This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience. Learn more

galton

galton

galton Sentence Examples

  • Statistical inquiry into the facts of life has long been employed, and in particular Francis Galton, within the Darwinian period, has advocated its employment and developed its methods.

    0
    0
  • It reported favourably, especially on the use of the measurements for primary classification, but recommended also the adoption in part of a system of "finger prints" as suggested by Francis Galton, and already practised in Bengal.

    0
    0
  • As regards scepticism concerning the faculty we may quote what Mr Galton says about the faculty of visualization: "Scientific men as a class have feeble power of visual reproduction..

    0
    0
  • Robert Waring Darwin (1766-1848), his third son by his first marriage, a doctor at Shrewsbury, was the father of the famous Charles Darwin; and Violetta, his eldest daughter by his second marriage, was the mother of Francis Galton.

    0
    0
  • All these principles are consistent with Francis Galton's law of particulate inheritance in heredity, and with the modern doctrine of " unity of characters " held by students of Mendelian phenomena.

    0
    0
  • Galton, Church and State in France, 1300-1907 (London, 1907); E.

    0
    0
  • Galton and carried on by Karl Pearson and the late W.

    0
    0
  • The conceptions indicated by Galton have been extended and added to by Karl Pearson, who has also developed the theory of chance so as to provide a means of describing many series of complex results in a simpler and more accurate way than was hitherto possible.

    0
    0
  • The ordinate which divides the area of the dotted curve into two equal areas is the median of Galton: it lies in this case nearly at 3.38 glands.

    0
    0
  • Pearson has shown that Galton's function has a value of 0.28 for stature of middle-class Englishmen and their wives.

    0
    0
  • Andersson in his Lake N'gami (pp. 2 5326 9) has given a lively account of the pursuit by himself and Francis Galton of a brood of ostriches, in the course of which the male bird feigned being wounded to distract their attention from his offspring.

    0
    0
  • Galton, The Narrative of an Explorer in Tropical South Africa (1853); C. J.

    0
    0
  • The founder of this science may be said to be Sir Francis Galton, who has done much to further its study, not only by his writings, but by the establishment of a research fellowship and scholarship in eugenics in the university of London.

    0
    0
  • The aim of the science as laid down by Galton is to bring as many influences as can reasonably be employed, to cause the useful classes in the community to contribute more than their proportion to the next generation.

    0
    0
  • Works by Galton bearing on eugenics are: Hereditary Genius (2nd ed., 1892), Human Faculty (1883), Natural Inheritance (1889), Huxley Lecture of the Anthropol.

    0
    0
  • SIR FRANCIS GALTON (1822-), English anthropologist, son of S.

    0
    0
  • Galton, of Duddeston, Warwickshire, was born on the 16th of February 1822.

    0
    0
  • These tracts had practically never been traversed before, and on the appearance of the published account of his journey and experiences under the title of Narrative of an Explorer in Tropical South Africa (1853) Galton was awarded the gold medal of the Royal Geographical Society.

    0
    0
  • Galton was a member of the meteorological committee (1868), and of the Meteorological Council which succeeded it, for over thirty years.

    0
    0
  • Galton was the author of memoirs on various anthropometric subjects; he originated the process of composite portraiture, and paid much attention to finger-prints and their employment for the identification of criminals, his publications on this subject including Finger Prints (1892), Decipherment of Blurred Finger Prints (1893) and Finger Print Directories (1895).

    0
    0
  • Galton, Inquiries into Human Faculty (1883), contains the first account of number-forms; for further examples and references see D.

    0
    0
  • Galton's primary interest in fingerprints was as an aid in determining heredity and racial background.

    0
    0
  • Statistical inquiry into the facts of life has long been employed, and in particular Francis Galton, within the Darwinian period, has advocated its employment and developed its methods.

    0
    0
  • It reported favourably, especially on the use of the measurements for primary classification, but recommended also the adoption in part of a system of "finger prints" as suggested by Francis Galton, and already practised in Bengal.

    0
    0
  • On the whole there seems little doubt that successful crystalgazing is the exertion of a not uncommon though far from universal faculty, like those of "chromatic audition" - the vivid association of certain sounds with certain colours - and the mental seeing of figures arranged in coloured diagrams (Galton, Inquiry into Human Faculty, pp. 114-154).

    0
    0
  • As regards scepticism concerning the faculty we may quote what Mr Galton says about the faculty of visualization: "Scientific men as a class have feeble power of visual reproduction..

    0
    0
  • Robert Waring Darwin (1766-1848), his third son by his first marriage, a doctor at Shrewsbury, was the father of the famous Charles Darwin; and Violetta, his eldest daughter by his second marriage, was the mother of Francis Galton.

    0
    0
  • All these principles are consistent with Francis Galton's law of particulate inheritance in heredity, and with the modern doctrine of " unity of characters " held by students of Mendelian phenomena.

    0
    0
  • Galton, Church and State in France, 1300-1907 (London, 1907); E.

    0
    0
  • Galton and carried on by Karl Pearson and the late W.

    0
    0
  • The theory of chance was applied to the study of human variation by Quetelet; but the most important applications of this theory to biological problems are due in the first instance to Francis Galton, who used the theory of correlation in describing the relation between the deviation of one character in an animal body from the mean proper to its race and that of a second character in the same body (correlation as commonly understood), or between deviation of a parent from the mean of its generation and deviation of offspring from the mean of the following generation (inheritance).

    0
    0
  • The conceptions indicated by Galton have been extended and added to by Karl Pearson, who has also developed the theory of chance so as to provide a means of describing many series of complex results in a simpler and more accurate way than was hitherto possible.

    0
    0
  • The ordinate which divides the area of the dotted curve into two equal areas is the median of Galton: it lies in this case nearly at 3.38 glands.

    0
    0
  • Pearson has shown that Galton's function has a value of 0.28 for stature of middle-class Englishmen and their wives.

    0
    0
  • Andersson in his Lake N'gami (pp. 2 5326 9) has given a lively account of the pursuit by himself and Francis Galton of a brood of ostriches, in the course of which the male bird feigned being wounded to distract their attention from his offspring.

    0
    0
  • Galton, The Narrative of an Explorer in Tropical South Africa (1853); C. J.

    0
    0
  • The founder of this science may be said to be Sir Francis Galton, who has done much to further its study, not only by his writings, but by the establishment of a research fellowship and scholarship in eugenics in the university of London.

    0
    0
  • The aim of the science as laid down by Galton is to bring as many influences as can reasonably be employed, to cause the useful classes in the community to contribute more than their proportion to the next generation.

    0
    0
  • Works by Galton bearing on eugenics are: Hereditary Genius (2nd ed., 1892), Human Faculty (1883), Natural Inheritance (1889), Huxley Lecture of the Anthropol.

    0
    0
  • SIR FRANCIS GALTON (1822-), English anthropologist, son of S.

    0
    0
  • Galton, of Duddeston, Warwickshire, was born on the 16th of February 1822.

    0
    0
  • These tracts had practically never been traversed before, and on the appearance of the published account of his journey and experiences under the title of Narrative of an Explorer in Tropical South Africa (1853) Galton was awarded the gold medal of the Royal Geographical Society.

    0
    0
  • Galton was a member of the meteorological committee (1868), and of the Meteorological Council which succeeded it, for over thirty years.

    0
    0
  • Galton was the author of memoirs on various anthropometric subjects; he originated the process of composite portraiture, and paid much attention to finger-prints and their employment for the identification of criminals, his publications on this subject including Finger Prints (1892), Decipherment of Blurred Finger Prints (1893) and Finger Print Directories (1895).

    0
    0
  • Galton, Inquiries into Human Faculty (1883), contains the first account of number-forms; for further examples and references see D.

    0
    0
  • That the friction at the higher velocities occurring in engineering practice is much less than at common velocites has been shown by several modern experiments, such as those of Sir Douglas Galton (see Report Brit.

    0
    0
  • The theory of chance was applied to the study of human variation by Quetelet; but the most important applications of this theory to biological problems are due in the first instance to Francis Galton, who used the theory of correlation in describing the relation between the deviation of one character in an animal body from the mean proper to its race and that of a second character in the same body (correlation as commonly understood), or between deviation of a parent from the mean of its generation and deviation of offspring from the mean of the following generation (inheritance).

    0
    1
Browse other sentences examples →