.

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  • This half-success in a subordinate sphere was, however, so far from coinciding with his aspirations that he had again, in the winter of 1821, begun to turn his attention towards missionary labour in the East, when the possibility of fulfilling the dream of his life was suddenly revealed to him by an invitation from the Caledonian church, Hatton Garden, London, to "make trial and proof" of his gifts before the "remnant of the congregation which held together."

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  • William Roper, husband of More's eldest daughter, mentions one of these visits, when the king after dinner walked in the garden by the space of an hour holding his arm round More's neck.

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  • It is worthy of remark that Homer names, as adorning the garden of Alcinous, seven plants only - wild olive, oil olive, pear, pomegranate, apple, fig and vine.

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  • It is a well-known garden plant, and several other species of the genus are cultivated in the open air and as greenhouse plants.

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  • Each occupied a small detached cottage, standing by itself in a small garden surrounded by high walls and connected by a common corridor or cloister.

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  • To the north of the church, beyond the sacristy (L), and the side chapels (M), we find the cell of the sub-prior (a), with its garden.

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  • The superior had free access to this corridor, and through open niches was able to inspect the garden without being seen.

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  • H is the garden, cultivated by the occupant of the cell.

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  • He was afterwards (1662) preferred to the rectory of-St Paul's, Covent Garden, London, where he continued to labour during the plague.

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  • It has a military school, a first-class meteorological station and a botanical garden.

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  • Tradition also connects Laraish with the garden of the Hesperides, `Arasi being the Arabic for "pleasure-gardens," and the "golden apples" perhaps the familiar oranges.

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  • That night the whole city was shaken out of sleep by an explosion of gunpowder which shattered to fragments the building in which he should have slept and perished;and the next morning the bodies of Darnley and a page were found strangled in a garden adjoining it, whither they had apparently escaped over a wall, to be despatched by the hands of Bothwell's attendant confederates.

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  • The finest of the modern thoroughfares of Milan is the Via Dante, constructed in 1888; it runs from the Piazza de' Mercanti to the spacious Foro Bonaparte, and thence to the Parco Nuovo, the great public garden in which stands the Castello Sforzesco.

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  • The subject naturally divides itself into two sections, which we here propose to treat separately, commencing with the science, and passing on to the practice of the cultivation of flowers, fruits and vegetables as applicable to the home garden.

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  • Part I.-Principles Or Science Of Horticulture Horticulture, apart from the mechanical details connected with the maintenance of a garden and its appurtenances, may be considered as the application of the principles of plant physiology to the cultivation of plants from all parts of the globe, and from various altitudes, soils and situations.

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  • From a careful series of experiments made in the Horticultural Society's Garden at Chiswick, it was found that where the soil is loamy, or light and slightly enriched with decayed vegetable matter, the apple succeeds best on the doucin stock, and the pear on the quince; and where it is chalky it is preferable to graft the apple on the crab, and the pear on the wild pear.

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  • Many garden plants have originated solely by selection; and much has been done to improve our breeds of vegetables, flowers and fruit by systematic selection.

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  • The almost universal practice is to have the fruit and vegetable gardens combined; and the flower garden may sometimes be conveniently placed in juxtaposition with them.

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  • Ground possessing a gentle inclination towards the south is desirable for a garden.

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  • A hazel-coloured loam, moderately light in texture, is well adapted for most garden crops, whether of fruits or vegetables, especially a good warm deep loam resting upon chalk; and if such a soil occurs naturally in the selected site, but little will be required in the way of preparation.

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  • It is advantageous to possess a variety of soils; and if the garden be on a slope it will often be practicable to render the upper part light and dry, while the lower remains of a heavier and damper nature.

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  • These are unfitted for garden purposes until improved by draining, liming, trenching and the addition of porous materials, such as ashes, burnt ballast or sand, but when thoroughly improved they are very fertile and less liable to become exhausted than most other soils.

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  • Such soils properly drained and prepared are very suitable for orchards, and when the proportion of clay is smaller (20-30%) they form excellent garden soils, in which the better sort of fruit trees luxuriate.

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  • The clay marls are, like clay soils, too stiff for garden purposes until well worked and heavily manured; but loamy marls are fertile and well suited to fruit trees, and sandy marls are adapted for producing early crops.

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  • Vegetable soils or moulds, or humus soils, contain a considerable percentage (more than 5) of humus, and embrace both the rich productive garden moulds and those known as peaty soils.

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  • In laying out the garden, the plan should be prepared in minute detail before commencing operations.

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  • This access is especially desirable as regards the store-yards and framing ground, where fermenting manures and tree leaves for making up hot beds, coals or wood for fuel and ingredients for composts, together with flower-pots and the many necessaries of garden culture, have to be accommodated.

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  • A considerable portion of the north wall is usually covered in front with the glazed structures called forcing-houses, and to these the houses for ornamental plants are sometimes attached; but a more appropriate site for the latter is the flower garden, when that forms a separate department.

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  • The frame ground, including melon and pine pits, should occupy some well-sheltered spot in the slips, or on one side of the garden, and adjoining to this may be found a suitable site for the compost ground, in which the various kinds of soils are kept in store, and in which also composts may be prepared.

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  • Care should be taken, however, not to hem in the garden by crowded plantations, shelter from the prevailing strong winds being all that is required, while the more open it is in other directions the better.

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  • Although water is one of the most important elements in plant life, we do not find one garden in twenty where even ordinary precautions have been taken to secure a competent supply.

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  • Iron pipes are the best conductors; they should lead to a capacious open reservoir placed outside the garden, and at the highest convenient level, in order to secure sufficient pressure for effective distribution, and so that the wall trees also may be effectually washed.

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  • Stand-pipes should be placed at intervals beside the walks and in other convenient places, from which water may at all times be drawn; and to which a garden hose can be attached, so as to permit of the whole garden being readily watered.

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  • In fact, every part of the garden, including the working sheds and offices, should have water supplied without stint.

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  • Although the interior garden receives its form from the walls, the ring fence and plantations may be adapted to the shape and surface of the ground.

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  • In smaller country gardens the enclosure or outer fence is often a hedge, and there is possibly no space enclosed by walls, but some divisional wall having a suitable aspect is utilized for the growth of peaches, apricots, &c., and the hedge merely separates the garden from a paddock used for grazing.

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  • The best material for the construction of garden walks is good binding gravel.

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  • They give an old-fashioned and restful appearance to a garden, and in the interstices charming little plants like thyme, Ionopsidium acaule, &c., are allowed to grow.

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  • Bricks cannot be too well burnt for garden walls; the harder they are the less moisture will they absorb.

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  • The coping of garden walls is important, both for the preservation of the walls and for throwing the rain-water off their surfaces.

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  • The botanist Jungermann had plant houses at Altdorf in Switzerland; those of Loader, a London merchant, and the conservatory in the Apothecaries' Botanic Garden at Chelsea, were among the first structures of the kind erected in British gardens.

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  • The conservatory may also with great propriety be placed in the flower garden, where it may occupy an elevated terrace, and form the termination of one of the more important walks.

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  • Pits and frames of various kinds are frequently used for the cultivation of cucumbers and melons, as well as hot beds covered by ordinary garden frames.

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  • A lean-to against the north side of the garden wall will be found suitable for the purpose, though a span-roofed form may also be adopted, especially if the building stands apart.

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  • Lime in the caustic state is beneficially applied to soils which contain an excess of inert vegetable matter, and hence may be used for the improvement of old garden soils saturated with humus, or of peaty soils not thoroughly reclaimed.

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  • Garden Tools, &c. - Most of these are so well known that we shall not discuss them here.

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  • Whatever the seeds, the ground should be made tolerably firm both beneath and above them; this may be done by treading in the case of most kitchen garden crops, which are also better sown in drills, this admitting the more readily of the ground being kept clear from weeds by hoeing.

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  • Nowadays, however, quite large trees, chiefly of an ornamental character, and perhaps weighing several tons, are lifted with a large ball of soil attached to the roots, by means of a special tree-lifting machine, and are readily transferred from one part of the garden to another, or even for a distance of several miles, without serious injury.

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  • Garden pots are made with a comparatively large hole in the bottom, and those of the largest size have also holes at the side near the bottom; these openings are to prevent the soil becoming saturated or soured with superabundant water.

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  • The bottom crock is made from a piece of a broken garden pot, and is laid with the convex side upwards; then comes a layer of irregular pieces of crock of various sizes, about i in.

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  • When plants are required to stand in ornamental china pots or vases, it is better, both for the plants and for avoiding risk of breakage, to grow them in ordinary garden pots of a size that will drop into the more valuable vessels.

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  • Various other contrivances take the place of garden pots for special purposes.

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  • When the flower garden is to be seen from the windows, or any other elevated point of view, the former is to be preferred; but where the surface is irregular, and the situation more remote, and especially where the beauty of flowers is mainly looked to, the choice should probably fall on the latter.

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  • The flower garden may include several different compartments..

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  • Thus, for example, there is the " Rock Garden," which should consist of variously grouped masses of large stones, those which are remarkable for being figured by water-wearing, or containing petrifactions or impressions, or showing something of natural stratification, being generally preferred.

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  • A moist or rather a shady border, or a section of the pleasure ground supplied with bog earth, may be devoted to what is called the " American Garden," which, as it includes.

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  • The number of variegated and various-coloured hardy shrubs is now so great that a most pleasant plot for a " Winter Garden " may be arrayed with plants.

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  • The old-fashioned stereotyped flower garden that one met with almost everywhere is rapidly becoming a thing of the past, and grounds are now laid out more in accordance with their natural disposition, their climatic conditions and their suitability for certain kinds of plants.

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  • They are useful in the mixed garden, for though in some cases they are of short duration, many of them are possessed of much beauty of hue and elegance of form.

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  • To obviate this defect, it has been recommended that ornamental plants should be formed into four or five separate suites of flowering, to be distributed over the garden.

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  • These compartments should be so intermingled that no particular class may be entirely absent from any one quarter of the garden.

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  • The flower-gardener should have a small nursery, or reserve garden, for the propagation of the finer plants, to be transferred into the borders as often as is required.

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  • Handsome liliaceous plants, with fleshy roots, erect stems, and showy flowers, thriving in any good garden soil.

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  • C. auriculata, 2 to 3 ft., has yellow and brown flowers in July and August; C. lanceolata, 2 to 3 ft., bright yellow, in August; next to the biennial C. grandiflora it is the best garden plant.

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  • It is really a biennial, but grows itself so freely as to become perennial in the garden.

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  • The double varieties are fine garden plants obtained from P. argyrophylla atrosanguinea and P. nepalensis.

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  • Leaves heart-shaped lobed and toothed; flowers white starry; ordinary garden soil.

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  • Splendid dwarfish bulbs, thriving in deep, sandy, wellenriched garden soil, and increased by offsets.

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  • The Speedwell family, containing many ornamental members; all the hardy species are of the easiest cultivation in ordinary garden soil.

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  • Noble subarborescent liliaceous plants, which should be grown in every garden.

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  • The fact that rents are so heavy around Paris is in itself an indication of the money that is realized by the growers not only in the Paris markets, but also in Covent Garden.

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  • Put plants of fuchsias, petunias, verbenas, heliotropes, salvias and other soft-wooded subjects, into a propagating house to obtain cuttings, &c., for the flower garden.

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  • Pot off tender annuals, and cuttings of half-hardy greenhouse plants put in during February to get them well established for use in the flower garden.

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  • Flower Garden, &c. - Sow in the beginning of this month all halfhardy annuals required for early flowering; also mignonette in pots, thinning the plants at an early stage; the different species of primula; and the seeds of such plants as, if sown in spring, seldom come up the same season, but if sown in September and October, vegetate readily the succeeding spring.

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  • Plant evergreens; lay and put in cuttings of most of the hard-wooded sorts of shrubby plants October Kitchen Garden.

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  • Flower Garden, &c. - Plant dried tubers of border flowers, but the finer sorts had better be deferred till spring.

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  • In the outside flower garden little can be done except that shrubs may be pruned, or new work, such as making walks or grading, performed, if weather permits.

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  • Lawns can be raked off and mulched with short manure, or rich garden earth where manure cannot be obtained.

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  • All herbaceous plants and hardy shrubs may be planted in the garden.

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  • Any who expect to get early cabbage, cauliflower, lettuce or radishes, while planting or sowing is delayed until the time of sowing tomato and egg plant in May, are sure to be disappointed of a full crop. Frequent rotation of crops should be practised in the vegetable garden, in order to head off insects and diseases; and also to make the best use of the land.

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  • Every three or four years the vegetable garden should be laid out in some new place; but if this cannot be done, the crops should be rotated on different parts of the old garden.

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  • When the greenhouse is not to be used during the summer months, camellias, azaleas and plants of that character should be set out of doors under partial shade; but most of the other plants usually grown in the conservatory or window garden in winter may be set in the open border.

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  • If the fruit garden is large enough to admit of horse culture, it is best to keep the bush-fruits well cultivated during the season; this tillage conserves the moisture and helps to make a full and plump crop of berries.

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  • The fruit garden must be protected from the ravages of mice in winter.

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  • Little can be done in the flower garden, except to clean off all dead stalks, and straw up tender roses, vines, &c., and, wherever there is time, to dig up and rake the borders, as it will greatly facilitate spring work.

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  • He also found time for the studies which were ultimately to appear in the volume entitled Laokoon, and in fresh spring mornings he sketched in a garden the plan of Minna von Barnhelm.

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  • Pleasant gardens and promenades extend on the north side of the town, together with a botanical garden.

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  • In the neighbourhood are the Cave of the Winds, the Grand Caverns, charming glens, mountain lakes and picturesque canyons; and the Garden of the Gods, - approached by a narrow gateway between two tremendous masses of red rock 330 ft.

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  • The well-known failures with rhododendrons, heaths, &c., in ordinary garden soils are also explained by the need of the fungus-infected.

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  • It has a public library and a botanic garden.

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  • In connexion with the university are the observatory, the chemical laboratory in Ny Vester Gade, the surgical academy in Bredgade, founded in 1786, and the botanic garden.

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  • The botanical garden (1874) contains an observatory with a statue of Tycho Brahe, and the chemical laboratory, mineralogical museum, polytechnic academy (1829) and communal hospital adjoin it.

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  • Here is also the museum of industrial art, and the Ny-Carlsberg Glyptotek, with its collection of sculpture, is on this boulevard, which skirts the pleasure garden called Tivoli.

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  • The lower part of the altar is composed of Italian marble, with a representation of Christ's sufferings in the garden of Gethsemane; and the organ is considered the finest in Copenhagen.

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  • Antonio; and at a like distance to the south is the ancient palace of the grand masters of the order of St John, with an extensive public garden called Il Boschetto.

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  • Professor Bayley Balfour, F.R.S., the Regius Keeper of the Royal Botanic Garden in Edinburgh, has described an arboretum as a living collection of species and varieties of trees and shrubs arranged after some definite method - it may be properties, or uses, or some other principle - but usually after that of natural likeness.

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  • Its beginnings may be traced hack to 1762, when, at the suggestion of Lord Bute, the duke of Argyll's trees and shrubs were removed from Whitton Place, near Hounslow, to adorn the princess of Wales's garden at Kew.

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  • Of the more specialized public arboreta in the United Kingdom the next to Kew are those in the Royal Botanic Garden in Edinburgh and the Glasnevin Garden in Dublin.

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  • There is a small but very select collection of trees at Oxford, the oldest botanical garden in Great Britain, which was founded in 1632.

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  • It grows luxuriantly in the south of Ireland, where it was introduced in 1798, and also flourishes on the west coast of Scotland, and is generally cultivated as an ornamental garden plant in Europe.

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  • The leaves are vertical, and arranged in two rows as in the garden flag; they are very thick, stiff and leathery, dark green above, paler below, with the margin and nerve reddishorange.

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  • At the back was a garden.

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  • Later, under Greek influences, a peristyle with rooms round it was added in place of the garden.

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  • In some cases it has even been possible to recover the original arrangement of the garden beds, and to replant them accordingly, thus giving an appropriate framework to the statues, &c. with which the gardens were decorated, and which have been found in situ.

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  • In January 1840 the Assam Company was formed to take over the early tea garden of the East India Company, and this, the premier company, is still in existence, having produced up to 1907 no less than 117,000,000 lb of tea and paid in dividends X1,360,000 or 730 per cent.

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  • The latter is a tree attaining in its natural conditions, or where allowed to grow unpruned in a seed garden, a height of from 30 to 40 ft.

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  • The country cultivator has, as a rule, only a small area - perhaps a corner of his farm or garden - planted with tea, the produce of which is roughly sun-dried and cured in a primitive manner.

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  • The labourers being barefooted, a spade is useless, so a "khodalee" or hoe (much like a very heavy and long-bladed garden Dutch hoe) is used.

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  • Wherever there is any pretence at irrigation, along the banks of the two great rivers and by the few canals which are still in existence, the yield is enormous, and the shores of the Tigris and Euphrates in the neighbourhood of Bagdad and Hilla seem to be one great palm garden.

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  • The scene of his teaching was a garden which he bought for about X300 (80 minae).

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  • Epicurus died of stone in 270 B.C. He left his property, consisting of the garden (Ki iroc 'E7rLKoupov), a house in Melite (the south-west quarter of Athens), and apparently some funds besides, to two trustees on behalf of his society, and for the special interest of some youthful members.

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  • The garden was set apart for the use of the school; the house became the house of Hermarchus and his fellow-philosophers during his lifetime.

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  • Among his other acts of munificence may be mentioned his gift to the Apothecaries' Company of the botanical or physic garden, which they had rented from the Chelsea estate since 1673.

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  • If his questing had been unsuccessful, he appeased the rage of hunger with some scraps of broken meat, and lay down to rest under the piazza of Covent Garden in warm weather, and, in cold weather, as near as he could get to the furnace of a glass house.

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  • Ulm, Nuremberg, Quedlinburg, Erfurt, Strassburg and Guben are famed for their vegetables and garden seeds.

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  • The country gentlemen could not have a garden party without the presence of a commissary of police.

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  • There is a promenade along the harbour and a botanical garden.

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  • Having obtained their confidence, he sent a messenger to Tarquinius to inquire the next step. His father made no reply to the messenger, but walked up and down his garden, striking off the heads of the tallest poppies.

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  • A fine promenade extends along the shore; there are a quay and a pier, a winter garden, and all the appointments of a seaside resort.

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  • The Palazzo Municipale, built by Rocco Lurago at the end of the 16th century, once the property of the dukes of Turin, has a beautiful entrance court and a hanging terraced garden fronting a noble staircase of marble which leads to the spacious council chamber.

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  • Attached to it are a library, an observatory, a botanical garden, and a physical and natural history museum.

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  • In London great meetings were held in Covent Garden theatre, at which William Johnson Fox was the chief orator, but Bright and Cobden were the leaders of the movement.

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  • Riverside park extends along its water front for about 3 m., and on the outskirts of the city lies Cadwalader park (ioo acres), containing a zoological garden.

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  • Here also are to be found the churches, schools, theatres, asylums, and hospitals, academies of law and medicine, governor's palace, public library, and museum, and an interesting public garden on the edge of the bluff, overlooking the bay.

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  • The Oriental poppy (P. orientale) and its several varieties are fine garden plants, having huge bright crimson flowers with black blotches at the base.

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  • In 1709 he became professor of botany and medicine, and in that capacity he did good service, not only to his own university, but also to botanical science, by his improvements and additions to the botanic garden of Leiden, and by the publication of numerous works descriptive of new species of plants.

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  • The grounds have been laid out as a recreation garden.

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  • Within the curtain stand the monastic buildings, a large garden and a cruciform chapel, with many curious old stone carvings, half hidden beneath whitewash.

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  • Macon is near the fruitgrowing region of Georgia, and large quantities of peaches and of garden products are annually shipped from the city.

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  • He once defined himself as "l'avocat du pauvre," and few things gave him more pleasure than the famous answer of the miller whose windmill stood on ground which was wanted for the king's garden.

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  • It shows, moreover, a strong resemblance to Nasir Khosrau's ethical poems and Sana'i's Hadikat-ulhakikat, or "Garden of Truth."

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  • This rodent is one of the commonest of British mammals, and frequents fields, woods and gardens in numbers, often doing considerable damage owing to its fondness for garden produce.

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  • Of the outlying buildings in connexion with the Alhambra, the foremost in interest is the Palacio de Generalife or Gineralife (the Moorish Jennat al Arif, " Garden of Arif," or " Garden of the Architect ").

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  • In the immediate vicinity of the city, on the Red river, cotton, sugar, alfalfa and garden vegetables are cultivated; south of the Red river is a peculiarly rich farming country watered by Bayou Rapides and Bayou Boeuf.

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  • About this week must have occurred the interview in the garden at the Douglas's house of Whittingehame, between Morton, Bothwell and Lethington, when Morton refused to be active in Darnley's murder, unless he had a written warrant from the queen.

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  • Although more than two centuries later than the event to which it refers, this inscription is good evidence of the site of the garden.

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  • Among its notable public buildings and institutions are the old government palace in Santo Antonio built upon the foundations of the official residence of Prince Maurice of Nassau, with a pretty garden attached; a theatre facing upon the Praga da Republica, dating from the second empire; the palace of the Provincial Assembly in Boa Vista, built in 1860-66, surmounted by a high dome; the municipal palace, or prefecture, on Rua do Imperador, with the public library (Biblioteca Publica) occupying its third floor and containing about 30,000 volumes; the Gymnasium, a large plain building of two floors standing near the legislative palace; the Pedro II.

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  • It is surrounded by a magnificent garden, which descends in steep terraces to the Danube, and which offers a splendid view of the town lying on the opposite bank.

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  • It is well provided with scientific laboratories, botanic garden, and various collections, and possesses a library with nearly a quarter of a million volumes.

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  • It has an area of 286 acres, and contains the zoological garden.

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  • The family gathered in this three-storeyed building, with its back windows looking over the Elbe and its front door opening on a great garden, was latterly Luther and his wife, their three sons and two daughters, Magdelena von Bora, Catherine's aunt, two orphan nieces and a grandniece.

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  • She made the long-neglected garden profitable; kept pigs and poultry; rented other gardens; stocked a fishpond; farmed in a small way; and had her house full of boarders.

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  • It is pre-eminently a garden vegetable, the ear being used before the grain hardens, when it is well filled but soft and milky.

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  • The dwelling is surrounded by a garden or small field of grain.

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  • He was also, though he deplored the conduct of the militants, a decided supporter of woman suffrage; and he took an active interest in, and lent a helping hand to, many social movements, the Working Men's College, Toynbee Hall, the Hampstead Garden Suburb, Children's Country Holidays, the Shakespeare National Memorial, as well as to a number of miscellaneous church societies.

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  • The principal part of the garden lands in villages round Kandahar is vineyard, and the produce must be enormous.

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  • Vegetables are everywhere cultivated in garden plots for household use, and also on a larger scale in the neighbourhood of great towns.

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  • After a mission to England, by way of protest and appeal, he settled down in the pleasant suburb of Garden Reach near Calcutta, where he lived in the enjoyment of a pension of £1 20,000 a year.

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  • He wrote also a number of essays, such as "My Garden Acquaintance," "A Good Word for Winter," "On a Certain Condescension in Foreigners," which were incursions into the field of nature and society.

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  • The town has monuments to the Bavarian king, Maximilian II., and to other famous men; it contains a botanical garden and a public park.

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  • The natives care little for the garden vegetables common to Europe and America, but in the vicinity of Manila and other large centres of population the Chinese grow many of these for consumption by European and American inhabitants.

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  • In their first ascent from the garden of the Conservatoire des Arts on the 24th of August 1804 an altitude of 4000 metres (about 13,000 ft.) was attained.

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  • About 1661 public gardens were laid out here, known as the New Spring Garden, and later as Spring Gardens, but more familiar under the title of Vauxhall Gardens.

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  • Every position of influence and emolument was assigned to them; they themselves boastingly called the important province of Irak the garden of Koreish.

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  • In truth, the entire empire had become that garden.

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  • The villages lie thickly scattered, consisting of low thatched cottages, and surrounded by patches of garden land, or groves of banyan, pipal and pakar trees.

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  • The garden of Eden is placed in the valley of the Araxes; Marand is the burial-place of Noah's wife; at Arghuri, a village near the great chasm, was the spot where Noah planted the first vineyard, and here were shown Noah's vine and the monastery of St James, until village and monastery were overwhelmed by a fall of rock, ice and snow, shaken down by an earthquake in 1840.

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  • A certain amount of upland rice is also cultivated, and cotton, sugar-cane and garden produce make up the rest; recently large orange groves have been planted in the west of the state.

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  • The imperial parks and gardens cover 1680 acres; the chief of them is the "old" garden, containing the "old palace," built (1724) by Rastrelli and gorgeously decorated with mother-of-pearl, marbles, amber, lapis lazuli, silver and gold; the gallery of Cameron adorned with fine statues and entrance gates; numerous pavilions and kiosks; and a bronze statue (1900) of the poet Pushkin.

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  • In Bombay these towers are erected in a beautiful garden on the highest point of Malabar Hill, amid trees swarming with vultures; they are constructed of stone, and rise some 25 ft.

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  • Upon arriving at the "tower of silence" the bier is laid down, and prayers are said in the sagri, or house of prayer, containing a fire-sanctuary; which is erected near the entrance to the garden.

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  • There is an ample supply of good water, and a large public garden in the centre of the town.

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  • Small fruits, orchard fruits, hay, garden products and grains are decreasingly dependent on irrigation; wheat, which was once California's great staple, is (for good, but not for best results) comparatively independent of it, - hence its early predominance in Californian agriculture, due to this success on arid lands since taken over for more remunerative irrigated crops.

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  • He appears to have survived till the year 1536; for on the 22nd of November in that year, the king presented John Garden to the rectory of Tyrie, vacant by the death of "Mr Hector Boiss."

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  • On the history of the great European treaties generally, see the Histoire abregee des traites de paix entre les puissances de l'Europe, by Koch, as recast and continued by Scholl (1817 and 1818), and again by Count de Garden in 1848-1859, as also the Recueil manuel of De Martens and Cussy, continued by Geffcken.

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  • It includes the Zoological Garden, is beautifully laid out and forms one of the most attractive features of Adelaide.

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  • In India the serpent-godlings are very often associated with water, and, even at the digging of a well,worship is paid to the ` ` world serpent," and the Salagrama (spiral ammonite), sacred to Vishnu, is solemnly wedded to the Tulasi or basil plant, representative of the garden which the pool will fertilize.

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  • No great church has yet modified its articles of religion so as to admit, for example, that the Garden of Eden was not a definite place where Eve was tempted, yet the doctrine is contradicted with approval by individuals, and the results of modern science are accepted and taught without rebuke.

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  • The Royal Botanic Gardens of Kew originated in the exotic garden formed by Lord Capel and greatly extended by the princess dowager, widow of Frederick, prince of Wales, and by George III., aided by the skill of William Aiton and of Sir Joseph Banks.

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  • The old gates have been somewhat ruthlessly cleared away, and the site of the town walls on the north and west competes with the park called the Prince's Garden as a public pleasure ground.

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  • The Prince's Garden was originally laid out by William Frederick of Nassau in 1648, and was presented to the town by King William I.

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  • The university of Pavia has long been famous as a medical school, and has the oldest anatomical cabinet in Italy; in addition it has a natural history museum founded under Spallanzini in 1772, a botanical garden, begun in 1774, and excellent geological, palaeontological and mineralogical collections.

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  • An elegant portal leads from the church into the small cloister, which has a pretty garden in the centre; the terra-cotta ornaments surmounting the slender marble pillars are the work of Rinaldo de Stauris (1463-1478), who executed similar decorations in the great cloister.

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  • In particular, it boasts a fine bathing-ghat, a town-hall, a marketplace, a tank to supply water, and a public garden.

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  • The interest which Bogota has always taken in education, and because of which she has been called the "Athens of South America," is shown in the number and character of her institutions of learning - a university, three endowed colleges, a school of chemistry and mineralogy, a national academy, a military school, a public library with some 50,000 volumes, a national observatory, a natural history museum and a botanic garden.

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  • Adjacent is the garden in which the saint's thornless roses bloom in May.

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  • The plants are rapidly-growing, hardy, ornamental climbers, which flourish in common garden soil, and are readily propagated by cuttings.

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  • Connected with it are a library of over 200,000 volumes, geological, anatomical and mineralogical institutions, a hospital, several clinical establishments, laboratories and a botanical garden.

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