Gaelic sentence example

gaelic
  • Its Gaelic name was Dunedin.
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  • The number of persons speaking Gaelic was recorded for the first time in 1881.
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  • What does Rhyn mean in Gaelic?
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  • It is said that Robert Bruce held within its walls the last parliament in which the Gaelic language was used.
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  • The Celtic heroic saga in the British islands may be divided into the two principal groups of Gaelic (Irish) and Brython (Welsh), the first, excluding the purely mythological, into the Ultonian (connected with Ulster) and the Ossianic. The Ultonianis grouped round the names of King Conchobar and the heroCuchulainn, " the Irish Achilles," the defender of Ulster against all Ireland, regarded by some as a solar hero.
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  • It has been translated into Spanish, Danish, Swedish, Welsh, Polish, Gaelic, Russian, Bohemian, Dutch, Catalan, Chinese, modern Greek and phonetic writing.
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  • The principal points on the shores are Glengyle, formerly a fastness of the Macgregors, the Trossachs, the Goblins' Cave on Ben Venue, and Stronachlachar (Gaelic, "the mason's nose"), from which there is a ferry to Coilachra on the opposite side.
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  • Its name, derived from the Scandinavian Thingvollr, " field or meetingplace of the thing," or local assembly, preserves the Norse origin of the town; its Gaelic designation is Inverpefferon,"the mouth of the Peffery."
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  • The earliest New Testament (1767) and Old Testament (1783-1801) in Gaelic were published by the Society in Scotland for Propagating Christian Knowledge (founded 1709).
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  • The old market cross still exists, and close to it stands the stone that gives the town its name (Gaelic, clack, stone; Manann, the name of the district).
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  • The transition to the latinized form Bertha and later to Perth (the Gaelic name being Pearl) appears obvious.
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  • At Moffat he met John Home, the author of Douglas, for whom he recited some Gaelic verses from memory.
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  • Dr Hugh Blair, who was a firm believer in the authenticity of the poems, got up a subscription to allow Macpherson to pursue his Gaelic researches.
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  • In 1761 he announced the discovery of an epic on the subject of Fingal, and in December he published Fingal, an Ancient Epic Poem in Six Books, together with Several Other Poems composed by Ossian, the Son of Fingal, translated from the Gaelic Language, written in the musical measured prose of which he had made use in his earlier volume.
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  • Hence we find Shumer, probably pronounced Shuwer, with a sound similar to that heard to-day in the Scottish Gaelic word lamh, " hand "; viz.
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  • Also in the curious tinker's " Thary " spoken still on the English roads and lanes, we find merely an often inaccurately inverted Irish Gaelic. But in none of these nor in any other artificial jargons can any grammatical development be found other than that of the language on which they are based.
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  • On the west side of the Forth Bridge, in the fairway, lies the rocky islet of Bimar with a lighthouse, and immediately to the east is the island of Inchgarvie (Gaelic, "the rough island"), which once contained a castle used as a State prison, the ruins of which were removed to make way for one of the piers of the Forth Bridge.
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  • Originally called Ardmeanach (Gaelic ard, height; manaich, monk, "the monk's height," from an old religious house on the finely-wooded ridge of Mulbuie), it derived its customary name from the fact that, since snow does not lie in winter, the promontory looks black while the surrounding country is white.
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  • The old form of the name of the town was Kilcudbrit, from the Gaelic Cil Cudbert, " the chapel of Cuthbert," the saint's body having lain here for a short time during the seven years that lapsed between its exhumation at Lindisfarne and the re-interment at Chester-leStreet.
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  • The counties in which the highest percentages obtained of persons speaking Gaelic only were Ross and Cromarty with 15.92% (12,171 persons) and Inverness with 13.01% (11,722 persons).
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  • That they were non-Aryan, the theory of Sir John Rhys, seems improbable; for the non-English placenames of Scotland are either Gaelic or Brythonic (more or less Welsh), and the names of Pictish kings are either common to Gaelic and Welsh (or Cymric, or Brythonic), or are Welsh in their phonetics.
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  • While southern Scotland was thus English and Cymric, the north, from Cape Wrath to Lochaber, in the west, and to the Firth of Tay, on the east, was Pictland; and the vernacular spoken there was the Gaelic. The west, south of Lochaber to the Mull of Kintyre, with the isles of Bute, Islay, Arran and Jura, was the realm of the Dalriadic kings, Scots from Ireland (503): here, too, Gaelic was spoken, as among the " Southern Picts " of the kingdom of Galloway.
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  • There are material relics of his church, bearing the Christian monogram, and there are stones with Latin epitaphs; these objects are wholly unlike the Irish crosses and inscriptions of the Gaelic church.
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  • His conquest was not achieved at a blow, but his language, Gaelic, prevailed.
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  • After Donald Ban no Scottish sovereign bears a Gaelic Christian name save Malcolm the Maiden; and perhaps no later king knew Gaelic.
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  • Where Anglo-Normans obtained lands in Moray and Renfrewshire, there seems to have been no displacement of the population: though a FitzAlan was dominant in Renfrewshire, the " good men," or gentry, still bore Gaelic names, till territorial names - " of " this or that place - came into use.
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  • Malcolm the Maiden, before his early death in 1165, had put down the menacing power of Somerled, lord of the Isles, a chief apparently of mixed Celtic and Scandinavian blood, the founder of the great clan of Macdonald, whose chiefs, the lords of the Isles, were almost royal; Malcolm also subdued the Celts of Galloway, sometimes called Picts, but at this time Gaelic in speech.
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  • The murmur of the sea won for the cave a Gaelic name meaning " the Cave of Music."
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  • By the end of the 13th century appears the form Faukirke (the present local pronunciation), which is merely a translation of the Gaelic fau or faw, meaning "dun," "pale red."
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  • Though it is a biographical tradition that he lacked wit, Moliere and Don Quixote seem to have been his favourites; and though the utilitarian wholly crowds romanticism out of his writings, he had enough of that quality in youth to prepare to learn Gaelic in order to translate Ossian, and sent to Macpherson for the originals !
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  • In 1901 there were 1900 persons who spoke English and Gaelic and nine Gaelic only.
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  • The highest is Goatfell (2866 ft., the name said to be a corruption of the Gaelic Goadh Bhein, " mountain of the winds").
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  • In later Gaelic literature the primitive form Eriu became the dissyllable Eire; hence the Norsemen called the island the land of Eire, i.e.
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  • Its name is variously derived from the Gaelic crom, crooked, and bath, bay, or ard, height, meaning either the "crooked bay," or the "bend between the heights" (the high 'rocks, or Sutors, which guard the entrance to the Firth), and gave the title to the earldom of Cromarty.
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  • Another derivation is from Gaelic words meaning "the island beyond the bend."
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  • Primitive Celtic split up, as already shown, into two dialects, represented in modern times by two groups of languages - (i) the Goidelic group, comprising Irish, Scottish, Gaelic and Manx.
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  • But, though usage has made it convenient in this work to employ the term, " Celtic " cannot be properly applied to what is really " Gaelic."
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  • It is situated on the "burn" from which its name is derived, the Bannock (Gaelic, ban oc, "white, shining stream"), a right-hand affluent of the Forth, which was once a considerable river.
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  • Turning again to the legislative history, in 1567 the prayers were done into Gaelic; in 1579 parliament ordered all gentlemen and yeomen holding property of a certain value to possess copies.
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  • It consisted of a small MS. of the Gospels in the Vulgate, fragments of the liturgy of the Celtic church, and notes, in the Gaelic script of the 12th century, referring to the charters of the ancient monastery, including a summary of that granted by David I.
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  • These are among the oldest examples of Scottish Gaelic. The MS. was also adorned with Gaelic designs.
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  • Coming back to Ireland he helped to found in 1893 the Gaelic League or Connradh na Gaedhilge, and became its first president, a position to which he was annually reelected until 1915, when he resigned.
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  • He was also first president of the National Literary Society, a post which he resigned on the foundation of the Gaelic League.
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  • The AngloIrish word "Brehon" is derived from the Gaelic word Brethem (= judge).
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  • The extant remains of these laws are manuscript transcripts from earlier copies made on vellum from the 8th to the 13th century, now preserved with other Gaelic manuscripts in Trinity College and the Royal Irish Academy, Dublin, the British Museum, Oxford University, some private collections and several libraries on the continent of Europe.
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  • The text and earlier commentaries are in the - the most archaic form of the Celtic or Gaelic language.
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  • The name is derived from the Gaelic and means "the Crook of Kenneth," or Cairenachus.
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  • Earlier forms of the name of Stirling are Strivilen, Estriuelen, Striviling and Sterling, besides the Gaelic Struithla.
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  • William Ross (1762-1790), the Gaelic poet, who was schoolmaster of Gairloch, of which his mother was a native, was buried in the old kirkyard, where a monument commemorates him.
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  • Concerning this there are several legends which state that the relics of Andrew were brought under supernatural guidance from Constantinople to the place where the modern St Andrews stands (Pictish, Muckross; Gaelic, Kilrymont).
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  • The efforts of the Gaelic League, founded to encourage the study of Gaelic literature and the Irish language, produced results seen in the census returns for 1901, which showed that the pupils learning Irish had very largely increased as compared with 1891.
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  • In addition to his achievements in black-letter bibliography he threw great light on ancient Celtic language and literature by the discovery, in 1857, of the Book of Deer, a manuscript copy of the Gospel in the Vulgate version, in which were inscribed old Gaelic charters.
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  • The name is derived from the Gaelic lios mor, " great garden."
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  • For the Book of the Dean of Lismore see CELT: Scottish Gaelic Literature.
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  • The course curriculum has always offered contemporary, vocational subjects relevant to the needs of the Gaidhealtachd and the wider Gaelic community.
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  • Karen Matheson appears singing a Gaelic lament in one of the emotional highlights of the film.
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  • There is a Gaelic proverb to the effect that a friend at hand is better than a brother who is far away.
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  • These monks would also have taught the alphabet to the Picts using the Gaelic names of trees to express the sound of the letters.
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  • Perhaps you fancy hearing Highland stories from the lips of a genuine Gaelic bard.
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  • Gaelic is, however, relevant to a much broader range of posts, including many of a manual nature.
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  • Gaelic traditions were belittled and Gaelic speakers held up as illiterate bumpkins.
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  • Ms Diack said: " take cairngorm for example; the Gaelic is An Carn Gorm and this means the Blue Mountain.
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  • And of course protecting Peebles-shire cattle and maidens from the Gaelic caterans and reivers.
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  • English is so strong and it becomes so engrained that often many people just decide not to speak Gaelic later.
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  • Scottish life is greatly enriched by the Gaelic dimension.
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  • Gliondar it means glee in Irish Gaelic formed in 1998 after meeting at the Royal Scottish Academy of Music and Drama.
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  • This is particularly so in parts of Scotland outside the Gaelic heartland.
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  • Irish folksong in English, on the other hand, is often regarded as inferior to Gaelic folksong.
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  • The road signs are in Gaelic here and the language is still spoken by the islanders.
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  • About half of the population of Skye can speak the Gaelic language and the native islanders are very proud of their Celtic heritage.
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  • Tomintoul is Tom an t-Sabhail in Gaelic which means the knoll of the barn.
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  • The death of Donald Archie MacDonald is a tragic loss to Gaelic scholarship and a blow keenly felt by the Society.
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  • Gaelic orthography is the set of spelling conventions used in Gaelic.
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  • It became part of the Gaelic language during the Dark Ages, being based on the Latin root pallium.
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  • Lastly and importantly, there is the behind-the-scenes contribution of Gaelic poets and women poets.
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  • No wonder: the lowland Scottish intelligentsia were not interested in mediating authentic Gaelic poetry to the Germans.
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  • This took me to a selection of words and phrases in Irish Gaelic, which I was able to hear pronounced.
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  • He was deeply interested in the Gaelic revival and in 1911 went to the United States to lecture on the subject.
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  • Another possible native literary influence on the songs of the hedge schoolmaster is Gaelic verse forms.
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  • I only know the merest smattering of Gaelic words, but I loved just listening to the music of it.
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  • With all her family speaking Gaelic she was brought up speaking Gaelic she was brought up speaking Gaelic as her first language.
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  • The number of Gaelic speakers in Scotland has reached an all-time low.
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  • Among the Gaelic peoples it was a powerful totem of many tribes.
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  • Gaelic uncial I find it useful to classify uncial fonts on a three-point scale of ornateness.
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  • It was founded in 1776 by Sir James Grant of Grant, and became the chief seat of that ancient family, who had lived on their adjoining estate of Freuchie (Gaelic, fraochach, " heathery") since the beginning of the 15th century, and hence were usually described as the lairds of Freuchie.
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  • The word is Celtic, appearing in Welsh (very frequently) as afon, in Manx as aon, and in Gaelic as abhuinn (pronounced avain), and is radically identical with the Sanskrit ap, water, and the Lat.
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  • Little more than a mile to the west lies the royal and police burgh of Pittenweem (Gaelic, "the hollow of the cave"), a quaint old fishing town (pop. 1863), with the remains of a priory.
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  • The Scots, from Ireland, also now come into view, the name of Scotland being derived from that of a people really Irish in origin, who spoke a Gaelic (see CeltIC) akin to that of the Caledonians, and were in a similar stage of higher barbarism.
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  • With all her family speaking Gaelic she was brought up speaking Gaelic as her first language.
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  • We looked for Terns but no luck however five Long Tailed Ducks near the Gaelic College were a real highlight.
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  • However, ministers believe recent schemes to teach Gaelic in primary schools could help to arrest the decline.
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  • There is some toponymic evidence that Gaelic endured longer in this region than in Fife to the east.
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  • Against all odds, Manx Gaelic has clawed itself back from the verge of extinction over the past thirty years.
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  • In the Gaelic language, Anam Cara means "soul friend".
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  • They also feature rings with Gaelic lettering.
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  • Couples who want to put a bit of Celtic magic into their daily lives may find Gaelic poesy rings quite romantic.
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  • Wedding bands engraved with Gaelic love poetry come in many modern styles as well as museum replicas of traditional rings.
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  • Examples of Gaelic verses include "Pulse of My Heart " and "Anam Cara" (Soul Friend).
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  • Some people who lived in France at the time of Julius Caesar, for example, were also called "Celts", but they themselves used the term "Gaul" or even Gaelic.
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  • Runrig's first album was released in 1980, entitled 'Play Gaelic', consisting entirely of Gaelic songs.
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  • Touring and band member replacements filled the time up until '98, their 25th anniversary, which they fittingly marked with the release of a 2-disc album, 'The Gaelic Collection' under their original Ridge Records.
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  • World music can means Gaelic music, Flamenco, classical Indian sitar, Eastern European folk, or reggae music, to name only a few.
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  • Celtic Gaelic Baby Names - Provides the meaning of each name to help you match it to your character or gaming persona.
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  • She didn't walk far before someone in a tiny car speaking only Gaelic pulled alongside her and motioned to her.
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  • A mile and a half northeast are the Falls of Bracklinn (Gaelic, "white-foaming pool"), formed by the Keltie, which takes a leap of 50 ft.
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  • Both in Gaelic and in old French it is cat, although sometimes taking the form of chater in the latter; the Gaelic designation of the European wild cat being cat fiadhaich.
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  • This usage, coupled with the existence of a distinct term in Gaelic for the wild species, leaves little doubt that the word "cat" properly denotes only the domesticated species.
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  • The skull is I There are no native names either in Teutonic or Celtic languages; such words as German Kaninchen or English cony are from the Latin cuniculus, while the Irish, Welsh and Gaelic are adaptations from English.
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  • In 1901 there were 55 persons speaking Gaelic and English, none who spoke Gaelic only, and 92 foreigners (almost all Scandinavians).
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  • By correspondence he stimulated some friends in Edinburgh to establish charity schools in the Highlands, and the Gaelic School Society (1811) was his idea.
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  • In 1745, owing to his knowledge of Gaelic, he was appointed deputy chaplain of the 43rd (afterwards the 42nd) regiment (the Black Watch), the licence to preach being granted him by special dispensation, although he had not completed the required six years of theological study.
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  • Other monthlies are the Indian Magazine (1871); the Irish Monthly (Dublin, 1873); the Gaelic Journal (Dublin, 1882); the African Review (1892) and the Empire Review (1900).
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  • For a discussion of this question see Celt: Scottish Gaelic Literature.
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  • But in the struggle for existence it chanced that the early English invaders secured a kingdom, Bernicia, which stretched from the Humber into Lothian, or farther north, as the fortune of battle might at various times determine; and thus, from the centre to the south-east of what is now Scotland, the people had come to be anglicized in speech before the Norman Conquest, though Gaelic survived much later in Galloway.
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  • Beyond the railway station stands the obelisk to the memory of Ewen Maclachlan (1775-1822), the Gaelic poet, who was born in the parish.
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  • In 1901 there were 70 persons who spoke Gaelic and English, but none who spoke Gaelic only.
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