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fur

fur

fur Sentence Examples

  • A yellow ball of hissing fur flew past her.

  • The animals were sleek and their black fur shined in the sunlight.

  • White-gray fur covered a body with moth-eaten wings, a hideous face and yellowed fangs.

  • Who bought the orange juice with fur in it?

  • Wings, short fur, fangs the size of her forearm … she moved farther into the bathroom, lest she draw his attention.

  • She was dressed in a long, white fur coat that Katie had no doubt cost more than a small house.

  • Hannah removed her fur coat with a graceful flourish to reveal her snug clothing and perfect body.

  • A massive creature with black fur and fangs paused in front of the open door, sniffing the air.

  • The door exploded open in flames, wood, and black fur.

  • The cats' fur was matted from a bath in her dipping soup.

  • He wore jeans, a ski sweater and an opened, fur collared jacket.

  • Gladys, bedecked in an orange caftan and a fox fur jacket, smiled a knowing smile to Cynthia and was gone.

  • I can close my eyes and see the hustle-bustle of the village, the children playing, the pack mules and miners, the ladies decked out in long dresses and fur muffs.

  • A soft moan sounding nothing like her reached his ears, and then slowly, out from under the cover, emerged a huge wolf with bronze colored fur.

  • The fur was the exact color of Elisabeth's hair in his dream.

  • Her fur was lustrous and her nose looked like black velvet.

  • He exhaled and began to pet her, still amazed at how thick and soft her fur felt.

  • Jackson ran both his hands through her fur, checking for injury.

  • Sarah crouched to the floor and timidly put her hand into Elisabeth's fur.

  • The kid had been cleaned and its copper colored fur was still damp.

  • Outside the circle of light lay a small form, and a sweep of the flashlight revealed fur with copper highlights.

  • One ear was torn half off and his fur was bloody around the collar.

  • The occupant of the large chair in the corner of the living room launched towards her in a flurry of brown and black fur.

  • She jumped off in her graceful way, a bal­lerina in a black fur coat.

  • As long as each thought the other stole their lousy couple of a million the fur kept flying.

  • They looked a little thin to her, and their fur looked shaggy.

  • Hopefully there wouldn't be any little surprise piles of fur and bones.

  • Xander barely resisted the urge to touch the finely woven garment with a fur lining that was certain to be the softest thing in the world.

  • Xander was instantly fascinated by the sensation of downy fur and cotton spun so finely, it was like silk.

  • There is a good deal of variation in the colour of the fur, the prevailing tint being grey.

  • By his energy, industry and sound judgment he gradually enlarged his operations, did business in all the fur markets of the world, and amassed an enormous fortune, - the largest up to that time made by any American.

  • He devoted many years to carrying out a project for organizing the fur trade from the Great Lakes to the Pacific Ocean, and thence by way of the Hawaiian Islands to China and India.

  • fur Instrumentenkunde, by permission of Julius Springer, Berlin.

  • fur Instrumenten- the focussing screws 0 1 and 02.

  • The region of the Red River and Assiniboine valleys was opened up by the fur traders, who came by the waterways from Lake Superior, and afterwards by the water communication with Hudson Bay.

  • Boiler Tap to, empty +G the same water is used over and over again, and no fresh deposit of fur occurs.

  • The lime deposit or " fur " is a poor conductor of heat, and it is therefore most detrimental to the efficiency of the system to allow the interior of the boiler or any other portion to become furred up. Further, if not removed, the fur will in a short time bring about a fracture in the boiler.

  • Fur short and closely applied to the skin.

  • She brushed the dog's fur rather harshly and briskly.

  • Fur short and harsh.

  • Fur soft and silky.

  • Fur soft and loose.

  • Arboreal species include the well-known opossums (Phalanger); the extraordinary tree-kangaroo of the Queensland tropics; the flying squirrel, which expands a membrane between the legs and arms, and by its aid makes long sailing jumps from tree to tree; and the native bear (Phascolarctos), an animal with no affinities to the bear, and having a long soft fur and no tail.

  • Rundschau fur Geog.

  • fur Socialwissenschaft, ix.

  • The system has already been put into practice in Germany by the Gesellschaft fur drahtlose Telegraphie, and in the United States by R.

  • fur anorg.

  • General colour dark brown, the outer fur being long and rather loose, with a woolly under-coat.

  • fur Sinnesphysiologie (1907), xli.

  • fur praktische Geologie, 1901, p. 201; H.

  • The spores of Rusts, Erysipheae an d other Fungi may be conveyed from plant to plant by snails; those of tree-killing polyporei, &c., by mice, rabbits, rats, &c., which rub their fur against the hymenophores.

  • It was formerly employed by the Hudson's Bay Company as part of a canoe route to the fur lands of the north.

  • Dondorff, Die Normannen and ihre Bedeutung fur das europdische Kulturleben im Mittelalter (Berlin, 1875); A.

  • For other sources see articles "Bohmische-Bruder" and "Zinzendorf" in Hauck's Realencyklopaedie; and for latest results of historical research, Zeitschrift fur Briidergeschichte (half-yearly).

  • - The total construction capital invested in the railways of the world in 1907 was estimated by the Archiv fur Eisenbahnwesen at £8,986,150,000; the figure is necessarily incomplete, though it serves as a rough approximation.

  • They present great diversities of size, length and thickness of fur, and coloration, although resembling each other in all important structural characters.

  • In northern countries the fur is longer and thicker, and the animal generally larger and more powerful than in the southern portion of its range.

  • fur Prot.

  • 2 See Archiv fur Religionswiss.

  • The post was used by fur traders as late as 1718.

  • Carpets (especially at Shusha), silk, cotton and woollen goods, felts and fur cloaks are made, and small arms in Daghestan and at Tiflis, Nukha and Sukhumkaleh; silversmiths' work at Tiflis, Akhaltsikh and Kutais; pottery at Elisavetpol and Shusha; leather shoe-making at Alexandropol, Nukha, Elisavetpol, Shusha and Tiflis; saddlery at Sukhum-kaleh and Ochemchiri on the Black Sea and at Temirkhan-shura in Daghestan; and copper work at Derbent and Alexandropol.

  • Jacques Vieau established here a post for the North-west Company of fur traders in 1795.

  • Schultze in Herzog-Hauck's Realencyklopadie fur protestantische Theologie, iv.

  • Hauck's Realencyklop. fur Prot.

  • Nitzsch, the Deutsche Zestschrift fur christliche Wissenschaft and christliches Leben.

  • 1 Journal fur Ornithologie (1869), pp. 107, 341, 381.

  • Keyserling and Blasius briefly pointed out in the Archie fur Naturgeschichte (v.

  • almucia, almucium, armucia, &c.), a hooded cape of fur, or fur-lined, worn as a choir vestment by certain dignitaries of the Western Church.

  • Almuces were occasionally made of silk or wool, but from the 13th century onward usually of fur, the hem being sometimes fringed with tails.

  • Hence they were known in England as "grey amices" (from the ordinary colour of the fur), to distinguish them from the liturgical amice.

  • The fur trade of the Black Sea furnished the pretext for the next war (1355-54), which ended in the crushing defeat of Venice at Sapienza, and the loss of her entire fleet.

  • Several of them, such as Echinomys and Loncheres, are rat-like creatures with spiny or bristly fur.

  • It is rather a heavilybuilt animal, with a broad head, no distinct neck, and short limbs, the eyes are small, and the ears project very little beyond the fur.

  • As their fur is an important article of commerce, large numbers are annually killed, being either trapped or speared at the mouths of their holes.

  • The city continued to be the largest primary fur market of the world, with sales of $27,200,000 in 1920.

  • The Berichte der deutschen chemischen Gesellschaft, published by the Berlin Chemical Society, the Chemisches Centralblatt, which is confined to abstracts of papers appearing in other journals, the Zeitschrift fur Chemie, and Liebig's Annalen der Chemie are the most important of the general magazines.

  • Others devoted to special phases are the Journal fur praktische Chemie, founded by Erdmann in 1834, the Zeitschrift fur anorganische Chemie and the Zeitschrift fur physikalische Chemie.

  • Practical methods are treated in Lassar-Cohn, Arbeitsmethoden fur organisch-chemische Laboratorien (4th ed., 1906-1907).

  • For not only has the weight been more than quadrupled in some of the larger breeds, and the structure of the skull and other parts of the skeleton greatly altered, but the proportionate size of the brain has been reduced and the colour and texture of the fur altered in a remarkable manner.

  • The Angora rabbit is characterized by the extreme elongation and fineness of the fur, which in good specimens reaches 6 or 7 in.

  • The Angoras most valued are albinos, with pure white fur and pink eyes; in some parts of the Continent they are kept by the peasants and clipped regularly.

  • Amongst the breeds which are valued for the distribution of colour on the fur are the Himalayan and the Dutch.

  • The silver grey is a uniform-coloured breed, the fur of which is a rich chinchilla grey, varying in depth in the different strains.

  • From the greater value of the fur, silver greys have been frequently employed to stock warrens, as they breed true to colour in the open if the ordinary wild rabbits are excluded.

  • The largest and heaviest of all is the Flemish giant, with iron-grey fur above and white below.

  • Valuable fur is obtained from the white and blue fox, the skin of the eider-duck and the polar bear.

  • In 1842 he became professor ordinarius at Rostock, but in 1845 returned once more to Erlangen as the successor of Gottlieb Christoph Adolf von Harless (1806-1879), founder of the Zeitschrift fur Protestantismus and Kirche, of which Hofmann became one of the editors in 1846, J.

  • For the history of Hamburg see the Zeitschrift des Vereins fur hamburgische Geschichte (1841, fol.); G.

  • The Bochumer Verein fur Bergbau (mining) and Gusstahl Fabrication (steel manufacture) is one of the principal trusts in this industry, founded in 1854.

  • Heffter in Zeitschrift fur Gymnasialwesen, ix.

  • 7 fur.

  • Brauer, " Development of Scorpion," Zeitschrift fur wiss.

  • In November 1851 he obtained his doctorate, the thesis being "Grundlagen fur eine allgemeine Theorie der Functionen einer veranderlichen complexen Grosse."

  • Alberti in C. Bursian's Biographisches Jahrbuch fur Altertumskunde, xx.

  • argentatus) of North America which yields the valuable silver-tipped black fur.

  • When first born these are clothed with a uniform slaty-grey fur, which in due course gives place to a coat of more tawny hue than the adult livery.

  • lagopus), a very distinct species characterized by the hairy soles of its feet, the short, blunt ears, the long, bushy tail, and the great length of the fur in winter.

  • In a second phase of the species, the colour, which often displays a slaty hue (whence the name of blue fox), remains more or less the same throughout the year, the winter coat being, however, recognizable by the great length of the fur.

  • The prevailing colour of the fur of the upper parts is iron-grey.

  • See C. Krumbacher, Geschichte der byzantinischen Litteratur (1897), and article in Herzog-Hauck, Realencyklopddie fur protestantische Theologie (1901).

  • long, and the tail half as much; the fur is long and soft, light grizzled grey in colour, and banded with black on the lower part of the back.

  • PACA, the Brazilian name for a large, heavily-built, shorttailed rodent mammal, easily recognized by its spotted fur.

  • Pacas may be distinguished from agoutis by their heavier and more compact build, the longitudinal rows of light spots on the fur, the five-toed hind-feet, and the peculiar structure of the skull, in which the cheek-bones are expanded to form large capsules on the sides of the face, each enclosing a cavity opening on the side of the cheek.

  • See Schuchard, Die Stadt Liegnitz (Berlin, 1868); Sammter and Kraffert, Chronik von Liegnitz (Liegnitz, 1861-1873); Jander, Liegnitz in seinem Entwickelungsgange (Liegnitz, 1905); and Fiihrer fur Liegnitz and seine Umgebung (Liegnitz, 1897); and the Urkundenbuch der Stadt Liegnitz bis 1455, edited by Schirrmacher (Liegnitz, 1866).

  • Gesellschaft (1898); P. Jensen, " Grundlagen fur eine Entzifferung der (Hat.

  • The portrait of Archbishop Warham at Lambeth, for instance, shows a rochet with fairly wide sleeves narrowing towards the wrists, where they are confined by fur cuffs.

  • It is covered with a dense soft fur 4 in.

  • The fur (q.v.) of this rodent was prized by the ancient Peruvians, who made coverlets and other articles with the skin, and at the present day the skins are exported in large numbers to Europe, where they are made into muffs, tippets and trimmings.

  • Jacobsthal, "Die musikalische Bildung der Meistersinger" (Zeitschrift fur dent.

  • B.-Beet sugar (compiled from data furnished by the Statistisches Bureau fur die Riibenzucker Industrie des Deutschen Reiches, of Mr F.

  • 1900); Gustav von Schonberg, "Zur wirthschaftlichen Bedeutung des deutschen Zunftwesens im Mittelalter," in Jahrbiicher fur Nationalokonomie and Statistik, ed.

  • It is of no particular service to man, neither its flesh nor its fur being generally put to use, while the statement that its presence is sufficient to drive off rats and mice appears to be without foundation.

  • Sprachlehre fur Anfanger (4th ed., 1874); Uber einige dltere Sanskritmetra (1827); Liber Vakedii de Mesopotamiae expugnatae historia (1827); Commentarius in Apocalypsin Johannis (1828); Abhandlungen zur biblischen u.

  • Lieutenant Waxel and William Steller, a naturalist, left at the head of Bering's party after his death, by their researches laid the foundation of the important fur trade of these waters.

  • de l'epftre Ph., 1850); Grimm (Zeitschrift fur wiss.

  • SPINY SQUIRREL, a book-name for a group of African ground squirrels, characterized by the spiny nature of the fur of the more typical forms. They form the genus Xerus, which is split up into a number of subgenera; Xerus rutilus of Abyssinia and East Africa belonging to the typical group, while the striped North African X.

  • i.-v., 1875-1882); Soltl, Munchen mit seinen Umgebungen (1854); Reber, Bautechnischer Fiihrer durch die Stadt Munchen (1876); Daniel, Handbuch der Geographic (new ed., 1895); Prantl, Geschichte der Ludwig-Maximilians Universit¢t (Munich, 1872); Goering, 30 Jahre Munchen (Munich, 1904); von Ammon, Die Gegend von Munchen geologisch geschildert (Munich, 1895); Kronegg, Illustrierte Geschichte der Stadt Munchen (Munich, 1903); the Jahrbuch fur Miinchener Geschichte, edited by Reinhardstottner and Trautmann (Munich, 1887-1894); Aufleger and Trautmann, Alt-Munchen in Bild and Wort (Munich, 1895); Rohmeder, Munchen als Handelsstadt (Munich, 1905); H.

  • The fur is short, dense and rather soft to the touch, and composed of an extremely fine and close under-fur, and of longer hairs which project beyond this, each of which is very slender at the base, and expanded, flattened and glossy towards the free end.

  • fur streaking or russet-moss dappling, the prince of all wares in the estimation of the Japanese tea-clubs.

  • One of the most remarkable periodicals of this class was the Jahrbucher fur wissenschaftliche Kritik (1827-1846), first published by Cotta.

  • The Allgemeine Monatschrift fur Literatur (1850), conducted after 1851 by Droysen, Nitzsch and others, continued only down to 1854; the Literarisches Centralblatt (1850) is still published.

  • The Blotter fur literarische Unterhaltung sprang out of the Literarisches Wochenblatt (1818), founded by Kotzebue; after 1865 it was edited by R.

  • (Leipzig, 1878); Stadelmann, Preussens Kiinige in ihrer Tcitigkeit fur die Landeskultur, vol.

  • Though all yield fur of serviceable quality, the commercial value varies immensely, not only according to the species from which it is obtained, but according to individual variation, depending upon age, sex, season, and other circumstances.

  • Enormous numbers of animals are caught, chiefly in traps, to supply the demand of the fur trade, Siberia and North America being the principal localities from which they are obtained.

  • The general ` brown' has a greyish cast, as far as the under fur is concerned, and is overlaid with rich lustrous blackish-brown in places where the long bristly hairs prevail.

  • - Distinguished from the following by the greater breadth of the skull, and some minute but constant dental characters, by the dull greyish-brown colour of the fur of the upper parts and the pure white of the throat and breast.

  • - Fur rich dark brown; under fur reddish-grey, with clear yellow tips; breast spot usually yellow, varying from bright orange to pale cream-colour or yellowishwhite.

  • zibellina, the sable (German, Zobel and Zebel; Swedish, sabel; Russian, sobel, a word probably of Turanian origin), which closely resembles the last, if indeed it differs except in the quality of the fur - the most highly valued of that of all the group. The sable is found chiefly in eastern Siberia.

  • The importance of the fur of this animal as an article of commerce may be judged of from the fact that 15,000 skins were sold in one year by the Hudson's Bay Company as long ago as 1743.

  • It is principally trapped during the colder months, from October to April, when the fur is in good condition, as it is nearly valueless during the shedding in summer.

  • In 1816 Fort Crawford was erected - it was rebuilt on a different site in 1829 - and in 1820 one of the principal depots of the American Fur Company was established here.

  • It has a long tail and shaggy fur; the general colour of the latter being dark grey, with conspicuous black and white markings on the face.

  • Travers, The Experimental Study of Gases (1901); and vapour density determinations in Lassar-Cohn's Arbeitsmethoden fur organisch-chemische Laboratorien (1901), and Manual of Organic Chemistry (1896), and in H.

  • Reports of many minor expeditions and researches have appeared in the Reports of the Fishery Board for Scotland; the Marine Biological Association at Plymouth; the Kiel Commission for the Investigation of the Baltic; the Berlin Institut fur Meereskunde; the bluebooks of the Hydrographic Department; the various official reports to the British, German, Russian, Finnish, Norwegian, Swedish, Danish, Belgian and Dutch governments on the respective work of these countries in connexion with the international cooperation in the North Sea; the Bulletin du musee oceanographique de Monaco (1903 seq.); the Scottish Geographical Magazine; the Geographical Journal; Petermanns Mitteilungen; Wagner's Geogi'aphisches Jahrbuch; the Proceedings and Transactions of the Royal Societies of London and Edinburgh; the Annalen der Hydrographie; and the publications of the Swedish Academy of Sciences.

  • Mommsen in Neues Archiv der Gesellschaft fur dltere deutsche Geschichtskunde, xix.

  • Wagner, Die Geschichte Waldecks and Pyrmonts (Wildungen, 1888), and the Geschichtsblalter fur Waldeck and Pyrmont (Mengeringhausen, 1901, fol.).

  • P.) active promoters of the Zeitschrift fur jildische Theologie (18 351839 and 1842-1847).

  • fur vergleichende Litteraturgeschichte and Renaissance-Litteratur (1887-1891).

  • This is the standard Catholic treatment of the Reformation, and is being supplemented by a series of monographs, Ergcinzungen zu Janssens Geschichte des deutschen Volkes, which have been appearing since 1898 and correspond with the Protestant Schriften des Vereins fur Reformationsgeschichte (1883 sqq.).

  • They are covered with a fur to which they owe their chief commercial value; this consists of two kinds of hair - the one close-set, silky and of a greyish colour, the other much coarser and longer, and of a reddish brown.

  • The American species is also greatly diminished in numbers from incessant pursuit for the sake of its valuable fur.

  • In 1599, under the encouragement of Henry IV., speculators began to frequent the St Lawrence in pursuit of the fur trade.

  • It was true that the most active French colonial element, the trappers, were barbarized by the natives, and that the pursuit of the fur trade and other causes had brought the French into sharp collision with the most formidable of the native races, the confederation known as the Five (or Six) Nations.

  • The fur trade, the horse, the gun, disturbed the sedentary habit of American tribes.

  • Of the fur and game animals which were inhabitants of the primeval forests few of the larger species remain except in the Adirondack region.

  • The merchants of Amsterdam and Hoorn soon formed themselves into the New Netherland Company, and on the 11th of October 1614 received from the States-General a three years' monopoly of the Dutch fur trade in New Netherland, i.e.

  • The Company promised to permit the patroons to engage in the fur trade, whenever it had no commissary of its own, subject to a tax of one guilder (40 cents) on each skin, and to engage in other trade along the coast from Newfoundland to Florida subject to a tax of 5% on goods shipped to Europe.

  • the western boundary of the province was not definitely extended beyond the Hudson, Dongan laid the basis of New York's claim to the western lands of the Iroquois by a new covenant with them in which they recognized the English as their protectors, and throughout his administration he was busy neutralizing French influence among the Iroquois and in diverting the fur trade of the north-west from the St Lawrence to Albany.

  • Pursuing the same wise policy he established a trading post at Oswego in 1722 and fortified it in 1727, and thereby placed the Iroquois in the desirable position of middlemen in a profitable fur trade with the " Far Indians."

  • Heppe, in Niedner's Zeitschrift fur die historische Theologie, Bd.

  • The story of the struggle of the rival British and American companies to control the fur trade, with the final dominance of the Hudson's Bay Company has been told under Oregon and need not be repeated.

  • Kritiken, Eduard Zeller's Theologische Jahrbucher, and Adolf Hilgenfeld's Zeitschrift fur wissenschaftliche Theologie.

  • The report of Lewis and Clark attracted many traders and trappers, and within a few years the Missouri Fur Company, the Rocky Mountain Fur Company, the Hudson Bay Company and the American Fur Company had established fortified trading posts on the Missouri, the Yellowstone, the Marias, the Milk and other rivers; the most prominent among these was Fort Benton, which was established in 1846 at the head of navigation on the Missouri, and was made the headquarters of the American Fur Company.

  • The " Yellowstone," a steamboat sent out by the American Fur Company, ascended the Missouri to Fort Pierre in 1831 and to the mouth of the Yellowstone river in 1832.

  • Fort Pierre, which was founded by the American Fur Company about 1832, was sold to the United States government ' The rate for direct heirs and brothers and sisters is non-progressive.

  • In 1795 Jacques Vieau, a Frenchman in the employ of the North-Western Fur Company, established a permanent post here, which seems to have continued, under his direction, with practically no interruption until 1820, when it was superseded by that of Astor's American Fur Company.

  • This relatively small cat, uniformly coloured, is generally of some shade of brownish-grey, but in some individuals the fur has a rufous coat, while in others grey predominates.

  • Chaboillez, a French trader in the service of the North-West Fur Company, built a trading post on the southern bank of the Pembina river, near its mouth, but this was soon abandoned.

  • David Thompson (1770-1857), an employee at different times of the Hudson's Bay and North-West Fur companies, explored the region of the Missouri river in 1797-1798, and thus anticipated the work of Lewis and Clark, who entered the present limits of the state in 1804 and wintered among the Mandans,constructingFortMandan in what is nowMcLean county.

  • 1804) erected a trading post for the North-West Fur Company on the site of the present Grand Forks.

  • The dissipation of the dissolved carbon dioxide results in the formation of "fur" in kettles or boilers, and if the solution is falling, as from the roof of a cave, in the formation of stalactites and stalagmites.

  • In the whiteness of its fur also, it shows such an assimilation in colour to that of surrounding nature as must be of considerable service in concealing it from its prey.

  • Land bears have the soles of the feet destitute of hair, and their fur more or less shaggy.

  • The fur is usually brownish, but there are black, blackish-grey and yellowish varieties.

  • Its fur is usually of a yellowish-brown colour, coarse and grizzled, and of little value commercially, while its flesh, unlike that of other bears, is uneatable even by the Indians.

  • It is similar in size to the brown bear, but its fur is of a soft even texture, and of a shining black colour, to which it owes its commercial value.

  • Littledale'sChokur Pass (9530 ft.) and others at altitudes ranging from 8600 to 1 In " Orographie des Kwen-lun," in Zeitschrift der Gesellschaft fur Erdkunde zu Berlin (1891).

  • The weasel is an elegant little animal, with elongated slender body, back much arched, head small and flattened, ears short and rounded, neck long and flexible, limbs short, five toes on each foot, all with sharp, com - pressed, curved claws, tail rather short, slender, cylindrical, and pointed at the tip, and fur short and close.

  • als empirische Wissenschaft (2 vols., Leipzig, 1855); Darstellung and Kritik der Beweise fur das Dasein Gottes (Heidelberg, 1840); Beitrcige zur Psych.

  • In the Journal fur Ornithologie for 1881 A.

  • During his absence de Chastes had died, and his privileges and fur trade monopolies were conferred upon Pierre de Guast, sieur de Monts (1560-1611).

  • It differs in the colour of its fur, which is usually yellowish-white, and of its eyes, which are pinky-red.

  • The groundcolour of the fur varies from a pale fawn to a rufous buff, graduating in the Indian race into pure white on the under-parts and inside of the limbs.

  • Perfectly black leopards, which in certain lights show the characteristic markings on the fur, are not uncommon, and are examples of melanism, occurring as individual variations, sometimes in one cub out of a litter of which the rest are normally coloured, and therefore not indicating a distinct race, much less a species.

  • The artificers in gold and silver melted the metals by means of a reed-blowpipe and cast them solid or hollow, and were also skilled in hammered work and chasing, as some fine specimens remain to show, though the famous animals modelled with gold and silver, fur, feathers and scales have disappeared.

  • fur Anthropologie, neue Folge, iii., 2; 1907), Eng.

  • The Laconia Company received - its first grant under the erroneous impression that the Piscataqua river had its source in or near Lake Champlain, and its principal object was to establish an extensive fur trade with the Iroquois Indians.

  • It was founded in 1811, as a depot for the fur trade, by John Jacob Astor, in whose honour it was named.

  • In 1821, while occupied by the North-West Fur Company, it was burned and practically abandoned, only a few settlers remaining.

  • on this whole subject Hilgenfeld (Zeitschrift fur wiss.

  • The leading imports in 1909 were as follows, indicating in each case, when not evidently unnecessary, the value of finished manufactures and of unmanufactured materials: Silk (manufactured, $32,963,162; unmanufactured, $75,512,401); hides and skins, other than fur skins ($103,758,277); sugar and molasses ($91,535,466); fibres, vegetables and textile grasses (manufactured, $33,511,696; unmanufactured, $54,860,698); coffee ($86,524,006); chemicals ($86,401,432); cotton (manufactured, $68,380,780; raw and waste, $1 5,421,854); rubber (manufactured, $1,462,541, unmanufactured, $83,682,013); wool (manufactured, $22,058,712; unmantifactured, $55,530,366); and wood (manufactured, $43,620,591; unmanufactured, $13,584,172).

  • It will be observed that the abbey precincts are surrounded by a strong wall, fur nished at intervals with watch-towers and other defensive works.

  • The United States claimed as a matter of right an exclusive jurisdiction over the sealing industry in Bering Sea; they also contended that the protection of the fur seal was, upon grounds both of morality and interest, an international duty, and should be secured by international arrangement.

  • They also claimed an interest in the fur seals, involving the right to protect them outside the three-mile limit.

  • (5) Had the United States any and what right of protection over, or property in, the fur seals frequenting the islands of Bering Sea when such seals are found outside the three-mile limit?

  • In 1608 he began the settlement which was named Quebec. From 1608 to his death in 1635 Champlain worked unceasingly to develop Canada as a colony, to promote the fur trade and to explore the interior.

  • During the next sixty years the fisheries and the fur trade received some attention, but no colonization was undertaken.

  • In The Far West, However, A Little Group Of Adventurous Fur Traders, Of Whom Sir Alexander Mackenzie, David Thompson, Alexander Henry And Daniel Williams Harmon May Be Taken As Conspicuous Types, Were Unfolding The Vast Expanse Of The Future Dominion.

  • Zeumer, Die Konstantinische Schenkungsurkunde (Berlin, 1888; Festgaben fur R.

  • fur prot.

  • fur prof. Theologie, and the literature there cited.

  • Wiedemann, "Mumie als Heilmittel," in Zeitschrift des Vereins fur rheinische and westfalische Volkskunde (1906).

  • fur phys.

  • In Ireland and the southern districts of Sweden it is permanently of a light fulvous grey colour, with black tips to the ears, but in more northerly districts the fur - except the black ear-tips - changes to white in winter, and still farther north the animal appears to be white at all seasons of the year.

  • aegyptius) is a small animal, with long ears and pale fur; and in the south there are the Cape hare (L.

  • The fur varies exceedingly in character, - in some, like the chinchillas and hares, being fine and soft, while in others it is more or less replaced by spines on the upper surface, as in spiny rats and porcupines; these spines in several genera, as Xerus, Acomys, Platacanthomys, Echinothrix, Loncheres and Echinomys, being flattened.

  • pyrrhopus is a well-known example, is also African and allied to Xerus, but has a still longer skull and soft fur.

  • Perognathus and Heteromys have rooted molars; the latter genus is distinguished by the presence of flattened spines among the fur, and has species extending into South America.

  • Of these, Hypogeomys is a large, long-tailed, fawn-coloured rat, with large ears and feet; Nesomys is a red species, with long hair; Brachytarsomys is shortfooted and long-tailed, with velvety fawn fur; HallQmys has elongated hind feet, as has also Macrotarsomys; Gymnuromys is naked-tailed; and the several species of Eliurus are dormouselike.

  • In some cases there may be spines among the fur.

  • The spiny mice, Acornys (or Acanthomys), of Western Asia, Cyprus and Africa, take their name from the fur being almost entirely replaced by flattened spines, and are further distinguished by the rudimentary coronoid process of the lower jaw.

  • The single species is from Tasmania, though it has been found fossil in New South Wales; it is somewhat similar in size and appearance to the English water-rat, but has longer and softer fur.

  • leucura, being about the size of the common rat, with its fur thickly mixed with spines, a native of Celebes.

  • The family, Chinchillidae, typified by the wellknown chinchilla, includes a small number of South American rodents with large ears and proportionately great auditory bullae in the skull, elongated hind-limbs, bushy tails, very soft fur and perfect clavicles.

  • in length, being the largest member of the group. It has a long tail, brown fur and red incisors, and lives in burrows near water, feeding on aquatic plants.

  • The typical genus is represented by the degu (Octodon degus) and several nearly related species; other genera being Ctenomys, Octodontomys (Neoctodon), Aconaemys, Spalacopus and Abrocoma; the latter taking its name from its unusually soft fur.

  • The second group of the family is formed by the genera Loncheres, Dactylomys, Echi[nolmys, Proechimys and a few others, the members of which are rat-like rodents, with long scaly or furry tails, and frequently flattened spines mingled with the fur of the back.

  • In the gundi the two inner toes of the hind-foot are furnished with a horny comb and bristles for the purpose of cleaning the fur, and the tail is very short; but in Pectinator the tail is longer.

  • aquaticus) of the southern United States form the group Limnotragus, characterized by the harsher fur, the shorter ears, tail and hind-feet, and the complete fusion of the post-orbital process (which is so distinct in the typical hares) with the adjacent parts of the skull, so that neither notches nor perforations are developed in this region.

  • The spiny rabbit, separated from Lepus by Blyth in 1845 under the name of Caprolagus hispidus, is an inhabitant of Assam and the adjacent districts, and distinguished by its harsh, bristly fur and short ears and tail.

  • After bloodshed between the rival fur companies, and their union in 1821, Fort Garry was erected, as a trading post and settlers' depot, and with somewhat elaborate structure, with stone walls, bastions and portholes.

  • fur Instrumentenkunde, 1906, 26, p. 2, containing a description of a magnetometer for field use, designed by M.

  • The crusene was a fur coat, while the serc or smoc seems to have been an undergarment and probably sleeveless.

  • Specimens vary considerably in size and colour, but the usual length is about 5 in., and the soft fur yellowish-brown, marked with spots of dark brown and black.

  • It has a short, rounded head, obtuse muzzle, small bead-like eyes, and short rounded ears, nearly concealed by the fur.

  • Kirchenstaat (1878); Geymiiller, Entwiirfe fur St Peter (1875-1880); Schulte, Maximilian als Candidat fir den pcipstlichen Stuhl (1906).

  • In these animals the eyeball and the fur of the body are unpigmented, but the tips of the ear pinnae and extremities of the fore and hind limbs, together with the tail, are marked by more or less well defined colour.

  • In the case of the Norway hare, it has been stated that a general moult, including all the hairs and under fur, takes place and new white hairs are substituted.

  • On the other hand, it has been stated that during the whole of the transformation in the fur no hairs fall from the animal, and it is attributed to an actual change in the colour of the hair (Edinburgh Philosophical Journal, vol.

  • fur Orn., 1858, pp. 125-151).

  • GREEN MONKEY, a west African representative of the typical group of the guenon monkeys technically known as Cercopithecus callitrichus, taking its name from the olive-greenish hue of the fur of the back, which forms a marked contrast to the white whiskers and belly.

  • fur Assyriol.

  • super, over, and penis, fur; Span.

  • Its name is derived, as Durandus and Gerland also affirm, from the fact that it was formerly put on over the fur garments which used to be worn in church and at divine service as a protection against the cold.

  • Meurer, Handbuch der alpinen Sport (1882), Katechismus fur Bergsteiger (1892), and Der Bergsteiger im Hochgebirge (1893); and C. Wilson, Mountaineering (1893, " All England " series).

  • In 1754 he gave a particularly brilliant proof of his critical powers in his Vademecum fur Herrn S.

  • - Ordinary conidia and similarly abstricted dry spores are so minute, light and numerous that their dispersal is ensured by any current of air or water, and we also know that rats and other burrowing animals often carry them on their fur; similarly with birds, insects, slugs, worms, &c., on claws, feathers, proboscides, &c., or merely adherent to the slimy body.

  • For one kind of meat we could substitute another; wool could be replaced by cotton, silk or fur; were our common silicate glass gone, we could probably perfect and cheapen some other of the transparent solids; but even if the earth could be made to yield any substitute for the forty or fifty million tons of iron which we use each year for rails, wire, machinery, and structural purposes of many kinds, we could not replace either the steel of our cutting tools or the iron of our magnets, the basis of all commercial electricity.

  • FUR (connected with O.

  • The fur differs from the overhair, in that it is soft, silky, curly, downy and barbed lengthwise, while the overhair is straight, smooth and comparatively rigid.

  • These properties of fur constitute its essential value for felting purposes, and mark its difference from wool and silk; the first, after some slight preparation by the aid of hot water, readily unites its fibres into a strong and compact mass; the others can best be managed by spinning and weaving.

  • On the living animal the overhair keeps the fur filaments apart, prevents their tendency to felt, and protects them from injury - thus securing to the animal an immunity from cold and storm; while, as a matter of fact, this very overhair, though of an humbler name, is most generally the beauty and pride of the pelt, and marks its chief value with the furrier.

  • We arrive thus at two distinct and opposite uses and values of fur.

  • Regarded as useful for felt it is denominated staple fur, while with respect to its use with and on the pelt it is called fancy fur.

  • The manufacture of fur into a felt is of comparatively modern origin, while the use of fur pelts as a covering for the body, for the couch, or for the tent is coeval with the earliest history of all northern tribes and nations.

  • The pelt or skin is requisite to keep out the piercing wind and driving storm, while the fur and overhair ward off the cold; and "furs" are as much a necessity to-day among more northern peoples as they ever were in the days of barbarism.

  • The Carnivora include bears, wolverines, wolves, raccoons, foxes, sables, martens, skunks, kolinskis, fitch, fishers, ermines, cats, sea otters, fur seals, hair seals, lions, tigers, leopards, lynxes, jackals, &c. The Rodentia include beavers, nutrias, musk-rats or musquash, marmots, hamsters, chinchillas, hares, rabbits, squirrels, &c. The Ungulata include Persian, Astrachan, Crimean, Chinese and Tibet lambs, mouflon, guanaco, goats, ponies, &c. The Marsupialia include opossums, wallabies and kangaroos.

  • These, of course, could be subdivided, but for general purposes of the fur trade the above is deemed sufficient.

  • The question frequently arises, not only for those interested in the production of fur apparel, but for those who derive so much comfort and pleasure from its use, whether the supply of fur-bearing animals is likely to be exhausted.

  • The youngest, known as "broadtails," are killed when a few days old, but for the well-developed curly fur, the lambs must be six or seven weeks old.

  • During these weeks their bodies are covered with leather so that the fur may develop in close, light and clean curls.

  • The experiment has been tried of rearing rare, wild, fur-bearing animals in captivity, and although climatic conditions and food have been precisely as in their natural environment, the fur has been poor in quality and bad in colour, totally unlike that taken from animals in the wild state.

  • The majority of animals taken for their fur are trapped or snared, the gun being avoided as much as possible in order that the coat may be quite undamaged.

  • After the skins have been carefully removed - the sooner after death the better for the subsequent condition of the fur - they are lightly tacked out, pelt outwards, and, without being exposed to the sun or close contact with a fire, allowed to dry in a hut or shady place where there is some warmth or movement of air.

  • Fur skins taken out of season are indifferent, and the hair is liable to shed itself freely; a good furrier will, however, reject such faulty specimens in the manufacturing.

  • The finest furs are obtained from the Arctic and northern regions, and the lower the latitude the less full and silky the fur, till, at the torrid zone, fur gives place to harsh hair without any underwool.

  • Of sealskins there are two distinct classes, the fur seals and the hair seals.

  • The latter have no growth of fur under the stiff top hair and are killed, with few exceptions (generally of the marbled seals), on account of the oil and leather they yield.

  • The best fur seals are found off the Alaska coast and down as far south as San Francisco.

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