This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience. Learn more

furs

furs Sentence Examples

  • It was devised by the Hudson's Bay Company for carrying freight, as a substitute for the less serviceable canoe, and was named after their York factory, the centre to which the traders brought down the furs for shipment to England and from which they took back merchandise and supplies to the interior of Rupert's Land.

    2
    2
  • It was devised by the Hudson's Bay Company for carrying freight, as a substitute for the less serviceable canoe, and was named after their York factory, the centre to which the traders brought down the furs for shipment to England and from which they took back merchandise and supplies to the interior of Rupert's Land.

    2
    2
  • The river is navigable for 770 m.; grain and a variety of goods conveyed from the upper Kama are floated down, while furs, fish and other products of the sea are shipped up the river to be transported to Cherdyn on the Kama.

    1
    0
  • Silver fox is one of the most valuable of all furs, as much as £480 having been given for an unusually fine pair of skins in 1902.

    1
    0
  • The external trade of the Russian empire (bullion and the external trade of Finland not included) since the year 1886 is shown in the following table: The exports rank in the following order :- cereals (wheat, barley, rye, oats, maize, buckwheat) and flour, 49.2%; timber and wooden wares, 7.2; petroleum, 5.8; eggs, 5.4; flax, 5; butter, 3; sugar, 2-4; cottons and oilcake, 2 each; oleaginous seeds, &c., 1.5; with hemp, spirits, poultry, game, bristles, hair, furs, leather, manganese ore, wool, caviare, live-stock, gutta-percha, vegetables and fruit, and tobacco.

    0
    0
  • place in corn and flour from the presence of the larvae of the Mediterranean flour moth (Ephestia kuniella); while furs and clothes are often ruined by the clothes moth (Tinea trapezella).

    0
    0
  • Sealskins and other furs, and whale and seal oil, are exported, and the herring fishery is very productive.

    0
    0
  • Sometimes a difference of meaning is indicated by difference of spelling though the sounds in the two words are identical, as in furs and furze.

    0
    0
  • Trade with Persia and India, as also with the Khazars and the Russians, and undoubtedly with Biarmia (Urals), was, however, their chief occupation, their main riches being furs, leather, wool, nuts, wax and so on.

    0
    0
  • Soon after the first appearance (1580) of the Cossacks of Yermak in Siberia thousands of hunters, attracted by the furs, immigrated from north Russia, explored the country, traced the first footpaths and erected the first houses in the wilderness.

    0
    0
  • Taxed with a tribute in furs from the earliest years of the Russian conquest, they often revolted in the 17th century, but were cruelly reduced to obedience.

    0
    0
  • The forests on the Amur yielded a rich return of furs during the first years of the Russian occupation, and the Amur sable, although much inferior to the Yakutsk and Transbaikalian, was largely exported.

    0
    0
  • In the external trade the exports to Russia consist chiefly of grain, cattle, sheep, butter and other animal products, furs, game, feathers and down.

    0
    0
  • The town is the centre of a pastoral district and has a large trade in furs, while at Bushy Hill, a mile from the town, is a small gold-field.

    0
    0
  • The Germans recognized the staple rights of Bruges for a number of commodities, such as wool, wax, furs, copper and grain, and in return for this material contribution to the growing commercial importance of the town, they received in 1309 freedom from the compulsory brokerage which Bruges imposed on foreign merchants.

    0
    0
  • The merchants of Byzantium, Armenia and Bagdad met in the markets of Itil (whither since the raids of the Mahommedans the capital had been transferred from Semender), and traded for the wax, furs, leather and honey that came down the Volga.

    0
    0
  • Drawers of cedar or chips of the wood are now employed to protect furs and woollen stuffs from injury by moths.

    0
    0
  • The staple exports are beans, pulse and peas, marine products, sulphur, furs and timber; the staple imports, comestibles (especially salted fish), kerosene and oil-cake.

    0
    0
  • Cotton yarn and cloth, petroleum, timber and furs are among the chief imports; copper, tin, hides and tea are important exports; medicines in the shape not only of herbs and roots, but also of fossils, shells, bones, teeth and various products of the animal kingdom; and precious stones, principally jade and rubies, are among the other exports.

    0
    0
  • m., established there a settlement of miners and continued his mining operations, together with a trade in furs, until his death in 1810.

    0
    0
  • He conceived that a vast trade with the Iroquois for furs might be established; his report aroused great interest in Holland; and the United Netherlands, whose independence had been acknowledged in the spring, claimed the newly discovered country.

    0
    0
  • At the beginning of the 19th century black bears were killed in enormous numbers for their furs, which at that time were highly valued.

    0
    0
  • Other manufactures consist of a strong coarse cotton cloth called kham (which forms the dress of the common people, and for winter wear is padded with cotton and quilted), boots and shoes, saddlery, felts, furs and sheepskins made up into cloaks, and various articles of domestic use.

    0
    0
  • Bismarck is the headquarters for navigation of the upper Missouri river, is situated in a good agricultural region, and has a large wholesale trade, shipping grain, hides, furs, wool and coal.

    0
    0
  • From Mongolia come leather, saddlery, sheep and horses, with coral, amber and small diamonds from European sources; from Kham perfumes, fruits, furs and inlaid metal saddlery; from Sikkim and Bhutan rice, musk, sugar-balls and tobacco; from Nepal broadcloth, indigo, brasswork, coral, pearls, sugar, spices, drugs and Indian manufactures; from Ladak saffron, dried fruits and articles from India.

    0
    0
  • The exports from Tibet are silver, gold, salt, wool, woollen cloth, rugs, furs, drugs, musk.

    0
    0
  • The weaving of sail-cloth and the manufacture of tobacco are the principal industries, and the chief articles of trade are wood, butter and furs.

    0
    0
  • In all probability the surplice is no more than an expansion of the ordinary liturgical alb, due to the necessity for wearing it over thick furs.

    0
    0
  • The pelt or skin is requisite to keep out the piercing wind and driving storm, while the fur and overhair ward off the cold; and "furs" are as much a necessity to-day among more northern peoples as they ever were in the days of barbarism.

    0
    0
  • This, in brief, has been the history of its use in China, Tatary, Russia, Siberia and North America, and at present the employment of fancy furs among civilized nations has grown to be more extensive than at any former period.

    0
    0
  • Furs have constituted the price of redemption for royal captives, the gifts of emperors and kings, and the peculiar badge of state functionaries.

    0
    0
  • The history of furs can be read in Marco Polo, as he grows eloquent with the description of the rich skins of the khan of Tatary; in the early fathers of the church, who lament their introduction into Rome and Byzantium as an evidence of barbaric and debasing luxury; in the political history of Russia, stretching out a powerful arm over Siberia to secure her rich treasures; in the story of the French occupation of Canada, and the ascent of the St Lawrence to Lake Superior, and the subsequent contest to retain possession against England; in the history of early settlements of New England, New York and Virginia; in Irving's Astoria; in the records of the Hudson's Bay Company; and in the annals of the fairs held at Nizhniy Novgorod and Leipzig.

    0
    0
  • Here it may suffice to give some account of the present condition of the trade in fancy furs.

    0
    0
  • We are dependent upon the Carnivora, Rodentia, Ungulata and Marsupialia for our supplies of furs, the first two classes being by far of the greatest importance.

    0
    0
  • Although it is a fact that the demand is ever increasing, and that some of the rarer animals are decreasing in numbers, yet on the other hand some kinds of furs are occasionally neglected through vagaries of fashion, which give nature an opportunity to replenish their source.

    0
    0
  • These respites are, however, becoming fewer every day, and what were formerly the most neglected kinds of furs are becoming more and more sought after.

    0
    0
  • Opossums and wallabies, good useful furs, come from Australia and New Zealand.

    0
    0
  • The finest furs are obtained from the Arctic and northern regions, and the lower the latitude the less full and silky the fur, till, at the torrid zone, fur gives place to harsh hair without any underwool.

    0
    0
  • The sea otter, one of the richest and rarest of furs, especially for men's wear, is an exception to this unhairing process, which it does not require, the hair being of the same length as the wool, silky and bright, quite the reverse of the case of other aquatic animals.

    0
    0
  • It is found that in densely wooded districts furs are darker in colour than in exposed regions, and that the quality of wool and hair is softer and more silky than those from bare tracts of country, where nature exacts from its creatures greater efforts to secure food, thereby developing stronger limbs and a consequently coarser body covering.

    0
    0
  • The principal sales of general furs are held in London in January and March, smaller offerings being made in June and October; while the bulk of fur sealskins is sold separately in December.

    0
    0
  • General Russian furs.

    0
    0
  • Easter: Leipzig, Germany General furs.

    0
    0
  • August: Nizhniy Novgorod, Persian lamb and general Russia furs.

    0
    0
  • Chinese furs and ermine.

    0
    0
  • Of course there are many transactions, generally in the cheaper and coarser kinds of furs, used only in central Europe, Russia and Asia which in no way interest the London market, and there are many direct consignments of skins from collectors in America and Russia to London, New York and Leipzig merchants.

    0
    0
  • But the bulk of the fine furs of the world is sold at the large public trade auction sales in London.

    0
    0
  • Since, however, the value of all good furs has advanced, dyers and manufacturers have made very successful efforts with this fur.

    0
    0
  • Moles are plentiful in the British Isles and Europe, and owing to their lovely velvety coats of exquisite blue shade and to the dearness of other furs are much in demand.

    0
    0
  • Formerly the fur was only used for hatters' felt, but with the rise in prices of furs these skins have been more carefully removed and-with improved dressing, unhairing and silvering processes-the best provides a very effective and suitable fur for ladies' coats, capes, stoles, muffs, hats and gloves, while the lower qualities make very useful, light-weighted and inexpensive linings for men's or women's driving coats.

    0
    0
  • The finest wolves are very light weighted and most suitable for carriage aprons, in fact, ideal for the purpose, though lacking the strength of some other furs.

    0
    0
  • Special grease is then rubbed in and the skin placed in a machine which softly and continuously beats in the softening mixture, after which it is put into a slowly revolving drum, fitted with wooden paddles, partly filled with various kinds of fine hard sawdust according to the nature of the furs dealt with.

    0
    0
  • The Viennese are successful in dyeing marmot well, and their cleverness in colouring it with a series of stripes to represent the natural markings of sable which has been done after the garments have been made, so as to obtain symmetry of lines, has secured for them a large trade among the dealers of cheap furs in England and the continent.

    0
    0
  • The French influence upon the trade has been, and still is, primarily one of style and combination of colour, bad judgment in which will mar the beauty of the most valuable furs.

    0
    0
  • It is a recognized law among high-class furriers that furs should be simply arranged, that is, that an article should consist of one fur or of two furs of a suitable contrast, to which lace may be in some cases added with advantage.

    0
    0
  • As illustrative of this, it may be explained that any brown tone of fur such as sable, marten, mink, black marten, beaver, nutria, &c., will go well upon black or very dark-brown furs, while those of a white or grey nature, such as ermine, white lamb, chinchilla, blue fox, silver fox, opossum, grey squirrel, grey lamb, will set well upon seal or black furs, as Persian lamb, broadtail, astrachan, caracul lamb, &c. White is also permissible upon some light browns and greys, but brown motley colours and greys should never be in contrast.

    0
    0
  • The qualities, too have to be considered - the fulness of one, the flatness of the other, or the coarseness or fineness of the furs.

    0
    0
  • With regard to the natural colours of furs, the browns that command the highest prices are those that are of a bluish rather than a reddish tendency.

    0
    0
  • Perhaps for ingenuity and the latest methods of manipulating skins in the manufacturing of furs the Americans lead the way, but as fur cutters are more or less of a roving and cosmopolitan character the larger fur businesses in London, Berlin, Vienna, St Petersburg, Paris and New York are guided by the same thorough and comparatively advanced principles.

    0
    0
  • Another great source of inexpensive furs is China, and for many years past enormous quantities of dressed furs, many of which are made up in the form of linings and Chinese looseshaped garments, have been imported by England, Germany and France for the lower class of business; the garments are only regarded as so much fur and are reworked.

    0
    0
  • With, however, the exception of the best white Tibet lambs, the majority of Chinese furs can only be regarded as inferior material.

    0
    0
  • One of the most remarkable results of the European intervention in the Boxer rising in China (I goo) was the absurd price paid for so-called "loot" of furs, particularly in mandarins' coats of dyed and natural fox skins and pieces, and natural ermine, poor in quality and yellowish in colour; from three to ten times their value was paid for them when at the same time huge parcels of similar quality were warehoused in the London docks, because purchasers could not be found for them.

    0
    0
  • The skins are invariably tanned and beautifully sewn, the furs are generally flat in quality and not very strong in the hair, and are retained more as curiosities than for use as a warm covering.

    0
    0
  • Among the principal imitations of other furs is musquash, out of which the top hair has been pulled and the undergrowth of wool clipped and dyed exactly the same colour as is used for seal, which is then offered as seal or red river seal.

    0
    0
  • The most usual misnaming of manufactured furs is as follow: - Musquash, pulled and dyed .

    0
    0
  • Sold as White hairs inserted in foxes and sables Sold as real or natural furs.

    0
    0
  • have been preserved in cold storage, but it is only within a recent period, owing to the difficulty there was in obtaining the necessary perfectly dry atmosphere, that dressed and madeup furs have been preserved by freezing.

    0
    0
  • Furs kept in such a condition are not only immune from the ravages of the larvae of moth, but all the natural oils in the pelt and fur are conserved, so that its colour and life are prolonged, and the natural deterioration is arrested.

    0
    0
  • Sunlight has a tendency to bleach furs and to encourage the development of moth eggs, therefore continued exposure is to be avoided.

    0
    0
  • When furs are wetted by rain they should be well shaken and allowed to dry in a current of air without exposure to sun or open fire.

    0
    0
  • Where a freezing store for furs is not accessible, furs should be well shaken and afterwards packed in linen and kept in a perfectly cool dry place, and examined in the summer at periods of not less than five weeks.

    0
    0
  • In England moth life is practically continuous all the year round, that is, as regards those moths that attack furs, though the destructive element exists to a far greater extent during spring and summer.

    0
    0
  • Comparative Durability of Various Furs and Weight of Unlined Skins per Square Foot.

    0
    0
  • Otter, with its water hairs removed, the strongest of furs for external use, is, in this table, taken as the standard at too and other furs marked accordingly: The Precious Furs.

    0
    0
  • The Less Valuable Furs.

    0
    0
  • Motoring or driving coat, full length Weight and Durability of Furs for Men's Coat Linings.

    0
    0
  • Durability and Weight of Motoring Furs made up with Fur outside.

    0
    0
  • 15 16 22 27 Durability and Weight of Furs for Rugs and Foot-sacks.

    0
    0
  • Furs 265,700 720,200

    0
    0
  • The rocky hills of the tableland to the north long repelled settlement, the region being looked on by the thrifty farmers of the south as a wilderness useless except for its forests and its furs; and unfortunate settlers who ventured into it usually failed and went west or south in search of better land.

    0
    0
  • The trade supplied almost all the clothing, merchandise and manufactures used in the province; hides and furs were given in exchange.

    0
    0
  • However, the Russians came in 1805, and in 1812 founded on Bodega Bay a post they held till 1841, whence they traded and hunted (even in San Francisco Bay) for furs.

    0
    0
  • It has few manufactures, but does an extensive trade principally in the importation of silk from Cheh-kiang and Sze-ch`uen, tea from Hu-peh and Hu-nan, and sugar from Sze-ch`uen, and in the exportation of these and other articles (such as skins and furs) to Kan-suh, Russia and Central Asia.

    0
    0
  • The goods mostly dealt in are cotton, woollen, linen and silk stuffs (35 to 38% of the whole), iron and iron wares, furs and skins, pottery, salt, corn, fish, wine and all kinds of manufactured goods.

    0
    0
  • There is a fair local trade in wheat and agricultural produce, also sheep and cattle, wool, hides and furs for export.

    0
    0
  • In winter the cassock was often lined with furs varying in costliness with the rank of the wearer, and its colour also varied in the middle ages with his ecclesiastical or academic status.

    0
    0
  • As freighters for the Hudson's Bay Company many of these settlers made, with their ox or pony carts, the long journey over the natural prairie roads to Fort Garry, fording or swimming the streams, carrying furs for a thousand miles or more on the eastern trip, and returning brought loads of merchandise for the company.

    0
    0
  • He praises the horses of the Svear and speaks of their great trade in furs of arctic animals which were transferred from merchant to merchant until they reached Rome.

    0
    0
  • In winter an over-mantle like the kulijah, or coat of the man, with short sleeves, lined and trimmed with furs, is worn.

    0
    0
  • Its fair is one of the most important in the southern Ural region for cattle, hides, furs, grain, tea, manufactured articles, crockery, &c., which are sold to the annual value of X500,000.

    0
    0
  • Hunting and fishing are resorted to, and the skins and furs are tanned.

    0
    0
  • (See Seal Fisheries and Bering Sea Arbitration.) The value of the fur seals taken from 1868 to 1902 was estimated at $35,000,000 and that of other furs at $17,000,000.

    0
    0
  • It has been estimated that in the same period the United States drew from Alaska fish, furs and gold to the value of about $150,000,000; that up to 1903 the imports from the states aggregated $100,000,000; and that $25,000,000 of United States capital was invested in Alaska.

    0
    0
  • In the simple arts of broiling and roasting meat, the use of hides and furs for covering, the plaiting of mats and baskets, the devices of hunting, trapping and fishing, the pleasure taken in personal ornament, the touches of artistic decoration on objects of daily use, the savage differs in degree but not in kind from the civilized man.

    0
    0
  • Soon after the close of the War of Independence American merchants began to buy furs along the north-west coast and to ship them to China to be exchanged for the products of the East.

    0
    0
  • Wares that can be safely purchased by sample appear at the fairs in steadily diminishing quantities, while others, such as hides, furs and leather, which require to be actually examined, show as marked an increase.

    0
    0
  • The principal commodity is furs (chiefly American and Russian), of which about one and a quarter million pounds worth are sold annually; other articles disposed of are leather, hides, wool, cloth, linen and glass.

    0
    0
  • Other industries include the manufacture of artificial flowers, wax-cloth, chemicals, ethereal oils and essences, beer, mineral waters, tobacco and cigars, lace, indiarubber wares, rush-work and paper, the preparation of furs and numerous other branches.

    0
    0
  • In 1602, in command of the "Concord," chartered by Sir Walter Raleigh and others, he crossed the Atlantic; coasted from what is now Maine to Martha's Vineyard, landing at and naming Cape Cod and Elizabeth Island (now Cuttyhunk) and giving the name Martha's Vineyard to the island now called No Man's Land; and returned to England with a cargo of furs, sassafras and other commodities obtained in trade with the Indians about Buzzard's Bay.

    0
    0
  • The articles mentioned in the edict, which is chiefly interesting as giving their relative values at the time, include cereals, wine, oil, meat, vegetables, fruits, skins, leather, furs, foot-gear, timber, carpets, articles of dress, and the wages range from the ordinary labourer to the professional advocate.

    0
    0
  • The chief agricultural products are grain, rice, beans, cotton, opium and poppy seed, sesame, fennel, red pepper, and much of the finest tobacco grown in Europe; there is also some trade in timber, livestock, skins, furs, wool and silk cocoons.

    0
    0
  • apricot juice that furs my throat.

    0
    0
  • Scott and Shackleton were not particularly interested in ice and snow and were appallingly ignorant of skis, sledges and furs.

    0
    0
  • Mixed and flanged by Ed Buller (former keyboardist of Psychedelic Furs) and Slowdive.

    0
    0
  • Will attack furs, carpets and all kinds of woolen textiles.

    0
    0
  • The finest and softest Faux Furs which are then individually made in their own workrooms by highly skilled craftsmen.

    0
    0
  • On the voyage he became acquainted with a fur-trader, by whose advice he devoted himself to the same business, buying furs directly from the Indians, preparing them at first with his own hands for the market, and selling them in London and elsewhere at a great profit.

    0
    0
  • The river is navigable for 770 m.; grain and a variety of goods conveyed from the upper Kama are floated down, while furs, fish and other products of the sea are shipped up the river to be transported to Cherdyn on the Kama.

    0
    0
  • The external trade of the Russian empire (bullion and the external trade of Finland not included) since the year 1886 is shown in the following table: The exports rank in the following order :- cereals (wheat, barley, rye, oats, maize, buckwheat) and flour, 49.2%; timber and wooden wares, 7.2; petroleum, 5.8; eggs, 5.4; flax, 5; butter, 3; sugar, 2-4; cottons and oilcake, 2 each; oleaginous seeds, &c., 1.5; with hemp, spirits, poultry, game, bristles, hair, furs, leather, manganese ore, wool, caviare, live-stock, gutta-percha, vegetables and fruit, and tobacco.

    0
    0
  • place in corn and flour from the presence of the larvae of the Mediterranean flour moth (Ephestia kuniella); while furs and clothes are often ruined by the clothes moth (Tinea trapezella).

    0
    0
  • Sealskins and other furs, and whale and seal oil, are exported, and the herring fishery is very productive.

    0
    0
  • Sometimes a difference of meaning is indicated by difference of spelling though the sounds in the two words are identical, as in furs and furze.

    0
    0
  • Trade with Persia and India, as also with the Khazars and the Russians, and undoubtedly with Biarmia (Urals), was, however, their chief occupation, their main riches being furs, leather, wool, nuts, wax and so on.

    0
    0
  • There is some trade in furs, mammoth bones, dried and salted fish.

    0
    0
  • Soon after the first appearance (1580) of the Cossacks of Yermak in Siberia thousands of hunters, attracted by the furs, immigrated from north Russia, explored the country, traced the first footpaths and erected the first houses in the wilderness.

    0
    0
  • Taxed with a tribute in furs from the earliest years of the Russian conquest, they often revolted in the 17th century, but were cruelly reduced to obedience.

    0
    0
  • The forests on the Amur yielded a rich return of furs during the first years of the Russian occupation, and the Amur sable, although much inferior to the Yakutsk and Transbaikalian, was largely exported.

    0
    0
  • In the external trade the exports to Russia consist chiefly of grain, cattle, sheep, butter and other animal products, furs, game, feathers and down.

    0
    0
  • Pope was never tired of girding at "Morality by her false guardians drawn, Chicane in furs, and casuistry in lawn"; while Fielding has embodied the popular conception of a casuist in Parson Thwackum and Philosopher Square, both of whom only take to argument when they want to reason themselves out of some obvious duty.

    0
    0
  • The town is the centre of a pastoral district and has a large trade in furs, while at Bushy Hill, a mile from the town, is a small gold-field.

    0
    0
  • Silver fox is one of the most valuable of all furs, as much as £480 having been given for an unusually fine pair of skins in 1902.

    0
    0
  • The Germans recognized the staple rights of Bruges for a number of commodities, such as wool, wax, furs, copper and grain, and in return for this material contribution to the growing commercial importance of the town, they received in 1309 freedom from the compulsory brokerage which Bruges imposed on foreign merchants.

    0
    0
  • The merchants of Byzantium, Armenia and Bagdad met in the markets of Itil (whither since the raids of the Mahommedans the capital had been transferred from Semender), and traded for the wax, furs, leather and honey that came down the Volga.

    0
    0
  • Drawers of cedar or chips of the wood are now employed to protect furs and woollen stuffs from injury by moths.

    0
    0
  • The staple exports are beans, pulse and peas, marine products, sulphur, furs and timber; the staple imports, comestibles (especially salted fish), kerosene and oil-cake.

    0
    0
  • Cotton yarn and cloth, petroleum, timber and furs are among the chief imports; copper, tin, hides and tea are important exports; medicines in the shape not only of herbs and roots, but also of fossils, shells, bones, teeth and various products of the animal kingdom; and precious stones, principally jade and rubies, are among the other exports.

    0
    0
  • m., established there a settlement of miners and continued his mining operations, together with a trade in furs, until his death in 1810.

    0
    0
  • He conceived that a vast trade with the Iroquois for furs might be established; his report aroused great interest in Holland; and the United Netherlands, whose independence had been acknowledged in the spring, claimed the newly discovered country.

    0
    0
  • At the beginning of the 19th century black bears were killed in enormous numbers for their furs, which at that time were highly valued.

    0
    0
  • Other manufactures consist of a strong coarse cotton cloth called kham (which forms the dress of the common people, and for winter wear is padded with cotton and quilted), boots and shoes, saddlery, felts, furs and sheepskins made up into cloaks, and various articles of domestic use.

    0
    0
  • Bismarck is the headquarters for navigation of the upper Missouri river, is situated in a good agricultural region, and has a large wholesale trade, shipping grain, hides, furs, wool and coal.

    0
    0
  • From Mongolia come leather, saddlery, sheep and horses, with coral, amber and small diamonds from European sources; from Kham perfumes, fruits, furs and inlaid metal saddlery; from Sikkim and Bhutan rice, musk, sugar-balls and tobacco; from Nepal broadcloth, indigo, brasswork, coral, pearls, sugar, spices, drugs and Indian manufactures; from Ladak saffron, dried fruits and articles from India.

    0
    0
  • The exports from Tibet are silver, gold, salt, wool, woollen cloth, rugs, furs, drugs, musk.

    0
    0
  • The weaving of sail-cloth and the manufacture of tobacco are the principal industries, and the chief articles of trade are wood, butter and furs.

    0
    0
  • In all probability the surplice is no more than an expansion of the ordinary liturgical alb, due to the necessity for wearing it over thick furs.

    0
    0
  • The pelt or skin is requisite to keep out the piercing wind and driving storm, while the fur and overhair ward off the cold; and "furs" are as much a necessity to-day among more northern peoples as they ever were in the days of barbarism.

    0
    0
  • This, in brief, has been the history of its use in China, Tatary, Russia, Siberia and North America, and at present the employment of fancy furs among civilized nations has grown to be more extensive than at any former period.

    0
    0
  • Furs have constituted the price of redemption for royal captives, the gifts of emperors and kings, and the peculiar badge of state functionaries.

    0
    0
  • The history of furs can be read in Marco Polo, as he grows eloquent with the description of the rich skins of the khan of Tatary; in the early fathers of the church, who lament their introduction into Rome and Byzantium as an evidence of barbaric and debasing luxury; in the political history of Russia, stretching out a powerful arm over Siberia to secure her rich treasures; in the story of the French occupation of Canada, and the ascent of the St Lawrence to Lake Superior, and the subsequent contest to retain possession against England; in the history of early settlements of New England, New York and Virginia; in Irving's Astoria; in the records of the Hudson's Bay Company; and in the annals of the fairs held at Nizhniy Novgorod and Leipzig.

    0
    0
  • Here it may suffice to give some account of the present condition of the trade in fancy furs.

    0
    0
  • We are dependent upon the Carnivora, Rodentia, Ungulata and Marsupialia for our supplies of furs, the first two classes being by far of the greatest importance.

    0
    0
  • Although it is a fact that the demand is ever increasing, and that some of the rarer animals are decreasing in numbers, yet on the other hand some kinds of furs are occasionally neglected through vagaries of fashion, which give nature an opportunity to replenish their source.

    0
    0
  • These respites are, however, becoming fewer every day, and what were formerly the most neglected kinds of furs are becoming more and more sought after.

    0
    0
  • Opossums and wallabies, good useful furs, come from Australia and New Zealand.

    0
    0
  • Some of the poorer sorts of furs, such as hamster, marmot, Chinese goats and lambs, Tatar ponies, weasels, kaluga, various monkeys, antelopes, foxes, otters, jackals and others from the warmer zones, which until recently were neglected on account of their inferior quality of colour, by the better class of the trade, are now being deftly dressed or dyed in Europe and America, and good effects are produced, although the lack of quality when compared with the better furs from colder climates which possess full top hair, close underwool and supple leathers, is readily manifest.

    0
    0
  • The finest furs are obtained from the Arctic and northern regions, and the lower the latitude the less full and silky the fur, till, at the torrid zone, fur gives place to harsh hair without any underwool.

    0
    0
  • The sea otter, one of the richest and rarest of furs, especially for men's wear, is an exception to this unhairing process, which it does not require, the hair being of the same length as the wool, silky and bright, quite the reverse of the case of other aquatic animals.

    0
    0
  • It is found that in densely wooded districts furs are darker in colour than in exposed regions, and that the quality of wool and hair is softer and more silky than those from bare tracts of country, where nature exacts from its creatures greater efforts to secure food, thereby developing stronger limbs and a consequently coarser body covering.

    0
    0
  • The principal sales of general furs are held in London in January and March, smaller offerings being made in June and October; while the bulk of fur sealskins is sold separately in December.

    0
    0
  • General Russian furs.

    0
    0
  • Easter: Leipzig, Germany General furs.

    0
    0
  • August: Nizhniy Novgorod, Persian lamb and general Russia furs.

    0
    0
  • Chinese furs and ermine.

    0
    0
  • Of course there are many transactions, generally in the cheaper and coarser kinds of furs, used only in central Europe, Russia and Asia which in no way interest the London market, and there are many direct consignments of skins from collectors in America and Russia to London, New York and Leipzig merchants.

    0
    0
  • But the bulk of the fine furs of the world is sold at the large public trade auction sales in London.

    0
    0
  • Since, however, the value of all good furs has advanced, dyers and manufacturers have made very successful efforts with this fur.

    0
    0
  • Moles are plentiful in the British Isles and Europe, and owing to their lovely velvety coats of exquisite blue shade and to the dearness of other furs are much in demand.

    0
    0
  • Formerly the fur was only used for hatters' felt, but with the rise in prices of furs these skins have been more carefully removed and-with improved dressing, unhairing and silvering processes-the best provides a very effective and suitable fur for ladies' coats, capes, stoles, muffs, hats and gloves, while the lower qualities make very useful, light-weighted and inexpensive linings for men's or women's driving coats.

    0
    0
  • The finest wolves are very light weighted and most suitable for carriage aprons, in fact, ideal for the purpose, though lacking the strength of some other furs.

    0
    0
  • Special grease is then rubbed in and the skin placed in a machine which softly and continuously beats in the softening mixture, after which it is put into a slowly revolving drum, fitted with wooden paddles, partly filled with various kinds of fine hard sawdust according to the nature of the furs dealt with.

    0
    0
  • The Viennese are successful in dyeing marmot well, and their cleverness in colouring it with a series of stripes to represent the natural markings of sable which has been done after the garments have been made, so as to obtain symmetry of lines, has secured for them a large trade among the dealers of cheap furs in England and the continent.

    0
    0
  • At that period the chief concern of the body was to prevent buyers from being imposed upon by sellers who were much given to offering old furs as new; a century later the Skinners' Company received other charters empowering them to inspect not only warehouses and open markets, but workrooms. In 1667 they were given power to scrutinize the preparing of rabbit or cony wool for the wool trade and the registration of the then customary seven years' apprenticeship. To-day all these privileges and powers are in abeyance, and the interest that they took in the fur trade has been gradually transferred to the leather-dressing craft.

    0
    0
  • The French influence upon the trade has been, and still is, primarily one of style and combination of colour, bad judgment in which will mar the beauty of the most valuable furs.

    0
    0
  • It is a recognized law among high-class furriers that furs should be simply arranged, that is, that an article should consist of one fur or of two furs of a suitable contrast, to which lace may be in some cases added with advantage.

    0
    0
  • As illustrative of this, it may be explained that any brown tone of fur such as sable, marten, mink, black marten, beaver, nutria, &c., will go well upon black or very dark-brown furs, while those of a white or grey nature, such as ermine, white lamb, chinchilla, blue fox, silver fox, opossum, grey squirrel, grey lamb, will set well upon seal or black furs, as Persian lamb, broadtail, astrachan, caracul lamb, &c. White is also permissible upon some light browns and greys, but brown motley colours and greys should never be in contrast.

    0
    0
  • The qualities, too have to be considered - the fulness of one, the flatness of the other, or the coarseness or fineness of the furs.

    0
    0
  • With regard to the natural colours of furs, the browns that command the highest prices are those that are of a bluish rather than a reddish tendency.

    0
    0
  • Perhaps for ingenuity and the latest methods of manipulating skins in the manufacturing of furs the Americans lead the way, but as fur cutters are more or less of a roving and cosmopolitan character the larger fur businesses in London, Berlin, Vienna, St Petersburg, Paris and New York are guided by the same thorough and comparatively advanced principles.

    0
    0
  • Another great source of inexpensive furs is China, and for many years past enormous quantities of dressed furs, many of which are made up in the form of linings and Chinese looseshaped garments, have been imported by England, Germany and France for the lower class of business; the garments are only regarded as so much fur and are reworked.

    0
    0
  • With, however, the exception of the best white Tibet lambs, the majority of Chinese furs can only be regarded as inferior material.

    0
    0
  • One of the most remarkable results of the European intervention in the Boxer rising in China (I goo) was the absurd price paid for so-called "loot" of furs, particularly in mandarins' coats of dyed and natural fox skins and pieces, and natural ermine, poor in quality and yellowish in colour; from three to ten times their value was paid for them when at the same time huge parcels of similar quality were warehoused in the London docks, because purchasers could not be found for them.

    0
    0
  • With regard to Japanese furs, there is little to commend them.

    0
    0
  • The skins are invariably tanned and beautifully sewn, the furs are generally flat in quality and not very strong in the hair, and are retained more as curiosities than for use as a warm covering.

    0
    0
  • Among the principal imitations of other furs is musquash, out of which the top hair has been pulled and the undergrowth of wool clipped and dyed exactly the same colour as is used for seal, which is then offered as seal or red river seal.

    0
    0
  • The most usual misnaming of manufactured furs is as follow: - Musquash, pulled and dyed .

    0
    0
  • Sold as White hairs inserted in foxes and sables Sold as real or natural furs.

    0
    0
  • have been preserved in cold storage, but it is only within a recent period, owing to the difficulty there was in obtaining the necessary perfectly dry atmosphere, that dressed and madeup furs have been preserved by freezing.

    0
    0
  • Furs kept in such a condition are not only immune from the ravages of the larvae of moth, but all the natural oils in the pelt and fur are conserved, so that its colour and life are prolonged, and the natural deterioration is arrested.

    0
    0
  • Sunlight has a tendency to bleach furs and to encourage the development of moth eggs, therefore continued exposure is to be avoided.

    0
    0
  • When furs are wetted by rain they should be well shaken and allowed to dry in a current of air without exposure to sun or open fire.

    0
    0
  • Where a freezing store for furs is not accessible, furs should be well shaken and afterwards packed in linen and kept in a perfectly cool dry place, and examined in the summer at periods of not less than five weeks.

    0
    0
  • In England moth life is practically continuous all the year round, that is, as regards those moths that attack furs, though the destructive element exists to a far greater extent during spring and summer.

    0
    0
  • Comparative Durability of Various Furs and Weight of Unlined Skins per Square Foot.

    0
    0
  • Otter, with its water hairs removed, the strongest of furs for external use, is, in this table, taken as the standard at too and other furs marked accordingly: The Precious Furs.

    0
    0
  • The Less Valuable Furs.

    0
    0
  • Motoring or driving coat, full length Weight and Durability of Furs for Men's Coat Linings.

    0
    0
  • Durability and Weight of Motoring Furs made up with Fur outside.

    0
    0
  • 15 16 22 27 Durability and Weight of Furs for Rugs and Foot-sacks.

    0
    0
  • Furs 265,700 720,200

    0
    0
  • The rocky hills of the tableland to the north long repelled settlement, the region being looked on by the thrifty farmers of the south as a wilderness useless except for its forests and its furs; and unfortunate settlers who ventured into it usually failed and went west or south in search of better land.

    0
    0
  • The trade supplied almost all the clothing, merchandise and manufactures used in the province; hides and furs were given in exchange.

    0
    0
  • However, the Russians came in 1805, and in 1812 founded on Bodega Bay a post they held till 1841, whence they traded and hunted (even in San Francisco Bay) for furs.

    0
    0
  • It has few manufactures, but does an extensive trade principally in the importation of silk from Cheh-kiang and Sze-ch`uen, tea from Hu-peh and Hu-nan, and sugar from Sze-ch`uen, and in the exportation of these and other articles (such as skins and furs) to Kan-suh, Russia and Central Asia.

    0
    0
  • The goods mostly dealt in are cotton, woollen, linen and silk stuffs (35 to 38% of the whole), iron and iron wares, furs and skins, pottery, salt, corn, fish, wine and all kinds of manufactured goods.

    0
    0
  • There is a fair local trade in wheat and agricultural produce, also sheep and cattle, wool, hides and furs for export.

    0
    0
  • In winter the cassock was often lined with furs varying in costliness with the rank of the wearer, and its colour also varied in the middle ages with his ecclesiastical or academic status.

    0
    0
  • As freighters for the Hudson's Bay Company many of these settlers made, with their ox or pony carts, the long journey over the natural prairie roads to Fort Garry, fording or swimming the streams, carrying furs for a thousand miles or more on the eastern trip, and returning brought loads of merchandise for the company.

    0
    0
  • He praises the horses of the Svear and speaks of their great trade in furs of arctic animals which were transferred from merchant to merchant until they reached Rome.

    0
    0
  • In winter an over-mantle like the kulijah, or coat of the man, with short sleeves, lined and trimmed with furs, is worn.

    0
    0
  • Its fair is one of the most important in the southern Ural region for cattle, hides, furs, grain, tea, manufactured articles, crockery, &c., which are sold to the annual value of X500,000.

    0
    0
  • Hunting and fishing are resorted to, and the skins and furs are tanned.

    0
    0
  • (See Seal Fisheries and Bering Sea Arbitration.) The value of the fur seals taken from 1868 to 1902 was estimated at $35,000,000 and that of other furs at $17,000,000.

    0
    0
  • It has been estimated that in the same period the United States drew from Alaska fish, furs and gold to the value of about $150,000,000; that up to 1903 the imports from the states aggregated $100,000,000; and that $25,000,000 of United States capital was invested in Alaska.

    0
    0
  • In the simple arts of broiling and roasting meat, the use of hides and furs for covering, the plaiting of mats and baskets, the devices of hunting, trapping and fishing, the pleasure taken in personal ornament, the touches of artistic decoration on objects of daily use, the savage differs in degree but not in kind from the civilized man.

    0
    0
  • Soon after the close of the War of Independence American merchants began to buy furs along the north-west coast and to ship them to China to be exchanged for the products of the East.

    0
    0
  • Wares that can be safely purchased by sample appear at the fairs in steadily diminishing quantities, while others, such as hides, furs and leather, which require to be actually examined, show as marked an increase.

    0
    0
  • The principal commodity is furs (chiefly American and Russian), of which about one and a quarter million pounds worth are sold annually; other articles disposed of are leather, hides, wool, cloth, linen and glass.

    0
    0
  • Other industries include the manufacture of artificial flowers, wax-cloth, chemicals, ethereal oils and essences, beer, mineral waters, tobacco and cigars, lace, indiarubber wares, rush-work and paper, the preparation of furs and numerous other branches.

    0
    0
  • In 1602, in command of the "Concord," chartered by Sir Walter Raleigh and others, he crossed the Atlantic; coasted from what is now Maine to Martha's Vineyard, landing at and naming Cape Cod and Elizabeth Island (now Cuttyhunk) and giving the name Martha's Vineyard to the island now called No Man's Land; and returned to England with a cargo of furs, sassafras and other commodities obtained in trade with the Indians about Buzzard's Bay.

    0
    0
  • The articles mentioned in the edict, which is chiefly interesting as giving their relative values at the time, include cereals, wine, oil, meat, vegetables, fruits, skins, leather, furs, foot-gear, timber, carpets, articles of dress, and the wages range from the ordinary labourer to the professional advocate.

    0
    0
  • The chief agricultural products are grain, rice, beans, cotton, opium and poppy seed, sesame, fennel, red pepper, and much of the finest tobacco grown in Europe; there is also some trade in timber, livestock, skins, furs, wool and silk cocoons.

    0
    0
  • Originally bred for their furs, rex rabbits were also suitable for the meat trade.

    0
    0
  • Will attack furs, carpets and all kinds of woolen textiles.

    0
    0
  • The finest and softest Faux Furs which are then individually made in their own workrooms by highly skilled craftsmen.

    0
    0
  • Everything sold by Fabulous Furs not only looks great, it's of excellent quality.

    0
    0
  • Synthetic furs have been around since the late 1920s, but really came into vogue in the mid-1950s.

    0
    0
  • Their products are available across North America and include sporting wear, denim, furs, accessories and shoes.

    0
    0
  • Fussy outerwear made of heavy furs was giving way to slim wool coats, although many men still liked to throw a raccoon coat over their slim suits.

    0
    0
  • The wealthy classes wore the softest furs made from mink, weasel or ermine.

    0
    0
  • Aside from wool, other popular fabric choices include leather, suede, faux furs, and other stylish options.

    0
    0
  • Look for thick furs, luscious wool/alpaca blends and smart A-line cuts.

    0
    0
  • In these early years, the company was all about furs and leathers.

    0
    0
  • Furs, leather goods, ready-to-wear clothing, handbags, watches, and, yes, eyewear.

    0
    0
  • Jaffe was soon successfully selling pieces like leather jackets, blouses, furs, and flared pants, and had the opportunity to open another Dress Barn location.

    0
    0
  • Making your own Mrs. Claus costume can get expensive if you are using nice velvet fabrics and furs.

    0
    0
  • Designer Rebekka Leigh, for example, specializes in hand crafted designed from faux furs.

    0
    0
  • You can use any kind of yarn you like, from novelty fun furs to suede, chenille and wool.

    0
    0
  • However, many items like jewelry, furs, silver, and antiques have limitations for theft.

    0
    0
  • Does the home contain any special items (furs, jewelry, art, coins) which need to be insured separately?

    0
    0
  • The title track on the Pretty in Pink soundtrack was originally recorded by The Psychedelic Furs in 1981, and appeared on their album Talk Talk Talk.

    0
    0
  • The song itself was Hughes' inspiration for the movie, and the Furs re-recorded it especially for the soundtrack.

    0
    0
  • Look there, those are furs! they exclaimed.

    0
    1
Browse other sentences examples →