Fruit sentence example

fruit
  • Jackson picked up an apple from the bowl of fruit, tossed it in the air, caught it, then bit into it.
    213
    72
  • A great variety of industries is carried on, the chief being the manufacture of semolina and other farinaceous foods, confectionery, preserved fruit and jams, chemicals and rubber goods.
    224
    84
  • Beetroot for sugar, grain and fruit are also grown.
    142
    64
  • It is exceedingly picturesque, the villages clinging to the sides of the mountain glens from which water is drawn for irrigation; and excellent fruit is grown.
    96
    52
  • Destiny was in her high chair playing with fruit colored cereal.
    88
    45
    Advertisement
  • How is my little fruit bat doing?
    55
    26
  • It started with Crocus and Jonquils and then the fruit trees as the weather grew warmer.
    109
    81
  • Presently they came to a low plant which had broad, spreading leaves, in the center of which grew a single fruit about as large as a peach.
    31
    14
  • Where do you get fruit and vegetables from?
    37
    24
  • While Bird Song fed its guests only breakfast, there was always fresh fruit available and the management triumvirate ate heartily of nature's stores.
    74
    64
    Advertisement
  • Like the fruit of a garden I will give thee offspring."
    22
    12
  • Trade is in cider, cattle, butter, flowers and fruit, and there are salmon and other fisheries.
    12
    4
  • The principal fruit trees are the duri-an, mangosteen, custard-apple, pomegranate,.
    23
    16
  • She stopped to admire the colors of a fruit pyramid and the textures of textiles.
    19
    13
  • The displays of fruit and vegetables, homemade food, crafts, and other items soon enthralled her.
    20
    15
    Advertisement
  • She shopped responsibly, but this time she picked up healthy fresh fruit and vegetables – something she previously would have had to replace with canned food.
    21
    16
  • If we come across another of the strange fruit we must avoid it.
    15
    10
  • These he peddles still, prompting God and disgracing man, bearing for fruit his brain only, like the nut its kernel.
    10
    5
  • The scales showed seven pounds less, he was eating baskets of fruit and goody-goody health food, plus he'd laid off the booze completely.
    15
    11
  • Sueca has a thriving trade in grain and fruit from the Jucar valley, which is irrigated by waterways created by the Moors.
    8
    5
    Advertisement
  • The district is by no means devoid of fertility, the steep slopes facing the south enjoying so fine a climate as to render them very favorable for the growth of fruit trees, especially the olive, which is cultivated in terraces to a considerable height up the face of the mountains, while the openings of the valleys are generally occupied by towns or villages, some of which have become favorite winter resorts.
    6
    3
  • At one time he painted the picture of some fruit which was so real that the birds flew down and pecked at it.
    12
    9
  • Oh, the delight with which I gathered up the fruit in my pinafore, pressed my face against the smooth cheeks of the apples, still warm from the sun, and skipped back to the house!
    8
    5
  • How well I remember the graceful draperies that enfolded me, the bright autumn leaves that wreathed my head, and the fruit and grain at my feet and in my hands, and beneath all the piety of the masque the oppressive sense of coming ill that made my heart heavy.
    5
    2
  • It frequently happens that the perfume of a flower or the flavour of a fruit recalls to her mind some happy event in home life, or a delightful birthday party.
    6
    3
    Advertisement
  • They like juicy fruit to eat as well as people, and they are hungry.
    13
    10
  • I want the flower and fruit of a man; that some fragrance be wafted over from him to me, and some ripeness flavor our intercourse.
    8
    5
  • She drank the cool fruit punch, grateful as it chilled her parched throat.
    8
    6
  • I cared enough to make sure Darkyn's little fruit bat is okay.
    8
    6
  • With his silver pride and joy secured to the bike rack, a spare change of clothes and rain gear in his pannier and some fruit and crackers for a snack, he rolled away from town to the peace and quiet of the countryside.
    11
    9
    Advertisement
  • The conqueror visits a cannibal kingdom and finds many marvels in the palace of Porus, among them a vine with golden branches, emerald leaves and fruit of other precious stones.
    5
    3
  • Nut constituting the fruit.
    3
    1
  • Another favourite haunt of mine was the orchard, where the fruit ripened early in July.
    7
    5
  • I hope she will not eat too many of the delicious fruit for they will make her very ill.
    4
    2
  • From behind the crystal decanters and fruit vases, the count kept glancing at his wife and her tall cap with its light-blue ribbons, and busily filled his neighbors' glasses, not neglecting his own.
    9
    7
    Advertisement
  • All this was the fruit of Anisya Fedorovna's housekeeping, gathered and prepared by her.
    5
    3
  • Located right off the kitchens, the cafeteria was awash with the smells of bread, fruit pies and the jerk-spiced meat the Caribbean was renowned for.
    7
    6
  • He'd forgotten what color real fire was, but he found himself thinking it was orange, like the fruit in the basket on Sasha's desk.
    6
    5
  • The town is noted for its fruit, especially its vines; and it exports tissues, carpets, hides, yellow berries and dried fruit.
    3
    2
  • The beet sugar, fruit and other agricultural products of the surrounding and tributary section were valued in 1906 at about $20,000,000.
    4
    3
    Advertisement
  • Other products are tobacco, olives, castor-oil, peanuts, canary-seed, barley, rye, fruit and vegetables.
    4
    3
  • Monoecious, and bearing their male flowers in catkins, they are readily distinguished from the rest of the catkin-bearing trees by their peculiar fruit, an acorn or nut, enclosed at the base in a woody cup, formed by the consolidation of numerous involucral bracts developed beneath the fertile flower, simultaneously with a cup-like expansion of the thalamus, to which the bracteal scales are more or less adherent.
    3
    2
  • Gramuntia, also furnishes a fruit which, after acquiring sweetness by keeping, is eaten by the Spaniards.
    4
    3
  • This hierarchical tie was soon snapped, but the Hellenizing influence continued to work, and bore its most abundant fruit in the 5th century.
    5
    4
  • All fruit and forest trees suffer from these curious insects, which in the female sex always remain apterous and apodal and live attached to the bark, leaf and fruit, hidden beneath variously formed scale-like coverings.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Aphides often ruin whole crops of fruit, corn, hops, &c., by sucking out the sap, and not only check growth, but may even entail the death of the plant.
    0
    0
  • For insects provided with a biting mouth, which take nourishment from the whole leaf, shoot or fruit, the poisonous washes used are chiefly arsenical.
    0
    0
  • He promoted the union of the Greek and Latin Churches as far as possible, but his efforts in this direction bore no permanent fruit.
    0
    0
  • Hitherto, from the nature of the case, the works aforesaid treated of scarcely any but the birds belonging to the orbis veteribus notus; but the geographical discoveries of the 16th century began to bear fruit, and many animals of kinds un suspected were, about one hundred years later, made known.
    0
    0
  • Other European countries, though not quite so prolific as Germany, bore some ornithological fruit at this period; but.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • There is a thriving trade in wine, fruit, wheat, cattle, brandy, chalk and soap.
    0
    0
  • In the littoral districts excellent crops of cereals, cotton, fruit, wine and tobacco are obtained with the aid of irrigation.
    0
    0
  • The town carries on the manufacture of earthenware and pottery, leather, &c. and the cultivation of fruit and wine.
    0
    0
  • But Chrysanthius declined on the strength of unfavourable omens, as he said, but probably because he realized that the scheme was unlikely to bear fruit.
    0
    0
  • Ibn Haukal goes on to say that finally the Hamdanids took possession of the town, confiscated the estates of those who had emigrated, and compelled those who remained to substitute corn for their profitable fruit crops.
    0
    0
  • The maiden ate the fruit, and in due course a child was born to her, whom she named Aisin Gioro, or the Golden.
    0
    0
  • Fruits normally form the principal crop; the total value for 1907-8 of the fruit crops of the state (including oranges, lemons, limes, grape-fruit, bananas, guavas, pears, peaches, grapes, figs, pecans, &c.) was $6,160,299, according to the report of the State Department of Agriculture.
    0
    0
  • For instance, the names which they give to certain fruits, such as the duri-an, the rambut-an and the pulas-an, which are indigenous in the Malayan countries, and are not found elsewhere, are all compound words meaning respectively the thorny, the hairy and the twisted fruit.
    0
    0
  • Reinach (Revue archeologique, 1903), Tantalus was represented in a picture standing in a lake and clinging to the branches of a tree, which gave rise to the idea that he was endeavouring to pluck its fruit.
    0
    0
  • Holland is a grain and fruit shipping centre, and among its manufactures are furniture, leather, grist mill products, iron, beer, pickles, shoes, beet sugar, gelatine, biscuit (Holland rusk), electric and steam launches, and pianos.
    0
    0
  • He assisted others who came to him for spiritual advice; and seeing the fruit reaped from helping his neighbour, he gave up the extreme severities in which he had delighted and began to take more care of his person, so as not needlessly to offend those whom he might influence for good.
    0
    0
  • In the lowlands of the western portion, the Chinese have introduced a large number of cultivated plants and fruit trees.
    0
    0
  • The village manufactures agricultural implements, vinegar, evaporated fruit, and canned fruit and vegetables, and has two large coldstorage houses.
    0
    0
  • The surrounding district is well cultivated and produces an abundance of fruit and vegetables.
    0
    0
  • The medieval studies which Wagner had begun for his work at the libretto of Tannhauser bore rich fruit in his next opera Lohengrin, in which he also developed his principles on a larger scale and with a riper technique than hitherto.
    0
    0
  • In most genera the fruit consists of oneseeded nutlets, generally four, but one or more may be undeveloped.
    0
    0
  • It is connected with Ponce by railway (1910), and with the port of Arroyo by an excellent road, part of the military road extending to Cayey, and it exports sugar, rum, tobacco, coffee, cattle, fruit and other products of the department, which is very fertile.
    0
    0
  • He says, "From the year 1725 to 1729, I preached much, but saw no fruit to my labour.
    0
    0
  • From the year 1729 to 1734, laying a deeper foundation of repentance, I saw a little fruit.
    0
    0
  • From 1734 to 1738, speaking more of faith in Christ, I saw more fruit of my preaching."
    0
    0
  • The class-meeting, the love-feast, the watch-night, the covenant service, leaders, stewards, lay preachers, all were the fruit of this readiness to avail himself of suggestions made by men or events.
    0
    0
  • Manacor has a small trade in grain, fruit, wine, oil and live stock.
    0
    0
  • Growing specimens of good colour and in fruit are if possible selected, and cleansed as much as practicable from adhering foreign particles, either in the sea or a rocky pool.
    0
    0
  • The total value of fruit products in 1899 was $412,933.
    0
    0
  • Before the Civil War of 1895-1898 the capital invested in sugar estates was greater by half than that reprerented by tobacco and coffee plantations, live-stock ranches and other farms. Since that time fruit and live-stock interests have increased.
    0
    0
  • There are some tanneries, some preparation of preserves and other fruit products, and some old handicraft industries like the making of hats; but these have been of comparatively scant importance.
    0
    0
  • The leading articles of export are sugar, tobacco and fruit products; of import, textiles, foodstuffs, lumber and wood products, and machinery.
    0
    0
  • The fruits and spices of the Bahamas are very numerous, the fruit.
    0
    0
  • According to these statistics the most important articles of export are coal and turf, fruit, minerals, soda, iron and steel, and cattle.
    0
    0
  • Clocks and watches are manufactured here and also other articles of silver, while the town has a considerable trade in corn, hops and fruit.
    0
    0
  • There are fertile valleys in the vicinity which provide the city's markets with fruit and vegetables, while the vineyards of Camargo (formerly known as Cinti), in the southern part of the department, supply wine and spirits of excellent quality.
    0
    0
  • The chief articles of commerce are fattened poultry, prunes (pruneaux d'Agen) and other fruit, cork, wine, vegetables and cattle.
    0
    0
  • They differ greatly from all other members of the family (Macropodidae), being chiefly arboreal in their habits, and feeding on bark, leaves and fruit.
    0
    0
  • It is limited to Disco Island, and perhaps to a small part of the Noursoak Peninsula, and the neighbouring country, and consists of numerous thin beds of sandstone, shale and coal - the sideritic shale containing immense quantities of leaves, stems, fruit, &c., as well as some insects, and the coal pieces of retinite.
    0
    0
  • The nectarine is a variation from the peach, mainly characterized by the circumstance that, while the skin of the ripe fruit is downy in the peach, it is shining and destitute of hairs in the nectarine.
    0
    0
  • Aitchison, however, gathered in the Hazardarakht ravine in Afghanistan a form with different-shaped fruit from that of the almond; being larger and flatter.
    0
    0
  • Xenophon makes no mention of the peach, though the Ten Thousand must have traversed the country where, according to some, the peach is native; but Theophrastus, a hundred years later, does speak of it as a Persian fruit, and De Candolle suggests that it might have been introduced into Greece by Alexander.
    0
    0
  • The fruit of the peach is produced on the ripened shoots of the preceding year.
    0
    0
  • The pruning for fruit consists in shortening back the laterals which had been nailed in at the disbudding, or summer pruning, their length depending on their individual vigour and the luxuriance of the tree.
    0
    0
  • In well-developed shoots the buds are generally double, or rather triple, a wood bud growing between two fruit buds; the shoot must be cut back to one of these, or else to a wood bud alone, so that a young shoot may be produced to draw up the sap beyond the fruit, this being generally desirable to secure its proper swelling.
    0
    0
  • The point of this leading shoot is subsequently pinched off, that it may not draw away too much of the sap. If the fruit sets too abundantly, it must be thinned, first when as large as peas, reducing the clusters, and then when as large as nuts to distribute the crop equally; the extent of the thinning must depend on the vigour of the tree, but one or two fruits ultimately left to each square foot of wall is a full average crop. The final thinning should take place after stoning.
    0
    0
  • If there be no young shoot below, and the bearing branch is short, the shoot at the point of the latter may sometimes be preserved as a fruit bearer, though if the bearing branch be long it is better to cut it back for young wood.
    0
    0
  • After gathering the fruit all the wood not needed for extending the tree or for fruit bearing next season should be cut out so as to give the shoots left full exposure to air and light.
    0
    0
  • What is most worthy of notice in this method is the management of the e subordinates in the pruning for fruit.
    0
    0
  • It may also be stated here that when occasion arises peachtrees well furnished with buds may be transplanted and forced immediately without risking the crop of fruit, a matter of some importance when, as sometimes happens, a tree may accidentally fail.
    0
    0
  • After the fruit has set, the foliage should be refreshed and cleansed by the daily use of the syringe or garden engine.
    0
    0
  • When the, fruit begins to ripen, syringing must be discontinued till the crop is gathered, after which the syringe must be again occasionally used.
    0
    0
  • Woollen fabrics are manufactured, and the sugar industry established in 1890 employs several thousand hands; but the majority of the inhabitants are occupied by the trade in grain, fruit, wine and oil.
    0
    0
  • The largest of the public squares in Hamburg is the Hopfenmarkt, which contains the church of St Nicholas (Nikolaikirche) and is the principal market for vegetables and fruit.
    0
    0
  • In Arabia it is the chief source of national wealth, and its fruit forms the staple article of food in that country.
    0
    0
  • The tree has also been introduced along the Mediterranean shores of Europe; but as its fruit does not ripen so far north, the European plants are only used to supply leaves for the festival of Palm Sunday among Christians, and for the celebration of the Passover by Jews.
    0
    0
  • The fruit is oblong, fleshy and contains one very hard seed which is deeply furrowed on the inside.
    0
    0
  • The fruit varies much in size, colour and quality under cultivation.
    0
    0
  • Nor is it, when newly gathered, heating, - a defect inherent to the preserved fruit everywhere; nor does its richness, however great, bring satiety; in short it is an article of food alike pleasant and healthy."
    0
    0
  • The dried fruit used for dessert in European countries contains more than half its weight of sugar, about 6% of albumen, and 12% of gummy matter.
    0
    0
  • Sugar, cereals, tobacco, cotton and coffee are produced, and probably fruit may be raised successfully.
    0
    0
  • The fruit is a capsule containing three seeds rather larger than cobnuts, having a brown smooth surface figured with black patches.
    0
    0
  • It is about the size of an ordinary apple tree, with small leaves like the willow, and a drooping habit like a weeping birch, and has an edible fruit like a yellow plum called " mangaba," for which, rather than for the rubber, the tree is cultivated in some districts.
    0
    0
  • In the subdivision of the order into tribes use is made of differences in the form of the fruit and the manner of folding of the embryo.
    0
    0
  • When the fruit is several times longer than broad it is known as a siliqua, as in stock or wallflower; when about as long as broad, a silicula, as in shepherd's purse.
    0
    0
  • The fruit also is of excellent quality and in great variety, although the culture of the vine is limited to some of the warmer valleys in the southern districts.
    0
    0
  • Agricultural products, fruit and wool from the surrounding country are shipped in considerable quantities.
    0
    0
  • It has also been held that the word Africa comes from friqi, farikia (the country of fruit).
    0
    0
  • Corn, raw cotton, hides, wool, nuts and dried fruit are exported.
    0
    0
  • The fruit is a capsule bursting loculicidally, i.e.
    0
    0
  • Fruit, split open.
    0
    0
  • The soil is varied, much of it being good meadow land or well adapted to the growing of grain and fruit.
    0
    0
  • The plants have a rhizome or corm, and the fruit is a capsule.
    0
    0
  • The flowers are borne in a terminal raceme, the anthers open introrsely and the fruit is a capsule, very rarely, as in Dianella, a berry.
    0
    0
  • The plants generally have an erect stem with a crown of leaves which are often leathery; the anthers open introrsely and the fruit is a berry or capsule.
    0
    0
  • Plants growing from a rhizome; fruit a berry.
    0
    0
  • Luzuriagoideae are shrubs or undershrubs with erect or climbing branches and fruit a berry.
    0
    0
  • Smilacoideae are climbing shrubs with broad net-veined leaves and small dioecious flowers in umbels springing from the leaf-axils; the fruit is a berry.
    0
    0
  • When living near the coast foxes will, however, visit the shore at low water in search of crabs and whelks; and the old story of the fox and the grapes seems to be founded upon a partiality on the part of the creature for that fruit.
    0
    0
  • Segesvar has a good woollen and linen trade, as well as exports of wine and fruit.
    0
    0
  • It has important cloth factories and a lively trade in fruit and wine.
    0
    0
  • The second group represents, first, the birth of Mithras; then the god nude, cutting fruit and leaves from a fig-tree in which is the bust of a deity, and before which one of the winds is blowing upon Mithras; the god discharging an arrow against a rock from which springs a fountain whose water a figure is kneeling to receive in his palms; the bull in a small boat, near which again occurs the figure of the animal under a roof about to be set on fire by two figures; the bull in flight, with Mithras in pursuit; Mithras bearing the bull on his shoulders; Helios kneeling before Mithras; Helios and Mithras clasping hands over an altar; Mithras with drawn bow on a running horse; Mithras and Helios banqueting; Mithras and Helios mounting the chariot of the latter and rising in full course over the ocean.
    0
    0
  • Chilled by the wind, the new-born god went to a fig-tree, partook of its fruit, and clothed himself in its leaves.
    0
    0
  • Amasia has extensive orchards and fruit gardens still, as in Ibn Batuta's time, irrigated by water wheels turned by the current of the river; and there are steam flourmills.
    0
    0
  • The fruit of the pupunha or peach palm (Guilielma speciosa) is an important food among the Indians of the Amazon valley, where the tree was cultivated by them long before the discovery of America.
    0
    0
  • The ita palm, Mauritia, flexuosa (a fanleaf palm) provides an edible fruit, medullary meal, drink, fibre, roofing and timber, but is less used on the Amazon than it is on the lower Orinoco.
    0
    0
  • The assai (Euterpe oleracea) is another highly-prized palm because of a beverage made from its fruit along the lower Amazon.
    0
    0
  • Another highly useful palm is the carnauba or carnahuba (Copernicia cerifera) which supplies fruit, medullary meal, food for cattle, boards and timber, fibre, wax and medicine.
    0
    0
  • The fibre of the piassava (Leopoldinia piassava, or Attalea funifera) is widely used for cordage, brushes and brooms. There are many other palms whose fruit, fibre and wood enter largely into the domestic economy of the natives, but the list given shows how important a service these trees rendered to the aboriginal inhabitants of tropical America, and likewise how useful they still are to the people of tropical Brazil.
    0
    0
  • Another vegetable product of the Amazon region is made from the fruit of the Paullinia sorbilis, Mart., and is known by the name of guarand.
    0
    0
  • Very little attention has thus far been given to the cultivation of fruit for exportation, the exceptions being bananas for the Argentine and Uruguayan markets, and oranges and pineapples for European markets.
    0
    0
  • The nuts are the fruit of the Bertholletia excelsa, one of the largest trees of the Amazon forest region, and are enclosed, sixteen to eighteen in number, in a hard, thick pericarp. Another nut-producing tree is the sapucaia (Lecythis ollaria), whose nuts are enclosed in a larger pericarp, and are considered to be better flavoured than those first described.
    0
    0
  • The Waverley Market for vegetables and fruit presents a busy scene in the early morning, and is used for monster meetings and promenade and popular concerts.
    0
    0
  • Syria, and manufactures textiles in silk, cotton and wool, carpets and leather commodities, besides being the centre of a large district growing cereals, pistachios and fruit.
    0
    0
  • The amatungulu or Natal plum, found chiefly near the sea, is one of the few wild plantswith edible fruit.
    0
    0
  • Its leaves are of a glossy dark green, its1 flower white and star-shaped, and its fruit resembles the plum.
    0
    0
  • Among fruit trees, besides the wild fruits already mentioned, are the pineapple, mango, papua, guava, grenadilla, rose apple, custard apple, soursop, loquat, naartje, shaddock and citrous fruits.
    0
    0
  • The fruit industry is of considerable importance and by 1905 had reached a turnover of over £ioo,000 a year.
    0
    0
  • Some have held that it is a prickly shrub, Zizyphus Lotus, which bears a sweet-tasting fruit, and still grows in the old home of the Lotophagi.
    0
    0
  • Certain districts are distinguished for particular kinds of fruit, which form an important article of commerce both for inland consumption and for export.
    0
    0
  • Fruit, slightly reduced.
    0
    0
  • Besides wine, fruit, grain and timber, the surrounding uplands yield petroleum and salt.
    0
    0
  • Besides its manufactures of leather, silk, velvet and ribbons, Gandia has a thriving export trade in fruit, and imports coal, guano, timber and flour.
    0
    0
  • Schweinfurt carries on an active trade in the grain, fruit and wine produced in its neighbourhood, and it is the seat of an important sheep and cattle market.
    0
    0
  • It is impossible to enumerate or to give due consideration to all the names in the army of anatomical and embryological students of the middle third of the 19th century whose labours bore fruit in the modification of zoological theories and in the building up of a true classification of animals.
    0
    0
  • In the Bergedorf district lies the Vierlande, or Four Districts (Neuengamme, Kirchwarder, Altengamme and Curslack), celebrated for its fruit gardens and the picturesque dress of the inhabitants.
    0
    0
  • The crops raised in the country districts are principally vegetables and fruit, potatoes, hay, oats, rye and wheat.
    0
    0
  • The town contains large iron foundries and chemical works, and has an active trade in fruit, cider, timber and live stock.
    0
    0
  • It is situated near the Guanajibo river, in a fertile agricultural region which produces sugar, coffee, fruit, cacao and tobacco.
    0
    0
  • Fruit farming is a thriving industry, the slopes of the plateaus and the river valleys being specially adapted for this culture.
    0
    0
  • At the census of 1904 over 3,032,000 fruit trees were enumerated.
    0
    0
  • The country on the east side and on the slopes of the Hardt yield a number of the most varied products, such as wine, fruit, corn, vegetables, flax and tobacco.
    0
    0
  • The fruit is rarely formed.
    0
    0
  • It carries on a flourishing trade, especially in fruit, and is an important market for horses and cattle.
    0
    0
  • The fruit is edible and its juice is made into beer; the sap of the tree is made into wine, and its pith into bread; the leaves furnish an excellent thatch, and the fibre extracted from their midribs is used f or fish lines, cordage, hammocks, nets, &c.; and the wood is hard and makes good building' material.
    0
    0
  • The fruit of the Guilielma is also widely used for food among the natives.
    0
    0
  • In the neighbourhood large quantities of fruit are grown, including apples, pears, plums, gooseberries, and strawberries.
    0
    0
  • Local prosperity was greatly enhanced during the period 18 751905 by the improvement of communications, which enabled the grain, fruit and wine of the Guadiana valley, on the north, and of the upland known as the Tierra de Barros, on the south, to be readily exported by the Merida-Seville railway.
    0
    0
  • Gainesville is a trading centre and market for the surrounding country, in which cotton, grains, garden truck, fruit and alfalfa are grown and live-stock is raised; and a wholesale distributing point for the neighbouring region in Texas and Oklahoma.
    0
    0
  • The fruit of Aristotle's teaching and example was seen later on in the schools of Alexandria.
    0
    0
  • These productions - incomparably the most remarkable and most absolutely good fruit of his genius - were usually composed as pamphlets, with a purpose of polemic in religion, politics, or what not.
    0
    0
  • The district produces hops and fruit, and there is trade in cider.
    0
    0
  • Covent Garden, the great mart in the west of London for flowers, fruit and vegetables, is in the hands of private owners.
    0
    0
  • The low ground between it and the shore, and between the Niagara escarpment and the water on the Canadian shore, is a celebrated fruit growing district, covered with vineyards, peach, apple and pear orchards and fruit farms. The Niagara river is the main feeder of the lake; the other largest rivers emptying into the lake are the Genesee, Oswego and Black from the south side, and the Trent, which discharges into the upper end of the bay of Quinte, a picturesque inlet 70 m.
    0
    0
  • There is a great profusion of fruit, the apples yielding a kind of cider which, however, does not keep longer than a month.
    0
    0
  • The soil is very fertile; wheat, Indian corn, olives, vines, fruit trees of many kinds cover both the plain and the surrounding hills; the chief non-fruit-bearing trees are the stone pine, the cypress, the ilex and the poplar, while many other varieties are represented.
    0
    0
  • The vine requires a high summer temperature and a prolonged period in which to ripen its fruit.
    0
    0
  • Fruit, reduced.
    0
    0
  • The vine is hardy in Britain so far as regards its vegetation, but not hardy enough to bring its fruit to satisfactory maturity, so that for all practical purposes the vine must be regarded as a tender fruit.
    0
    0
  • Planted against a wall or a building having a south aspect, or trained over a sunny roof, such sorts as the Black Cluster, Black Prince, Pitmaston White Cluster, Royal Muscadine, Sweetwater, &c., will ripen in the warmest English summers so as to be very pleasant eating; but in cold summers the fruit is not eatable in the raw state, and can only be converted into wine or vinegar.
    0
    0
  • A moist growing atmosphere is necessary both for the swelling fruit and for maintaining the health of the foliage.
    0
    0
  • When the vines are in flower, and when the fruit is colouring, the evaporating troughs should be kept dry, but the aridity must not be excessive, lest the red spider and other pests should attack the leaves.
    0
    0
  • The principle of this mode of pruning is to train in at considerable length, according to their strength, shoots of the last year's growth for producing shoots to bear fruit in the present; these rods are afterwards cut away and replaced by young shoots trained up during the preceding summer; and these are in their turn cut out in the following autumn after bearing, and replaced by shoots of that summer's growth.
    0
    0
  • The leaf directly opposite the bunch must in all cases be preserved, and the young shoot is to be topped at one or two joints beyond the incipient fruit, the latter distance being preferable if there is plenty of room for the foliage to expand; the lateral shoots, which will push out after the topping, must be again topped above their first or second joints.
    0
    0
  • Grapes attacked by the fungus; the fruit becomes black, hard and shrivelled.
    0
    0
  • Fruit attacked by the fungus(reduced).
    0
    0
  • The fruit consists of black shining drupes about the size of a, pea.
    0
    0
  • The wholesale jam manufacturers of the present day use this sugar; they boil the jam in vacuo and secure a product that will last a long time without deteriorating, but it lacks the delicacy and distinctive flavour of fruit preserved by a careful housekeeper, who boils it in an open pan with cane sugar to a less density, though exposed for a short time to a greater heat.
    0
    0
  • It is an important river port for the export of corn, wool, fruit, wine and cattle.
    0
    0
  • It produces vegetables and fruit for the Hamburg markets, and carries on tanning, glass manufacture, brewing and brick-making.
    0
    0
  • Most bats are insect-eaters, but the tropical "flying foxes" or fox-bats of the Old World live on fruit; some are blood-suckers, and two feed on small fish.
    0
    0
  • The fruit is a kind of drupe, the fleshy husk of which is the dilated receptacular tube, while the two-valved stone represents the two carpels.
    0
    0
  • The leaves and husk of the fruit are resinous and astringent, and are sometimes used medicinally as well as for dyeing purposes.
    0
    0
  • It grows well, and ripens its fruit in the southern and midland counties of England; but large trees may be seen as far north as Ross-shire in sheltered places.
    0
    0
  • The fruit is produced at the extremities of the shoots of the preceding year; and therefore, in gathering the crop, care should be taken not to injure the young wood.
    0
    0
  • Considerable trade in wine, fruit, grain and timber is carried on by boats on the Main.
    0
    0
  • At night it crawls about in search of food, which consists to a small extent of dead animal or vegetable matter, but principally, as gardeners are aware, of the petals and other parts of flowers of growing shoots and soft ripe fruit.
    0
    0
  • On the old clearings of another village Mr Bates himself, although he did not see a gorilla, saw the fresh tracks of these great apes and the torn stems and discarded fruit rinds of the "mejoms," as well as the broken stalks of the latter, which had been used for beds.
    0
    0
  • The lower valleys produce dates in abundance, and at higher elevations wheat, barley, millets and excellent fruit are grown, while juniper forests are said to cover the mountain slopes.
    0
    0
  • Among fruit trees the vine, apricot, peach, apple, quince, fig and banana are cultivated in the highlands, and in the lower country the date palm flourishes, particularly throughout the central zone of Arabia, in Hejaz, Nejd and El Hasa, where it is the prime article of food.
    0
    0
  • In 1903 the harbour was entered by 66 vessels of about 25,000 tons, engaged in the exportation of grain, rice and fruit, and the importation of guano.
    0
    0
  • The blackbird feeds chiefly on fruits, worms, the larvae of insects and snails, extracting the last from their shells by dexterously chipping them on stones; and though it is generally regarded as an enemy of the garden, it is probable that the amount of damage by it to the fruit is largely compensated for by its undoubted services as a vermin-killer.
    0
    0
  • Cabinet woods, fruit, tobacco, sugar, wax, honey and cattle products are the leading exports.
    0
    0
  • The fruit is also known under the name of grape-fruit, pommeloes, and "forbidden fruit."
    0
    0
  • Some authorities, however, dispute this, in a measure, by saying that it was not naturally forested, and that the trees growing represented orchards of olives or other fruit trees planted by the Romans or romanized Berbers.
    0
    0
  • Those indigenous to the country are the delicious chirimoyas, paltas or alligator pears, the paccay, a species of Inga, the lucma, and the granadilla or fruit of the passion-flower.
    0
    0
  • Grapes are produced in many of the irrigated valleys of the coast, such as Chincha, Lunahuana, Ica, Vitor, Majes, Andaray, Moquegua and Locumba, and the fruit is manufactured into wines and brandies.
    0
    0
  • The fruit is commonly used for the manufacture of oil, which is consumed in the country, and only a small part is exported.
    0
    0
  • Probably it was not the fruit of a single effort of its author.
    0
    0
  • Good wine, fruit and olive oil are the most important natural products of the country round Trieste.
    0
    0
  • The principal articles imported are cotton and cotton goods, coffee, coal, cereals, hides, fruit and tobacco; the principal articles exported are wool and woollen goods,.
    0
    0
  • The value of trade probably exceeds 2,000,000, principal exports being rice, raw silk, dry fruit, fish, sheep and cattle, wool and cotton, and cocoons, the principal imports sugar, cotton goods, silkworm "seed" or eggs (70,160 worth in 1906-7), petroleum, glass and china., The trade in dried silkworm cocoons has increased remarkably since 1893, when only 76,150 lb valued at 6475 were exported; during the year 1906-7 ending 10th March, 2,717,540 lb valued at 238,000 were exported.
    0
    0
  • The principal are the governor's residence and government offices, the barracks, the cathedral, the missionary institutions, the fruit market, Wilberforce Hall, courts of justice, the railway station and the grammar school.
    0
    0
  • It derived its name from the abundance and luxuriance of the apple, pear and other fruit trees in the neighbourhood.
    0
    0
  • These produce cotton, rice, sugar-cane, wheat, coffee, Indian corn, barley, potatoes and fruit.
    0
    0
  • All these treesthe plum, the cherry and the peachbear no fruit worthy of the name, nor do they excel their Occidental representatives in wealth of blossom, but the admiring affection they inspire in Japan is unique.
    0
    0
  • But although the use of the potters wheel had long been understood, the objects produced were simple utensils tc contain offerings of rice, fruit and fish at the austere ceremonials of the Shinto faith, jars for storing seeds, and vessels for commor domestic use.
    0
    0
  • A small quantity of hemp and flax is raised, but a considerable quantity of fruit and vegetables is annually produced, and some wine, in the Coburg district of Konigsberg.
    0
    0
  • The fruit-stalk is very short, bearing a subglobose fruit an inch or rather more in diameter, of an orange-yellow colour, and with a sweetish astringent pulp. It is surrounded at the base by the persistent calyxlobes, which increase in size as the fruit ripens.
    0
    0
  • The astringency renders the fruit somewhat unpalatable, but after it has been subjected to the action of frost, or has become partially rotted or "bletted" like a medlar, its flavour is improved.
    0
    0
  • The fruit is eaten in great quantities in the southern states of America,.
    0
    0
  • An astringent fluid, known as shibu, rich in tannin, is expressed from the green fruit and used in various industries.
    0
    0
  • The principal exports are wines, especially champagne, spirits, hay, straw, wool, potatoes, woven goods, fruit, glass-ware, lace and metal-ware.
    0
    0
  • The jungles afford good pasturage in the hot weather, and abound in lac, silk cocoons, catechu, resin and the mahud fruit, which is both used as fruit and for the manufacture of spirits.
    0
    0
  • Among its exports are sugar, coffee, cacao, tobacco and fruit.
    0
    0
  • The fruit of the marriage was Ninyas, i.e.
    0
    0
  • Wine, fruit, cork, baskets and sumach are exported in small coasting vessels; there are important sardine and tunny fisheries; and boats, sails and cordage are manufactured.
    0
    0
  • The fruit is a berry - the scarlet berries of the cuckoo-pint are familiar objects in the hedges in late summer.
    0
    0
  • As the fruit ripens the spathe withers, and the brilliant red berries are exposed.
    0
    0
  • Some are said occasionally to resort to berries and other fruit for food, but as a rule they are carnivorous, feeding chiefly on birds and their eggs, small mammals, as squirrels, hares, rabbits and moles, but chiefly mice of various kinds, and occasionally snakes, lizards and frogs.
    0
    0
  • Varro speaks of its apple trees which gave fruit twice in the year and Pliny praises its wine also.
    0
    0
  • But here Joab had taken the side of Adonijah against Solomon, and was put to death by Benaiah at Solomon's command, and it is possible that the charges are the fruit of a later tradition to remove all possible blame from Solomon (q.v.).
    0
    0
  • The farm colony at Hadleigh in Essex has a large acreage under cultivation, with fruit and market gardens and various industrial undertakings.
    0
    0
  • The river valleys in the vicinity produce cotton, pepper, tobacco, rice, Indian corn and fruit.
    0
    0
  • Notwithstanding its mountainous character, Morelos is one of the most flourishing agricultural states of Mexico, producing sugar, rice, Indian corn, coffee, wheat, fruit and vegetables.
    0
    0
  • Cautin lies within the temperate agricultural and forest region of the south, and produces wheat, cattle, lumber, tan-bark and fruit.
    0
    0
  • His wisdom is shown by the prudent measures which he took by enacting the Nizam-ijedid, or new regulations for the improvement of the condition of the Christian rayas, and for affording them security for life and property; a conciliatory attitude which at once bore fruit in Greece, where the people abandoned the Venetian cause and returned to their allegiance to the Porte.
    0
    0
  • The city is in the Kansas-Oklahoma oil and gas field, and is surrounded by a fine farming and dairying region, in which special attention is given to the raising of small fruit; oil, gas, cement rock and brick shale are found in the vicinity.
    0
    0
  • The place is surrounded by extensive vineyards and orchards, all well watered by canals led from the river, and producing great quantities of fruit for exportation to Russia.
    0
    0
  • Fertilization is effected by insects, especially by bees, which are directed in their search by the colour and fragrance of the flowers; but some pollen must also be transported by the wind to the female flowers, especially in arctic species which, in spite of the poverty of insect life, set abundant fruit.
    0
    0
  • The other trades are olive-oil refining, barrel-making and soap-boiling; corn, honey and fruit are largely exported.
    0
    0
  • Some of the roots and branches were examined by Captain Samuel Turner during his journey to Tibet; but the plant being neither in blossom nor bearing fruit, it was impossible to decide whether it was the true cinnamon or an inferior kind of cassia.
    0
    0
  • The food of the working classes is principally bread, with oil, olives, cheese and fruit, sometimes fish, but seldom meat; common wine is largely imported from southern Europe.
    0
    0
  • There is a considerable area under vines, but it is generally more profitable to sell the fruit as grapes than to convert it into wine.
    0
    0
  • More than two-thirds of the wheat comes from abroad; fish, vegetables and fruit are also imported from Sicily in considerable quantities.
    0
    0
  • At the base of the tube, in both groups, the ovary becomes developed into a fleshy (often edible) fruit, that produced by the Opuntia being known as the prickly pear or Indian fig.
    0
    0
  • The fruit, which has an agreeably acid flavour, is frequently eaten in the West Indies.
    0
    0
  • Both these species are extensively cultivated for their fruit in Southern Europe, the Canaries and northern Africa; and the fruits are not unfrequently to be seen in Covent Garden Market and in the shops of the leading fruiterers of the metropolis.
    0
    0
  • The exports are mahogany, rosewood, cedar, logwood and other cabinet-woods and dye-woods, with cocoanuts, sugar, sarsaparilla, tortoiseshell, deerskins, turtles and fruit, especially bananas.
    0
    0
  • He purified the administration of justice; he encouraged the arts and sciences; he fostered national interests, and he induced other countries to recognize that independence which was in a great measure the fruit of his own exertions.
    0
    0
  • The " fig-insects," whose presence in ripening figs is believed essential to the proper development of the fruit, belong to Blastophaga and other genera of this family.
    0
    0
  • Coffee is the staple production, though Indian corn, mandioca and fruit are produced largely for local consumption.
    0
    0
  • There are manufactures of cigars, beer, hats, watches, furniture and machines, and a trade in wine, fruit and cereals.
    0
    0
  • The value of the fruit crop, for which Delaware has long been noted, also increased during the same decade, but disease and frost caused a marked decline in the production of peaches, a loss balanced by an increased production of apples, pears and other orchard fruits.
    0
    0
  • The vicissitudes of fruit raising have also caused increasing attention to be paid to market gardening, dairying and stock raising, particularly to market gardening, an industry which is favoured by the proximity of large cities.
    0
    0
  • The tanning, currying and finishing of leather ranks second in importance, with a gross product ($10,250,842) 9% greater than that of 1900, and constituting about one-fourth of the gross factory product of the state in 1905; and the manufacture of food products ranked third, the value of the products of the fruit canning and preserving industry having more than doubled in the decade 1890-1900, but falling off a little more than 7% in 1900-1905.
    0
    0
  • Successful attempts have been made to introduce fruit cultivation.
    0
    0
  • Coal and wine are leading imports, while cereals, timber, wool, fruit and industrial products are exported.
    0
    0
  • Among manufactures are lumber, spokes, handles, waggons, lime, evaporated fruit and flour.
    0
    0
  • Speranski's labours also bore fruit in the constitutions granted by Alexander to Finland and Poland.
    0
    0
  • It was the fruit of twenty years' labour, and exhibits with a brevity of expression, which, it has been said, "condenses more matter into a line than can be extracted from pages of other writers," the results of his study.
    0
    0
  • In Sir Lowry Road, the chief eastern thoroughfare, is the large vegetable and fruit market.
    0
    0
  • They contain a rich abundance of fruit trees, especially vines, oranges, lemons and figs, and in some parts present scenes of almost Alpine grandeur.
    0
    0
  • Fruit is also cultivated in the principality.
    0
    0
  • Among the principal imports are cocoa, coffee, grain (including Indian corn), fruit, provisions (including butter, eggs and potatoes from France and the Channel Islands), wines and spirits, sugar, wool, and other foreign and colonial produce.
    0
    0
  • The Santa Clara Valley has many vegetable and flower-seed farms; it is one of the most fertile of the fruit regions of California, prunes, grapes, peaches and apricots being produced in especial abundance.
    0
    0
  • The value of farms on which dairying was the chief source of income in 1900 was 46% of the total farm value of the state; the corresponding percentages for livestock, vegetables, hay and grain, flowers and plants, fruit and tobacco, being respectively 14.6, 10 2, 8 o, 4.2, 3.2, and 1 8%.
    0
    0
  • The inhabitants are engaged in cattlerearing, the cultivation of corn, hops and fruit, shipbuilding and the shipping trade, and the manufacture of cloth, paper and cutlery.
    0
    0
  • The sepals and petals are free or more or less united, the stamens as many or twice as many as the petals; the carpels, usually free, are equal to the petals in number, and form in the fruit follicles with two or more seeds.
    0
    0
  • The environs are fertile, the orchards producing excellent fruit.
    0
    0
  • Both of these plains are so level, and have so fertile a soil that they are the seats of extensive agriculture, especially fruit raising, which is further encouraged by the influence of the large bodies of lake water that moderate the heat of summer and the cold of winter, and tend to check the late frosts of spring and the early frosts of autumn.
    0
    0
  • The value of the fruit crop in 18 99 ($ 1 5, 8 44,34 6) was second only to that of California; and the most productive agricultural lands are those devoted to floriculture and nurseries.
    0
    0
  • The surrounding territory is fertile and well cultivated, especially in fruit gardens and palmgroves.
    0
    0
  • Coming to a country without useful animals, cereals, rich grasses or fruit trees, the colonists had to bring all these necessaries with them.
    0
    0
  • Oranges, lemons, grapes, passion fruit, figs, pine-apples, guavas and other fruits grow abundantly; while potatoes, onions, maize and arrowroot can be cultivated.
    0
    0
  • The valley and delta of the Vistula are very fertile, and produce good crops of wheat and pasturage for horses, cattle and sheep. Besides cereals, the chief crops are potatoes, hay, tobacco, garden produce, fruit and sugar-beet.
    0
    0
  • But grapes and fruit are amongst the most valuable of the crops.
    0
    0
  • The fruit of his labours was his `IaTopiac in 29 books, the first universal history, beginning with the return of the Heraclidae to Peloponnesus, as the first well-attested historical event.
    0
    0
  • European fruit trees and vines flourish in certain localities, while in the drier regions the Australian wattle, gum trees and pepper trees have been introduced with success.
    0
    0
  • Fruit farming engages attention, about 8000 morgen being devoted to orchards in 1904.
    0
    0
  • The fruit trees commonly cultivated are the peach, apricot, apple, orange, lemon, pear, fig and plum.
    0
    0
  • Saxony owes its unusual wealth in fruit partly to the care of the elector Augustus I., who is said never to have stirred abroad without fruit seeds for distribution among the peasants and farmers.
    0
    0
  • Benton Harbor has a large trade in fruit (peaches, grapes, pears, cherries, strawberries, raspberries and apples) and other market garden produce raised in the vicinity.
    0
    0
  • For instance, did the original story mention two trees, or only one, of which the fruit was taboo?
    0
    0
  • There was only one tree whose fruit was forbidden; it might be called either "the tree of life" or "the tree of knowledge," but certainly not "the tree of knowledge of good and evil."
    0
    0
  • He is perhaps best regarded, in the light of Arabian folk-lore, as the manifestation of a demon residing in the tree with the magic fruit.
    0
    0
  • Elsewhere eating the fruit of the "tree of wisdom" is given as the cause of the expulsion of the human pair.
    0
    0
  • Its industries comprise wire-drawing, tanning and saw-milling, and there is a considerable trade in wine, fruit and other agricultural produce.
    0
    0
  • The dose of the fruit is 30 to 60 grains, and the British Pharmacopoeia contains a tincture with a dose of a to 1 drachm.
    0
    0
  • The most valuable permanent result of the embassy was the literary fruit it bore several years afterwards in Elphinstone's great work on Kabul.
    0
    0
  • This is what the Gospel of Christ aims chiefly at producing as its proper fruit; and the Apostolic Fathers would have desired no better record than that they were themselves genuine "epistles of Christ."
    0
    0
  • Ameria is not mentioned in the history of the Roman conquest of Umbria, but is alluded to as a flourishing place, with a fertile territory extending to the Tiber, by Cicero in his speech in defence of Sextus Roscius Amerinus, and its fruit is often extolled by Roman writers.
    0
    0
  • But the county is specially noted for the cultivation of fruit and hops.
    0
    0
  • The ideals of this Verein were not destined to bear religious fruit, but the "science of Judaism" survived.
    0
    0
  • On the ground that the assimilable nutriment from a given weight of selected fruit and grain and nut and vegetable foods will cost less than the same nutriment obtained from flesh foods.
    0
    0
  • On the ground that an acre of cultivable land under fruit and vegetable cultivation will produce from two to twenty times as much food as if the same land were utilized for feeding cattle.
    0
    0
  • On the ground that the aim of every prosperous community should be to have a large proportion of hardy country yeomen, and that horticulture and agriculture demand such a high ratio of labour, as compared with feeding and breeding cattle, that the country population would be greatly increased by the substitution of a fruit and vegetable for an animal dietary.
    0
    0
  • Very little attention is paid to fruit and vegetable growing.
    0
    0
  • Among the chief productions of the plains are rice (the staple export of the country); pepper (chiefly from Chantabun); sirih, sago, sugar-cane, coco-nut and betel, Palmyra or sugar and attap palms; many forms of banana and other fruit, such as durian, orange-pommelo, guava, bread-fruit, mango, jack fruit, pine-apple, custard-apple and mangosteen.
    0
    0
  • These negotiations bore important fruit in the Anglo-French convention of 1896, the chief provision of which was the neutralization by the contracting parties of the central portion of Siam, consisting of the basin of the river Menam, with its rich and fertile land, which contains most of the population and the.
    0
    0
  • In his work De Plantis, published at Florence in 1583, he distributed the 1520 plants then known into fifteen classes, the distinguishing characters being taken from the fruit.
    0
    0
  • He divided them into eighteen classes, distinguishing plants according as they were woody or herbaceous, and taking into account the nature of the flowers and fruit.
    0
    0
  • It produces much corn and fruit; a great quantity of the latter, dried, is exported.
    0
    0
  • It also eats fruit and vegetables.
    0
    0
  • It feeds chiefly on fruit and roots, but kills sheep, goats, deer, ponies and cattle, and sometimes devours carrion.
    0
    0
  • Palma has a thriving trade in grain, wine, oil, almonds, fruit, vegetables, silk, foodstuffs and livestock.
    0
    0
  • The development of the banana trade dates from 1881, when 3500 bunches of fruit were exported to New Orleans.
    0
    0
  • In 1899 the total value of fruit grown in Kentucky was $2,491,457 (making the state rank thirteenth among the states of the Union in the value of this product), of which $ 1, 943, 6 45 was the value of orchard fruits and $435,462 that of small fruits.
    0
    0
  • But the prophetic societies were in their origin one symptom of that upheaval of national life of which the institution of the human sovereign reigning under the divine King was the chief fruit; they preserved the traditions of that great movement;.
    0
    0
  • But on the whole the false prophets deserve that name, not for their conscious impostures, but because they were content to handle religious formulas, which they had learned by rote, as if they were intuitive principles, the fruit of direct spiritual experience, to enforce a conventional morality, shutting their eyes to glaring national sins, after the manner of professional orthodoxy, and, in brief, to treat the religious status quo as if it could be accepted without question as fully embodying the unchanging principles of all religion.
    0
    0
  • Parramatta was one of the earliest seats of the tweed manufacture, but its principal industrial dependence has been on the fruit trade.
    0
    0
  • The betel nut is the fruit of the Areca or betel palm, Areca Catechu, and the betel leaf is the produce of the betel vine or pan, Chavica Betel, a plant allied to that which yields black pepper.
    0
    0
  • The fruit is about the size of a small hen's egg, and within its fibrous rind is the seed or so-called nut, the albumen of which is very hard and has a prettily mottled grey and brown appearance.
    0
    0
  • It began to bear fruit in Christian mysticism, and to diffuse a new magical leaven through the worship of the church.
    0
    0
  • The Principality Of Birkenfeld iS hilly and well-forested; agriculture prospers on the cleared lands, and fruit is grown in the valley of the Nahe, the principal stream.
    0
    0
  • The last book of the Laws of Manu deals with karmaplialam, " the fruit of karma," and gives many curious details of the way in which sin is punished and merit rewarded.
    0
    0
  • It has some comparatively insignificant industries, such as tanning and tobacco manufacture; its direct trade is in wine and fruit.
    0
    0
  • These ants will strip a tree in a few hours and are very destructive to fruit plantations.
    0
    0
  • The " tomato " or " tomatillo " mentioned, is the fruit of the Physalis ixocarpa, sometimes called the " strawberry tomato " and the " Mexican groundcherry," which is used with red peppers to make chili sauce.
    0
    0
  • Its fruit, called " tuna " by the natives, is refreshing and wholesome and is a staple food in spite of its spiny covering.
    0
    0
  • The inhabitants of Kalocsa and its wide-spreading communal lands are chiefly employed in the cultivation of the vine, fruit, flax, hemp and cereals, in the capture of water-fowl and in fishing.
    0
    0
  • Among the rare big trees - found chiefly in the north-east - are baobab and palmyra and certain fruit trees, one bearing a pink plum.
    0
    0
  • The crops include grain of all kinds (not sufficient, however, for the needs of the province), peas and beans, buckwheat, potatoes, fruit and hemp. The cultivation of flax is very extensive, especially in the N.E.
    0
    0
  • The city has an important trade in fruit, and has various manufactures, including paper, fruit packages, baskets, motor boats, gasolene launches, automobile supplies, hosiery and knit goods, air guns and sashes and blinds.
    0
    0
  • The district has thirty-three villages and is famous for its celebrated shkhan dates, which are exported in great quantities; it also produces much tobacco and fruit.
    0
    0
  • Thus (in Flatey) the grapes of Vinland are found in winter and gathered in spring; the man who first finds them, Leif's foster-father Tyrker the German, gets drunk from eating the fruit; and the vines themselves are spoken of as big trees affording timber.
    0
    0
  • His imagination, thus kindled, animated him to those severe labours of which his great discoveries were the fruit.
    0
    0
  • His great work, Le Istorie del regno di Napoli dal 1250 fino al 1498, first appeared at Naples in 1572, and was the fruit of thirty or forty years' labour; but nine more years were devoted to the task before it was issued in its final form at Aquila (1581).
    0
    0
  • It has a small river-port, and carries on trade in wine, brandy, grain, fruit and timber.
    0
    0
  • His more important books, of which English translations have been published, are the poems Gitanjali (Song Offerings) (1913), The Crescent Moon (1913), The Gardener (1913), Songs of Kabir (1915), Fruit Gathering (1916), Stray Birds (1917), The Lover's Gift and the Crossing (1918); the plays Chitra (1914), The King of the Dark Chamber (1914), The Post Office (1914),.
    0
    0
  • The local industries developed considerably between 1875 and 1905, and the city has important flour, wine and fruit export houses.
    0
    0
  • The signaculum oris forbids all eating of unclean food (which included all bodies of animals, wine, &c. - vegetable diet being allowed because plants contained more light, though the killing of plants, or even plucking their fruit and breaking their twigs, was not permitted), as well as all impure speech.
    0
    0
  • It is a shipping centre for a large wheat, fruit and cotton-raising region, and the principal jobbing market for northern Texas, Oklahoma and part of Louisiana, and the biggest distributing point for agricultural machinery in the South-west.
    0
    0
  • Miss Cons's work bore fruit after some years in the excellence of the entertainment provided and the high repute which the " Old Vic " attained.
    0
    0
  • According to ancient authorities, the word (derived by them from vuKov, " fig," and cbaivecv, " to show") meant one who informed against another for exporting figs (which was forbidden by law) or for stealing the fruit of the sacred fig-trees, whether in time of famine or on any other occasion.
    0
    0
  • Great to intervene in Rome remained without immediate effect, since Alberic's position was too strong to be attacked, but it bore fruit after his death.
    0
    0
  • Apples and pears are the chief sorts of fruit exported.
    0
    0
  • Establishments for evaporating fruit are now found in most of the larger apple-growing districts, and canning factories and jam factories have been established in many parts of Canada, and are conducted with advantage and profit.
    0
    0
  • In some parts of the semiarid districts in the interior of the province irrigation is being successfully practised for the purpose of bringing land under profitable cultivation for fruit.