Gallic sentence example

gallic
  • I was just beginning to read Caesar's "Gallic War" when I went to my home in Alabama.
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  • The former established himself in 64 at Panticapaeum, and was planning new campaigns against the Romans when his own troops revolted, and, after vainly trying to poison himself, he ordered a Gallic mercenary to kill him.
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  • As early as 1866, tannic acid, gallic acid, wood spirit, acetic acid, essential oil and eucalyptol were produced from various species of eucalyptus, and researches made by Australian chemists, notably by Messrs.
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  • In the time of Caesar the Arverni were a powerful confederation, the Arvernian Vercingetorix being the most famous of the Gallic chieftains who fought against the Romans.
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  • and Oscan, (3) Messapian, (4) North Oscan, (5) Volscian, (6) East Italic or Sabellic, (7) Latinian, (8) Sabine, (9) Iguvine or Umbrian, (10) Gallic, (11) Ligurian and (12) Venetic.
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  • (~) It is difficult to point to any definite evidence by which we may determine the dates of the earliest appearance of Gallic tribes in the north of Italy.
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  • No satisfactory collection has been made of the Celtic inscriptions of Cisalpine Gaul, though many are scattered about in different museums. For our present purpose it is important to note that the archaeological stratification in deposits like those of Bologna shows that the Gallic period supervened upon the Etruscan.
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  • Latin will be counted the language of the earlier plebeian stratum of the population of Rome and Latium, probably once spread over a large area of the peninsula, and akin in sijme degree to the language or languages spoken in north Italy before either the Etruscan or the Gallic invasions began.
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  • At first the Treveri resisted the appeal of Civilis and his Batavi to join the revolt, and built a defensive wall from Trier to Andernach, but soon after the two Treverans, Tutor and Classicus, led their fellow tribesmen, aided by the Lingones (Langres), in the attempt to set up a "Gallic empire."
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  • The Gallic Wars (58-51) of Caesar (q.v.) added all the rest of Gaul, north-west of the Cevennes, to the Rhine and the Ocean, and in 49 also annexed Massilia.
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  • Apt was at one time the chief town of the Vulgientes, a Gallic tribe; it was destroyed by the Romans about 125 B.C. and restored by Julius Caesar, who conferred upon it the title Apta Julia; it was much injured by the Lombards and the Saracens, but its fortifications were rebuilt by the counts of Provence.
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  • The name is taken from that of a Gallic tribe, the Cadurci, and was applied to a small district watered by the Dordogne, the Lot and the Tarn.
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  • He mentions it as originally a Gallic invention for giving a bright hue to the hair (" rutilandis capillis ").
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  • Potassium chlorate and hydrochloric acid oxidize phenol, salicylic acid (o-oxybenzoic acid), and gallic acid ([2.3.4] trioxybenzoic acid) to tri chlorpyroracemic acid (isotrichlorglyceric acid), CC13 C(OH)2 C02H, a substance also obtained from trichloracetonitrile, CC1 3 CO CN, by hydrolysis.
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  • The other class of mercenaries were Gauls, and from the time of the Gallic invasion of Asia Minor in 279 Gauls or Galatians were a regular constituent in all armies.
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  • There were the true indigenous Thracians and also Celtic tribes such as the Treres in the early period, the Getae and Trausi later, and the Gallic Scordisci in Roman days.
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  • Gratian acquiesced in their choice; reserving for himself the administration of the Gallic provinces, he handed over Italy, Illyria and Africa to Valentinian and his mother, who fixed their residence at Milan.
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  • For the Gallic retreat, see Polybius ii.
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  • Cremona was founded by the Romans in 218 B.C. (the same year as Placentia) as an outpost against the Gallic tribes.
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  • He served as a legatus throughout Caesar's Gallic campaigns and took Caesar's place whenever he went to Rome.
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  • The other, territorially distinct from it for reasons of statecraft, was the Temple of Roma and Augustus, to which the inhabitants of the 64 Gallic cantons in the three Roman provinces of Aquitania, Lugudunensis and Belgica - the so-called Tres Galliae - sent delegates every summer to hold games and otherwise celebrate the worship of the emperor which was supposed to knit the provincials to Rome.
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  • ANJOU, the old name of a French territory, the political origin of which is traced to the ancient Gallic state of the Andes, on the lines of which was organized, after the conquest by Julius Caesar, the Roman civitas of the Andecavi.
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  • But this is not certain, and even if it were, it does not necessarily imply that Hippolytus enjoyed the personal teaching of the celebrated Gallic bishop; it may perhaps merely refer to that relation of his theological system to that of Irenaeus which can easily be traced in his writings.
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  • The Gallic trooper sent to strike off the old man's head quailed, it is said, before the fire of his eyes, and fled exclaiming, "I cannot kill Gaius Marius."
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  • Vinen, loc. cit.), with gallic and ellagic acids, ligneous fibre, water, and minute quantities of proteids, chlorophyll, resin, free sugar and, in the cells around the inner shelly chamber, calcium oxalate.
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  • In the last years of his life he returned to the vegetable acids, and investigated citric, malic, oxalic and gallic acids.
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  • The Gallic leuga, or league, is a different unit, being 1.59 British miles by the very concordant itinerary of the Bordeaux pilgrim.
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  • Bibulus, who belonged to the as the provincia of the consuls of B.e.the supervision Gallic p 59 P wars.
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  • The mutual jealousies of the Gallic tribes had enabled German invaders first to gain a foothold on the left bank of the Rhine, and then to obtain a predominant position in Central Gaul.
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  • The Gallic chiefs now appealed to Caesar to deliver them from the actual or threatened tyranny of Ariovistus.
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  • In 52 B.C. he passed a fresh law de jure magistratuum which cut away the ground beneath Caesar's feet by making it possible to provide a successor to the Gallic provinces before the close of 49 B.C., which meant that Caesar would become for some months a private person, and thus liable to be called to account for his unconstitutional acts.
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  • have been written in 51 B.C. and carry the narrative of the Gallic campaigns down to the close of the previous year (the eighth book, written by A.
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  • The Gallic War, though its publication was doubtless timed to impress on the mind of the Roman people the great services rendered by Caesar to Rome, stands the test of criticism as far as it is possible to apply it, and the accuracy of its narrative has never been seriously shaken.
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  • The Gallic campaigns have been treated by Napoleon III., Histoire de Jules Cesar (1865-1866), which is valuable as giving the result of excavations, and in English by T.
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  • Twelve speeches of the kind (Pliny's included), eight of them by famous Gallic rhetoricians (Claudius Mamertinus, Eumenius, Nazarius, Drepanius Pacatus) and three of anonymous authorship, have been collected under the title of Panegyrici veteres latini (ed.
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  • After the death of Vitellius, the inhabitants refused to join the Gallic revolt against Rome instigated by Julius Civilis and Julius Sabinus, and drove back Sabinus, who had invaded their territory.
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  • Its exports include timber, citrons, skins, chestnuts and gallic acid.
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  • After Rome had been weakened by the Gallic invasion (390) Praeneste joined its foes in a long struggle with Rome.
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  • They carried double-edged swords and short daggers for use hand to hand, the steel of which was hardened b y being buried underground; their defensive armour was a light Gallic shield or a round wicker buckler, and greaves of felt round their legs.
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  • The first treats of the mythic history of the nonHellenic, and afterwards of the Hellenic tribes, to the destruction of Troy; the second section ends with Alexander's death; and the third continues the history as far as the beginning of Caesar's Gallic War.
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  • Their chief town was Vindinum or Suindinum (corrupted into Subdinnum), afterwards Civitas Cenomanorum (whence Le Mans), the original name of the town, as usual in the case of Gallic cities, being replaced by that of the people.
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  • The Cenomani nearly always appear in history as loyal friends and allies of the Romans, whom they assisted in the Gallic war (225 B.C.), when the Boii and Insubres took up arms against Rome, and during the war against Hannibal.
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  • Anthragallol is synthetically prepared by the condensation of benAoic and gallic acids with sulphuric acid OH i [[Cooh + I 10h - 2h20+ Hooc /Oh]] or from pyrogallol and phthalic anhydride in the presence of sulphuric acid or zinc chloride.
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  • He distinguished himself as one of Julius Caesar's legates in the Gallic campaigns, served in Britain, and afterwards under his brother in Cilicia.
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  • It was regarded as the political and religious centre of the Gallic nation.
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  • During the war they sent 12,000 men to relieve Alesia, but shared in the defeat of the Gallic army.
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  • Thus in Cappadocia the facial type of the nonAryan race is common, and in Galatia there are traces of Gallic blood.
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  • During the 3rd century, 278-277 B.C., certain Gallic tribes crossed the Bosporus and Hellespont, and established a Celtic power in central Asia Minor.
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  • According to Pliny, Spanish, Gallic and Greek wines were all consumed in Rome during the 1st century of the Christian era, but in Gaul the production of wine appears to have been limited to certain districts on the Rhone and Gironde.
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  • To judge from the traces of an inscription, the arch seems to have been erected in honour of Tiberius, perhaps to commemorate his victory over the Gallic chieftain Sacrovir in A.D.
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  • He was also author of prose Lucubrationes and perhaps of an epic poem on Caesar's Gallic wars (Pragmatia Belli Gallici).
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  • Some appear to be glucosides of gallic acid, since they yield this acid and a sugar on hydrolysis, e.g.
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  • pp. 268 et seq.); and conversely on boiling with dilute acids or alkalis it takes up a molecule of water and yields two molecules of gallic acid, C 7 H 6 0 5.
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  • The tannin of oak, C/9H16010, which is found, mixed with gallic acid, ellagic acid and quercite, in oak bark, is a red powder; its aqueous solution is coloured dark blue by ferric chloride, and boiling with dilute sulphuric acid gives oak red or phlobaphene.
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  • From tannic acid is also made gallic acid, which resembles tannic acid but has no astringent taste.
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  • Tannic acid is absorbed as gallic acid into the blood and eliminated as gallic and pyrogallic acids, darkening the urine.
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  • Gallic acid does not coagulate albumen when used externally.
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  • BUDGET (originally from a Gallic word meaning sack, latinized as bulga, leather wallet or bag, thence in O.
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  • This power is possessed alike by a glass of brandy, by solution of lime, soluble salts of zinc, copper, or silver, by tannic and gallic acids, as well as vegetable juices and extracts which contain them.
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  • Angers, capital of the Gallic tribe of the Andecavi, was under the Romans called Juliomagus.
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  • It is then not strange that the Gallic name for a henchman (ambactus) is the same as the Gothic (ambahts).
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  • The Byzantines had to pay them a yearly tribute of 80 talents, until on the death of the Gallic king Cavarus (some time after 220 B.C.) they were annihilated by the Thracians.
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  • of Pontus seems to have negotiated with them to gain their aid against Rome, and Bituitus, a Gallic mercenary, was with him at his death.
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  • Not only are relics of La Tene culture found in Ireland, but the oldest Irish epics celebrate tall, fair-haired, grey-eyed heroes, armed and clad in Gallic fashion, who had come from the continent.
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  • Of the continuations of Caesar's Commentaries - the eighth book of the Gallic war, the history of the Alexandrian, African and Spanish wars - the first is generally allowed to be by Hirtius; the Alexandrian war is perhaps by him (or Oppius); the last two are supposed to have been written at his request, by persons who had taken part in the events described, with a view to subsequent revision and incorporation in his proposed work on military commanders.
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  • From this time the Gallic Senones disappear from history.
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  • CAECILIUS STATIUS, Or Statius Caecilius, Roman COI/11C poet, contemporary and intimate friend of Ennius, died in 168 (or 166) B.C. He was born in the territory of the Insubrian Gauls, and was probably taken as a prisoner to Rome (c. 200), during the great Gallic war.
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  • Gallic Acid >>
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  • EPONA, a goddess of horses, asses and mules, worshipped by the Romans, though of foreign, probably Gallic, origin.
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  • Beauvais was known to the Romans as Caesaromagus, and took its present name from the Gallic tribe of the Bellovaci, whose capital it was.
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  • Brazilwood (Caesalpinia echinata), valuable for its timber and colouring extract, and "roco" (Bixa orellana), the "urucn" of Brazil which furnishes the anatto of commerce, are widely distributed in central and southern Colombia, and another species of the first-named genus, the C. coariaria, produces the "divi-divi" of the Colombian export trade - a peculiarly shaped seed-pod, rich in tannic and gallic acids, and used for tanning leather.
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  • It may be prepared by keeping moist and exposed to the air for from four to six weeks, at a temperature of 20° to 25° C., a paste of powdered gall-nuts and water, and removing from time to time the mould which forms on its surface; the paste is then boiled with water, the hot solution filtered, allowed to cool, the separated gallic acid drained, and purified by dissolving in boiling water, recrystallization at about 27° C., and washing of the crystals with ice-cold water.
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  • Gallic acid is most readily obtained by boiling the tannin procured from oak-galls by means of alcohol and ether with weak solution of acids.
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  • Solution of calcium bicarbonate becomes with gallic acid, on exposure to the air, of a dark blue colour.
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  • Unlike tannic acid, gallic acid does not precipitate albumen or salts of the alkaloids, or, except when mixed with gum, gelatin.
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  • With phosphorus oxychloride at 520° C. gallic acid yields tannic acid, and with concentrated sulphuric acid at 100°, rufigallic acid, C14H808, an anthracene derivative.
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  • Medicinally, gallic acid has been, and is still, largely used as an astringent, styptic and haemostatic. Gallic acid, however, does not coagulate albumen and therefore possesses no local astringent action.
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  • Avignon (Avenio) was an important town of the Gallic tribe of the Cavares, and under the Romans one of the leading cities of Gallia Narbonensis.
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  • g Y g, and contains 98 documents - Eastern and African canons and papal letters, but no Gallic councils; so that it is not a collection of local law.
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  • It would be impossible to enumerate here all the Gallic councils which contributed towards the canon law of that country; we will mention only the following: - Arles (314), of great importance; a number of councils in the district of Arles, completed by the Statuta Ecclesiae antiqua of St Caesarius; 2 the councils of the province of Tours; the assemblies of the episcopate of the three kingdoms of the Visigoths at Agde (506), of the Franks at Orleans (511), and of the Burgundians at Epaone (517); several councils of the kingdoms of the Franks, chiefly at Orleans; and finally, the synods of the middle of the 8th century, under the influence of St Boniface.
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  • His brother Ptolemy Ceraunus found compensation by becoming king in Macedonia in 281, and perished in the Gallic invasion of 280-79 (see Brennus).
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  • His original name was Bassianus; his nickname Caracalla was derived from the long Gallic tunic which he wore and introduced into the army.
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  • Substances containing tannic or gallic acid turn black when compounded with a ferric salt, so it cannot be used in combination with vegetable astringents except with the infusion of quassia or calumba.
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  • The canons of Agde are based in part on earlier Gallic, African and Spanish legislation; and some of them were re-enacted by later councils, and found their way into collections such as the Hispana, Pseudo-Isidore and Gratian.
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  • Like the Gallic Druids, they recited their laws in a kind of sing-song to prevent their being forgotten, a practice still in existence in the days of Aristotle (Problemata, xix.
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  • The circumstances under which he came into the West are also unknown to us; the only thing which is certain is that at the time of the persecution of the Gallic Church under Marcus Aurelius (177) he was a presbyter of the church at Lyons.
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  • Of the vast Celtic empire which had dominated ~si~ Europe nothing now remained but scattered remnants in the farthest corners of the land, refuges for all the vanquished Gaels, Picts or Gauls; and of its civilization there lingered only idioms and dialectsGaelic, Pict and Gallic awhich gradually dropped out of use.
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  • To investigate the dispute an imperial commission was issued to five Gallic bishops, under the presidency of Melchiades, bishop of Rome.
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  • A Roman road and aqueduct and other Roman and Gallic remains have been discovered.
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  • After absorption into the blood it loses this effect, as it is partly broken up into gallic acid and partly combined with alkalis, both of which changes nullify its action upon albumen.
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  • Market's gallic charms Channel isle airport plans fail to.. .
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  • For several years Britain was part of a breakaway, and financially disastrous, ' Gallic empire ' .
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  • gallic acid.
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  • gallic verve.
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  • gallic coat " .
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  • Eateries in Siem Reap marry high Gallic culinary standards with the very best in local gastronomy.
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  • taking hostages, Caesar returned to Gaul, where there was a grave threat of a Gallic uprising.
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  • Claudius Paulinus Before becoming a Proconsul of one of the Gallic provinces and then imperial legate to another.
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  • lusty Gallic cheers.
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  • The same hefty frame, shaggy mane of hair and beard, brooding brows and Gallic bearing.
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  • self-destructive habits on the rugby pitch were as Gallic as Perrier and perfume.
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  • shaggy mane of hair and beard, brooding brows and Gallic bearing.
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  • The standard answer was invariably a gallic shrug: sometimes you get in, sometimes you don't.
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  • In the first period (Italic) cremation burials closely approximating to the Villanova type are found; in the second 1 (Venetian) the tombs are constructed of blocks of stone, and situlae (bronze buckets), sometimes decorated with elaborate designs, are frequently used to contain the cinerary urns; in the third (Gallic), which begins during the 4th centilry B.C., though cremation continues, the tombs are much poorer, the ossuaries being of badly baked rough clay, and show traces of Gallic influence, and characteristics of the La-Tene civilization.
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  • PYROGALLOL, or Pyrogallic Acid, a trioxybenzene, C 6 H 3 (OH) 3 (1: 2: 3), prepared by Scheele in 1786 by heating gallic acid, C 6 H 2 (OH) 3 CO 2 H.
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  • A bilingual inscription (Gallic and Latin) of the 2nd century B.C. was found as far south as Tuder, the modern Todi (Italic Dialects, ii.
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  • It is to the following effect: Gaius Plinius Caecilius, son of Lucius, of the Ufentine tribe; augur; legate-propraetor of the province of Pontus and Bithynia, with consular power, by decree of the senate sent into the said province by the emperor Nerva Trajan; curator of the bed and banks of the Tiber and of the; praefect of the Treasury of Saturn; praefect of the Treasury of War;, tribune of the plebs; emperor's quaestor, sevir of the knights; military tribune of the Gallic legion; for the adjudication of; provided by will for the erection of baths at a cost of ., adding for the furnishing of the same 300,000 sesterces (2400) and furthermore, for maintenance, 200,000 sesterces (£1600); likewise, for the support of one hundred of his own freedmen to the township 1,866,666 sesterces (c. 15,000), the eventual accretions he devised to the townsfolk for a public entertainment;.
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  • 1330), who devoted his knowledge of Latin to producing excellent translations of Caesar's Gallic War as well as Ovid's Metamorphoses and Heroides, and the classic work of Boethius; he also compiled (in 1302) the only Greek anthology known to scholars before the recovery in 1607 of the earlier and fuller anthology of Cephalas (fl.
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  • The population of Galatia was not entirely Gallic. Before the arrival of the Gauls, western Galatia up to the Halys was inhabited by Phrygians, and eastern Galatia by Cappadocians and other native races.
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  • This original idea of the word gave rise to a variety of meanings: notes and abstracts of speeches for the assistance of orators; family memorials, the origin of many of the legends introduced into early Roman history from a desire to glorify a particular family; diaries of events occurring in their own circle kept by private individuals, - the day-book, drawn up for Trimalchio in Petronius (Satyricon, S3) by his actuarius (a slave to whom the duty was specially assigned) is quoted as an example; memoirs of events in which they had taken part drawn up by public men, - such were the "Commentaries" of Caesar on the Gallic and Civil wars, and of Cicero on his consulship. Different departments of the imperial administration and certain high functionaries kept records, which were under the charge of an official known as a commentariis (cf.
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  • Originally a Phrygian city, probably on the Persian "Royal Road," it became the capital of the Gallic tribe Tolistobogii and the chief commercial city of the district.
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  • It may be obtained artificially by heating gallic acid with phosphorus oxychloride or dilute arsenic acid (cf.
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  • Thus Gallic petor (petor-ritum, " four-wheeler "), Umbrian petur, Homeric 7rfvvp€S, Boeotian (Achaean) 7lr7-apes, Welsh pedwar; but Gaelic cethir, Lat.
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  • It may be prepared by keeping moist and exposed to the air for from four to six weeks, at a temperature of 20° to 25° C., a paste of powdered gall-nuts and water, and removing from time to time the mould which forms on its surface; the paste is then boiled with water, the hot solution filtered, allowed to cool, the separated gallic acid drained, and purified by dissolving in boiling water, recrystallization at about 27° C., and washing of the crystals with ice-cold water.
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  • With phosphorus oxychloride at 520° C. gallic acid yields tannic acid, and with concentrated sulphuric acid at 100°, rufigallic acid, C14H808, an anthracene derivative.
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  • His Scotch and Gallic strains of ancestry are evident; his countenance was decidedly Scotch; his nervous speech and bearing and vehement temperament rather French; in his mind, agility, clarity and penetration were matched with logical solidity.
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  • Until recently self-destructive habits on the rugby pitch were as Gallic as Perrier and perfume.
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  • The standard answer was invariably a Gallic shrug: sometimes you get in, sometimes you do n't.
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  • Indian Rhubarb Root (Rheum officinale) is a type of rhubarb that contains tannins, phytosterols, gallic acid, and oxalic acid.
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  • It's a backwater AOC in France but don't stick one's Gallic nose up at the region, there are good-value wines to be found and this Rosè from Mas Grand Plagniol is one of them, blended from Grenache, Syrah, and Cinsault.
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  • Look for the Celebrated Sparkling Trio for some Carneros sparkling wine made with Gallic expertise.
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  • The Aedui are an ancient Gallic people whose native home was the eastern and southeastern areas of France, between modern day Saone and Loire.
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  • Due to antioxidants like reseveratrol, catechin and gallic acid, studies have shown that red wine has anti-viral properties and even help to prevent certain forms of cancer tumor growth.
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  • Beginning in the streets of Spain with music inspired by a combination of Moorish, Gypsy, and Gallic sources, the dance has spread to both spectators and flamenco dancers worldwide.
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