Fur sentence example

fur
  • The animals were sleek and their black fur shined in the sunlight.

    126
    55
  • Fur short and closely applied to the skin.

    99
    47
  • She was dressed in a long, white fur coat that Katie had no doubt cost more than a small house.

    51
    18
  • A yellow ball of hissing fur flew past her.

    34
    16
  • White-gray fur covered a body with moth-eaten wings, a hideous face and yellowed fangs.

    31
    13
    Advertisement
  • She understood all that awaited her only when, after stepping over the red baize at the entrance, she entered the hall, took off her fur cloak, and, beside Sonya and in front of her mother, mounted the brightly illuminated stairs between the flowers.

    27
    10
  • The cats' fur was matted from a bath in her dipping soup.

    36
    21
  • Xander was instantly fascinated by the sensation of downy fur and cotton spun so finely, it was like silk.

    23
    12
  • She jumped off in her graceful way, a bal­lerina in a black fur coat.

    14
    5
  • She brushed the dog's fur rather harshly and briskly.

    16
    7
    Advertisement
  • Who bought the orange juice with fur in it?

    21
    13
  • Gladys, bedecked in an orange caftan and a fox fur jacket, smiled a knowing smile to Cynthia and was gone.

    9
    2
  • Boiler Tap to, empty +G the same water is used over and over again, and no fresh deposit of fur occurs.

    10
    3
  • Hannah removed her fur coat with a graceful flourish to reveal her snug clothing and perfect body.

    11
    6
  • A massive creature with black fur and fangs paused in front of the open door, sniffing the air.

    5
    0
    Advertisement
  • For other sources see articles "Bohmische-Bruder" and "Zinzendorf" in Hauck's Realencyklopaedie; and for latest results of historical research, Zeitschrift fur Briidergeschichte (half-yearly).

    4
    0
  • He looked at the snowflakes fluttering above the fire and remembered a Russian winter at his warm, bright home, his fluffy fur coat, his quickly gliding sleigh, his healthy body, and all the affection and care of his family.

    4
    0
  • Pierre too when she had gone almost ran into the anteroom, restraining tears of tenderness and joy that choked him, and without finding the sleeves of his fur cloak threw it on and got into his sleigh.

    4
    0
  • He was armed with a musketoon (which he carried rather as a joke), a pike and an ax, which latter he used as a wolf uses its teeth, with equal ease picking fleas out of its fur or crunching thick bones.

    4
    0
  • He exhaled and began to pet her, still amazed at how thick and soft her fur felt.

    9
    6
    Advertisement
  • The region of the Red River and Assiniboine valleys was opened up by the fur traders, who came by the waterways from Lake Superior, and afterwards by the water communication with Hudson Bay.

    4
    1
  • The lime deposit or " fur " is a poor conductor of heat, and it is therefore most detrimental to the efficiency of the system to allow the interior of the boiler or any other portion to become furred up. Further, if not removed, the fur will in a short time bring about a fracture in the boiler.

    5
    2
  • General colour dark brown, the outer fur being long and rather loose, with a woolly under-coat.

    5
    2
  • Rostov, who had completely forgotten Denisov, not wishing anyone to forestall him, threw off his fur coat and ran on tiptoe through the large dark ballroom.

    5
    2
  • Why, she'll rush out more dead than alive just in the things she is wearing; if you delay at all there'll be tears and 'Papa' and 'Mamma,' and she's frozen in a minute and must go back--but you wrap the fur cloak round her first thing and carry her to the sleigh.

    4
    1
    Advertisement
  • In Marya Dmitrievna's anteroom the footman who helped him off with his fur coat said that the mistress asked him to come to her bedroom.

    4
    1
  • Her fur was lustrous and her nose looked like black velvet.

    16
    14
  • The spores of Rusts, Erysipheae an d other Fungi may be conveyed from plant to plant by snails; those of tree-killing polyporei, &c., by mice, rabbits, rats, &c., which rub their fur against the hymenophores.

    4
    2
  • It was formerly employed by the Hudson's Bay Company as part of a canoe route to the fur lands of the north.

    2
    0
  • Jackson ran both his hands through her fur, checking for injury.

    4
    3
    Advertisement
  • The kid had been cleaned and its copper colored fur was still damp.

    5
    4
  • One ear was torn half off and his fur was bloody around the collar.

    4
    3
  • They looked a little thin to her, and their fur looked shaggy.

    5
    4
  • Hopefully there wouldn't be any little surprise piles of fur and bones.

    4
    3
  • There is a good deal of variation in the colour of the fur, the prevailing tint being grey.

    5
    4
    Advertisement
  • By his energy, industry and sound judgment he gradually enlarged his operations, did business in all the fur markets of the world, and amassed an enormous fortune, - the largest up to that time made by any American.

    4
    3
  • He devoted many years to carrying out a project for organizing the fur trade from the Great Lakes to the Pacific Ocean, and thence by way of the Hawaiian Islands to China and India.

    2
    1
  • The portrait of Archbishop Warham at Lambeth, for instance, shows a rochet with fairly wide sleeves narrowing towards the wrists, where they are confined by fur cuffs.

    1
    0
  • It is covered with a dense soft fur 4 in.

    1
    0
  • The fur (q.v.) of this rodent was prized by the ancient Peruvians, who made coverlets and other articles with the skin, and at the present day the skins are exported in large numbers to Europe, where they are made into muffs, tippets and trimmings.

    1
    0
    Advertisement
  • It is of no particular service to man, neither its flesh nor its fur being generally put to use, while the statement that its presence is sufficient to drive off rats and mice appears to be without foundation.

    1
    0
  • Lieutenant Waxel and William Steller, a naturalist, left at the head of Bering's party after his death, by their researches laid the foundation of the important fur trade of these waters.

    1
    0
  • During his absence de Chastes had died, and his privileges and fur trade monopolies were conferred upon Pierre de Guast, sieur de Monts (1560-1611).

    1
    0
  • The door exploded open in flames, wood, and black fur.

    0
    0
  • A soft moan sounding nothing like her reached his ears, and then slowly, out from under the cover, emerged a huge wolf with bronze colored fur.

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Sarah crouched to the floor and timidly put her hand into Elisabeth's fur.

    0
    0
  • The occupant of the large chair in the corner of the living room launched towards her in a flurry of brown and black fur.

    0
    0
  • They present great diversities of size, length and thickness of fur, and coloration, although resembling each other in all important structural characters.

    0
    0
  • In northern countries the fur is longer and thicker, and the animal generally larger and more powerful than in the southern portion of its range.

    0
    0
  • The post was used by fur traders as late as 1718.

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Carpets (especially at Shusha), silk, cotton and woollen goods, felts and fur cloaks are made, and small arms in Daghestan and at Tiflis, Nukha and Sukhumkaleh; silversmiths' work at Tiflis, Akhaltsikh and Kutais; pottery at Elisavetpol and Shusha; leather shoe-making at Alexandropol, Nukha, Elisavetpol, Shusha and Tiflis; saddlery at Sukhum-kaleh and Ochemchiri on the Black Sea and at Temirkhan-shura in Daghestan; and copper work at Derbent and Alexandropol.

    0
    0
  • Jacques Vieau established here a post for the North-west Company of fur traders in 1795.

    0
    0
  • Almuces were occasionally made of silk or wool, but from the 13th century onward usually of fur, the hem being sometimes fringed with tails.

    0
    0
  • Hence they were known in England as "grey amices" (from the ordinary colour of the fur), to distinguish them from the liturgical amice.

    0
    0
  • The fur trade of the Black Sea furnished the pretext for the next war (1355-54), which ended in the crushing defeat of Venice at Sapienza, and the loss of her entire fleet.

    0
    0
  • Several of them, such as Echinomys and Loncheres, are rat-like creatures with spiny or bristly fur.

    0
    0
  • It is rather a heavilybuilt animal, with a broad head, no distinct neck, and short limbs, the eyes are small, and the ears project very little beyond the fur.

    0
    0
  • As their fur is an important article of commerce, large numbers are annually killed, being either trapped or speared at the mouths of their holes.

    0
    0
  • The city continued to be the largest primary fur market of the world, with sales of $27,200,000 in 1920.

    0
    0
  • The Berichte der deutschen chemischen Gesellschaft, published by the Berlin Chemical Society, the Chemisches Centralblatt, which is confined to abstracts of papers appearing in other journals, the Zeitschrift fur Chemie, and Liebig's Annalen der Chemie are the most important of the general magazines.

    0
    0
  • Others devoted to special phases are the Journal fur praktische Chemie, founded by Erdmann in 1834, the Zeitschrift fur anorganische Chemie and the Zeitschrift fur physikalische Chemie.

    0
    0
  • Practical methods are treated in Lassar-Cohn, Arbeitsmethoden fur organisch-chemische Laboratorien (4th ed., 1906-1907).

    0
    0
  • For not only has the weight been more than quadrupled in some of the larger breeds, and the structure of the skull and other parts of the skeleton greatly altered, but the proportionate size of the brain has been reduced and the colour and texture of the fur altered in a remarkable manner.

    0
    0
  • The Angora rabbit is characterized by the extreme elongation and fineness of the fur, which in good specimens reaches 6 or 7 in.

    0
    0
  • The Angoras most valued are albinos, with pure white fur and pink eyes; in some parts of the Continent they are kept by the peasants and clipped regularly.

    0
    0
  • Amongst the breeds which are valued for the distribution of colour on the fur are the Himalayan and the Dutch.

    0
    0
  • The silver grey is a uniform-coloured breed, the fur of which is a rich chinchilla grey, varying in depth in the different strains.

    0
    0
  • From the greater value of the fur, silver greys have been frequently employed to stock warrens, as they breed true to colour in the open if the ordinary wild rabbits are excluded.

    0
    0
  • The largest and heaviest of all is the Flemish giant, with iron-grey fur above and white below.

    0
    0
  • Valuable fur is obtained from the white and blue fox, the skin of the eider-duck and the polar bear.

    0
    0
  • The Bochumer Verein fur Bergbau (mining) and Gusstahl Fabrication (steel manufacture) is one of the principal trusts in this industry, founded in 1854.

    0
    0
  • When first born these are clothed with a uniform slaty-grey fur, which in due course gives place to a coat of more tawny hue than the adult livery.

    0
    0
  • In a second phase of the species, the colour, which often displays a slaty hue (whence the name of blue fox), remains more or less the same throughout the year, the winter coat being, however, recognizable by the great length of the fur.

    0
    0
  • The prevailing colour of the fur of the upper parts is iron-grey.

    0
    0
  • Pacas may be distinguished from agoutis by their heavier and more compact build, the longitudinal rows of light spots on the fur, the five-toed hind-feet, and the peculiar structure of the skull, in which the cheek-bones are expanded to form large capsules on the sides of the face, each enclosing a cavity opening on the side of the cheek.

    0
    0
  • The fur is short, dense and rather soft to the touch, and composed of an extremely fine and close under-fur, and of longer hairs which project beyond this, each of which is very slender at the base, and expanded, flattened and glossy towards the free end.

    0
    0
  • One of the most remarkable periodicals of this class was the Jahrbucher fur wissenschaftliche Kritik (1827-1846), first published by Cotta.

    0
    0
  • The Allgemeine Monatschrift fur Literatur (1850), conducted after 1851 by Droysen, Nitzsch and others, continued only down to 1854; the Literarisches Centralblatt (1850) is still published.

    0
    0
  • Though all yield fur of serviceable quality, the commercial value varies immensely, not only according to the species from which it is obtained, but according to individual variation, depending upon age, sex, season, and other circumstances.

    0
    0
  • Enormous numbers of animals are caught, chiefly in traps, to supply the demand of the fur trade, Siberia and North America being the principal localities from which they are obtained.

    0
    0
  • The general ` brown' has a greyish cast, as far as the under fur is concerned, and is overlaid with rich lustrous blackish-brown in places where the long bristly hairs prevail.

    0
    0
  • The importance of the fur of this animal as an article of commerce may be judged of from the fact that 15,000 skins were sold in one year by the Hudson's Bay Company as long ago as 1743.

    0
    0
  • It is principally trapped during the colder months, from October to April, when the fur is in good condition, as it is nearly valueless during the shedding in summer.

    0
    0
  • In 1816 Fort Crawford was erected - it was rebuilt on a different site in 1829 - and in 1820 one of the principal depots of the American Fur Company was established here.

    0
    0
  • It has a long tail and shaggy fur; the general colour of the latter being dark grey, with conspicuous black and white markings on the face.

    0
    0
  • Reports of many minor expeditions and researches have appeared in the Reports of the Fishery Board for Scotland; the Marine Biological Association at Plymouth; the Kiel Commission for the Investigation of the Baltic; the Berlin Institut fur Meereskunde; the bluebooks of the Hydrographic Department; the various official reports to the British, German, Russian, Finnish, Norwegian, Swedish, Danish, Belgian and Dutch governments on the respective work of these countries in connexion with the international cooperation in the North Sea; the Bulletin du musee oceanographique de Monaco (1903 seq.); the Scottish Geographical Magazine; the Geographical Journal; Petermanns Mitteilungen; Wagner's Geogi'aphisches Jahrbuch; the Proceedings and Transactions of the Royal Societies of London and Edinburgh; the Annalen der Hydrographie; and the publications of the Swedish Academy of Sciences.

    0
    0
  • This is the standard Catholic treatment of the Reformation, and is being supplemented by a series of monographs, Ergcinzungen zu Janssens Geschichte des deutschen Volkes, which have been appearing since 1898 and correspond with the Protestant Schriften des Vereins fur Reformationsgeschichte (1883 sqq.).

    0
    0
  • They are covered with a fur to which they owe their chief commercial value; this consists of two kinds of hair - the one close-set, silky and of a greyish colour, the other much coarser and longer, and of a reddish brown.

    0
    0
  • The American species is also greatly diminished in numbers from incessant pursuit for the sake of its valuable fur.

    0
    0
  • In 1599, under the encouragement of Henry IV., speculators began to frequent the St Lawrence in pursuit of the fur trade.

    0
    0
  • It was true that the most active French colonial element, the trappers, were barbarized by the natives, and that the pursuit of the fur trade and other causes had brought the French into sharp collision with the most formidable of the native races, the confederation known as the Five (or Six) Nations.

    0
    0
  • The fur trade, the horse, the gun, disturbed the sedentary habit of American tribes.

    0
    0
  • Of the fur and game animals which were inhabitants of the primeval forests few of the larger species remain except in the Adirondack region.

    0
    0
  • The merchants of Amsterdam and Hoorn soon formed themselves into the New Netherland Company, and on the 11th of October 1614 received from the States-General a three years' monopoly of the Dutch fur trade in New Netherland, i.e.

    0
    0
  • The Company promised to permit the patroons to engage in the fur trade, whenever it had no commissary of its own, subject to a tax of one guilder (40 cents) on each skin, and to engage in other trade along the coast from Newfoundland to Florida subject to a tax of 5% on goods shipped to Europe.

    0
    0
  • Pursuing the same wise policy he established a trading post at Oswego in 1722 and fortified it in 1727, and thereby placed the Iroquois in the desirable position of middlemen in a profitable fur trade with the " Far Indians."

    0
    0
  • The story of the struggle of the rival British and American companies to control the fur trade, with the final dominance of the Hudson's Bay Company has been told under Oregon and need not be repeated.

    0
    0
  • The report of Lewis and Clark attracted many traders and trappers, and within a few years the Missouri Fur Company, the Rocky Mountain Fur Company, the Hudson Bay Company and the American Fur Company had established fortified trading posts on the Missouri, the Yellowstone, the Marias, the Milk and other rivers; the most prominent among these was Fort Benton, which was established in 1846 at the head of navigation on the Missouri, and was made the headquarters of the American Fur Company.

    0
    0
  • The " Yellowstone," a steamboat sent out by the American Fur Company, ascended the Missouri to Fort Pierre in 1831 and to the mouth of the Yellowstone river in 1832.

    0
    0
  • Fort Pierre, which was founded by the American Fur Company about 1832, was sold to the United States government ' The rate for direct heirs and brothers and sisters is non-progressive.

    0
    0
  • In 1795 Jacques Vieau, a Frenchman in the employ of the North-Western Fur Company, established a permanent post here, which seems to have continued, under his direction, with practically no interruption until 1820, when it was superseded by that of Astor's American Fur Company.

    0
    0
  • This relatively small cat, uniformly coloured, is generally of some shade of brownish-grey, but in some individuals the fur has a rufous coat, while in others grey predominates.

    0
    0
  • Chaboillez, a French trader in the service of the North-West Fur Company, built a trading post on the southern bank of the Pembina river, near its mouth, but this was soon abandoned.

    0
    0
  • The dissipation of the dissolved carbon dioxide results in the formation of "fur" in kettles or boilers, and if the solution is falling, as from the roof of a cave, in the formation of stalactites and stalagmites.

    0
    0
  • In the whiteness of its fur also, it shows such an assimilation in colour to that of surrounding nature as must be of considerable service in concealing it from its prey.

    0
    0
  • Land bears have the soles of the feet destitute of hair, and their fur more or less shaggy.

    0
    0
  • The fur is usually brownish, but there are black, blackish-grey and yellowish varieties.

    0
    0
  • Its fur is usually of a yellowish-brown colour, coarse and grizzled, and of little value commercially, while its flesh, unlike that of other bears, is uneatable even by the Indians.

    0
    0
  • It is similar in size to the brown bear, but its fur is of a soft even texture, and of a shining black colour, to which it owes its commercial value.

    0
    0
  • It differs in the colour of its fur, which is usually yellowish-white, and of its eyes, which are pinky-red.

    0
    0
  • Perfectly black leopards, which in certain lights show the characteristic markings on the fur, are not uncommon, and are examples of melanism, occurring as individual variations, sometimes in one cub out of a litter of which the rest are normally coloured, and therefore not indicating a distinct race, much less a species.

    0
    0
  • The artificers in gold and silver melted the metals by means of a reed-blowpipe and cast them solid or hollow, and were also skilled in hammered work and chasing, as some fine specimens remain to show, though the famous animals modelled with gold and silver, fur, feathers and scales have disappeared.

    0
    0
  • The Laconia Company received - its first grant under the erroneous impression that the Piscataqua river had its source in or near Lake Champlain, and its principal object was to establish an extensive fur trade with the Iroquois Indians.

    0
    0
  • It was founded in 1811, as a depot for the fur trade, by John Jacob Astor, in whose honour it was named.

    0
    0
  • In 1821, while occupied by the North-West Fur Company, it was burned and practically abandoned, only a few settlers remaining.

    0
    0
  • It will be observed that the abbey precincts are surrounded by a strong wall, fur nished at intervals with watch-towers and other defensive works.

    0
    0
  • The United States claimed as a matter of right an exclusive jurisdiction over the sealing industry in Bering Sea; they also contended that the protection of the fur seal was, upon grounds both of morality and interest, an international duty, and should be secured by international arrangement.

    0
    0
  • They also claimed an interest in the fur seals, involving the right to protect them outside the three-mile limit.

    0
    0
  • In 1608 he began the settlement which was named Quebec. From 1608 to his death in 1635 Champlain worked unceasingly to develop Canada as a colony, to promote the fur trade and to explore the interior.

    0
    0
  • During the next sixty years the fisheries and the fur trade received some attention, but no colonization was undertaken.

    0
    0
  • In The Far West, However, A Little Group Of Adventurous Fur Traders, Of Whom Sir Alexander Mackenzie, David Thompson, Alexander Henry And Daniel Williams Harmon May Be Taken As Conspicuous Types, Were Unfolding The Vast Expanse Of The Future Dominion.

    0
    0
  • In Ireland and the southern districts of Sweden it is permanently of a light fulvous grey colour, with black tips to the ears, but in more northerly districts the fur - except the black ear-tips - changes to white in winter, and still farther north the animal appears to be white at all seasons of the year.

    0
    0
  • The fur varies exceedingly in character, - in some, like the chinchillas and hares, being fine and soft, while in others it is more or less replaced by spines on the upper surface, as in spiny rats and porcupines; these spines in several genera, as Xerus, Acomys, Platacanthomys, Echinothrix, Loncheres and Echinomys, being flattened.

    0
    0
  • Perognathus and Heteromys have rooted molars; the latter genus is distinguished by the presence of flattened spines among the fur, and has species extending into South America.

    0
    0
  • Of these, Hypogeomys is a large, long-tailed, fawn-coloured rat, with large ears and feet; Nesomys is a red species, with long hair; Brachytarsomys is shortfooted and long-tailed, with velvety fawn fur; HallQmys has elongated hind feet, as has also Macrotarsomys; Gymnuromys is naked-tailed; and the several species of Eliurus are dormouselike.

    0
    0
  • In some cases there may be spines among the fur.

    0
    0
  • The spiny mice, Acornys (or Acanthomys), of Western Asia, Cyprus and Africa, take their name from the fur being almost entirely replaced by flattened spines, and are further distinguished by the rudimentary coronoid process of the lower jaw.

    0
    0
  • The single species is from Tasmania, though it has been found fossil in New South Wales; it is somewhat similar in size and appearance to the English water-rat, but has longer and softer fur.

    0
    0
  • The family, Chinchillidae, typified by the wellknown chinchilla, includes a small number of South American rodents with large ears and proportionately great auditory bullae in the skull, elongated hind-limbs, bushy tails, very soft fur and perfect clavicles.

    0
    0
  • The typical genus is represented by the degu (Octodon degus) and several nearly related species; other genera being Ctenomys, Octodontomys (Neoctodon), Aconaemys, Spalacopus and Abrocoma; the latter taking its name from its unusually soft fur.

    0
    0
  • The spiny rabbit, separated from Lepus by Blyth in 1845 under the name of Caprolagus hispidus, is an inhabitant of Assam and the adjacent districts, and distinguished by its harsh, bristly fur and short ears and tail.

    0
    0
  • After bloodshed between the rival fur companies, and their union in 1821, Fort Garry was erected, as a trading post and settlers' depot, and with somewhat elaborate structure, with stone walls, bastions and portholes.

    0
    0
  • The crusene was a fur coat, while the serc or smoc seems to have been an undergarment and probably sleeveless.

    0
    0
  • Specimens vary considerably in size and colour, but the usual length is about 5 in., and the soft fur yellowish-brown, marked with spots of dark brown and black.

    0
    0
  • It has a short, rounded head, obtuse muzzle, small bead-like eyes, and short rounded ears, nearly concealed by the fur.

    0
    0
  • In these animals the eyeball and the fur of the body are unpigmented, but the tips of the ear pinnae and extremities of the fore and hind limbs, together with the tail, are marked by more or less well defined colour.

    0
    0
  • In the case of the Norway hare, it has been stated that a general moult, including all the hairs and under fur, takes place and new white hairs are substituted.

    0
    0
  • Its name is derived, as Durandus and Gerland also affirm, from the fact that it was formerly put on over the fur garments which used to be worn in church and at divine service as a protection against the cold.

    0
    0
  • For one kind of meat we could substitute another; wool could be replaced by cotton, silk or fur; were our common silicate glass gone, we could probably perfect and cheapen some other of the transparent solids; but even if the earth could be made to yield any substitute for the forty or fifty million tons of iron which we use each year for rails, wire, machinery, and structural purposes of many kinds, we could not replace either the steel of our cutting tools or the iron of our magnets, the basis of all commercial electricity.

    0
    0
  • The fur differs from the overhair, in that it is soft, silky, curly, downy and barbed lengthwise, while the overhair is straight, smooth and comparatively rigid.

    0
    0
  • These properties of fur constitute its essential value for felting purposes, and mark its difference from wool and silk; the first, after some slight preparation by the aid of hot water, readily unites its fibres into a strong and compact mass; the others can best be managed by spinning and weaving.

    0
    0
  • On the living animal the overhair keeps the fur filaments apart, prevents their tendency to felt, and protects them from injury - thus securing to the animal an immunity from cold and storm; while, as a matter of fact, this very overhair, though of an humbler name, is most generally the beauty and pride of the pelt, and marks its chief value with the furrier.

    0
    0
  • We arrive thus at two distinct and opposite uses and values of fur.

    0
    0
  • Regarded as useful for felt it is denominated staple fur, while with respect to its use with and on the pelt it is called fancy fur.

    0
    0
  • The manufacture of fur into a felt is of comparatively modern origin, while the use of fur pelts as a covering for the body, for the couch, or for the tent is coeval with the earliest history of all northern tribes and nations.

    0
    0
  • The pelt or skin is requisite to keep out the piercing wind and driving storm, while the fur and overhair ward off the cold; and "furs" are as much a necessity to-day among more northern peoples as they ever were in the days of barbarism.

    0
    0
  • The Carnivora include bears, wolverines, wolves, raccoons, foxes, sables, martens, skunks, kolinskis, fitch, fishers, ermines, cats, sea otters, fur seals, hair seals, lions, tigers, leopards, lynxes, jackals, &c. The Rodentia include beavers, nutrias, musk-rats or musquash, marmots, hamsters, chinchillas, hares, rabbits, squirrels, &c. The Ungulata include Persian, Astrachan, Crimean, Chinese and Tibet lambs, mouflon, guanaco, goats, ponies, &c. The Marsupialia include opossums, wallabies and kangaroos.

    0
    0
  • These, of course, could be subdivided, but for general purposes of the fur trade the above is deemed sufficient.

    0
    0
  • The question frequently arises, not only for those interested in the production of fur apparel, but for those who derive so much comfort and pleasure from its use, whether the supply of fur-bearing animals is likely to be exhausted.

    0
    0
  • The youngest, known as "broadtails," are killed when a few days old, but for the well-developed curly fur, the lambs must be six or seven weeks old.

    0
    0
  • During these weeks their bodies are covered with leather so that the fur may develop in close, light and clean curls.

    0
    0
  • The experiment has been tried of rearing rare, wild, fur-bearing animals in captivity, and although climatic conditions and food have been precisely as in their natural environment, the fur has been poor in quality and bad in colour, totally unlike that taken from animals in the wild state.

    0
    0
  • The majority of animals taken for their fur are trapped or snared, the gun being avoided as much as possible in order that the coat may be quite undamaged.

    0
    0
  • After the skins have been carefully removed - the sooner after death the better for the subsequent condition of the fur - they are lightly tacked out, pelt outwards, and, without being exposed to the sun or close contact with a fire, allowed to dry in a hut or shady place where there is some warmth or movement of air.

    0
    0
  • Fur skins taken out of season are indifferent, and the hair is liable to shed itself freely; a good furrier will, however, reject such faulty specimens in the manufacturing.

    0
    0
  • The finest furs are obtained from the Arctic and northern regions, and the lower the latitude the less full and silky the fur, till, at the torrid zone, fur gives place to harsh hair without any underwool.

    0
    0
  • Of sealskins there are two distinct classes, the fur seals and the hair seals.

    0
    0
  • The latter have no growth of fur under the stiff top hair and are killed, with few exceptions (generally of the marbled seals), on account of the oil and leather they yield.

    0
    0
  • The best fur seals are found off the Alaska coast and down as far south as San Francisco.

    0
    0
  • As regards density of colour the skunk or black marten has the blackest fur, and some cats of the domestic kind, specially reared for their fur, are nearly black.

    0
    0
  • Some Russian sables are of a very dense bluish brown almost a black, which is the origin undoubtedly of the term "sables," while some, from one district in particular, have a quantity of silver hairs, evenly interspersed in the fur, a peculiarity which has nothing to do with age.

    0
    0
  • These are the Hudson's Bay Co., Russian Fur Co., Alaska Commercial Co., North American Commercial Co., Russian Sealskin Co., Harmony Fur Co., Royal Greenland Fur Co., American Fur Co., Missouri Co.

    0
    0
  • The principal sales of general furs are held in London in January and March, smaller offerings being made in June and October; while the bulk of fur sealskins is sold separately in December.

    0
    0
  • In addition to the fur skins coming from North America vast numbers from Russia, Siberia, China, Japan, Australia and South America are offered during the same periods at public auction.

    0
    0
  • The annual collection of fur skins varies considerably in quantity according to the demand and to the good or had climatic conditions of the season; and it is impossible to give a complete record, as many skins are used in the country of their origin or exported direct to merchants.

    0
    0
  • Widely distributed in North America, the best come from Canada, are costly and are used for military caps, boas, muffs, trimmings, carriage rugs and coachmen's capes, and the fur wears exceedingly well.

    0
    0
  • The depths of fur quoted are the greatest, but there are plenty of good useful skins possessing a lesser depth.

    0
    0
  • Caracal.-A small lynx from India, the fur very poor, seldom imported.

    0
    0
  • A few come from China, but the fur is yellowish-grey, slightly spotted and worth little.

    0
    0
  • Although in colour, weight and warmth they are excellent, the fur is apt to become loose and to fall off with friction of wear.

    0
    0
  • Some small wild cats, very poor flat fur of a pale fawn colour with yellow spots, are imported from Australia and used for linings.

    0
    0
  • Chinchilla, La Plata, incorrectly named and known in the trade as "bastard chinchilla," size 9 X4 in., in a similar species, but owing to lower altitudes and warmer climatic conditions of habitation is smaller, with shorter and less beautiful fur, the underwool colour being darker and the top colour less pure.

    0
    0
  • Fur is longer and weaker and poorer and yellower than chinchilla.

    0
    0
  • DoG.-The only dogs that are used in the fur trade in civilized countries are those imported from China, which are heavy and coarse, and only used in the cheaper trade, chiefly for rugs.

    0
    0
  • When this fur is symmetrically spotted with black lamb pieces it is styled miniver, in which form it is used at the grand coronation functions of British sovereigns.

    0
    0
  • The tails are almost black and make up most handsomely into trimmings, muffs, &c. Tails worked separately in these forms are as rich and fine and more durable than any other fur suitable for a like purpose.

    0
    0
  • The fur of the skin itself is something like a dark silky raccoon, but is not as attractive as the tails.

    0
    0
  • English mayors' and civic officials' robes are frequently trimmed with this fur in lieu of sable.

    0
    0
  • Those from the west are larger than the average, with more fur of a brighter tone.

    0
    0
  • The fur is fairly serviceable for carriage rugs, the leather being stout, but its harshness of quality and nondescript colour does not contribute to make it a favourite.

    0
    0
  • Farther north, especially near the sea, the fur is coarse.

    0
    0
  • The skins, being the strongest of foxes', both in the fur and pelt, are serviceable.

    0
    0
  • The fur upon the necks usually runs dark, almost black, and in some cases the fur is black halfway down the length of the skin, in rarer cases three-quarters of the length and, in the most exceptional instances, the whole length, and when this is the case they are known as "Natural Black Foxes" and fetch enormous prices.

    0
    0
  • The even silvery sorts are highly esteemed, and the fur is one of the most effective and precious.

    0
    0
  • The farther south they are found, the poorer and coarser the fur.

    0
    0
  • The fur is not used in Great Britain, as formerly, and the greater quantity, known 'as mohair, is now imported for purposes of weaving.

    0
    0
  • It has a very long neck and exceedingly soft woolly fur of a light reddish-fawn colour with very white flanks.

    0
    0
  • The fur is very flat and poor, of a yellowish pale brown with a little marking of black.

    0
    0
  • The common hare of Europe does not much interest the furrier, the fur being chiefly used by makers of hatters' felt.

    0
    0
  • The fur is of the whitest when killed in winter, and that upon the flanks of the animal is very much longer than that upon its back.

    0
    0
  • This fur is dyed jet black and various shades of brown and grey, and manufactured into articles for the small drapers and for exportation.

    0
    0
  • The fur has often been designated as red or Tatar sable.

    0
    0
  • It cannot be regarded as an economical fur, as the pelt is too delicate to resist hard wear.

    0
    0
  • The first variety inhabit the Himalayas and are beautifully covered with a deep soft fur quite long compared to the flat harsh hair of the Bengal sort.

    0
    0
  • The Chinese are of a medium orange brown colour, but full in fur.

    0
    0
  • The fur upon the flanks is longer and white with very pronounced markings of dark spots, and this part of the skin is generally worked separately from the rest and is very effective for gown trimmings.

    0
    0
  • The British Hussar busbies are made of the dark brown lynx, and it is the free silky easy movement of the fur with the least disturbance in the atmosphere that gives it such a pleasing effect.

    0
    0
  • Lynx Cat or BAY Lynx.-Is about half the size and depth of fur of a lynx proper, and inhabits the central United States.

    0
    0
  • The fur is a yellowish brown and rather harsh and brittle and has no underwool.

    0
    0
  • Since, however, the value of all good furs has advanced, dyers and manufacturers have made very successful efforts with this fur.

    0
    0
  • The tails when split into two or three, with small strips of narrow tape so as to separate the otherwise dense fur, formerly made very handsome sets of trimmings, ties and muffs, and the probabilities are, as with other fashions, such use will have its period of revival.

    0
    0
  • In the central states of America the colour is a good brown, but in the north-west and south-west the fur is coarse and generally pale.

    0
    0
  • Values have greatly increased, and the fur possessing good qualities as to colour and durability will doubtless always be in good request.

    0
    0
  • Among the species of monkeys only one interests to any extent the fur trade, and that is the black monkey taken on the west coast of Africa (Colobus satanas).

    0
    0
  • There is no other fur that is so thick, and it is eminently suitable for sleighing rugs, for which purpose it is highly prized in Canada.

    0
    0
  • It is a very useful fur for men's coat linings and ladies' driving or motoring coats, being warm, durable and not too heavy.

    0
    0
  • As it is, this fur is only used for these smaller articles for the cheaper trade.

    0
    0
  • Is a rodent known in natural history as the coypu, about half the size of a beaver, and when unhaired has not more than half, generally less, the depth of fur, which is also not so close.

    0
    0
  • Formerly the fur was only used for hatters' felt, but with the rise in prices of furs these skins have been more carefully removed and-with improved dressing, unhairing and silvering processes-the best provides a very effective and suitable fur for ladies' coats, capes, stoles, muffs, hats and gloves, while the lower qualities make very useful, light-weighted and inexpensive linings for men's or women's driving coats.

    0
    0
  • With, however, recent experiments in brown and skunk coloured dyes, it bids fair to become a popular fur.

    0
    0
  • Is a totally different nature of fur to the American.

    0
    0
  • Their fur is pretty, warm and as yet inexpensive, and is useful for rugs, coat linings, stoles, muffs, trimmings and perambulator aprons.

    0
    0
  • But it is in the colder northern regions that they are found in the greatest numbers and with the best fur or underwool, the top hair, which, with the exception of the scarce and very rich dark brown specimens they have in common with most aquatic animals, is pulled out before the skins are manufactured.

    0
    0
  • Both as a fur and as a pelt it is extremely strong, but owing to its short and close wool it is usually made up for the linings, collars and cuffs of men's coats.

    0
    0
  • Unlike other aquatic animals the skin undergoes no process of unhairing, the fur being of a rich dense silky wool with the softest and shortest of water hairs.

    0
    0
  • The fur is most highly esteemed in Russia and China; in the latter country it is used to trim mandarins' state robes.

    0
    0
  • It has fur similar to otter, is of aquatic habits, being web-footed with spurs of a cock and the bill of a duck.

    0
    0
  • Is an animal varying considerably in size and in quality and colour of fur, according to the part of North America in which it is found.

    0
    0
  • The very finest skins are chiefly used for stoles and muffs, and the general run for coachmen's capes and carriage rugs, which are very handsome when the tails, which are marked with rings of dark and light fur alternately, are left on.

    0
    0
  • Raccoons are used in enormous quantities in Canada for men's coats, the fur outside.

    0
    0
  • From Japan a similar animal is obtained in smaller quantities with very good but longer fur, of yellowish motley light-brown shades.

    0
    0
  • It is more often imported and sold as Japanese fox, but its resemblance to the fur of the American raccoon is so marked as to surely identify it.

    0
    0
  • It is the most useful fur for use in America or Russia, having a full quantity of fur which will retain heat.

    0
    0
  • The skins are sold in the trade sale as martens, but as there are many that are of a very dark colour and the majority are almost as silky as the Russian sable, the retail trade has for generations back applied the term of sable to this fur.

    0
    0
  • These skins belong to a species of marten, very similar to the European and American, but much more silky in the nature of their fur.

    0
    0
  • This class of skin is the most expensive fur in the world, reckoning values by a square foot unit.

    0
    0
  • The quality too is lower, that is, the fur is not so close or deep, but they are very effective, particularly for close-fitting garments, as they possess the least appearance of bulk.

    0
    0
  • With, however, the exception of the pick of the Lobos Island seals the fur of the southern sea seals is very poor and only suitable for the cheapest market.

    0
    0
  • The preparation of seal skin occupies a longer time than any other fur skin, but its fine rich effect when finished and its many properties of warmth and durability well repay it.

    0
    0
  • These fur skins are dyed black or dark brown and are used for military caps and hearth-rugs.

    0
    0
  • The Hungarian peasants are very fond of their natural brown sheep coats, the leather side of which is not lined, but embellished by a very close fancy embroidery, worked upon the leather itself; these garments are reversible, the fur being worn inside when the weather is cold.

    0
    0
  • If it were not for its disagreeable odour, skunk would be worth much more than the usual market value, as it is naturally the blackest fur, silky in appearance and most durable.

    0
    0
  • The fur is excellent for stoles, boas, collars, cuffs, muffs and trimmings.

    0
    0
  • It has very short hair and is a poor fur even for the cheapest linings, which is the only use to which the skin could be put.

    0
    0
  • This measurement refers to the Russian and Siberian sorts, which are the only kind imported for the fur.

    0
    0
  • The numerous other species are too poor in their coats to attract notice from fur dealers.

    0
    0
  • The back of the Russian squirrel has an even close fur varying from a clear bluish-grey to a reddishbrown, the bellies in the former being of a flat quality and white, in the latter yellowish.

    0
    0
  • The fur is too long and bulky for linings.

    0
    0
  • Vicuna is a species of long-necked sheep native to South America, bearing some resemblance to the guanaco, but the fur is shorter, closer and much finer.

    0
    0
  • The colour is a pale golden-brown and the fur is held in great repute in South America for carriage rugs.

    0
    0
  • This peculiar character alone stamps it as a distinguished fur, in addition to which it has the excellent advantage of being the most durable fur for carriage aprons, as well as the richest in colour.

    0
    0
  • Hence it is an expensive fur, but its excellent qualities make it valuable.

    0
    0
  • The dressing of the pelt or skin that is to be preserved for fur is totally different to the making of leather; in the latter tannic acid is used, but never should be with a fur skin, as is so often done by natives of districts where a regular fur trade is not carried on.

    0
    0
  • The results of applying tannic acid are to harden the pelt and discolour and weaken the fur.

    0
    0
  • This process with a moderate degree of heat thoroughly cleans it of external greasy matter, and all that is necessary before manufacturing is to gently tap the fur upon a leather cushion stuffed with horsehair with smooth canes of a flexibility suited to the strength of the fur.

    0
    0
  • With seal skins the process is longer than with any other fur preparation and the series of processes engage many specialists, each man being constantly kept upon one section of the work.

    0
    0
  • The work done by English furriers was generally good, but since about 1865 has considerably improved on account of the influx of German workmen, who have long been celebrated for excellent fur work, being in their own country obliged to satisfy officially appointed experts and to obtain a certificate of capacity before they can be there employed.

    0
    0
  • It is a recognized law among high-class furriers that furs should be simply arranged, that is, that an article should consist of one fur or of two furs of a suitable contrast, to which lace may be in some cases added with advantage.

    0
    0
  • As illustrative of this, it may be explained that any brown tone of fur such as sable, marten, mink, black marten, beaver, nutria, &c., will go well upon black or very dark-brown furs, while those of a white or grey nature, such as ermine, white lamb, chinchilla, blue fox, silver fox, opossum, grey squirrel, grey lamb, will set well upon seal or black furs, as Persian lamb, broadtail, astrachan, caracul lamb, &c. White is also permissible upon some light browns and greys, but brown motley colours and greys should never be in contrast.

    0
    0
  • The introduction of a third fur in the same garment or indiscriminate selection of colours of silk linings, braids, buttons, &c., often spoils an otherwise good article.

    0
    0
  • Perhaps for ingenuity and the latest methods of manipulating skins in the manufacturing of furs the Americans lead the way, but as fur cutters are more or less of a roving and cosmopolitan character the larger fur businesses in London, Berlin, Vienna, St Petersburg, Paris and New York are guided by the same thorough and comparatively advanced principles.

    0
    0
  • During the period just mentioned the tailors' methods of scientific pattern cutting have been adopted by the leading furriers in place of the old chance methods of fur cutters, so that to-day a fur garment may be as accurately and gracefully fitted as plush or velvet, and with all good houses a material pattern is fitted and approved before the skins are cut.

    0
    0
  • Through the advent of German and American fur sewingmachines since about 1890 fur work has been done better and cheaper.

    0
    0
  • A very great feature of German and Russian work is the fur linings called rotondes, sacques or plates, which are made for their home use and exportation chiefly to Great Britain, America and France.

    0
    0
  • The majority of heads, gills or throats, sides or flanks, paws and pieces of skins cut up in the fur workshops of Great Britain, America and France, weighing many tons, are chiefly exported to Leipzig, and made up in neighbouring countries and Greece, where labour can be obtained at an alarmingly low rate.

    0
    0
  • Another great source of inexpensive furs is China, and for many years past enormous quantities of dressed furs, many of which are made up in the form of linings and Chinese looseshaped garments, have been imported by England, Germany and France for the lower class of business; the garments are only regarded as so much fur and are reworked.

    0
    0
  • While the work is often cleverly done as to matching and manipulation of the pelt which is very soft, there are great objections in the odour and the brittleness or weakness of the fur.

    0
    0
  • The best are a species of raccoon usually sold as fox, and, being of close long quality of fur, they are serviceable for boas, collars, muffs and carriage aprons.

    0
    0
  • The hat trade is largely interested in the fur piece trade, the best felt hats being made from beaver and musquash wool and the cheaper sorts from nutria, hare and rabbit wools.

    0
    0
  • The opportunities for cheating in the fur trade are very considerable, and most serious frauds have been perpetrated in the selling of sables that have been coloured or "topped"; that is, just the tips of the hairs stained dark to represent more expensive skins.

    0
    0
  • The fur, apart from a clumsy appearance, is so brittle, however, as to be of scarcely any service whatever.

    0
    0
  • White hares are frequently sold as white fox, but the fur is weak, brittle and exceedingly poor compared to fox and possesses no thick underwool.

    0
    0
  • But if sold upon its own merits, pointed fox is a durable fur.

    0
    0
  • Furs kept in such a condition are not only immune from the ravages of the larvae of moth, but all the natural oils in the pelt and fur are conserved, so that its colour and life are prolonged, and the natural deterioration is arrested.

    0
    0
  • Any chemical that is strong enough to destroy the life in a moth egg would also be sufficiently potent to injure the fur itself.

    0
    0
  • The following estimates of durability refer to the use of fur when made up "hair outside" in garments or stoles, not as a lining.

    0
    0
  • The durability of fur used as linings, which is affected by other conditions, is set forth separately.

    0
    0
  • Otter with the water hairs removed, the strongest fur suited for linings, is here taken as the standard.

    0
    0
  • Sable gills, the strongest fur suited for ladies' linings, is taken as the standard.

    0
    0
  • Durability and Weight of Motoring Furs made up with Fur outside.

    0
    0
  • Otter with the water hairs, the strongest fur suited for motoring garments, is taken as the standard.

    0
    0
  • Wolverine, the strongest fur suited for rugs and foot-sacks, is taken as the standard.

    0
    0
  • They are now chiefly valued for the hair, that of the European badger being used in the manufacture of the best shaving-brushes while the softer hair of the American species is employed for the same purpose, and also for painters' pencils, and the fur is used for articles of ladies' apparel and trimmings.

    0
    0
  • The variations in external characters which lions present, especially in the colour and the amount of mane, as well as in the general colour of the fur, indicate local races, to which After a Drawing by Woll in Elliot's Monograph of the Felidae.

    0
    0
  • It is a native of Siberia and famous for its fur.

    0
    0
  • It has usually been assumed that this is an extension of the name of the fur, but sable fur is brown.

    0
    0
  • Fur Company, but the permanent settlement of the city did not.

    0
    0
  • For a fuller description of these social reforms, see the Jahrbuch fir Gesetzgebung (Leipzig, 1886, 1888 and 1894); also the annual summary of new laws in the Zeitschrift fur Staatswissenschaft (Stuttgart).

    0
    0
  • The first permanent settlement within the present limits of Kansas City, which took its name from Kansas river,' was established by French fur traders about 1821.

    0
    0
  • The ears are small, low, rounded, and scarcely project beyond the adjacent fur.

    0
    0
  • The pelage consists of a dense, soft, matted under fur, mixed with long, stiff, lustrous hairs on all parts of the body and tail.

    0
    0
  • Northern specimens have the finest and most glistening pelage; in those from southern regions there is less difference between the under and over fur, and the whole pelage is coarser and harsher.

    0
    0
  • The fur is important in commerce.

    0
    0
  • The fur has, however, a tawny yellow or reddishgrey ground colour, marked with black spots, aggregated in streaks and blotches, or in elongated rings enclosing areas rather darker than the general ground-colour.

    0
    0
  • It is about the size of a rat, and has long soft thick fur, of a uniform grizzled brown, except when (as is not uncommon) it is black.

    0
    0
  • See John Ball, Hints and Notes for Travellers in the Alps (article x., especially pp. lvii.-lxv.); new edition, London, 1899; Felix Anderegg, Illustriertes Lehrbuch fur die gesamte schweiz.

    0
    0
  • Their soft fur, huge staring eyes, rudimentary tails and imperfectly developed index-fingers render lorises easy of recognition.

    0
    0
  • The Indian wolf has a dingy reddish-white fur, some of the hairs being tipped with black.

    0
    0
  • A prodigiously long tail, beetling eyebrows with long black hairs, black ears, face, feet and hands, and a general greyish-brown colour of the fur are the distinctive characteristics of the langur.

    0
    0
  • The first white men certainly known to have traversed the region were Sieur de la Verendrye and his sons, who working down from Canada spent a part of the year1743-1744examining the possibilities of the fur trade.

    0
    0
  • Ashley with a considerable party explored and trapped in the Sweetwater and Green river valleys, and in 1826 wagons were driven from St Louis to Wind river for the Rocky Mountain Fur Company.

    0
    0
  • Bonneville was the first to cross the Rockies with wagons (1832),' and two years later Fort Laramie, near the mouth of the Laramie river, was established to control the fur trade of the Arapahoes, Cheyennes and Sioux.

    0
    0
  • The Semitic alphabet is excellently treated by Lidzbarski in the Jewish Encyclopaedia (1901); his Nordsemitische Epigraphik (1898) has excellent facsimiles and tables of the alphabets, and there are many contributions to the history of the alphabet in the same writer's Ephemeris fur semitische Epigraphik (Giessen, since 1900).

    0
    0
  • The body is broad and depressed, the neck short, the head large and flat, the eyes small and the tail rudimentary and hidden in the fur.

    0
    0
  • The wombat of Tasmania and the islands of Bass's Straits (P. ursinus), and the closely similar but larger P. platyrhinus of the southern portion of the mainland of Australia, belong to this group. On the other hand, in the hairy-nosed wombat (P. latifrons) of Southern Australia, the fur is smooth and silky; the ears are large and more pointed; the muzzle is hairy; the frontal region of the skull is broader than in the other section, with well-marked postorbital processes; and there are thirteen ribs.

    0
    0
  • The eyes are red and injected; the tongue is somewhat swollen, and at first covered with a thin white fur, except at the tip and edges, but later it is dry, and the fur yellow or brownish.

    0
    0
  • The American Fur Company established a post here in 1829 or earlier, but settlement really began in 1833, after the Black Hawk War, and the place had a population of 1200 in 1838.

    0
    0
  • The Indians had again attacked the border farmers, and the governor had refused assistance, being willing, it was generally believed, that the border population should suffer while he and his adherents enjoyed a lucrative fur trade with the Indians.

    0
    0
  • It is of medium size, with long limbs, short tail, and tawny fur spotted with black; the head and body may measure 40 in.

    0
    0
  • The general colour of the fur is greyish, with a deep tinge of chestnut from the middle of the back to the root of the tail.

    0
    0
  • On their return trip the wagons often brought loads of wool, fur and blankets.

    0
    0
  • See, for sources, Quetif-Echard, Scriptores ordinis praedicatorum; Denifle, in Archiv fur Litteratur and Kirchengeschichte des Mittelalters, i.

    0
    0
  • The common Australian "opossum" or phalanger (Trichosurus vulpecula) has been naturalized in New Zealand, although very destructive to fruit trees; the value of its fur being probably the motive.

    0
    0
  • The tigers which inhabit hotter regions, as Bengal and the south Asiatic islands, have shorter and smoother hair, and are more richly coloured and distinctly striped than those of northern China and Siberia, in which the fur is longer, softer and lighter-coloured.

    0
    0
  • She was with him, too, during his earlier Caspian campaigns, and was obliged on this occasion to shear off her beautiful hair and wear a close-fitting fur cap to protect her from the rays of the sun.

    0
    0
  • Edmonton is the depot of the fur traders for the great region on the north and west.

    0
    0
  • It became a northwestern centre, and in its neighbourhood many employees of the fur company, both Scottish and French, took up land as settlers.

    0
    0
  • A white winter fur is characteristic of several of the smaller animals, such as the hare, fox and weasel.

    0
    0
  • The coypu, sometimes called the South American beaver, inhabits the river-banks, and is highly prized for its fur.

    0
    0
  • Nowhere more abundant than in the Scandinavian peninsula, this tree is the true fir (fur, fura) of the old Norsemen, and still retains the name among their descendants in Britain, though botanically now classed as a pine.

    0
    0
  • Rather smaller than a squirrel, with dusky brown fur, the tarsier has immense eyes, large ears, a long thin tail, tufted at the end, a greatly elongated tarsal portion of the foot, and disk-like adhesive surfaces on the fingers, which doubtless assist the animal in maintaining its position on the boughs.

    0
    0
  • The two little claws of these toes, projecting together from the skin, may be of use in scratching and cleaning the fur of the animal, but the toes must have quite lost all connexion with the functions of support or progression.

    0
    0
  • The typical genus Macropus, in which the muzzle is generally naked, the ears large, the fur on the nape of the neck usually directed backwards, the claw of the fourth hind-toe very large, and the tail stout and tapering, includes a large number of species.

    0
    0
  • The muzzle is naked, the fur on the nape of the neck directed more or less completely forward, and the hind-limbs are less disproportionately elongated.

    0
    0
  • Others attach chief importance to the slaying of Neoptolemus (Pyrrhus) by Orestes at Delphi; according to Radermacher (Das Jenseits im Mythos der Hellenen, 1903), Orestes is an hypostasis of Apollo, Pyrrhus the principle of evil, which is overcome by the god; on the other hand, Usener (Archiv fur Religionswesen, vii., 1899, 334) takes Orestes for a god of winter and the underworld, a double of the Phocian Dionysus the "mountain" god (among the Ionians a summer-god, but in this case corresponding to Dionysus j Xavaiyis), who subdues Pyrrhus "the light," the double of Apollo, the whole being a form of the well-known myths of the expulsion of summer by winter.

    0
    0
  • Gloversville has more than a score of tanneries and leather-finishing factories, and manufactures fur goods.

    0
    0
  • The oldest settlement in the vicinity was made by the Hudson's Bay Fur Company on the west side of the Boise river, before 1860; the present city, chartered in 1864, dates from 1863.

    0
    0
  • In 1810 Fort Henry, on the Snake river, was established by the Missouri Fur Company, and in the following year a party under the auspices of the Pacific Fur Company descended the Snake river to the Columbia.

    0
    0
  • Two Jesuits, Raymbault and Jogues, visited the site of Sault Sainte Marie as early as 1641 for the conversion of the Chippewas; in 1668 Marquette founded there the first permanent settlement within the state; three years later he had founded a mission among the Hurons at Michilimackinac; La Salle built a fort at the mouth of the Saint Joseph in 1679; and in 1701 Cadillac founded Detroit as an important point for the French control of the fur trade.

    0
    0
  • But the missionaries were not interested in the settlement of the country by Europeans, the fur traders were generally opposed to it, there was bitter strife between the missionaries and Cadillac, and the French system of absolutism in government and monopoly in trade were further obstacles to progress.

    0
    0
  • Up to this time the Territory had still remained for the most part a wilderness in which the fur trade reaped the largest profits, its few small settlements being confined to the borders; and the inaccurate reports of the surveyors sent out by the national government described the interior as a vast swamp with only here and there a little land fit for cultivation.

    0
    0
  • Typically the fur is greyishyellow, darker on the back and lighter beneath.

    0
    0
  • The rich fisheries of Spitzbergen and the fur industry of the Hudson Bay Territory were the immediate fruit of his labours.

    0
    0
  • The fur is of some commercial value, although rather stiff and harsh; its colour being reddishbrown.

    0
    0
  • From the end of the 18th century the Russian fur traders had settlements here for the capture of the seal and the sea otter and the blue and the Arctic fox.

    0
    0
  • Under the American regime seal fishing off the Aleutians save by the natives has never been legal, but the depletion of the Pribilof herd, the almost complete extinction of the sea otter, and the rapid decrease of the foxes and other fur animals, have threatened the Aleuts (as the natives are commonly called) with starvation.

    0
    0
  • Siberian fur hunters at once flocked to the Commander Islands and gradually moved eastward across the Aleutian Islands to the mainland.

    0
    0
  • The walrus is now found mainly far N.; the sea otter, once fairly common throughout the Aleutian district, is now rarely found even on the remoter islands; the fur seal, whose habitat is the Pribilof Islands in Bering Sea, ha .s been considerably reduced in numbers by pelagic hunting.

    0
    0
  • Sables, ermine, wolverines, minks, land otters, beavers and musk-rats have always been important items in the fur trade.

    0
    0
  • The fur and fish resources of Alaska have until recently held first place in her industries.

    0
    0
  • The walrus, hunted for its ivory tusks, and the sea otter, rarest and most valuable of Alaskan fur animals, are near extermination; the blue fox is now bred for its pelt on the Aleutians and the southern continental coast; the skins of the black and silver fox are extremely rare, and in general the whole fur industry is discouragingly decadent.

    0
    0
  • They have also felt the fatal influence of the liquor traffic. From 1893 to 1895 the United States expended $55,000 to support the natives of the Fur Seal Islands.

    0
    0
  • The treasury department has chartered the coasts, sought to enforce the prohibition law, controlled and protected the fur seals and fisheries, and incidentally collected the customs. Since the creation of the department of commerce and labour (1903), it has taken over from other departments some of these scattered functions.

    0
    0
  • Dall, " Alaska as it was and is, 1865-1895," in Bulletin of the Philadelphia Society of Washington, xiii.; Governor of Alaska, Annual Report to the Secretary of the Interior; Fur Seal Arbitration, Proceedings (Washington, 1895, 16 vols.); also Great Britain, Foreign Office Correspondence, United States, Nos.

    0
    0
  • The fur is long and coarse, of a dull black hue with a grey wash on the head and fore-limbs.

    0
    0