Furrows sentence example

furrows
  • The furrows between his eyes deepened as his brows drew down further.
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  • the anthers oblong and converging; the ovary is globose, and has three furrows; the seeds are roundish and black.
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  • Numerous old river valleys and furrows entrenched in.
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  • - This genus, which comprises nearly 300 species, mostly Mexican, with a few Brazilian and West Indian, is called nipple cactus, and consists of globular or cylindrical succulent plants, whose surface instead of being cut up into ridges with alternate furrows, as in Melocactus, is broken up into teat-like cylindrical or angular tubercles, spirally arranged, and terminating in a radiating tuft of spines which spring from a little woolly cushion.
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  • Rapidly leaping the furrows, he fled across the field with the impetuosity he used to show at catchplay, now and then turning his good-natured, pale, young face to look back.
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  • The dark portions represent supporting and conducting tissue; the upper face bears furrows, at the bottom of each of which are seen the motor cells m.
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  • Glacial furrows, striae and elongated troughs are met with everywhere, running mostly from north-west to south-east, as well as asar or eskers, which have the same direction.
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  • The bark, of nearly the same tint as that of the redwood, is extremely thick and is channelled towards the base with vertical furrows; at the root the ridges often stand out in buttress-like projections.
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  • The chlorophyll-containing tissue reaches the surface at the sides and base of the furrows, I.
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  • The furrows between his brows deepened.
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  • This is found advantageous on hill-sides where the work is easier if all the furrows are turned downhill; or from another point of view the furrows may be all laid uphill so as to counteract the tendency for the soil to work down the slope.
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  • high, the surface divided into numerous furrows like the ribs of a melon, with projecting angles, which are set with a regular series of stellated spines - each bundle consisting of about five larger spines, accompanied by smaller but sharp bristles - and the tip of the plant being surmounted by a cylindrical crown 3 to 5 in.
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  • The very finest sediment is kept in a state of movement until it drops into the gulleys or furrows of the shelf, where it can come to rest together with the finer fragments of the remains of littoral or bank vegetation.
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  • Being remarkably free from trees, rocks and streams, the soil can be turned in furrows that run perfectly straight for miles, and favours the development of " bonanza farms," where thousands of acres are cultivated in a single field.
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  • By the unequal development of the secondary cortex the stem becomes twoor three-lobed; the roots, which branch dichotomously, spring from the furrows between the lobes.
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  • with the scars on each rib rather widely spaced, and Favularia, where they are approximated and separated by transverse furrows, each rib thus consisting of a series of contiguous leaf-bases.
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  • Double furrow or multiple ploughs are a combination of two or more ploughs arranged in echelon so as to plough two or more furrows.
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  • In most cases, however, many such furrows are formed (polydisk strobilization), so that the animal comes to resemble a pile of saucers one above the other (fig.
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  • The surface must necessarily be thrown into ridges, and the furrows and cross-cuts cleared out after each process of tillage, and upon this surface-drainage as much labour is expended in twenty years as wouldsuffice to make under-drains enough to lay it permanently dry.
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  • There are many furrows in the sand where some creature has travelled about and doubled on its tracks; and, for wrecks, it is strewn with the cases of caddis-worms made of minute grains of white quartz.
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  • Then they rode downhill and uphill, across a ryefield trodden and beaten down as if by hail, following a track freshly made by the artillery over the furrows of the plowed land, and reached some fleches * which were still being dug.
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  • The parallel multiple striations are the gradiometer 's response to plow furrows in the soils which have a locally high level of magnetic susceptibility.
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  • The furrows disappeared and he chuckled as he moved away from the door jam.
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  • I only wanted to know … He paused and the furrows vanished as his brows lifted.
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  • The varnish to fix the webs is applied, not on the surface T as is usual, but on a bevel for the purpose,' the position of the webs depending on their tension to keep them in their furrows.
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  • As the aerial stem is traced down into the underground rhizome portion, these three mantles die out almost entirelythe central hydrom strand forming the bulk of the cylinder and its elements becoming mixed with thick-walled stereids; at the same time this central hydromstereom strand becomes three-lobed, with deep furrows between the lobes in which the few remaining leptoids run, separated from the central mass by a few starchy cells, the remains of the amylom sheath.
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  • Upper and lower jaws with teeth in furrows.
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  • The upper surface of the elytron is sharply folded inwards at intervals, so as to give rise to a regular series of external longitudinal furrows (striae) and to form a set of supports between the two chitinous layers forming the elytron.
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  • " At sowing do not plough large furrows, but little and well laid together, that the seed may fall evenly."
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  • 13) with longitudinal slit, and of a Metanemertine;(fig_ 14) with transverse groove and furrows.
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  • A ploughed field is divided into lands or sections of equal width separated by furrows.
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  • is the usual width; on the heaviest lands it may be as little as 5 yds., and in the latter case the furrows will act as drains into which the water flows from the intervening ridges.'
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  • Such valleys are very clearly indicated in the belts of the western Baltic by furrows a thousand yards wide and twenty to thirty fathoms deeper than the neighbouring sea-bed.
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  • Amongst the best known of the furrows of the continental shelf are the Cape Breton Deep, in the Bay of Biscay, the Hudson Furrow, southward of New York, the so-called Congo Canon, the Swatch of No Ground off the Ganges delta, the Bottomless Pit off the Niger delta, and numerous similar furrows on the west coast of North America and outside the fjords of Norway, Iceland and the west of Scotland, as well as in the.
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  • The beak or umbo of each valve is prominent and rounded, and a number of sharp ridges and furrows radiate from the apex to the free edge of the shell, which is crenated.
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  • - Fixed valve long, cylindro-conical, with three longitudinal furrows which correspond internally to two pillars for support of the siphons.
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  • above the adjoining furrows.
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  • The water overflowing from the feeders down the sides of the beds is received into small drains formed in the furrows between the beds.
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  • There are the same difficulties to be contended with as in hunting with the ordinary harrier, and a very few days' running will teach the youthful sportsman that he cannot run at the same pace over sound ground and over a deep ploughed field, up hill and down, or along and across furrows.
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  • There are two principal varieties - silver cochineal, which has a greyish-red colour, and the furrows of the body covered with a white bloom or fine down; and black cochineal, which is of a dark reddish brown, and destitute of bloom.
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  • The female is of much smaller size, and more slender; and, though the general tone of the hairy parts of the body is the same, the prominences, furrows, and colouring of the face are much less marked.
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  • ' ing longitudinal ridges, generally on the upper face; the stomata are in lines in the intervening furrows.
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  • Surface drainage is usually effected by ploughing the land into convex ridges off which the water runs into intervening furrows and is conveyed into ditches.
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  • The surface must necessarily be thrown into ridges, and the furrows and cross-cuts cleared out after each process of tillage, and upon this surface-drainage as much labour is expended in twenty years as would suffice to make under-drains enough to lay it permanently dry.
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  • long, and from 1 to 4 lines broad, and have two lateral furrows, a close fracture, a disagreeable rancid taste, and a faint, fishy odour, which last becomes more perceptible when the powder of, the drug is mixed with potash solution.
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  • share, turns two furrows, and is drawn by five horses.
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  • The common casts of Calamites are of this nature, representing the form of the hollow medulla, and bearing on their surface the print of the nodal constrictions and of the ridges and furrows on the inner surface of the wood.
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  • Comprehension removed the furrows between his brows.
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  • I only wanted to know … He paused and the furrows vanished as his brows lifted.
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  • Previously evaluation work in the northeastern part of the site recorded a series of medieval furrows.
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  • Years of poverty without hope had worn deep furrows into the brows of the beggars who approached us on the street.
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  • The permanent muscle tone present in many facial muscles make the creases look like deep furrows.
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  • The parallel multiple striations are the gradiometer's response to plow furrows in the soils which have a locally high level of magnetic susceptibility.
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  • It seems also to take a very clean V cut, as the webs can be laid in their furrows with an astonishing ease and precision.
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  • Generally a row of shorter grooves perpendicular to the first, and similarly provided with strong cilia, enlarges the surface of these furrows (fig.
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  • The one-way plough lays the furrows alternately to its left and right, so that they all slope in the same direction.
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  • One-way ploughs also leave the land level and dispense with the wide open furrows between the ridges which are left by the ordinary plough.
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  • When a field is ridged in the line of the greatest ascent of the ground, there is an obvious convenience in adopting the furrows as the site of the drains; but wherever this is not the case the drains must be laid off to suit the contour of the ground, irrespective of the furrows altogether.
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  • Limnaea and Planorbis); the existence of belts of dead poplars, patches of dead and moribund tamarisks, and vast expanses of withered reeds, all these crowning the tops of the jardangs, never found in the wind-scooped furrows; the presence of ripple-marks of aqueous origin on the leeward side of the clay terraces and in other wind-sheltered situations; and, in fact, by the general conformation, contour lines, and shapes of the deserts as a whole.
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  • Place your asparagus crowns in the furrows about two feet apart and cover with two to three inches of soil pressed firmly around the plants.
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  • It also contains less fat, so the skin will settle into lines and furrows - wrinkles, in other words.
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  • It helps to reduce brow furrows, eye lines, and other skin wrinkles.
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  • Over time, it works to diminish the appearance of drooping brows, crow's feet, forehead creases, laugh lines, furrows, feathered lips and more.
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  • The furrows are the great ocean basins, and these would still persist even if the land surface were enlarged to the 1400 fathoms contour.
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  • The latter shows marked xerophytic adaptations; the single vascular bundle was surrounded by a sheath of short tracheides, and the stomata were sheltered in two deep furrows of the lower surface.
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  • The stems, the surface of which exhibits a number of ridges with intervening furrows, perform the greater part of the work of assimilation.
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  • In some species certain of the legs bear on their ventral sides furrows with tumid lips and lined by smooth non-tuberculate epithelium; they are called coxal organs, and it appears that they can be everted.
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  • In the Thallophytes the cytoplasm may be segmented by constriction, due to the in-growth of a new cell wall from the old one, as in Spirogyra and Cladophora, or by the formation of cleavage furrows in which the new cell-wall is secreted, as occurs in the formation of the spores in many Algae and Fungi.
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  • The cheek-prominences are of an intense blue, the effect of which is heightened by deeply sunk longitudinal furrows of a darker tint, while the central line and termination of the nose are bright scarlet.
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  • These furrows have apparently been cut in situ with a very accurate engine; for not the slightest departure from parallelism can be detected in any of the movable webs relative to the fixed webs.
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  • He asked, furrows between lowered brows.
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