This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience. Learn more

fungi

fungi

fungi Sentence Examples

  • These two fungi usually grow in woods, but sometimes in hedges and in shady places in meadows, or even, as has been said, as invaders on mushroom-beds.

    182
    48
  • It is by many esteemed as the best of all the edible fungi found in Great Britain.

    152
    38
  • By far the greater number of spot-diseases are due to Fungi, as indicated by the numerous leaf-diseases described, but such is by no means always the case.

    140
    32
  • Many other fungi in addition to the fairy-ring champignon grow in circles, so that this habit must merely be taken with its other characters in cases of doubt.

    98
    40
  • Many Fungi, in themselves not very aggressive, slowly bring about important ~nd far-reaching secondary effects.

    75
    25
  • Parasitic Fungi may be, as regards their direct action, purely locale.g.

    13
    13
  • Red spots may indicate the presence of Fungi, e.g.

    13
    19
  • This wood is in great part already dead substance, but the mycelium gradually invades the vessels occupied with the transmission of water up the trunk, cuts off the current, and so kills the tree; in other cases such Fungi attack the roots, and so induce rot and starvation of oxygen, resulting in fouling.

    10
    19
  • The algal fungi, Phycomycetes, are obviously derived from the Green Algae, while the remaining Fungi, the Eumycetes, appear to have sprung from the same stock as the Rhodophyceae.

    9
    10
  • It was not till De Bary (1866) made known the true nature of parasitic Fungi, based on his researches between 1853-1863, that the vast domain of epidemic diseases of plants was opened up to fruitful investigation, and such modern treatises as those of Frank (1880 and L895), Sorauer (1886), Kirchner (1890), were gradually made possible.

    9
    10
  • Schinzia, which forms galllike swellings on the roots of rushes; Gymnosporangium, causing excrescences on juniper stems; numerous leaf Fungi such as Puccinia, Aecidium, Sep/one, &c., causing yellow, brown or black spots on leaves; or Ustilago in the anthers of certain flowers.

    9
    14
  • In other cases the presence of insects, Fungi or poisons at the roots may be looked for.

    9
    15
  • The independence of the two is suggested by the fact that fungi can live, thrive and grow in nutritive media which contain carbohydrates together with certain salts of ammonia, but which are free from proteids.

    8
    9
  • In both Algae and Fungi the latter are primarily supporting and food-conducting, and in.

    8
    14
  • Those Fungi which are saprophytic can only live when supplied with organic compounds of some complexity, which they derive from decomposing animal or vegetable matter.

    7
    10
  • The preference exhibited by yeast cells for sugar molecules is shared by mould fungi and soluble enzymes in their fermentative actions.

    6
    7
  • Still further insight is afforded by our increasing knowledge of the enzymes, and it is to be remarked that both poisons and enzymes are very common in just such parasitic Fungi as induce discolorations, hypertrophies and the death of cellse.g.

    6
    9
  • Insects, indeed, are largely concerned in disseminating Fungi, either on their bodies or via the alimentary canal.

    6
    10
  • Monotropas afford an extreme case of it, having lost their chlorophyll almost entirely, and come to depend upon the Fungi for their nutrinient.

    5
    6
  • Mycorhizas.The most interesting cases, however, in which Fungi form symbiotic relationships with green plants have been discovered in connection with forest trees.

    5
    7
  • Each species of green plant may form a mycorhiza with two or three different Fungi, and a single species of Fungus may enter into symbiosis with several green plants.

    5
    7
  • The true mushroom itself is to a great extent a dung-borne species, therefore mushroom-beds are always liable to an invasion from other dung-borne forms. The spores of all fungi are constantly floating about in the air, and when the spores of dung-infesting species alight on a mushroom-bed they find a nidus already prepared that exactly suits them; and if the spawn of the new-comer becomes more profuse than that of the mushroom the stranger takes up his position at the expense of the mushroom.

    5
    8
  • the infection of rats and mice with disease bacilli, or of locusts with insect-killing Fungi, and signs of the successful carrying out of such measures are not wanting.

    5
    8
  • (13) Phycomycetes (Algal fungi); (I 4) Phaeophyceae (Brown Algae).

    5
    10
  • In the higher forms a storage and a mechanically-strengthening system may also be developed, and in some aerial Fungi an external protective tissue.

    4
    6
  • Such a source is commonly met with among the Fungi, the insectivorous plants, and such of the higher plants as have a saprophytic habit.

    4
    6
  • In determining fungi no single character must be relied upon as conclusive, but all the characters must be taken together.

    3
    7
  • The better plan is to discard at once all fungi which have not been gathered from open pastures; by this act alone more than nine-tenths of worthless and poisonous species will be excluded.

    3
    7
  • It should always be specially noted whether the fungi to be consumed are in a fresh and wholesome condition, otherwise they act as a poison in precisely the same way as does any other semi-putrid vegetable.

    3
    9
  • Cells of this type are often called trumpet-hyphae (though they have no connection with the hyphae of Fungi), and in some genera of Laminariaceae those at the periphery of the medulla simulate the sieve-tubes of the higher plants in a striking degree, even (like these latter) developing the peculiar substance callose on or in the perforated cross-walls or sieve-plates.

    3
    9
  • Numerous Fungi, though conspicuous as parasites, cannot be said to do much individual injury to the host.

    3
    9
  • The prothalli of the Pterido phytes, which form similar symbioses, show a somewhat different mode of arrangement, the Fungi occupying the external or the lower layers of the thalloid body.

    3
    10
  • These hairs often occur in tufts, and are so colored and arranged that they were long taken for Fungi and placed in the genus Erineum.

    3
    10
  • of the thallus, whatever its external form, by branched, continuous or septate, coenocytic tubes (Siphoneae and Fungi), or by simple or branched cell-threads (Red and many Green Algae), in both cases growing mainly or entirely at the apex of each branch, is almost universal in.

    3
    11
  • White or grey spots may be due to Peronospora, Erysiphe, Cystopus, Entyloma and other Fungi, the mycelium of which will be detected in the discoloured area; or they may be scale insects, or the results of punctures by Red-spider, &c. Yellow spots, and especially bright orange spots, commonly indicate Rust Fungi or other Uredineae; but Phyllosticta, Exoascus, Clasterosporium, Synchytrium, &c., also induce similar symptoms. Certain Aphides, Red-spider, Phylloxera and other insects also betray their presence by such spots.

    3
    11
  • The simpler Fungi, like the simpler Green Algae, consist of single cells or simple or branched cell-threads, but among the higher kinds a massive body is often formed, particuTissue t~Jf larly in con nexion with the formation of spores, and, er~n,~,onthiS may exhibit considerable tissue-differentiation.

    2
    5
  • To this character the fungus owes its generic name (Marasmius) as well as one of its most valuable qualities for the table, for examples may be gathered from June to November, and if carefully dried may be hung on strings for culinary purposes and preserved without deterioration for several years; indeed, many persons assert that the rich flavour of these fungi increases with years.

    2
    7
  • The spores of Rusts, Erysipheae an d other Fungi may be conveyed from plant to plant by snails; those of tree-killing polyporei, &c., by mice, rabbits, rats, &c., which rub their fur against the hymenophores.

    2
    8
  • The Fungi that have been discovered taking part in the union include Eurotium, Pythiam, Boletus, A garicus, Lactarias, Penscillium and many others of less frequent occurrence.

    2
    9
  • The internal tissue of the body of the solid higher Fungi, particularly the elongated stalks (stipes) of the fructifications of the Agarics, consists of hyphae running in a longitudinal direction, which no doubt serve for the conduction of organic food substances, just as do the trumpet-hyphae, similar in appearance, though not in origin, of the higher Brown Seaweeds.

    2
    10
  • ACOTYLEDONES, the name given by Antoine Laurent de Jussieu in 1789 to the lowest class in his Natural System of Botany, embracing flowerless plants, such as ferns, lycopods, horse-tails, mosses, liverworts, sea-weeds, lichens and fungi.

    1
    0
  • the suckers of a mollusc, the socket of the thigh-bone, &c.; and in botany for the receptacle of Fungi.

    1
    0
  • Bertrand have shown that certain fungi, the tissues of which, when exposed, to the air by injury, become immediately coloured, do so owing to the action of tyrosinase upon one or more chromogenous substances present in the plant.

    1
    0
  • Other parasitic fungi of less economic importance occasionally do considerable damage.

    1
    0
  • Among the lower classes of plants we have scarcely any knowledge of Palaeozoic Bryophyta; Fungi were probably abundant, but their remains give us little information; while, even among the Algae, which are better represented, well characterized specimens are scanty.

    1
    0
  • Fungi were no doubt abundant among Palaeozoic vegetation.

    1
    0
  • In examining the tissues of fossil plants of that epoch nothing is more common than to meet with mycelial hyphae in and among the cells; in many cases the hyphae are septate, showing that the higher Fungi (Mycomycetes), as distinguished from the more algoid Phycomycetes, already existed.

    1
    0
  • This will help avoid inhalation of high levels of fungi.

    1
    0
  • The yellowing and subsequent casting of leaves, for instance, is a very general symptom of disease in plants, and may be induced by drought, extremes of temperature, insufficient or excessive illumination, excess of water at the roots, the action of parasitic Fungi, insects, worms, &c., or of poisonous gases, and so forth; and extreme caution is necessary in.

    1
    9
  • Many instances are on record where mushroom-beds have been invaded by a growth of strange fungi and the true mushrooms have been ousted to the advantage of the new-comers.

    1
    10
  • The surface-layer of the body in the massive Fungi differs in character according, to its function, which is not constant throughout the class, as in the Algae, because of the very various conditions of life to which different Fungi are exposed.

    1
    10
  • those due to .Synchytrium, Protomyces, Cysto pus, many Ustilagineae, &c. These cases are not easily distinguished superficially froni the pustular outgrowth of actual mycelia and spores (stromata) of such Fungi as Nectria, Puccinia, &c. The cylindrical stem-swellings due to Calyptospora, Epichloe, &c., may also be mentioned here, and the tyro may easily confound with these the layers and cushions of eggs laid on similar organs by moths.

    0
    0
  • Aphidesand may be easily penetrated by certain Fungi such as Peziza, Nectria; and when thus attacked, the repeated conflicts between the cambium and callus, on the one hand, trying to heal over the wound, and the insect or Fungus, on the other, destroying the new tissues as they are formed, results in irregular growths; the still uninjured cambium area goes on thickening the branch, the dead parts, of course, remain unthickened, and the portion in which the Fungus is at work may for the time being grow more rapidly.

    0
    0
  • Pythium, Peronospore, Completoria, Vol utelta, Botrytis, &c. That such overturgescence should lead to the bursting of fleshy fruits, such as gooseberries, tomatoes and grapes, is not surprising, nor can we wonder that fermentation and mould Fungi rapidly spread in such fruits; and the same is true for bulbs and herbaceous organs generally.

    0
    0
  • Such frost-cracks, sun-cracks, &c., may then be slowly healed over by callus, but if the conditions for necrosis recur the crack may be again opened, or if Fungi, &c., interfere with occlusion, the healing is prevented; in such cases the local necrosis may give rise to cankers.

    0
    0
  • In many cases, however, monstrosities of flowers have been shown to be due to the irritating action of minute insects or Fungi, and others are known which, although induced by causes unknown to us, and regarded as internal, would not be likely to survive in the wild condition.

    0
    0
  • Under the head of malformations we place cases of atrophy of parts or general dwarfing, due to starvation, the attacks of Fungi or minute insects, the presence of unsuitable food-materials and so on, as well as cases of transformation of stamens into petals, carpels into leaves, and so forth.

    0
    0
  • of tke Fungi, &c. (1887); Frank, Die Krankh-eiten der Fflanzen (1895-1896); Sorauer, Handbuch der Pflanzenkrankheiten (i9o6); Ward, Disease in Plants (1901).

    0
    0
  • Fungi.

    0
    0
  • In some cases both the nucleus and the chromatophores may be carried along in the rotating stream, but in others, such as T.Titeila, the chloroplasts may remain motionless iii a non-motile layer of the cytoplasm in direct contact with the cell wall.i Desmids, Diatoms and Oscillaria show creeping movements probably due to the secretion of slime by the cells; the swarmspores and plasmodium of the Myxomycetes exhibit amoehoid movements; and the motile spores of Fungi and Algae, the spermatozoids of mosses, ferns, &c., move by means of delicate prolongations, cilia or flagella cf the protoplast.

    0
    0
  • Glycogen, a substance related to starch and sugar, is found in the Fungi and Cyanophyceae as a food reserve.

    0
    0
  • The spindle arises partly from the cytoplasm, partly from the nucleus, or it may be derived entirely from the nucleusintranuclear spindleas occurs in many of the lower plants (Fungi, &c.).

    0
    0
  • In the Thallophytes the cytoplasm may be segmented by constriction, due to the in-growth of a new cell wall from the old one, as in Spirogyra and Cladophora, or by the formation of cleavage furrows in which the new cell-wall is secreted, as occurs in the formation of the spores in many Algae and Fungi.

    0
    0
  • Cell budding takes place in yeast and in the formation of the conidia of Fungi.

    0
    0
  • In the Fungi it is usually composed of a modified form of cellulose known as fungus cellulose, which, according to Mangin, consists of callose in combination either with cellulose or pectic compounds.

    0
    0
  • Besides the internal or centripetal growth, some cell-walls are thickened on the outside, such as pollen grains, oospores of Fungi, cells of Peridineae, &c. This centrifugal growth must apparently take place by the activity of protoplasm external to the cell.

    0
    0
  • In many of the Fungi the non-motile male cell or nucleus is carried by means of a fertilizing tube actually into the interior of the egg-cell, and is extruded through the apex in close proximity to the egg nucleus.

    0
    0
  • In Monoblepliaris, one of the lower Fungi, in some Algae, in the Vascular Cryptograms, in Cycads (Zamia and Cycas), and in Ginkgo, an isolated genus of Gymnosperms, the male cell is a motile spermatozoid with two or more cilia.

    0
    0
  • The union of the germ nuclei has now been observed in all the main groups of Angiosperms, Gymnosperms, Ferns, Mosses, Algae and Fungi, and presents a striking resemblance in all.

    0
    0
  • The Nuclei of the Lower Plants.It is only in comparatively recent times that it has been possible to determine with any degree of certainty that the minute deeply stainable bodies described more especially by Schmitz (1879) in many Algae and Fungi could be regarded as true nuclei.

    0
    0
  • the Ascomycetes, Rust Fungi, &c., the same structure obtains so far as all essential details are concerned.

    0
    0
  • These changes may be brought about by external causes, such as the attacks of insects or of fungi, alterations in external conditions, &c., or by some unexplained internal disturbance of the morphological equilibrium.

    0
    0
  • Of the numerous other families of the Clavicornia may be mentioned the Cucujidae and Cryptophagidae, small beetles, examples of which may be found feeding on stored seeds or vegetable refuse, and the Mycetophagidae, which devour fungi.

    0
    0
  • The pear is subject to several diseases caused by fungi.

    0
    0
  • " Boll rot," or "Anthracnose," is a disease which may at times be sufficiently serious to destroy from ro to 50% of the crop. The fungus which causes it (Colletotrichum gossypii) is closely related to one of the fungi attacking sugar-cane in various parts of the world.

    0
    0
  • In nonflowering plants the works usually followed are for ferns, Hooker and Baker's Synopsis filicum; for mosses, Muller's Synopsis muscorum frondosorum, Jaeger & Sauerbeck's Genera et species muscorum, and Engler & Prantl's Pflanzenfamilien; for algae, de Toni's Sylloge algarum; for hepaticae, Gottsche, Lindenberg and Nees ab Esenbeck's Synopsis hepaticarum, supplemented by Stephani's Species hepaticarum; for fungi, Saccardo's Sylloge fungorum, and for mycetozoa Lister's monograph of the group. For the members of large genera, e.g.

    0
    0
  • The larger species of fungi, such as the Agaricini and Polyporei, &c., are prepared for the herbarium by cutting a slice out of the centre of the plant so as to show the outline of the cap or pileus, the attachment of the gills, and the character of the interior of the stem.

    0
    0
  • As it is impossible to preserve the natural colours of fungi, the specimens should, whenever possible, be accompanied by a coloured drawing of the plant.

    0
    0
  • Microscopic fungi are usually preserved in envelopes, or simply attached to sheets of paper or mounted as microscopic slides.

    0
    0
  • Those fungi which are of a dusty nature, and the Myxomycetes or Mycetozoa may, like the lichens, be preserved in small boxes and arranged in drawers.

    0
    0
  • Fungi under any circumstances form the least satisfactory portion of an herbarium.

    0
    0
  • aaK6s, a bag), a botanical term for the membranous sacs containing the reproductive spores in certain lichens and fungi.

    0
    0
  • The flora consists of 129 species of angiosperms, i Cycas, 22 ferns, and a few mosses, lichens and fungi, 17 of which are endemic, while a considerable number - not specifically distinct - form local varieties nearly all presenting Indo-Malayan affinities, as do the single Cycas, the ferns and the cryptogams. As to its fauna, the island contains 319 species of animals-54 only being vertebrates-145 of which are endemic. A very remarkable distributional fact in regard to them, and one not yet fully explained, is that a large number show affinity with species in the Austro-Malayan rather than in the Indo-Malayan, their nearer, region.

    0
    0
  • The amanitas include some of the most showy representatives of the Agaricineae or mushroom order of fungi.

    0
    0
  • In their mode of attack, in the symptoms they produce, and in the result upon the grapes and the vine the two fungi are so much alike that for practical purposes they may be regarded as identical.

    0
    0
  • Among the other fungi which infest the vine may be mentioned Phyllosticta viticola and Ph.

    0
    0
  • These, like the foregoing, are members of the Pyrenomycetes, while many other allied fungi have been described as causing spots on the leaves.

    0
    0
  • Less important disaccharoses are: Trehalose or mycose, C12H22011.2H20, found in various fungi, e.g.

    0
    0
  • The mycelium produced from the spores dropped by the fungus or from the "spawn" in the soil, radiates outwards, and each year's successive crop of fungi rises from the new growth round the circle.

    0
    0
  • The rich colour of the grass is due to the fertilizing quality of the decaying fungi, which are peculiarly rich in nitrogenous substances.

    0
    0
  • p. 865), the agents of the transformation of cellulose into peaty substances are saprophytic fungi and bacterial ferments.

    0
    0
  • Lilies are, under certain conditions favourable to the development of the disease, liable to the attacks of three parasitic fungi.

    0
    0
  • A great variety of deformations and growths produced by insects and mites as well as by fungi have been described.

    0
    0
  • Here you find articles in the encyclopedia about fungi and non-flowering plants.

    0
    0
  • The special fungi which take part in the association are, with rare exceptions, not found growing separately, while the algal forms are constantly found free.

    0
    0
  • Until comparatively recent times the lichens were considered as a group of simple organisms on a level with algae and fungi.

    0
    0
  • In 1869 Schwendener put forward the really illuminating view - exactly opposite to that of Baranetzkythat the gonidia in all cases were algae which had been attacked by parasitic fungi.

    0
    0
  • unable to consider with equanimity the loss of the autonomy of their group and its reduction to the level of a special division of the fungi.

    0
    0
  • He investigated the exact relation of fungus and alga and showed that the same alga is able to combine with a number of different fungi to form lichens; thus Chroolepns umbrinus is found as the gonidia of 13 different lichen genera.

    0
    0
  • In one view they are mere asexual conidia, and the term pycnoconidia is accordingly applied since they are borne in structures like the non-sexual pycnidia of other fungi.

    0
    0
  • In the two genera of lichens - the Basidiolichens - i n which the fungus is a member of the Basidiomycetes, we have the fructification characteristic of that class of fungi: these are dealt with separately.

    0
    0
  • in the formation of this organ or that of the apothecium it has the general structure characteristic of that division of fungi.

    0
    0
  • In other lichens we should expect to find the ascogenous hyphae arising directly from the vegetative hyphae as in Humaria rutilans among the ordinary fungi, where the process is associated with the fusion of vegetative nuclei.

    0
    0
  • The spores are ejected from the apothecia and peri thecia as in the fungi by forcible ejacu lation from the asci.

    0
    0
  • The so-called Gasterolichens, Trichocoma and Emeri- cella, have been shown to be merely ascomycetous fungi.

    0
    0
  • They also differ very markedly from free living fungi in their chemical reactions.

    0
    0
  • (e) The epiphyllous species are very peculiar as occurring upon perennial leaves of certain trees and shrubs, whose vitality is not at all affected by their presence as it is by that of fungi.

    0
    0
  • It any state most plants feed greedily upon it, and when pure or free from decaying wood or sticks it is a very safe ingredient in composts; but it is so liable to generate fungus, and the mycelium or spawn of certain fungi is so injurious to the roots of trees, attacking them if at all sickly or weakened by drought, that many cultivators prefer not' to mix leaf-mould with the soil used for permanent plants, as peaches or choice ornamental trees.

    0
    0
  • Sloes and bird cherries should be removed from the neighbourhood of plum-trees, as the various disease-producing insects and fungi live also on these species.

    0
    0
  • Algae and fungi also were present, but there were no flowering plants.

    0
    0
  • C. Cooke, British Edible Fungi, (1891), pp. 104-105.

    0
    0
  • FUNGI (pl.

    0
    0
  • While some moulds (Penicillium, Aspergillus) can utilize almost any organic food-materials, other fungi are more restricted in their choice - e.g.

    0
    0
  • insect-parasites, hornand feather-destroying fungi and parasites generally.

    0
    0
  • It was formerly the custom to include with the Fungi the Schizomycetes or Bacteria, and the Myxomycetes or Mycetozoa; but the peculiar mode of growth and division, the cilia, spores and other peculiarities of the former, and the emission of naked amoeboid masses of protoplasm, which creep and fuse to streaming plasmodia, with special modes of nutrition and spore-formation of the latter, have led to their separation as groups of organisms independent of the true Fungi.

    0
    0
  • On the other hand, lichens, previously regarded as autonomous plants, are now known to be dual organisms - fungi symbiotic with algae.

    0
    0
  • The number of species in 1889 was estimated by Saccardo at about 32,000, but of these 8500 were so-called Fungi imperfecti - i.e.

    0
    0
  • As regards their geographical distribution, fungi, like flowering plants, have no doubt their centres of origin and of dispersal; but we must not forget that every exchange of wood, wheat, fruits, plants, animals, or other commodities involves transmission of fungi from one country to another; while the migrations of birds and other animals, currents of air and water, and so forth, are particularly efficacious in transmitting these minute organisms. Against this, of course, it may be argued that parasitic forms can only go where their hosts grow, as is proved to be the case by records concerning the introduction of Puccinia malvacearum, Peronospora viticola, Hemileia vastatrix, &c. Some fungi - e.g.

    0
    0
  • That the north temperate regions appear richest in fungi may be due only to the fact that North America and Europe have been much more thoroughly investigated than other countries; it is certain that the tropics are the home of very numerous species.

    0
    0
  • When we remember that many parts of the world are practically unexplored as regards fungi, and that new species are constantly being discovered in the United States, Australia and northern Europe - the best explored of all - it is clear that no very accurate census of fungi can as yet be made, and no generalizations of value as to their geographical distribution are possible.

    0
    0
  • The existence of fossil fungi is undoubted, though very few of the identifications can be relied on as regards species or genera.

    0
    0
  • Appressoria are also formed by some parasitic fungi, as a minute flattening of the tip of a very short branch (Erysiphe), or the swollen end of any hypha which comes in contact with the surface of the host (Piptocephalis, Syncephalis), haustoria piercing in each case the cell-wall below.

    0
    0
  • Many fungi (Phallus, Agaricus, Fumago, &c.) when strongly growing put out ribbon-like or cylindrical cords, or sheet-like mycelial plates of numerous parallel hyphae, all growing together equally, and fusing by anastomoses, and in this way extend long distances in the soil, or over the surfaces of leaves, branches, &c. These mycelial strands may be white and tender, or the outer hyphae may be hard and black, and very often the resemblance of the subterranean forms to a root is so marked that they are termed rhizomorphs.

    0
    0
  • - Fungi, like other plants, are often found to store up large quantities of reserve materials (oil, glycogen, carbohydrates, &c.) in special parts of their vegetative tissues, where they lie accumulated between a period of active assimilation and one of renewed activity, forming reserves to be consumed particularly during the formation of large fructifications.

    0
    0
  • The various sclerotia, if kept moist, give rise to the fructifications of the fungi concerned, much as a potato tuber does to a potato plant, and in the same way the reserve materials are consumed.

    0
    0
  • In the more complex tissue-bodies of higher fungi, however, we find considerable differences in the various layers or strands of hyphae.

    0
    0
  • As regards its composition, the cell-wall of fungi exhibits variations of the same kind as those met with in higher plants.

    0
    0
  • The cells of fungi, in addition to protoplasm, nuclei and sap-vacuoles, like other vegetable cells, contain formed and amorphous bodies of various kinds.

    0
    0
  • Among the enzymes already extracted from fungi are invertases (yeasts, moulds, &c.), which split cane-sugar and other complex sugars with hydrolysis into simpler sugars such as dextrose and levulose; diastases, which convert starches into sugars (Aspergillus, &c.); cytases, which dissolve cellulose similarly (Botrytis, &c.); peptases, using the term as a general one for all enzymes which convert proteids into peptones and other bodies (Penicillium, &c.); lipases, which break up fatty oils (Empusa, Phycomyces, &c.); oxydases, which bring about the oxidations and changes of colour observed in Boletus, and zymase, extracted by Buchner from yeast, which brings about the conversion of sugar into alcohol and carbondioxide.

    0
    0
  • That such enzymes are formed in the protoplasm is evident from the behaviour of hyphae, which have been observed to pierce cell-membranes, the chitinous coats of insects, artificial collodion films and layers of wax, &c. That a fungus can secrete more than one enzyme, according to the materials its hyphae have to attack, has been shown by the extraction of diastase, inulase, trehalase, invertase, maltase, raffinase, malizitase, emulsin, trypsin and lipase from Aspergillus by Bourquelot, and similar events occur in other fungi.

    0
    0
  • The same fact is indicated by the wide range of organic substances which can be utilized by Penicillium and other moulds, and by the behaviour of parasitic fungi which destroy various cell-contents and tissues.

    0
    0
  • Many of the coloured pigments of fungi are fixed in the cell-walls or excreted to the outside (Peziza aeruginosa).

    0
    0
  • Matruchot has used them for staining the living protoplasm of other fungi by growing the two together.

    0
    0
  • Although many fungi have been regarded as devoid of nuclei, and all have not as yet been proved to contain them, the numerous investigations of recent years have revealed them in the cells of all forms thoroughly examined, and we are justified in concluding that the nucleus is as essential to the cell of a fungus as to that of other organisms. The hyphae of many contain numerous, even hundreds of nuclei (Phycomycetes); those of others have several (Aspergillus) in each segment, or only two (Exoascus) or one (Erysiphe) in each cell.

    0
    0
  • As with other plants, so in fungi the essential process of fertilization consists in the fusion of two nuclei, but owing to the absence of well-marked sexual organs from many fungi, a peculiar interest attaches to certain nuclear fusions in the vegetative cells or in young spores of many forms. Thus in Ustilagineae the chlamydospores, and in Uredineae the teleutospores, each contain two nuclei when young, which fuse as the spores mature.

    0
    0
  • Physiologically, any cell or group of cells separated off from a hypha or unicellular fungus, and capable of itself growing out - germinating - to reproduce the fungus, is a spore; but it is evident that so wide a definition does not exclude the ordinary vegetative cells of sprouting fungi, such as yeasts, or small sclerotium like cell-aggregates of forms like Coniothecium.

    0
    0
  • In practice these various kinds of spores of fungi receive further special names in the separate groups, and names, more over, which will appear, to those unacquainted with the history, to have been given without any consistency or regard to general principles; nevertheless, for ordi nary purposes these names are far more useful in most cases, owing to their descriptive character, than the proposed new names, which have been only partially accepted.

    0
    0
  • It has been accepted for some time now that the majority of the fungi proper fall into three main groups, the Phycomycetes, Ascomycetes and Basidiomycetes, the Schizomycetes and Myxomycetes (Mycetozoa) being considered as independent groups not coming under the true fungi.

    0
    0
  • The recent work of the last twelve years has shown, however, that the two higher groups of fungi exhibit distinct sexuality, of either a normal or reduced type, and has also rendered very doubtful the view of the origin of these two groups from the Phycomycetes.

    0
    0
  • The real difficulty of classification of the fungi lies in the polyphyletic nature of the group. There is very little doubt that the primitive fungi have been derived by degradation from the lower algae.

    0
    0
  • Alga-like fungi with unicellular thallus and well-marked sexual organs.

    0
    0
  • Higher Fungi.

    0
    0
  • Fungi with segmental thallus; sexual reproduction sometimes with typical antheridia and oogonia (ascogonia) but usually much reduced.

    0
    0
  • They are usually included in Oomycetes, but their simple structure, minute size, usually uniciliate zoospores, and their negative characters would justify their retention as a separate group. It contains less than 200 species, chiefly parasitic on or in algae and other water-plants or animals, of various kinds, or in other fungi, seedlings, pollen and higher plants.

    0
    0
  • The Zygomycetes, of which about 200 species are described, are especially important from a theoretical standpoint, since they furnished the series whence Brefeld derived the vast majority of the fungi.

    0
    0
  • They are characterized especially by the zygospores, but the asexual organs (sporangia) exhibit interesting series of changes, beginning with the typical sporangium of Mucor containing numerous endospores, passing to cases where, as in Thamnidium, these are accompanied with more numerous small sporangia (sporangioles) containing few spores, and thence to Chaetocladium and Piptocephalis, where the sporangioles form but one spore and fall and germinate as a whole; that is to say, the monosporous sporangium has become a conidium, and Brefeld regarded these and similar series of changes as explaining the relation of ascus to conidium in higher fungi.

    0
    0
  • - Now that Brefeld's view of the origin of these forms from the Zygomycetes has been overthrown, the relationship of the higher and lower forms of fungi is left in obscurity.

    0
    0
  • The term Eumycetes is sometimes applied to this group to distinguish them from the Phycomycetes, but as the same name is also applied to the fungi as a whole to differentiate them from the Mycetozoa and Bacteria, the term had best be dropped.

    0
    0
  • The Higher Fungi fall into three groups: the Ustilaginales, of doubtful position, and the two very sharply marked groups Basidiales and A scomycetes.

    0
    0
  • The discovery of the yeast-conidia of these fungi, and their thorough investigation by Brefeld, have thrown new lights on the group, as also have the results elucidating the nature of the ordinary dark spores - smuts, bunt, &c. - which by their mode of origin and development are chlamydospores.

    0
    0
  • The ascus is thus one of the most sharply characterized structures among the fungi.

    0
    0
  • These are a small group of fungi including the wellknown truffles.

    0
    0
  • Laboulbeniineae are a group of about 150 species of fungi found on insects, especially beetles, and principally known from the researches of Thaxter in America.

    0
    0
  • They are distinguished from the other fungi and the rest of the Basidiales by the great variety of the spores and the great elaboration of the life-history to be found in many cases.

    0
    0
  • The physiology of the fungi comes under the head of that of plants generally, and the works of Pfeffer, Sachs, Vines, Darwin and Klebs may be consulted for details.

    0
    0
  • But we may refer generally here to certain phenomena peculiar to these plants, the life-actions of which are restricted and specialized by their peculiar dependence on organic supplies of carbon and nitrogen, so that most fungi resemble the colourless cells of higher plants in their nutrition.

    0
    0
  • Nevertheless, certain biological phenomena in fungi are especially pronounced, and of these the following require particular notice.

    0
    0
  • Some fungi, though able to live as saprophytes, occasionally enter the body of living plants, and are thus termed facultative parasites.

    0
    0
  • Many fungi, however, cannot complete their life-history apart from the host-plant.

    0
    0
  • The careful investigations of recent years have shown that in several groups of fungi we cannot be content to distinguish as units morphologically different species, but we are compelled to go deeper and analyse further the species.

    0
    0
  • Many trees are found to have their smaller roots invaded by fungi and deformed by their action, but so far from these being injurious, experiments go to show that this mycorhiza (fungus-root) is necessary for the well-being of the tree.

    0
    0
  • Teil (1892 onwards); Zopf, Die Pilze (Breslau, 1890); De Bary, Comparative Morphology of Fungi, &c. (Oxford, 1887); von Tafel, Vergleichende Morphologie der Pilze (Jena, 1892); Brefeld, Ureters.

    0
    0
  • Distribution, &c.: Cooke, Introduction to the Study of Fungi (London, 1895); Felix in Zeitschr.

    0
    0
  • Fungi," Pringsh.

    0
    0
  • Spore Distribution: Fulton, "Dispersal of the Spores of Fungi by Insects," Ann.

    0
    0
  • (1904); Thaxter, "New and Peculiar Aquatic Fungi," Bot.

    0
    0
  • Ustilagineae: Plowright, British Uredineae and Ustilagineae (London, 1889); Massee, British Fungi (Phycomycetes and Ustilagineae) (London, 1891); Brefeld, Unters.

    0
    0
  • Systematik der Fungi hypogaei," Ann.

    0
    0
  • 15 (1905); Wager, "The Sexuality of the Fungi," Ann.

    0
    0
  • The excluded genera are distributed among the liverworts, lichens and fungi; but notwithstanding the great advance in knowledge since the time of Linnaeus, the difficulty of deciding what limits to assign to the group to be designated Algae still remains.

    0
    0
  • Fungi Algae Bryophyta Pteridophyta Phanerogamia Gymnosperms Angiosperms Algae in this wide sense may be briefly described as the aggregate of those simpler forms of plant life usually devoid, like the rest of the Thallophyta, of differentiation into root, stem and leaf; but, unlike other Thallophyta, possessed of a colouring matter;.

    0
    0
  • It might be mentioned here that the whole group of the Fungi (q.v.),with its many thousands of species, is now generally regarded as having been derived from algae, and the system of classification of fungi devised by Brefeld is based upon this belief.

    0
    0
  • The similarity of the morphological characters of one group of fungi to those of certain algae has earned for it the name of Phycomycetes or alga -fungi.

    0
    0
  • Like the Fungi, therefore, the Red Algae consist for the most part of branched filaments, even where the thallus appears massive to the eye, and, as in the case of Fungi, this fact is not inconsistent with a great variety of external morphology.

    0
    0
  • Fertilization by means of non-motile spermatia and a trichogyne are known among the Fungi in the families Collemaceae and Laboulbeniaceae.

    0
    0
  • (For the remarkable symbiotism between algae and fungi see Fungi and Lichens.) Most algae, particularly Phaeophyceae and Rhodophyceae, spend the whole of the life-cycle immersed in water.

    0
    0
  • "Dry rot," which usually attacks the sap-wood, generally starts in a warm damp unventilated place, and is caused by the growth of fungi, some of which are visible to the naked eye, some microscopic. The spores from the fungi on the decayed wood float in the air and alight on any adjacent timber, infecting this also if the conditions be favourable.

    0
    0
  • Mushrooms and other fungi are largely used as food, especially by the Hindus of the towns, to whom they supply a substitute for meat.

    0
    0
  • BOLETUS, a well-marked genus of fungi (order Polyporeae), characterized by the central stem, the cap or pileus, the soft, fleshy tissue, and the vertical, closely-packed tubes or pores which cover the under surface of the pileus and are easily detachable.

    0
    0
  • In common with other pines, P. sylvestris is subject to the attacks of various fungi.

    0
    0
  • Ehrenberg adds a list of 8 Polygastric Infusoria, 1 fossil infusorian, 5 Phytolitharia and several microscopic fungi.

    0
    0
  • A bed of Agaricus was found by the writer near the river Styx; and upon this hint an attempt has been made to propagate edible fungi in this locality.

    0
    0
  • All the known forms of plant-life are either fungi or allied to them, and many are only microscopic. The most interesting inhabitants of Mammoth Cave are the blind, wingless grasshoppers, with extremely long antennae; blind, colourless crayfish (Cambarus pellucidus, Telk.); and the blind fish, Amblyopsis spelaeus, colourless and viviparous, from 1 in.

    0
    0
  • The former also looks on the ordinary disjointing bacterial cell as an oidium, and it must be admitted that since Brefeld's discovery of the frequency of minute oidia and chlamydospores among the fungi, the probability that some so-called bacteria - and this applies especially to the branching forms accepted by some bacteriologists - are merely reduced fungi is increased.

    0
    0
  • the cell-wall of the higher plants, it gives usually no react i ons of cellulose, nor is chitin present as in the fungi, but it consists of a proteid substance and is apparently a modification of the general protoplasm.

    0
    0
  • inimical to that of the fungi which are so common on this substratum.

    0
    0
  • Promise of more light on these oxidation fermentations is afforded by the recent discovery that not only bacteria and fungi, but even the living cells of higher plants, contain peculiar enzymes which possess the remarkable property of " carrying " oxygen - much as it is carried in the sulphuric acid chamber - and which have therefore been termed oxydases.

    0
    0
  • but results when the washings of fresh waste are added, has led to clearer proof that the heating of hay-stacks, hops, tobacco and other vegetable products is due to the vital activity of bacteria and fungi, and is physiologically a consequence of respiratory processes like those in malting.

    0
    0
  • the Sereh disease of the sugar-cane, the slime fluxes of oaks and other trees, are not only very doubtful cases, in which other organisms such as yeasts and fungi play their parts, but it may be regarded as extremely improbable that the bacteria are the primary agents at all; they are doubtless saprophytic forms which have gained access to rotting tissues injured by other agents.

    0
    0
  • Little is known of the mode of action of bacteria on these plants, but it may be assumed with great confidence that they excrete enzymes and poisons (toxins), which diffuse into the cells and kill them, and that the effects are in principle the same as those of parasitic fungi.

    0
    0
  • The plants during growth are liable to injury by severe frost, excessive rain, insects, fungi and the growth of a root-parasite (Orobanche indica).

    0
    0
  • In the sense of a furry growth, consisting of minute fungi found on animal or vegetable substances exposed to damp, the word may be either an extension of "mould," earth, or an adaptation of an early "moul," with an additional d due to "mould."

    0
    0
  • in the case of fungi or lichens, an abnormal change giving the appearance of a different species.

    0
    0
  • Of these the rust, smut and bunt fungi are by far the most common and the most destructive.

    0
    0
  • We have no similar calculation of loss for Great Britain, where wheat is not so much grown, but it is well known that there is a continual, serious depreciation of value in the crops due to parasitic fungi.

    0
    0
  • Small spores, almost certainly those of Fungi, are very common in the petrified tissues of Palaeozoic plants.

    0
    0
  • Bodies closely resembling the perithecia of Sphaeriaceous Fungi have often been observed on impressions of Palaeozoic plants, and may probably belong to the group indicated.

    0
    0
  • Weiss has obtained interesting evidence that the symbiotic association between roots and Fungi, known as " Mycorhiza," already occurred among Carboniferous plants.

    0
    0
  • The few and incomplete data which we at present possess as to Palaeozoic Fungi do not as yet justify any inferences as to the evolution of these plants.

    0
    0
  • The amber yields such things as fallen flowers, perfect catkins of oak, pollen grains and fungi.

    0
    0
  • The fungi themselves produce a variety of toxic metabolites, including aflatoxins.

    0
    0
  • agaric fungi (Amanita muscaria) growing in symbiotic association with silver birches (Betula pendula) in Glen Affric.

    0
    0
  • The Rydal Wetland has much alder, willow and birch which produce their own special fungi, with oak around the drier edges.

    0
    0
  • ambrosia beetles Back » The above species are all opportunistic, colonizing suitable wood after fungi have become established.

    0
    0
  • amylase enzymes are produced by other organisms, including fungi and bacteria, which carry out external digestion.

    0
    0
  • The book is divided into two main sections with the first describing the basics of wood anatomy, fungi and the decay process.

    0
    0
  • The cage is certainly readily penetrated by soil (as dust particles) containing virus, bacteria and fungi along with soil arthropods.

    0
    0
  • artichoke leaf extract can be effective in fighting fungi.

    0
    0
  • Fungi with spores produced inside a sac called an ascus.

    0
    0
  • The ingredients act on bacteria and fungi, is kind to sensitive skin and mildly astringent.

    0
    0
  • Other new chapters cover using the personal computer for healthcare epidemiology; infections associated with xenotransplantation; nosocomial bacteremia; and filamentous fungi.

    0
    0
  • biocidal paints Products painted onto internal surfaces such as ceilings and walls to prevent growth of fungi, mold and algae.

    0
    0
  • Ozone is a natural biocide, which effectively kills bacteria, viruses and fungi within seconds.

    0
    0
  • bracket fungi, others with mosses.

    0
    0
  • broad-spectrum disinfectant active against viruses, bacteria, fungi and other pathogen organisms (Virkon® S ).

    0
    0
  • Ragwort and fungi: Host to the common broomrape and 14 species of fungi.

    0
    0
  • buttercup plants are attacked by a number of insects, fungi and grazing animals.

    0
    0
  • cellulase production by burying cotton strips with the fungi, then, after inoculation, measuring the tensile strength of the strips.

    0
    0
  • These small ' cup ' fungi, as they are known, vary from just 0.5mm across to several centimeters.

    0
    0
  • circumpolar distribution, a much larger number of fungi have been recorded with dwarf birch.

    0
    0
  • A new community of plants, animals, fungi and micro-organisms has largely replaced the earliest pioneer species which first colonized the bare ground.

    0
    0
  • conidial fungi.

    0
    0
  • dacha fungi fell down and worshiped her that letteth for ever and ever.

    0
    0
  • And the quarter and Dewey dacha fungi fell down and worshiped her that letteth for ever and ever.

    0
    0
  • damping-off fungi.

    0
    0
  • deadwood invertebrates and fungi] .

    0
    0
  • Most are harmless, however, a group of fungi called dermatophytes can affect the feet.

    0
    0
  • It is divided into five major sections covering bacterial pathogens, toxigenic fungi and marine dinoflagellates, protozoa, and viral and virus-like agents.

    0
    0
  • Use a broad-spectrum disinfectant active against viruses, bacteria, fungi and other pathogen organisms (Virkon® S ).

    0
    0
  • edible fungi are.

    0
    0
  • effective against clinically important strains of yeasts and fungi (Wright, Lam, Hansen & Burrell, 1999 ).

    0
    0
  • Steyn DG (1934) The Toxicology of Plants in South Africa together with a consideration of poisonous foodstuffs and fungi.

    0
    0
  • foray into the world of fungi.

    0
    0
  • Probably the most common question on a fungi foray.

    0
    0
  • tropical forestry also had a look-in with a paper describing fungi associated with decay in Newtonia buchananii trees in Tanzania.

    0
    0
  • freaky fish to funky fungi and scaly skins to tremendous trees, wildlife can be both strange and fascinating.

    0
    0
  • fungusing grass too long can encourage a microclimate more suitable for the pathogenic fungi.

    0
    0
  • funguse are several different types of these substances; all of them are produced by filamentous fungi.

    0
    0
  • fungusn - but not always - the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi also produce large, swollen vesicles, which are thought to contain nutrient reserves.

    0
    0
  • fungus, vastly increasing my knowledge of edible woodland fungi!

    0
    0
  • fungusably the most common question on a fungi foray.

    0
    0
  • fungusy mildew fungi are among the most important diseases of crop plants, accounting for approximately 17% of global fungicide sales.

    0
    0
  • fungus of fungi as a carbon resource cycling: wood-rotting fungi.

    0
    0
  • gland secretions of leaf-cutting ants: role in defense against alien fungi.

    0
    0
  • Usually yeasts are grown on yeast glucose agar, other fungi on malt agar and bacteria on nutrient agar.

    0
    0
  • haustoriumes -- (of fungi) intricately branched haustoria in cortex cells.

    0
    0
  • Fungi are essential in breaking down dead organic matter to produce the humus which is needed for good soil structure - saprophytes.

    0
    0
  • hymenopteran endoparasite, or parasitoid ), and by entomopathogenic fungi.

    0
    0
  • The main body of most fungi is made up of fine, branching, usually colorless threads called hyphae.

    0
    0
  • inactivaterks by inactivating bacteria, viruses and fungi.

    0
    0
  • infecting mosquitoes with fungi, they can drastically reduce transmission of the disease, which kills well over a million people each year.

    0
    0
  • Auckland: Auckland Regional Council Cleland JB (1914) Plants, including fungi, poisonous or otherwise injurious to man in Australia.

    0
    0
  • Fungi are also a very important component of microbial inoculants.

    0
    0
  • meristem tip culture eliminates most viruses, fungi and bacteria, but not necessarily endophytes.

    0
    0
  • microhabitats provided by the tree for animals, plants and fungi to colonize.

    0
    0
  • important microhabitats include flowers and fruits, fungi, carrion, dung and nests.

    0
    0
  • mildew fungi.

    0
    0
  • By infecting mosquitoes with fungi, they can drastically reduce transmission of the disease, which kills well over a million people each year.

    0
    0
  • mycelium growth of the fungi.

    0
    0
  • myceliumt the ground beneath your feet will be absolutely seething with the mycelia of different fungi.

    0
    0
  • Consider sending samples for mycological examination in people without previous positive mycology - the absence of fungi suggests another diagnosis.

    0
    0
  • mycorrhiza fungi form highly branched, interconnected networks that invade the roots of plants in order to obtain a supply of carbohydrate.

    0
    0
  • Almost all of these fungi grow in symbiotic association with trees, forming mycorrhizas that aid the uptake of mineral nutrients from soil.

    0
    0
  • Trees grow in associations with fungi, called mycorrhizas.

    0
    0
  • Fungi play a vital role in decomposing dead material and recycling the nutrients to make them available for the growth of other plants.

    0
    0
  • Fungi can live on dead or decaying organic matter or parasitically by invading living organisms.

    0
    0
  • For example, fungi help turn a cow pat into soil.

    0
    0
  • pathogenic fungi.

    0
    0
  • polyphyletic group of organisms represented in most of the major groups of fungi.

    0
    0
  • powdery mildew fungi.

    0
    0
  • ringworm fungi.

    0
    0
  • rust fungi are the main culprits, as well as viral diseases and nematode pests.

    0
    0
  • Fungus Nutrition The first method of obtaining food is called ' saprophytic ' and the fungi that use this method are called saprophytes ' .

    0
    0
  • smut fungi!

    0
    0
  • sonnet cycle, The Fungi From Yuggoth, which he completed on January 4, 1930.

    0
    0
  • Plants include wood sorrel, wood anemone and a wide variety of mosses, lichens and fungi.

    0
    0
  • It will also destroy fungi spores giving freedom from rust.

    0
    0
  • spores of the fungi are sprayed on the crop pests.

    0
    0
  • I. Screening of activity to bacteria, fungi and American trypanosomes of 13 native plants.

    0
    0
  • Apart from these, fungi are a relatively uncommon cause of human disease.

    0
    0
  • Furthermore, within the body the acidity of the upper GI tract renders the habitat untenable to fungi.

    0
    0
  • Any remaining vestige of an Indian Summer is quickly blown away Birds; Butterflies; Bats; Fungi; .. .

    0
    0
  • Brown writes: "If for the theory ` life without air ' is substituted the consideration that yeast cells can use oxygen in the manner of ordinary aerobic fungi, and probably do require it for the full completion of their lifehistory, but that the exhibition of their fermentative functions is independent of their environment with regard to free oxygen, it will be found that there is nothing contradictory in Pasteur's experiments to such a hypothesis."

    0
    0
  • About this time Hansen, who had long been engaged in researches on the biology of the fungi of fermentation, demonstrated that yeast free from bacteria could nevertheless occasion diseases in beer.

    0
    0
  • The Saccharomycetes belong to that division of the Thallophyta called the Hyphomycetes or Fungi (q.v.).

    0
    0
  • Two great divisions are recognized in the Fungi: (i.) the Pycomycetes or Algal Fungi, which retain a definitely sexual method of reproduction as well as asexual (vegetative) methods, and (ii.) the Mycomycetes, characterized by extremely reduced or very doubtful sexual reproduction.

    0
    0
  • The Mycomycetes may be divided as follows: (A) forms bearing both sporangia and conidia (see Fungi), (B) forms bearing conidia only, e.g.

    0
    0
  • The gradual disappearance of the sexual method of reproduction, as we pass upwards in the fungi from the points of their departure from the Algae, is an important fact, the last traces of sexuality apparently disappearing in the ascomycetes.

    0
    0
  • It is beyond the scope of the present article to attempt to describe the different forms of budding fungi (Saccharomyces), mould fungi and bacteria which are capable of fermenting sugar solutions.

    0
    0
  • Many edible fungi depend upon minute and often obscure botanical characters for their determination, and may readily be confounded with worthless or poisonous species; but that is not the case with the common mushroom, for, although several other species of Agaricus somewhat closely approach it in form and colour, yet the true mushroom, if sound and freshly gathered, may be distinguished from all other fungi with great ease.

    0
    0
  • Its natural habit is to grow in rings, and the grassy fairy-rings so frequent amongst the short grass of downs and pastures in the spring are generally caused by the nitrogenous manure applied to the soil in the previous autumn by the decay of a circle of these fungi.

    0
    0
  • The groups of Fungi, Licheneae and Algae have completely run into one another, and, when the lowest forms of each are alone considered, even the animal and vegetable kingdoms cease to have a definite frontier.

    0
    0
  • The group has until recent years been regarded as comprising three classes distinguished by well-marked physiological featuresthe Algae (including the Seaweeds) which contain chlorophyll, the Fungi which have no chlorophyll and therefore lead a saprophytic or parasitic mode of life, and the Lichens which are composite organisms consisting of an alga and a fungus living together in a mutual parasitism (symbiosis); Bacteria were regarded as a section of Fungi.

    0
    0
  • It has however been deemed advisable to retain the older groups for purpose of treatment in this work, and articles will be found under the headings ALGAE, FUNGI, BACTERIA, and LIcHENs.

    0
    0
  • The study of phylogeny has suggested fourteen classes arranged in the following sequence: (1) Bacteria; (2) Cyanophyceae (Blue-green algae); (3) Flagellatae; (4) Myxomycetes (Slime-fungi); (5) Pendineae; (6) Conjugatae; (7) Diatomaceae (Diatoms); (8) Fleteroconteae; (9) Chlorophyceae (Green Algae); (10) Characeae (Stoneworts); (II) Rhodophyceae (Red Algae); (12) Eumycetes (Fungi);

    0
    0
  • The algal fungi, Phycomycetes, are obviously derived from the Green Algae, while the remaining Fungi, the Eumycetes, appear to have sprung from the same stock as the Rhodophyceae (see FUNGI).

    0
    0
  • Thallophyta.The simplest members of both the Algae and the Fungi (q.v.) (the two divisions of the Thailophyta, which is the lowest of the four great groups into which the plant-kingdom is divided) have their bodies each composed of a single cell.

    0
    0
  • mechanical injury from without, and against the entry of smaller parasites, such as fungi and bacteria, but also and especially to prevent the evaporation of water from within.

    0
    0
  • Ordinary soils will almost always provide the necessary chemical ingredients if of proper physical texture, depth, &c. (see FUNGI and BACTERIOLOGY).

    0
    0
  • The atmosphere is a cause of disease in the neighborhood of chemical works, large towns, volcanoes, &c., in so far as it carrie, acid gases and poisons to the leaves and roots; but it is usual tc associate with it the action of excessive humidity which brings about those tender watery and more or less etiolated condition, which favor parasitic Fungi, and diminish transpiration and therefore nutrition.

    0
    0
  • Trees, of which the young buds are nipped by frost, would frequently not suffer material injury, were it not that the small frost-cracks serve as points of entry for Fungi; and numerous cases are known where even high temperatures can be endured on rich, deep, retentive soils by plants which at once succumb to drought on shallow or non-retentive soils.

    0
    0
  • It is, however, among the Fungi that we find the most disastrous and elusive agents of disease.

    0
    0
  • Instances of what we may term tolerated parasitism, where the host plant seems to accommodate itself very well to the presence of the Fungus, paying the tax it extorts and nevertheless not succumbing but managing to provide itself with sufficient material to go on with, are not rare; and these seem to lead to those cases where the mutual accommodation between host and guest has been carried so far that each derives some benefit from the associationsymbiosis (see FUNGI).

    0
    0
  • Numerous special methods of preventing the spread of Fungi, or die migrations of insects, or of trapping various animals; of leaving infested ground fallow, or of growing another crop useless to the pest, &c., are also to be found in the practical treatises.

    0
    0
  • It is somewhat artificial to classify these diseases according to the color of the spots, and often impossible, because the color may differ according to the age of the part attacked and the stage of injury attained; many Fungi, for instance, induce yellow spots which become red, brown or black as they get older, and so on.

    0
    0
  • Brown spots are characteristic of Phytophthora, Puccinia, &c., and black ones of Fusicladium, Ustilago, Rhytisma, &c. Both are common as advanced symptoms of destruction by Fungi and insects.

    0
    0
  • The rotting of rhizomes, roots, &c., also comes into this category; but while it is extremely difficult in given cases to explain the course of events in detail, certain Fungi and bacteria have been so definitely associated with these roOtse.g.

    0
    0
  • Flux.A common event in the exudation of turbid, frothing liquids from wounds in the bark of trees, and the odours of putrefaction and even alcoholic fermentation in these are sufficiently explained by the coexistence of albuminous and saccharine matters with fungi, yeasts and bacteria in such fluxes.

    0
    0
  • See FUNGI and BACTERIA; also Marshall Ward, Diseases of Plants (Romance of Science Series), S.P.C.K.; Massee, Text-Book of Plant Diseases (1899); Tubeuf, Diseases of Plants (London, 1897).

    0
    0
  • Salmon, in Massees Text-Book of Fungi (1906), pp. f46I57.

    0
    0
  • Vol ut-in occurs in the cytoplasm of various Fungi, Bacteria, Cyanophyceae, diatoms, &c., in the form of minute granules which have a characteristic reaction towards methylene blue (Meyer).

    0
    0
  • The outer protective walls of the oospores of some Fungi are formed out of protoplasm containing numerous nuclei, which is at an early stage separ~t~d from tl-,c. r,rofc,nI,,,zm of ih,~ o,~nor~ T,.

    0
    0
  • In the higher Fungi nuclear fusions take place in basidia or asci which involve the union of two (fig.

    0
    0
  • The only groups of plants in which typical nuclei have not been found are the Cyanophyceae, Bacteria and Yeast Fungi.

    0
    0
  • ACROGENAE (" growing at the apex"), an obsolete botanical term, originally applied to the higher Cryptogams (mosses and ferns), which were erroneously distinguished from the lower (Algae and Fungi) by apical growth of the stem.

    0
    0
  • They probably express a variation which may have occurred in a far-back ancestor, or in one more recent, and render the individual vulnerable to the attacks of parasitic fungi, or, it may be, become manifest as errors of metabolism.

    0
    0
  • This disease is caused by the parasitism of Sphaceloma ampelinum, one of the Pyrenomycetous fungi (fig.

    0
    0
  • One cubic centimetre of soil taken within a foot or so from the surface contains from II to 2 millions of bacteria of many different kinds, as well as large numbers of fungi.

    0
    0
  • undergo decomposition in the soil and become broken down into compounds of simple chemical composition better suited for absorption by the roots of crops, the changes involved being directly due to the activity of bacteria and fungi.

    0
    0
  • Structural, having reference to the form and structure of the various parts, including (a) Morphology, the study of the general form of the organs and their development - this will be treated in a series of articles dealing with the great subdivisions of plants (see Angiosperms, Gymnosperms, Pteridophyta, Bryophyta, Algae, Lichens, Fungi and Bacteriology) and the more important organs (see Stem, Leaf, RooT, Flower, Fruit); (b) Anatomy, the study of internal structure, including minute anatomy or histology (see Plants: Anatomy).

    0
    0
  • The larch suffers from several diseases caused by fungi; the most important is the larch-canker caused by the parasitism of Peziza Willkommii.

    0
    0
  • are apothecia or perithecia (see Fungi) and spermogonia.

    0
    0
  • This form of relationship is now known in other groups of plants (see Bacteriology and Fungi), but it was first discovered in the lichens.

    0
    0
  • A further argument in support of this view is that it is in complete agreement with what we know of the sexuality of the ordinary, free-living ascomycetes, where we find both normal and reduced forms (see Fungi).

    0
    0
  • As indicated above, the weight of evidence seems to favour what has been put forward in the case of the non-lichenforming fungi (see Fungi), that in some cases the ascogonia develop as a result of a previous fertilization by spermatia, in other cases the ascogonia develop without such a union, while in still other Epithecium Asci  :Thecium (Hymenium) Paraphyses Parathecium, - Cortex gn,go mphitheciam - __ __MeddllzC-- _Hypoitienum==?=_` After Darbishire, from Berichte der deutschen botanischen Gesellschaft, by permission of Borntraeger & Co.

    0
    0
  • The best-known species is Cora pavonia, which is found in tropical regions growing on the bare earth and on trees; the gonidia belong to the genus Chroococcus while the fungus belongs, apparently, to the Thelephoreae (see Fungi).

    0
    0
  • The fungus seems, on the other hand, to stimulate the algal cells to special development, for those in the lichen are larger than those in the free state, but this is not necessarily adverse to the idea of parasitism, for it is well known that an increase in the size of the cells of the host is often the result of the attacks of parasitic fungi.

    0
    0
  • Such are sugars (glucose, mannite, &c.), acids (acetic, citric and a whole series of lichen-acids), ethereal oils and resinous bodies, often combined with the intense colours of fungi and lichens, and a number of powerful alkaloid poisons, such as muscarin (Amanita), ergotin (Claviceps), &c.

    0
    0
  • In some of the simpler fungi the spores are not borne on or in hyphae which can be distinguished from the vege A tative parts or mycelium, but in the vast majority of cases the sporogenous hyphae either ascend free into the air or radiate into the surrounding water as distinct branches, or are grouped into special columns, cushions, layers or complex masses obviously different in colour, consistency, shape and other characters from the parts which gather up and assimilate the food-materials.

    0
    0
  • The ordinary mycelium is the gametophyte since it hears the ascogonia and aritheridia when present; the cqe Two questions of great theoretical importance have been raised over and over again in connexion with yeasts, namely, (I) the morphological one as to whether yeasts are merely degraded forms of higher fungi, as would seem implied by their tendency to form elongated, hypha-like cells in the veils, and their development of "ascospores" as well as by the wide occurrence of yeast-like "sprouting forms" in other fungi (e.g.

    0
    0
  • - Taken in conjunction with Pfeffer's beautiful discovery that certain chemicals exert a distinct attractive influence on fungus hyphae (chemotropism), and the results of Miyoshi's experimental application of it, the phenomena of enzyme-secretion throw considerable light on the processes of infection and parasitism of fungi.

    0
    0
  • The remarkable case of life in common first observed in lichens, where a fungus and an alga unite to form a compound organism - the lichen - totally different from either, has now been proved to be universal in these plants, and lichens are in all cases merely algae enmeshed in the interwoven hyphae of fungi (see Lichens).

    0
    0
  • Numerous other cases of symbiosis have been discovered among the fungi of fermentation, of which those between Aspergillus and yeast in sake manufacture, and between yeasts and bacteria in kephir and in the ginger-beer plant are best worked out.

    0
    0
  • Septicaemia, tuberculosis, glanders, fowl-cholera, relapsing fever, and other diseases are now brought definitely within the range of biology, and it is clear that all contagious and infectious diseases are due to the action of bacteria or, in a few cases, to fungi, or to protozoa or other animals.

    0
    0
  • Laurent and others were right, and that Clostridium pasteurianum, for instance, if protected from access of free oxygen by an envelope of aerobic bacteria or fungi, and provided with the carbohydrates and minerals necessary for its growth, fixes nitrogen in proportion to the amount of sugar consumed.

    0
    0
  • "Eecp, to boil), a cellular organism produced in the alcoholic fermentation of saccharine liquids (see Fungi, Fermentation, Brewing).

    0
    0
  • Yes, external parasites transmissible to man include fleas, sarcoptic mange, the fur mite and ringworm fungi.

    0
    0
  • Fungus Nutrition The first method of obtaining food is called ' saprophytic ' and the fungi that use this method are called saprophytes '.

    0
    0
  • Claire Sansford never seems to be able to escape from the smut fungi !

    0
    0
  • The above poem is from H.P. Lovecraft 's sonnet cycle, The Fungi From Yuggoth, which he completed on January 4, 1930.

    0
    0
  • The spores of the fungi are sprayed on the crop pests.

    0
    0
  • Any remaining vestige of an Indian Summer is quickly blown away Birds; Butterflies; Bats; Fungi; ...

    0
    0
  • Second, even though your cat doesn't appear to have fleas, parasites or fungi can still be possibilities.

    0
    0
  • Research has shown over and over again that tea tree oil is effective against fungi, bacteria, and even viruses.

    0
    0
  • The oil also has a natural antifungal property that is used for treatment of various fungi especially those commonly found in damp climates.

    0
    0
  • Lignin is vulnerable to certain fungi and bacteria.

    0
    0
  • This single-celled fungi is actually part of a vast group of fungi categorized as yeasts.

    0
    0
  • But do single-celled fungi like yeast count as animals?

    0
    0
  • Yeast comes from fungi, and fungi are part of the plant kingdom.

    0
    0
  • The scratching can add to the skin irritation, and if the skin becomes broken, bacteria and fungi can cause an infection that will require treatment by a veterinarian.

    0
    0
  • This fungi grows primarily in moist dark matter such as soil, feces and decaying plants or trees.

    0
    0
  • A sample of the skin cells from around the nail can be viewed under a microscope to determine the presence of fungi.

    0
    0
  • If the dog has access to soil on a regular basis, monitor the area for muddy or standing water that may harbor the Blastomyces dermatitidis fungi.

    0
    0
  • If you find worms or saprophytic fungi -- a network of fine, white threads in a clump of compost - that is a sign that your compost pile is "working" nicely.

    0
    0
  • Worms and beneficial fungi help plant material to decompose.

    0
    0
  • The fungi and bacteria that cause so many problems can overwinter on contaminated stems and roots.

    0
    0
  • Fungi, bacteria and insects such as worms consume plant material and turn it into rich, nutrient-filled soil.

    0
    0
  • Fungi and molds: Powdery mildew and other molds and fungi attack the leaves, turning them brown, white or spotted.

    0
    0
  • Anthracnose refers to a group of diseases caused by fungi, and it can affect many shade trees.

    0
    0
  • How it spreads: As with anthracnose, the fungi that causes phyllosticta spends its winters hiding among the fallen leaves on the ground.

    0
    0
  • Likewise molds, fungi and viruses love the warm, humid conditions inside a greenhouse.

    0
    0
  • In the spring, seeds, leaf buds and pollen accumulate and cause fungi to grow and attract bugs.

    0
    0
  • While nominally classed as a fungi, they are in fact a colony of bacteria in a yeast mixture.

    0
    0
  • As the tea often contains fungi, one must be careful and sure that the kombucha kit they purchased was organic and certified, because some of the molds and fungi that form can be toxic.

    0
    0
  • Typically, compost is made from leftover food, grass clippings, leaves, and other natural materials that can be broken down by fungi and bacteria.

    0
    0
  • Mycotoxins - These toxic substances produced by fungi are present in pet foods when their ingredients have not been dried or stored properly.

    0
    0
  • Ideally, soil is a living, thriving ecosystem, with complex interactions between garden plants, earthworms, microorganisms and fungi.

    0
    0
  • Further, contact solution can prevent bacteria and fungi from growing on your contacts.

    0
    0
  • This bacteria is formed when airborne fungi attach themselves to chlorophenol compounds (compounds found in chlorine).

    0
    0
  • Allergic reactions can also be triggered by insect bites, molds and fungi, certain prescription drugs, plants such as poison ivy and poison oak, and irritating or toxic substances released into the air.

    0
    0
  • As with other childhood vasculitides, various disease organisms (including fungi as well as bacteria or viruses) have been suggested as the cause, but none have been definitely identified.

    0
    0
  • Fever, an elevation of normal body temperature, is a natural response of the body that helps fight off foreign substances, such as microorganisms (bacteria and viruses), parasites, fungi, and toxins.

    0
    0
  • Lymphadenitis is marked by swollen lymph nodes that develop when the glands are overwhelmed by bacteria, virus, fungi, or other organisms.

    0
    0
  • Streptococcal and staphylococcal bacteria are the most common causes of lymphadenitis, although viruses, protozoa, rickettsiae, fungi, and the tuberculosis bacillus can also infect the lymph nodes.

    0
    0
  • It can be caused by nearly any class of organism known to cause human infections, including bacteria, viruses, fungi, and parasites.

    0
    0
  • Vaccines contain antigens (weakened or dead viruses, bacteria, and fungi that cause disease and infection).

    0
    0
  • These antibodies are specific proteins (immunoglobulins) produced by the immune system to respond to bacteria, viruses, fungi, parasites, or toxins that invade the body.

    0
    0
  • Pneumonia is an infection of the lungs that can be caused by nearly any class of organism known to cause human infections, including bacteria, viruses, fungi, and parasites.

    0
    0
  • The list of organisms that can cause pneumonia is lengthy and includes nearly every class of infecting organism: viruses, bacteria, bacteria-like organisms, fungi, and parasites (including certain worms).

    0
    0
  • Classically considered a parasite, it appears to be more related to fungi.

    0
    0
  • Bacteria, fungi, and viruses have all been implicated in causing otitis externa.

    0
    0
  • Occasionally, fungi may cause otitis externa.

    0
    0
  • The function of the immune system is to respond to organisms and substances that invade the body, such as bacteria, viruses, fungi, parasites, and toxins, by producing antibodies against them.

    0
    0
  • The normal immune system involves a complex interaction of certain types of cells that can recognize and attack foreign invaders, such as bacteria, viruses, and fungi.

    0
    0
  • Severe defects in the ability of T lymphocytes to mature result in impaired immune responses to infections with viruses, fungi, and certain types of bacteria.

    0
    0
  • When these children are exposed to house dust mites, animal proteins, fungi, or other potential allergens, they produce a type of antibody that is intended to engulf and destroy the foreign materials.

    0
    0
  • Autoimmune disorders occur when the body's immune system mistakenly identifies the body's own tissue as foreign and goes about attacking those tissues, as if trying to rid the body of an invader (such as a bacteria, virus, or fungi).

    0
    0
  • Because both types of cells are affected, WAS patients are subject to repeated infections from bacteria, fungi, and viruses.

    0
    0
  • It also means the product does not contain harmful levels of contaminants, including certain heavy metals, such as lead or mercury, as well as pesticides, molds, and fungi.

    0
    0
  • Well, for starters, the human body is loaded with naturally occurring bacteria, fungi, and yeasts.

    0
    0
  • Eliminate the risk of exposure to fungi, dirt and germs by slipping on these convenient, disposable slippers.

    0
    0
  • The open cells make it possible for sweat (bacteria and fungi) to enter into the mat and stay there.

    0
    0
  • It is a form of mold, a type of fungi, that grows on many different kinds of materials.

    0
    0
  • Eco Moldzyme works to remove mildew and mold from outdoor furniture, decks, showers and any other place fungi grows.

    0
    0
  • Growth of bacteria and fungi leading to rashes and possible infection such as intertrigo.

    0
    0
  • Bacteria and fungi can live in foot bath water and on the tools used to do the treatment.

    0
    0
  • Fungi is a group of micro-organisms; some have beneficial properties, while others are linked to sickness or disease.

    0
    0
  • Mold and yeasts can be the cause of nail fungus infections, but most often the group of fungi known to cause these conditions is known as dermatophytes.

    0
    0
  • The microscopic fungi responsible for toenail fungus are found, not surprisingly, in damp areas like shower stalls, public gyms and swimming pools.

    0
    0
  • This, in turn, may kill off the microscopic fungi causing the problem in the first place.

    0
    0
  • Toe nail fungus is caused by trapped moisture underneath the nail bed that breeds with other bacteria until a fungi is born.

    0
    0
  • These nasty fungi may be acquired from sharing a public pool or common shower, or by skin contact.

    0
    0
Browse other sentences examples →