Ft Sentence Examples

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  • The city stands at the head of a small valley, 11,380 ft.

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  • The city is built on rolling ground about 900 ft.

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  • From Mafu to the sea, a distance of 215 m., the Senegal is navigable all the year round by vessels drawing not more than to ft.

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  • It is a lonely lake, situated in extremely wild surroundings at a height of 1153 ft.

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  • The mean depth is 189 ft., and the maximum 512 ft.

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  • The crossing is surmounted by a dome, and the extremity of the north transept by a fine square tower over 160 ft.

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  • Paris mushrooms are cultivated in enormous quantities in dark underground cellars at a depth of from 60 to 160 ft.

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  • The beds are formed of horse-droppings which have been slightly fermented and frequently turned, and may be made 2 or 3 ft.

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  • The town is charmingly situated on a small plateau, 1680 ft.

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  • The mountain ridges vary in height up to 4000 ft.

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  • Inasmuch as the state has a range of over 4000 ft.

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  • In Inishmore there stand, on a cliff 220 ft.

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  • This elevated region is known as the plateau of Matto Grosso, and its elevations so far as known rarely exceed 3000 ft.

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  • The river, here the boundary between the Cape province and Orange Free State, is crossed by a stone bridge 860 ft.

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  • Gavino, is only about loo ft.

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  • In the province of Cagliari 2 9.99% of the recruits born in 1862 were under 5 ft.

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  • They wear a black cap, about 12 ft.

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  • The nuraghe in its simplest form is a circular tower about 30 ft.

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  • The entrance almost invariably faces south, and measures, as a rule, 5 or 6 ft.

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  • The architrave is flat, and there is a space over it, serving both to admit light and to relieve the pressure on it from above, and the size decreases slightly from the bottom to the top. Within the doorway is, as a rule, a niche on the right, and a staircase ascending in the thickness of the wall to the left; in front is another similar doorway leading to the chamber in the interior, which is circular, and about 15 ft.

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  • A final argument is the existence in some cases of a village of circular stone buildings of similar construction to the nuraghi, but only 15 to 25 ft.

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  • In the district of Gennargentu they occur, rarely, as much as 3600 ft.

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  • The dockyard, chiefly used for naval repairs, covers about 60 acres, and consists of three basins and large docks, the depth of water in the basins ranging down to 26 ft.

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  • The town has wide streets and contains several old churches, one of which, a Roman Catholic church, built in the 14th century, has a tower 33 o ft.

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  • Asheville is situated at the junction of three branches of the Southern railway, on a high terrace on the east bank of the French Broad river, at the mouth of the Swannanoa, about 2300 ft.

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  • The old castle of Schwanenburg (formerly the residence of the dukes of Cleves), has a massive tower (Schwanenturm) 180 ft.

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  • The banks of the Beas are high, and on this side of the district well-water is not found except at 50 ft.

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  • A mile and a half northeast are the Falls of Bracklinn (Gaelic, "white-foaming pool"), formed by the Keltie, which takes a leap of 50 ft.

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  • There is an iron pier 450 ft.

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  • The An pass, an important trade route, rises to a height of 4664 ft.

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  • The fine campanile of the church is 246 ft.

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  • It forms an evergreen bush, about 4 ft.

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  • It is an irregular enclosure over Soo ft.

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  • This wall is in places over 30 ft.

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  • It is a hill rising 200 to 300 ft.

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  • There are capacious docks on the river, which is crossed by a wrought-iron bridge, 1000 ft.

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  • It seems possible that the road at first led to Tusculum, that it was then prolonged to Labici, and later still became a road for through traffic; it may even have superseded the Via Latina as a route to the S.E., for, while the distance from Rome to their main junction at Ad Bivium (or to another junction at Compitum Anagninum) is practically identical, the summit level of the former is 725 ft.

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  • The tree grows to the height of 150 ft.

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  • It is a majestic tree, sometimes attaining a height of more than 220 ft.

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  • Araucaria Rulei, which is a tree of New Caledonia, attains a height of 50 or 60 ft.

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  • Araucaria Cookii, also a native of New Caledonia, attains a height of 150 ft.

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  • To the south-west is the Forum, an area 265 ft.

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  • To the south-west of the Forum are the remains of three small temples, one dedicated to Venus, and a well-preserved Mithraeum, with mosaics representing the seven planets, &c. To the south-west again is the conspicuous brick cella of a lofty temple, on arched substructures, generally supposed to be that of Vulcan, with a threshold block of africano (Euboean) marble over 15 ft.

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  • It measures 1608 ft.

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  • The porches of this are handsomely ornamented, and about Ioo ft.

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  • A green is divided into spaces usually from 18 to 21 ft.

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  • Three points are scored if the bowl come to rest within I ft.

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  • A semicircle is then drawn behind the bowls with a radius of 9 ft.

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  • Were it not for these dams steamers might reach Mosul itself, at an elevation of 353 ft.

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  • Its general slope is from north-east, where the culminating point (930 ft.) is found, to south-west, though altitudes exceeding 750 ft.

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  • Its central tower carries a remarkable twisted spire of wood covered with lead, 230 ft.

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  • It rises gradually towards the centre, where it culminates in Mount Elias, 1864 ft.

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  • There is a lighthouse, 85 ft.

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  • The plant is about 1 ft.

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  • A portion of Basil's new city was surrounded with strong walls and turned into a fortress by Justinian; and within the walls, rebuilt in the 13th and 16th centuries, lies the greater part of Kaisarieh, altitude 3500 ft.

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  • Opposite the cathedral is a very fine round tower 100 ft.

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  • They are drained and in large part enclosed by the North (or Belle Fourche) and South forks of the Cheyenne river (at whose junction a fur-trading post was established about 1830); and are surrounded by semi-arid, alkaline plains lying 3000 to 3500 ft.

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  • The highest level of the site of the city of Winnipeg is said to have been under 5 ft.

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  • With cast iron pipe this cannot be done, and no length of piping over 40 ft.

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  • In Washington Square there is a Soldiers' and Sailors' Monument, 93 ft.

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  • There are two piers enclosing a harbour with a total area of 48 acres, having a depth of about 16 ft.

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  • Parma, one of the finest cities of northern Italy, lies in a fertile tract of the Lombard plain, within view of the Alps and sheltered by the Apennines, 170 ft.

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  • The lake is situated about 850 ft.

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  • North of them is the great saline depression, known as the " salinas grandes," 643 ft.

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  • The Misiones territory of the extreme north-east belongs to the older highlands of Brazil, is densely wooded, and has ranges of hills sometimes rising to a height of moo to 1300 ft.

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  • The gauge is broken at Mendoza, the Buenos Aires and Pacific having a gauge of 5 ft.

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  • On the south-eastern frontier the French Alps, which include Mont Blanc (15,800 ft.), and, more to the south, other summits over 11,000 ft.

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  • In the southern and most elevated portion of the range there are several summits exceeding 5500 ft.

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  • Averaging 524 ft.

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  • Those of the first class, which comprise rather less than half the entire system, have a minimum depth of 64 ft., with locks 126 ft.

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  • They are coral islands of comparatively recent elevation, and in no place rise more than 250 ft.

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  • The narrow Svendborg Sund separates Fiinen from the lesser islands of Taasinge and Turb, of which the former rises to 245 ft.

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  • The general shape of the animal is ungainly, owing to a huge hump on the withers, at which point the height is about 3 ft.

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  • The tendency of the currents in the Channel opposite Brighton is to drive the shingle eastward, and encroachments of the sea were frequent and serious until the erection of a massive sea-wall, begun about 1830, 60 ft.

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  • The city is built at the narrow end of the valley and at the foot of the Cerro de Avila, and stands from 2887 to 3442 ft.

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  • Two miles north-east is the famous Silla de Caracas, whose twin summits, like a gigantic old-fashioned saddle (silla), rise to an elevation of 8622 ft.; and the Naiguete, still farther eastward, overlooks the valley from a height of 9186 ft.

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  • On the east the valley of the Kidron separates this plateau from the ridge of the Mount of Olives, which is 100 to 200 ft.

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  • Both valleys fall rapidly as they approach the point of junction, which lies at a depth of more than 600 ft.

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  • Protogenes embellished the city with his paintings, and Chares of Lindus with the celebrated colossal statue of the sun-god, which was 105 ft.

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  • The basal plain of these terraces is the bed of the ocean, which on the Pacific side has an average depth of 15,000 ft.

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  • The first ledge rising from the ocean floor has depth averaging 8000 ft.

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  • Then there is a gentle rise to the low steppes, 500 to woo ft.

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  • In New South Wales, but close to the Victorian border, are found the loftiest peaks of Australia, Mount Kosciusco and Mount Townsend, rising to heights of 7328 and 7260 ft.

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  • The mass widens out once more in the Liverpool Range, where the highest peak, Mount Oxley, reaches 4500 ft., and farther north, in the New England Range, Ben Lomond reaches an elevation of 5000 ft.

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  • Near the Queensland border, Mount Lindsay, in the Macpherson Range, rises to a height of 5500 ft.

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  • An eastern system in South Australia touches at a few points a height of 3000 ft.; and the Stirling Range, belonging to the south-western system of South Australia, reaches to 2340 ft.

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  • The higher steppes, as far as they are known, consist of Ordovician and Cambrian rocks, with an average elevation of 1500 to 3000 ft.

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  • The Blackhall bore, put down at his advice from 1885 to 1888, reached a water-bearing layer at the depth of 1645 ft.

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  • The deepest well is that at Whitewood, 5046 ft.

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  • There are some twenty smaller species in Australia and Tasmania, besides the rock wallabies and the hare kangaroos; these last are wonderfully swift, making clear jumps 8 or io ft.

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  • The " leathery turtle," which is herbivorous, and yields abundance of oil, has been caught at sea off the Illawarra coast so large as 9 ft.

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  • The great crocodile of Queensland has been known to attain a length of 30 ft.; there is a smaller one about 6 ft.

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  • The mallee is a species of eucalyptus growing 12 to 14 ft.

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  • It is seen as a clump of wire-like leaves, a few feet in diameter, surrounding a stem, hardly thicker than a walking-stick, rising to a height of Jo or 12 ft.

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  • There are eight mines in the Bendigo district over 3000 ft.

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  • In Queensland there is one mine 3156 ft.

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  • It varies in width from 10 ft.

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  • One of the richest has been found at Greta in the Hunter river district; it contains an average thickness of 41 ft.

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  • The railways are of different gauges, the standard narrow gauge of 4 ft.

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  • He described it as barren and sterile, and almost devoid of animals, the only one of any importance somewhat resembling a raccoon - a strange creature, which advanced by great bounds or leaps instead of walking, using only its hind legs, and covering 12 or 15 ft.

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  • The Blue Mountains attain a height of between 3000 and 4000 ft.

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  • The surface on the whole is hilly and is partly occupied by offshoots of the Thuringian Forest; the highest summits are found in the eastern half, where the Kieferle reaches 2849 ft.

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  • It is built on a series of terraces, mostly on the west bank of the river, which is spanned here by a bridge 1100 ft.

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  • The highest known peak in the main range is that of Gunong Korbu, 7217 ft.

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  • The highest mountain is believed to be Gunong Tahan, which forms part of an isolated range on the eastern side, between Pahang and Kelantan, and is estimated at about 8000 ft.

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  • Extremes range from 106 ft.

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  • The crest line is generally more than 2000 ft.

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  • The Taconic Mountains rise in very irregular masses to1500-2000ft., and reach their maximum elevation in Mount Equinox at 3816 ft.

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  • Mount Ascutney, one of the Granitic Mountains, rises abruptly from the floor of the Connecticut Valley to a height of 33 20 ft.

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  • Among these are to be found a singularly large number of both active and inactive volcanoes, including the well-known Salak and Gede in the north, and bunched together at the eastern end the Chikorai, Papandayan, Wayang, Malabar, Guntur, &c., ranging from 6000 to 10,000 ft.

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  • The city consists of two parts; the modern French town, built on the level ground by the seashore, and the ancient city of the deys, which climbs the steep hill behind the modern town and is crowned by the kasbah or citadel, 400 ft.

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  • Two inclined roads lead from the centre of the boulevard to the quay 40 ft.

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  • The minaret is 90 ft.

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  • The depth at the entrance is 72 to 108 ft., and in port from 36 to 66 ft.

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  • It provides extensive quayage with a minimum depth of water of 28 ft.

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  • The scenery about the two Loughs Macnean is carved out in similarly scarped hills, rising to 2188 ft.

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  • There are also considerable remains of the ancient theatre, a large cryptoporticus 197 ft.

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  • The ancient chief town of the Aurunci, Aurunca or Ausona, is believed to have lain over 2000 ft.

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  • The celebrated Newland oak in Gloucestershire, known for centuries as "the great oak," was by the latest measurement 472 ft.

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  • The conifers are allowed to grow to a height of from 3 to 5 ft.

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  • The distance between the oaks depends upon the growth intended before thinning the young wood; usually they are placed from 8 to 12 ft.

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  • The growth of the oak is slow, though it varies greatly in different trees; Loudon states that an oak, raised from the acorn in a garden at Sheffield Place, Sussex, became in seventy years 12 ft.

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  • Robur; in the mild climate of Devonshire and Cornwall it has reached a height of TOO ft.

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  • On rich loams and the alluvial soils of river-valleys, when well drained, the tree attains a large size, often rivalling the giant oaks of Europe; trunks of 3 or 4 ft.

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  • This tree acquires large dimensions, the trunk being often from 4 to 6 ft.

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  • Chinquapin or prinoides, a dwarf species, often only I ft.

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  • The stem sometimes grows 80 or 90 ft.

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  • The most remarkable inundations were those of 1537 and 1740; in the former year the water rose to 8 ft.

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  • The castle has two storeys, is 90 ft.

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  • It is most elevated in its southern portion, Mt Dabo having a height of 3133 ft.

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  • Its general elevation is between 2000 and 2500 ft.; on the north-west side of the range the country is table-land some boo to moo ft.

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  • The walls are in some places about 5 ft.

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  • The principal edifice extends Boo ft.

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  • A small light sphere hanging from the end of 30 or 40 ft.

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  • Approximately II% should be added to the velocity recorded by a tube anemometer for each 1000 ft.

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  • The town is finely situated upon a group of hills nearly 1000 ft.

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  • Also, the work done in raising i lb through 2 ft.

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  • The adult worm in the female sometimes reaches a length of 6 ft.

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  • The village is situated in a farming country, about 1700 ft.

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  • The net effective work of lifting that can be performed by a man turning a handle may be taken, for intermittent work, as being on an average about 5000 foot-lb per minute; this is equivalent to 1 ton lifted about 24 ft.

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  • That the quantity of heat to be got rid of may become very considerable is seen when it is considered that the energy of a load of 60 tons descending through 50 ft.

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  • The crosstraversing speed of travellers varies from 60 to 120 ft.

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  • The source of the river is in the highlands of the Vindhyas, upwards of 2000 ft.

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  • The first antenna employed consisted of 50 bare copper wires 200 ft.

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  • Subsequently this antenna was enlarged, and four wooden lattice towers were built, 215 ft.

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  • At St John's in Newfoundland he erected a temporary receiving antenna consisting of a wire 400 ft.

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  • The process of reflection in the case of a wave motion involves the condition that the wave-length shall be small compared with the dimensions of the mirror, and hence the attempt to reflect and converge electric waves loon ft.

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  • Even if the proposal had been practicable with waves 1000 or 2000 ft.

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  • Supposing, then, that these waves are moo ft.

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  • The harbour, the largest in Spain after that of Vigo, and the finest on the east coast, is a spacious bay, deep, except near its centre, where there is a ledge of rock barely 5 ft.

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  • The diameter of the orchestra is 762 ft.

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  • The Parnahyba is navigable for boats of 3 ft.

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  • Eight days after birth the young Arabian camel stands 3 ft.

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  • From the neighbourhood of Savona to that of Genoa they do not rise to more than 3000 tO 4000 ft., and are traversed by passes of less than 2000 ft.

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  • As they extend towards the east they increase in elevation; the Monte Bue rises to 5915 ft., while the Monte Cimone, a little farther east, attains 7103 ft.

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  • The highest point in this part of the range is the Monte Falterona, above the sources of the Arno, which attains 5410 ft.

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  • Beginning from the group called the Alpi della Luna near the sources of the Tiber, which attain 4435 ft., they are continued by the Monte Nerone (5010 ft.), Monte Catria (5590), and Monte Maggio to the Monte Pennino near Nocera (5169 ft.), and thence to the Monte della Sibilla, at the source of the Nar or Nera, which attains 7663 ft.

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  • Proceeding thence southwards, we find in succession the Monte Vettore (8128 ft.), the Pizzo di Sevo (7945 ft.), and the two great mountain masses of the Monte Corno, commonly called the Gran Sasso d'Italia, the most lofty of all the Apennines, attaining to a height of 9560 ft., and the Monte della Maiella, its highest summit measuring 9170 ft.

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  • Such is the basin of Lake Fucino, situated in the centre of the mass, almost exactly midway between the two seas, at an elevation of 2180 ft.

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  • The rest of this tract is for the most part a hilly, broken country, of moderate elevation, but Monte Amiata, near Radicofani, an isolated mass of volcanic origin, attains a height of 5650 ft.

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  • This volcanic tract extends across the Campagna of Rome, till it rises again in the lofty group of the Alban hills, the highest summit of which, the Monte Cavo, is 3160 ft.

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  • South of Palestrina again, the main mass of the Apennines throws off another lateral mass, known in ancient times as the Volscian mountains (now called the Monti Lepini), separated from the central ranges by the broad valley of the Sacco, a tributary of the Liri (Liris) or Garigliano, and forming a large and rugged mountain mass, nearly 5000 ft.

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  • From the neighborhood of Potenza, the main ridge of the Apennines is continued by the Monti della Maddalena in a direction nearly due south, so that it approaches within a short distance of the Gulf of Policastro, whence it is carried on as far as the Monte Pollino, the last of the lofty summits of the Apennine chain, which exceeds 7000 ft.

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  • They are all of great depth—the Lago Maggiore having an extreme depth of 1198 ft., while that of Como attains to 1365 ft.

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  • The most important of these, the Lacus Fucinus of the ancients, now called the Lago di Celano, situated almost exactly in the centre of the peninsula, occupies a basin of considerable extent, surrounded by mountains and without any natural outlet, at an elevation of more than 2000 ft.

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  • Monte Venda, their highest peak, is 1890 ft.

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  • The Punta del Nasone, the highest point of Somma, is 3714 ft.

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  • Its highest peak, the Pizzuto di Melfi, attains an elevation of 4365 ft.

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  • The largest is not more than 160 ft.

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  • In Sardinia it covers the mountain slopes to a considerable height, and in Sicily covers the sides of the Madonie range, reaching a level above 3000 ft.

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  • It is picturesquely situated in Eagle valley, near the east base of the Sierra Nevada, at an elevation of 4720 ft.

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  • The town lies on the right bank of the Agno, which divides the province of Naples from that of Caserta, 90 ft.

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  • These are of great age, and rise sometimes to a height exceeding 15 ft.

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  • The average height of males is 4 ft.

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  • The most remarkable Roman building in Trier is the Porta Nigra, the north gate of the city, a huge fortified gateway, 115 ft.

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  • In the south-east corner of the city are the picturesque ruins of the Roman imperial palace, and near the bridge are the extensive substructures of the 4thcentury Roman baths, 660 ft.

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  • The older road crossed the back of the promontory at the foot of which Terracina stands; in imperial times, probably, the rock was cut away perpendicularly for a height of 120 ft.

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  • In the centre of the city stands the unfinished Belfry (Beffroi), a square tower some 300 ft.

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  • At a corner of the square is a remarkable cannon, known as Dulle Griete (Mad Meg), 19 ft.

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  • Both trees occasionally attain a height of 90 ft.

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  • It is a tree of rather large growth, sometimes too ft.

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  • This tree is of extremely rapid growth, and has been known to attain a height of 70 ft.

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  • The Hauraki Gulf, a great square inlet opening northward, is studded with islands of considerable elevation; Rangitoto, which protects the harbour, is a volcanic cone reaching nearly l000 ft.

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  • To the west the Titirangi hills exceed 1400 ft.

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  • A grassy road between banks io to 12 ft.

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  • For example, in southern Algeria, a region of steppes is situated on a flat plateau, about 3000 ft.

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  • Sir John Murray deduced the mean height of the land of the globe as about 2250 ft.

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  • Mill calculated the position of mean sphere-level at about Io,000 ft.

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  • The mean height deduced for the land was 2300 ft.

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  • The continental plateau might for purposes of detailed study be divided into the continental shelf from - 660 ft.

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  • In the vicinity of Farnham it contains a bed of "coprolites" of considerable extent and 2 to 15 ft.

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  • High Street, the principal business thoroughfare, is 100 ft.

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  • It is built in the simple Doric style, of grey limestone taken from a quarry owned by the state, near the city; is 304 ft.

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  • The Portland Observatory, on Munjoy Hill, erected in 1807 to detect approaching vessels, rises 222 ft.

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  • In 1800 he settled at Westbury near Bristol, and began to determine star-places with a fine altitude and azimuth circle of 22 ft.

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  • Cali stands 3327 ft.

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  • Amongst the principal buildings are the beautiful cathedral in the Italian style, with a handsome dome 130 ft.

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  • In the south-western corner of the enclosure stands the citadel (ark), within a wall 25 ft.

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  • All round the northern, western and southern sides of the quadrangle ran, at some 10 ft.

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  • The height to the top of this square wall must have been 90 or 100 ft.

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  • Over the western archway was a white cage for the muazzin, and outside it was a gigantic minaret 120 ft.

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  • It had an exquisitely carved capital, and above that a light pillar, seemingly 10 ft.

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  • Mantegna then returned to Mantua, and went on with a series of works - the nine temperapictures, each of them 9 ft.

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  • Its extreme elevation is about 2300 ft.

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  • The northern face of the mountain, overlooking Table Bay, extends like a great wall some two miles in length, and rises precipitously to a height of over 3500 ft.

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  • In the interior of the mines are sixteen ponds, of which the large lake of Przykos is 195 ft.

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  • The Dzungarian Ala-tau Mountains, which separate it from Kulja, extend south-west towards the river Ili, with an average height of 6000 ft.

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  • South of the lake two ranges of the Tian-shan, separated by the valley of the Naryn, stretch in the same direction, lifting up their icy peaks to 16,000 and 18,000 ft.; while westwards from the lake the precipitous slopes of the Alexander chain, 9000 to io,000 ft.

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  • The town is picturesquely situated 690 ft.

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  • At Avshin it enters a canon, with walls over l000 ft.

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  • Three or four piers or sometimes bridges of masonry are run out into the bed of the river, frequently from both sides at once, raising the level of the stream and thus giving a water power sufficient to turn the gigantic wheel or wheels, sometimes almost 40 ft.

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  • In this part of its course the rocky sides of the valley, which sometimes closely approach the river, are composed of marls and gypsum, with occasional selenite, overlaid with sandstone, with a topping of breccia or conglomerate, and rise at places to a height of 200 ft.

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  • At Hit the river is from 30 to 35 ft.

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  • The town is about 2000 ft.

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  • It is situated on the isthmus between the gulfs of S Eufemia and of Squillace, the narrowest part of Calabria, 970 ft.

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  • The city lies along a bluff about loo ft.

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  • Vessels drawing 8 or 9 ft.

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  • There is evidence that Ungava, like the rest of Labrador, has risen several hundred feet since the Ice Age, marine beaches being found up to 700 ft.

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  • A new harbour was made in 1891-1896, having a depth of 264 ft., with a fore port l000 ft.

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  • The most prominent building is the Capitol, about 400 ft.

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  • A mean degree of the meridian being assumed to be 69-09 statute miles of 5280 ft., the nautical mile (A l b - degree) is taken as 6080 ft., which is a sufficiently close approximation for practical purposes, and the distances between the knots are made to bear the same relation to 6080 ft.

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  • It follows that, if, say, five knots of the line run out in 28 seconds, the ship has gone 5X 47± ft.

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  • Sometimes a 30-second glass is used instead of a 28-second one, and the intervals between the knots on the log-line are then made 50 ft.

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  • The rotator was connected to the log by a rope 6 ft.

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  • It has a town hall with handsome rooms, a library, a gymnasium, a lyceum, elementary schools, an arsenal, and eleven churches, the finest of which is St Martin's, of the 15th century, with many excellent paintings and a tower 300 ft.

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  • There are also a pilgrimage church on a hill 1621 ft.

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  • Streets and avenues are 90 ft.

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  • The state capitol stands in a square 8 acres in extent, and has a central tower and dome 240 ft.

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  • The Soldiers' and Sailors' Monument, erected by the state, stands in the circle in the centre of the city, rises to a height of 284.5 ft.

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  • It is an extinct volcano rising to 4365 ft.

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  • It is only 23 ft.

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  • Cape Mount (on the northern side of which is a large lagoon - Fisherman Lake) at its highest point is 1050 ft.

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  • Cape Mesurado is about 350 ft., Cape Palmas about 200 ft.

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  • In the north-east, French explorers have computed the altitudes of some mountains at figures which would make them the highest land surfaces of the western projection of Africa - from 6000 to 9000 ft.

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  • It is possible that they may reach to 6000 ft.

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  • Between the western bend of the Cavalla river and the coast there is a somewhat broken mountain range with altitudes of from 2000 to 5000 ft.

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  • The Pa range to the west of the St Paul's river may reach in places to 3000 ft.

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  • Tree ferns are found on the mountains above 4000 ft.

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  • In general Sennar is a vast plain, lying for the most part much higher than the river-levels and about 2000 ft.

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  • From the plain rise isolated granitic hills, attaining heights of loon to 2000 ft.

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  • The highest volcanoes, Tabanan, Batur and Gunung Agung (Bali Beak), have respectively heights of 7545 ft., 73 8 3 ft., and 10,497 ft., the central chain having an average altitude of 3282 ft.

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  • Some of the sandbanks are dry; and no part of the shoal has a greater depth than 3 or 4 ft.

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  • At Balboa there are three wharves, one 985 ft.

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  • The round flattened summits of the Valdai plateau do not rise above 1100 ft., and they present the appearance of mountains only in consequence of the depths of the valleys - the rivers which flow towards the depression of Lake Peipus being only 200 to 250 ft.

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  • The same is true of the plateaus of Livonia, " Wendish Switzerland," and the government of Kovno, which do not exceed moo ft.

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  • It is only in the S.W., where spurs of the Carpathians enter the governments of Volhynia, Podolia and Bessarabia, that ridges reaching 1 100 ft.

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  • The former extends from the sea to the central chain of hills and contains all the lowlands and many mountainous districts, some of the latter rising to an elevation of between 3000 and 4000 ft.

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  • In 1767 the Colebrookdale Iron Works cast a batch of iron rails or plates, each 3 ft.

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  • These were cast in 3 ft.

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  • In the first instance he proposed to place the guiding wheels outside the bearing wheels, and the Nanpantan line was laid on this plan with a width of 5 ft.

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  • His rails were wedge-shaped in section, much wider at the top than at the bottom, with the intermediate portion or web thinner still, and he recommended that they should be made 18 ft.

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  • On the Liverpool && Manchester railway they were usually 12 ft.

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  • The slopes of the sides vary according to the nature of the ground, the amount of moisture present, &c. In solid rock they may be vertical; in gravel, sand or common earth they must, to prevent slipping, rise r ft.

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  • On this surface hurdles were placed, 4 ft.

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  • The gradient or grade of a line is the rate at which it rises or falls, above or below the horizontal, and is expressed by stating either the horizontal distance in which the change of level amounts to r ft., or the amount of change that would occur in some selected distance, such as roo ft., r000 ft.

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  • In Great Britain the curvature is defined by stating the length of the radius, expressed in chains (i chain=66 ft.), in America by stating the angle subtended by a chord ioo ft.

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  • The radius of a 1-degree curve is 5730 ft., or about 861 chains, of a 15-degree curve 383 ft.

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  • In North America, except for small industrial railways and some short lines for local traffic, chiefly in mountainous country, it has become almost universal; the long lines of 3 ft.

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  • A considerable number of lines still use 4 ft.

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  • In Great Britain railways are built to gauges other than 4 ft.

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  • In Ireland the usual gauge is 5 ft.

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  • On the continent of Europe the standard gauge is generally adopted, though in France there are many miles of 4 ft.

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  • In India the prevailing gauge is 5 ft.

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  • In the British colonies the prevailing gauge is 3 ft.

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  • Though the standard gauge is in use in Lower Egypt, the line into the Egyptian Sudan was built on a gauge of 3 ft.

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  • Its width depends on the numbers of tracks and their gauge; for a double line of standard gauge it is about 25 ft., a space of 6 ft.

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  • The rails, which for heavy main line traffic may weigh as much as too lb per yard, or even more, are rolled in lengths of from 30 to 60 ft., and sleepers are placed under them at intervals of between 2 and 3 ft.

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  • On the London & North-Western railway there are 24 sleepers to each 60 ft.

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  • The platforms on British railways have a standard elevation of 3 ft.

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  • The advantage claimed for roofs formed with one or two large spans is that they permit the platforms and tracks to be readily rearranged at any time as required, whereas this is difficult with the other type, especially since the British Board of Trade requires the pillars to be not less than 6 ft.

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  • Thus if R is equal to 10,000 lb when the velocity is 44 ft.

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  • Hence if all the energy supplied to the train is utilized at one axle there is the fundamental relation RV (I) Continuing the above arithmetical illustration, if the wheels to the axle of which the torque is applied are 4 ft.

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  • In the paper above quoted Aspinall cites a case where the resistance of a train of empty wagons 1830 ft.

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  • Hence if a train is travelling up the gradient at a speed of V ft.

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  • Further, let the diameter of the driving-wheels be 6 ft.

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  • In a particular case where the boiler pressure was maintained constant at 130 lb per square inch, and the cut-off was approximately 20% of the stroke, the values c =55 and b=o 031 were deduced, from which it will be found that the value of the piston speed corresponding to the maximum horsepower is 887 ft.

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  • For local services where stoppages are frequent the demand is for engines capable of quickly ' At the beginning of 1908 the Great Western's loading gauge on its main lines was widened to 9 ft.

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  • Early examples had bodies about 15 ft.

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  • It soon led to an increase in the length of the vehicles; thus in 1885 the Midland railway had four-wheeled bogie third-class carriages, with bodies 43 ft.

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  • They are distinguished essentially from the British type of carriage by having in the centre of the body a longitudinal passage, about 2 ft.

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  • The length is ordinarily about 50 ft., but sometimes 80 or go ft.

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  • The later examples of these railways have a diameter ranging from 13 to 15 ft.

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  • The Paris line is built with the standard gauge of 4 ft 82 in., but its tunnels are designedly made of such a small crosssection that ordinary main line stock cannot pass through them.

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  • The third type is the intermediate one between those two, followed by the Metropolitan and Metropolitan District railways, in London, where the railway has an arched roof, built usually at a sufficient distance below the surface of the street to permit the other subsurface structures to lie in the ground above the crown of the arch, and where the station platforms are from 20 to 30 ft.

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  • The cost of constructing the deep tubular tunnels in London, whose diameter is about 15 ft.

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  • Many lines, indeed, have been designed on the normal 4 ft.

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  • In Italy many railways which otherwise fulfil the conditions of a light railway are constructed with a gauge of 4 ft.

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  • The simplicity is great; they can be quickly mounted and dismounted; the correct gauge can be perfectly maintained; the sections of rails and sleepers (which are of iron) are very portable, and skilled labour is not required to lay or to take them up; the making of a " turn-out " is easy, by taking out a 15 ft.

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  • A portable line of this kind will have 20 lb steel rails and 2112 steel sleepers-4 ft.

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  • That he was of short stature is proved by the length of the coffin in which his body is still preserved, less than 5 ft.

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  • The plateau "lowlands" in the centre of the Basin are approximately 5000 ft.

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  • The northern portion is hilly, and is crossed by a rugged range, the Wickham Heights, running east and west, and rising in some places to a height of nearly 2000 ft.

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  • Mount Adam, the highest hill in the islands, is 2315 ft.

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  • Examined more closely these are found to be vast accumulations of blocks of quartzite, irregular in form, but having a tendency to a rude diamond shape, from 2 to 20 ft.

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  • In 1866 a submarine volcano near the islet of Olosenga was the scene of a violent commotion, discharging rocks and mud to a height of 2000 ft.

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  • In any case, the Samoans are the most perfect type of Polynesians, of a light brown colour, splendid physique, and handsome regular features, with an average height of 5 ft.

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  • Raised from seed it may become a tree 40 to as much as 70 ft.

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  • The snake, however, to which the word "asp" has been most commonly applied is undoubtedly the haje of Egypt, the spy-slange or spitting snake of the Boers (Naja haje), one of the very poisonous Elarinae, from 3 to 4 ft.

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  • Those of the Tatar portion, which is the oldest part of the city, are 50 ft.

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  • This mound, which forms a prominent object in the view over the city, is about 150 ft.

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  • In common with the others, it weighs 120,000 lb, is 14 ft.

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  • The altar at which these solemn rites are performed consists of a triple circular marble terrace, 210 ft.

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  • In the same temple stands the altar of prayer for good harvests, which is surmounted by a triple-roofed circular structure 99 ft.

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  • The highest point is 305 ft.

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  • There are also a round tower, 80 ft.

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  • In Britain the tree grows to a height of 40 ft., in its native soil to .70 or 90 ft.

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  • In the climate of the south of England its rate of growth when young is between 1 and 12 ft.

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  • The cypress of Somma, in Lombardy, is believed to have been in existence in the time of Julius Caesar; it is about 121 ft.

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  • Another species, C. lusitanica or glauca, the "cedar of Goa," is a handsome tree, 50 ft.

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  • Other Californian cypresses are C. macrocarpa, the Monterey cypress, which is 60 ft.

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  • It is a hardy species, reaching a height of from 80 to boo ft.

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  • It is a lofty tree reaching a height of 170 ft._ or more, with a massive trunk io to 15 ft.

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  • This plateau, however, is not a plain, but contains many buttes and mesas and isolated mountain ranges rising from 1000 to 8000 ft.

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  • The mean elevation of the state is 5500 ft.

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  • The highest point within the state is Wheeler Peak, near the centre of the eastern boundary, with an elevation of 13,058 ft.; the lowest points are along the Colorado river, where the altitudes range from 700 to Boo ft.

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  • From this depression eastward the general level of the plateau gradually rises to an elevation of 6000 ft.

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  • This range is the water-parting for nearly all the westward-flowing streams of the state, and is by far the steepest and most rugged within Nevada, a number of its peaks attaining a height of 11,000 or 12,000 ft.

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  • Thus at Pioche the altitude is 610o ft., at Hiko 3881 ft., at St Thomas 1600 ft., and at the Eldorado Canyon 828 ft.

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  • In very limited spaces on other mountains there are scattered trees - the pinon (nut pine) and the juniper at an altitude between 5000 and 7000 ft.

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  • Several varieties of poplar are found in the upper canyons, and trees of the willow-leaved species in the Humboldt Mountains often attain a height of 60 ft.

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  • The total fall is rather over 500 ft., and that from Salisbury about 140 ft.

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  • The total fall is between 500 and 600 ft., but it is only 235 ft.

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  • The total fall of the river is about Soo ft.; from Rugby about 230 ft., and from Warwick 120 ft.

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  • Of these ranges the summit of Mt Latmus alone reaches 4500 ft.

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  • It is surrounded by a mud wall about 30 ft.

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  • The islands rise to a height of about 70 ft.

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  • Ben A'an, an adjoining hill, is 384.3 ft.

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  • The harbour is well sheltered but generally shallow; it has been considerably improved by the United States government and also by the state, which in 1909 was making a channel 18 ft.

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  • The site of the city is level, about 1300 ft.

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  • Above this comes a row of circular shields, adorned with intricate arabesques, while bands and wreaths of lilies are everywhere scupltured on the windows, balconies, tambours and cornices, adding lightness to the fabric. The whole is raised on a platform 7 ft.

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  • His brother Domhnall (Donnell) was king of Ailech, a district in Donegal and Derry; the royal palace, the ruined masonry of which is still to be seen, being on the summit of a hill Boo ft.

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  • The central core, which consists of several steep pyramids, is that of a very denuded old volcano, which when its crater was complete may have reached 2000 ft.

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  • Glaciation was formerly much more extensive, old moraines being observed down to 12,000 ft.

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  • Of the fauna of the lower slopes, tracks of elephant, leopard and buffalo have been seen, between 11,500 and 14,500 ft.

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  • The bird fauna is of considerable interest, the finest species of the upper zone being an eagle-owl, met with at 14,000 ft.

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  • The maximum depth is 420 ft.

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  • Its remains lie from io to 20 ft.

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  • In the southern part of the monastery is the church of Sergius, beneath which are spacious rooms where 200,000 dinners are distributed gratis every year to the pilgrims. The bell-tower, 320 ft.

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  • The ruins on the hill, however, are those of a later edifice and are surmounted by a granite obelisk, 65 ft.

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  • Adjoining the town on the south-east is the beautifully-wooded Cluny Hill, a favourite public resort, carrying on its summit the tower, 70 ft.

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