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  • After that other people brought water from a brook and sprinkled the earth.
  • What are you going to hide from me that I haven't already seen?
  • Is the ranch far from here?
  • He leaped from his horse.
  • Unhitch those tugs, Zeb, and set me free from the buggy, so I can fight comfortably.
  • The sparkle faded from his eyes, leaving them soft sweet chocolate pools.
  • Water was dripping from the trees, and the grass was wet.
  • He got his satchel from the buggy and, opening it, took out two deadly looking revolvers that made the children shrink back in alarm just to look at.
  • "Cheep! cheep! cheep!" came from the wet grass.
  • She retrieved them from her purse and handed them to him.
  • Then he took from his pocket a sheet of paper on which some verses were written.
  • "Stith! stith! stith!" came from the leafy branches above them.
  • In just eighteen months from now, we will have duplicated that again and effectively doubled our computation power.
  • The Christmas tree could only be seen from the back of the house, but that didn't matter.
  • He got down from his horse and very gently took the little ones up in his big warm hands.
  • Sure, but we don't need that from the technology.
  • They used to hang in long festoons from our porch, filling the whole air with their fragrance, untainted by any earthy smell; and in the early morning, washed in the dew, they felt so soft, so pure, I could not help wondering if they did not resemble the asphodels of God's garden.
  • From the desperate city you go into the desperate country, and have to console yourself with the bravery of minks and muskrats.
  • The only bait he could find was a bright red blossom from a flower; but he knew fishes are easy to fool if anything bright attracts their attention, so he decided to try the blossom.
  • The next moment a broad-leaved plant was jerked from the ground where it grew and held suspended in the air before the Wizard.
  • The school was more than a mile from their home, and the children trotted along as fast as their short legs could carry them.
  • I slipped from my mother's lap and almost ran toward them.
  • This is the only way, we say; but there are as many ways as there can be drawn radii from one centre.
  • Anna Pavlovna's alarm was justified, for Pierre turned away from the aunt without waiting to hear her speech about Her Majesty's health.
  • From time to time she smoothed the folds of her dress, and whenever the story produced an effect she glanced at Anna Pavlovna, at once adopted just the expression she saw on the maid of honor's face, and again relapsed into her radiant smile.
  • The day before they were scheduled to leave, Alex came home from work and asked to see the tickets.
  • He pulled away from her, propping up on an elbow as he studied her face.
  • A few impressions stand out vividly from the first years of my life; but "the shadows of the prison-house are on the rest."
  • The family on my father's side is descended from Caspar Keller, a native of Switzerland, who settled in Maryland.
  • He is the well-known Prince Bolkonski who had to retire from the army under the late Emperor, and was nicknamed 'the King of Prussia.'
  • But scarcely had Pierre uttered these words before he was attacked from three sides.
  • From the hall of the nobility the Emperor went to that of the merchants.
  • His fingers unwrapped from her wrists and his warm palms caressed hers.
  • Pierre was among those who saw him come out from the merchants' hall with tears of emotion in his eyes.
  • She pushed the thought from her mind and turned to him.
  • Felipa took her from his arms and held her.
  • His cool gaze shifted idly from Felipa to Señor Medena.
  • Señor Medena was watching Alex, but from the corner of her eye Carmen could see Alex was looking out the window.
  • We... actually, I... was thinking about adopting a few wild horses from out west where they have too many.
  • Is the gulf far from here?
  • His empty gaze shifted momentarily from the window to her face.
  • More than likely the correction was to prevent her from being embarrassed.
  • From the foyer, they entered a huge room with a wide staircase that curved gracefully from the balcony on the second floor.
  • From the foyer, they entered a huge room with a wide staircase that curved gracefully from the balcony on the second floor.
  • Alex retrieved her from Felipa and shifted her so that she sat on his arm, one of her arms around his neck.
  • Carmen refrained from looking at Alex or displaying the shock she felt at the introduction of two more siblings he had never mentioned - an entire family.
  • Her dark hair was pulled back severely from a narrow face.
  • Finally she pushed away from his embrace.
  • Carmen grabbed a napkin and began wiping the mashed potatoes from her hand.
  • Waiting until they were out of view from the men at the corral, Carmen rode up beside Alex.
  • The belt buckle that deflected the knife from his heart was now irritating the scar.
  • Her anxious gaze went from Carmen to Alex and back again.
  • Getting no response from Alex, he shrugged and turned to his desk.
  • From behind them, Felipa's amused voice teased.
  • He turned from the mirror and gazed down at her solemnly.
  • Then he got into the buggy again and took the reins, and the horse at once backed away from the tree, turned slowly around, and began to trot down the sandy road which was just visible in the dim light.
  • They saw a landscape with mountains and plains, lakes and rivers, very like those upon the earth's surface; but all the scene was splendidly colored by the variegated lights from the six suns.
  • The rainbow tints from the colored suns fell upon the glass city softly and gave to the buildings many delicate, shifting hues which were very pretty to see.
  • "Yes; but it's lots of fun, if it IS strange," remarked the small voice of the kitten, and Dorothy turned to find her pet walking in the air a foot or so away from the edge of the roof.
  • A balloon meant to her some other arrival from the surface of the earth, and she hoped it would be some one able to assist her and Zeb out of their difficulties.
  • And you are little Dorothy, from Kansas.
  • Here is another person descended from the air to prove you were wrong.
  • "Now," said the Wizard of Oz, "having created something from nothing, I will make something nothing again."
  • Instead, he drew a leathern case from his pocket and took from it several sharp knives, which he joined together, one after another, until they made a long sword.
  • Do not all people grow upon bushes where you came from, on the outside of the earth?
  • All of our Princes and Rulers have grown upon this one bush from time immemorial.
  • "Pull!" cried Dorothy, and as they did so the royal lady leaned toward them and the stems snapped and separated from her feet.
  • Slowly he took the shining star from his own brow and placed it upon that of the Princess.
  • "They are from the Island of Teenty-Weent," said the Wizard, "where everything is small because it's a small island.
  • Then the Wizard bent a pin for a hook and took a long piece of string from his pocket for a fish-line.
  • Then she happened to remember that in a corner of her suit-case were one or two crackers that were left over from her luncheon on the train, and she went to the buggy and brought them.
  • Following these halls they discovered many small rooms opening from them, and some were furnished with glass benches, tables and chairs.
  • Just then his eye fell upon the lanterns and the can of kerosene oil which Zeb had brought from the car of his balloon, and he got a clever idea from those commonplace things.
  • The Mangaboos were much impressed because they had never before seen any light that did not come directly from their suns.
  • Next the Wizard poured a pool of oil from the can upon the glass floor, where it covered quite a broad surface.
  • Some of the Mangaboos fell down and had to be dragged from the fire, and all were so withered that it would be necessary to plant them at once.
  • There she entered in at Dorothy's window in the dome and aroused her from her sleep.
  • Jim hastened his lagging steps at this assurance of a quick relief from the dark passage.
  • From their elevated position they could overlook the entire valley, but not a single moving object could they see.
  • We were lucky to get away from those dreadful vegetable people.
  • One of the chairs pushed back from the table, and this was so astonishing and mysterious that Dorothy was almost tempted to run away in fright.
  • "Where do you come from, then?" asked the woman, in a curious tone.
  • Yes; for they eat of the dama-fruit, as we all do, and that keeps them from being seen by any eye, whether human or animal.
  • In front of each place was a plate bearing one of the delicious dama-fruit, and the perfume that rose from these was so enticing and sweet that they were sorely tempted to eat of them and become invisible.
  • We who live here much prefer to be invisible; for we can still hug and kiss one another, and are quite safe from the bears.
  • "Very well, I won't touch it," decided the kitten; "but you must keep it away from me, for the smell is very tempting."
  • Dorothy climbed into the buggy, although Jim had been unharnessed from it and was grazing some distance away.
  • "Oh, there is no need of that," said the voice, which from its gentle tones seemed to belong to a young girl.
  • The horse was plunging madly about, and two or three deep gashes appeared upon its flanks, from which the blood flowed freely.
  • "Run for the river!" shouted the Wizard, and Jim quickly freed himself from his unseen tormenters by a few vicious kicks and then obeyed.
  • As soon as he trotted out upon the surface of the river he found himself safe from pursuit, and Zeb was already running across the water toward Dorothy.
  • The Wizard opened his satchel and got out some sticking-plaster with which he mended the cuts Jim had received from the claws of the bears.
  • Looking through this opening they could see the Valley of Voe lying far below them, the cottages seeming like toy houses from that distance.
  • "Where did you come from?" asked Dorothy, wonderingly.
  • "The Country of the Gurgles can't be far from the top of the earth," remarked Dorothy.
  • The stairs had become narrower and Zeb and the Wizard often had to help Jim pull the buggy from one step to another, or keep it from jamming against the rocky walls.
  • The ground was sawdust and the pebbles scattered around were hard knots from trees, worn smooth in course of time.
  • These were very numerous, for the place was thickly inhabited, and a large group of the queer people clustered near, gazing sharply upon the strangers who had emerged from the long spiral stairway.
  • The others picked themselves up from the ground one by one and quickly rejoined their fellows, so for a moment the horse thought he had won the fight with ease.
  • "Those wooden things are impossible to hurt," he said, "and all the damage Jim has done to them is to knock a few splinters from their noses and ears.
  • Then a few of them advanced until another shot from the Wizard's revolver made them retreat.
  • As they had no wings the strangers could not fly away, and if they jumped down from such a height they would surely be killed.
  • From their platform a stair descended into the house, and the children and the Wizard explored it after lighting a lantern to show them the way.
  • In this country, as in all others they had visited underneath the earth's surface, there was no night, a constant and strong light coming from some unknown source.
  • So the horse gave a groan, flopped its four wings all together, and flew away from the platform.
  • Inside the archway were several doors, leading to different rooms built into the mountain, and Zeb and the Wizard lifted these wooden doors from their hinges and tossed them all on the flames.
  • But come, my children; let us explore the mountain and discover which way we must go in order to escape from this cavern, which is getting to be almost as hot as a bake-oven.
  • These were motionless at first, but soon began to flicker more brightly and to sway slowly from side to side and then up and down.
  • But at length they came unexpectedly upon a huge rock that shut off the passage and blocked them from proceeding a single step farther.
  • This rock was separate from the rest of the mountain and was in motion, turning slowly around and around as if upon a pivot.
  • They heard a crunching, grinding sound, a loud snap, and the turn-table came to a stop with its broadest surface shutting off the path from which they had come.
  • The lanterns were beginning to grow dim, and the Wizard poured the remaining oil from one into the other, so that the one light would last longer.
  • But their journey was almost over, for in a short time they reached a small cave from which there was no further outlet.
  • She had scarcely spoken the words then she suddenly disappeared from the cave, and with her went the kitten.
  • "Yes," said the soldier; "but I shaved them off long ago, and since then I have risen from a private to be the Chief General of the Royal Armies."
  • When a young man I ran away from home and joined a circus.
  • When the people saw me come from the sky they naturally thought me some superior creature, and bowed down before me.
  • That was why the people were so glad to see you, and why they thought from your initials that you were their rightful ruler.
  • But I escaped from her and am now the Ruler of my people.
  • "Princess Ozma did that," was the reply; "and it saves my legs from wearing out.
  • And this is the Hungry Tiger, the terror of the jungle, who longs to devour fat babies but is prevented by his conscience from doing so.
  • But here comes Ozma; so I'd better hush up, for the Princess doesn't like me to chatter since she changed her name from Tip to Ozma.
  • Then came Professor Woggle-Bug, with a group of students from the Royal College of Scientific Athletics.
  • The brilliantly polished Tin Woodman marched next, at the head of the Royal Army of Oz which consisted of twenty-eight officers, from Generals down to Captains.
  • The first thing the little humbug did was to produce a tiny white piglet from underneath his hat and pretend to pull it apart, making two.
  • There was enough material there to enable him to prepare several new tricks which he had learned from some of the jugglers in the circus, and he had passed part of the night in getting them ready.
  • An instant later the Tiger crouched and launched its huge body through the air swift and resistless as a ball from a cannon.
  • So the Captain-General took Eureka from the arms of the now weeping Dorothy and in spite of the kitten's snarls and scratches carried it away to prison.
  • He drew from his inside pocket one of the eight tiny piglets that were remaining and continued:
  • And now, at a signal from Ozma, the Woggle-Bug arose and addressed the jury.
  • "Let the Public Accuser continue," called Ozma from her throne, "and I pray you do not interrupt him."
  • "But Uncle Henry and Aunt Em need me to help them," she added, "so I can't ever be very long away from the farm in Kansas."
  • He would drive them from place to place as his master wished.
  • Why the boys should drive away, Little maidens from their play, Or love to banter and fight so well, That's the thing I never could tell.
  • "Which would you rather have" asked the caliph, "three hundred pieces of gold, or three wise sayings from my lips?"
  • In it were many great cities; and from one end of it to the other there were broad fields of grain and fine pastures for sheep and cattle.
  • He gave these to a shepherd and ordered him to bring them up among his sheep, far from the homes of men.
  • Some time later, the shepherd went to the city and told the king that the children had learned to speak one word, but how or from whom, he did not know.
  • From the hills of Charlestown they could watch and see what the king's soldiers were doing.
  • All at once a light flashed out from the tower.
  • The cry awoke the farmers; they sprang from their beds and looked out.
  • At Lexington, not far from Concord, there was a sharp fight in which several men were killed.
  • His home was in the country not far from a great forest.
  • Gilbert looked up from his play and saw that his mother was very deeply interested in her book.
  • He leaped from his hiding place and clasped it round its neck.
  • They show that three toes have been lost from the left forefoot.
  • From a bar of iron he made four horseshoes.
  • If a man was obliged to go from one city to another, he often rode on horseback.
  • He's just in from the backwoods.
  • He was dressed plainly, and, with his reddish-brown hair and mud-bespattered face, looked like a hard- working countryman just in from the backwoods.
  • It's from Mr. Boyle.
  • Here's another bird from Mr. Boyle.
  • "Here's a rabbit from Mr. Boyle," said the man.
  • The door was opened by the man from Mr. Boyle's.
  • Little Giotto came out from a corner, trembling and ashamed.
  • "One of these wreaths." said the queen, "is made of flowers plucked from your garden.
  • He looked at the wreaths from every side.
  • He remembered that he had seen many bees flying among these flowers and gathering honey from them.
  • You gather knowledge from the little things which common men pass by unnoticed.
  • They thought that pictures might take one's mind away from things that were better or more useful.
  • He turned the picture this way and that, and looked at it from every side.
  • Well, Andy Jackson, get down here and clean the mud from my boots.
  • When Daniel Webster was a child he lived in the country, far from any city.
  • The schoolhouse was two or three miles from home, but he did not mind the long walk through the woods and over the hills.
  • His mother unlocked her cabinet and took the precious volume from its place of safe keeping.
  • But you can learn many things from books.
  • He was noted for his great knowledge, the most of which he had obtained from books.
  • "Well, boy, what have you got?" asked one of the robbers, as he pulled Otanes from his horse.
  • "Well, it is this way," answered the man: "I bought a piece of ground from this neighbor of mine, and paid him a fair price for it.
  • He grew weak from hunger and thirst.
  • He expected to die from starvation.
  • One day, to the great joy of all, some ships arrived from another country.
  • Let it be a free gift to them from the city.
  • They do not deserve any gifts from the city.
  • Coriolanus made his way to the city of Antium, [Footnote: Antium (_pro._ an'shi um).] which was not far from Rome.
  • On the last day, the great army which Coriolanus had led from Antium was drawn up in battle array.
  • "Are you lately from Italy?" he asked.
  • Now, how was Arion saved from drowning when he leaped overboard?
  • They say that Arion, being a good swimmer, kept himself afloat until this ship happened to pass by and rescued him from the waves.
  • They were so tame that they sat on the shoulders of St. Francis and ate from his hand.
  • He gives you the rivers and the brooks from which to drink.
  • After all had eaten three meals from it, it was very much lighter.
  • The cows came home from the pasture and stood mooing at the gate.
  • Then up from his seat rose Abraham Davenport.
  • For this reason many people were glad when he ran away from home and went to sea.
  • Once his ship was sailing in the great Pacific Ocean, It was four hundred miles from the coast of South America.
  • There were pigs and goats on the island, and plenty of fish could be caught from the shore.
  • "If I ever have the good fortune to escape from this island," he said, "I will be kind and obliging to every one.
  • He wondered where they had come from and where they were going.
  • So, when he was eighteen years old, he ran away from his pleasant home and went to sea.
  • It was a letter from the page's mother:--
  • He took ten gold pieces from his table and wrapped them in the little letter.
  • They are resting there for the night and have no fear of danger from us.
  • And Robert the Bruce was never again obliged to hide in the woods or to run from savage hounds.
  • But at last his army was beaten; his men were scattered; and Tamerlane fled alone from the field of battle.
  • For a long time he wandered in fear from place to place.
  • When they wanted to move the boat from one place to another they had to pole it; that is, they pushed against a long pole, the lower end of which reached the bottom of the stream.
  • They fastened each of these wheels to the end of an iron rod which they passed through the boat from side to side.
  • He took something like an oarlock from his pocket and fastened it to the stern of the boat; then with a paddle which worked in this oarlock one of the boys could guide the boat while the other turned the paddle wheels.
  • One day a strange merchant came to him with some diamonds and pearls which he had brought from beyond the sea.
  • Find all the old men that live on the mountains or in the flat country around, and command them to appear before me one week from to-day.
  • Some large bird has stolen it from his palace.
  • My wife and children were suffering from the want of food and clothing.
  • So I took ten gold pieces from the many that were in the bag.
  • They drew up closer to the fire and felt thankful that they were safe from the raging storm.
  • But in the corner, almost hidden from his fellows, one poor man was sitting who did not enjoy the singing.
  • A song from Caedmon!
  • He was afraid and has slipped away from us.
  • So she called her clerk, who was a scholar, and bade him write the song, word for word, as it came from Caedmon's lips.
  • The next morning, Gautama sat in his carriage and rode out from the palace into one of the streets of the city.
  • At first he did not see anything that disturbed him; for word had gone before him to remove from sight everything that might be displeasing or painful.
  • The father cut slices from a loaf of brown bread.
  • They were just rising from the table when they heard a great noise in the street.
  • "Here!" cried the child himself, darting out from his hiding place.
  • People from all parts of the world sent to it, to tell it their troubles and get its advice.
  • Men come from every country to see him and learn from him.
  • "I have heard all about that tripod," he said, "and I know why you are carrying it from one place to another.
  • But it is the biggest, best store ever, where you can buy anything from anywhere, based on reviews by other buyers, at a discount, and have it gift wrapped, engraved, altered, drop-shipped, and probably delivered by tomorrow.
  • Think about it this way: All the technology accumulated from the dawn of time to today has given us a certain amount of processing power.
  • From this period came some of humanity's greatest masterpieces, including St. Peter's Basilica, Da Vinci's Last Supper, Michelangelo's Pieta, and hundreds of other instantly recognizable artistic treasures.
  • Its reawakening of the arts derived chiefly from seeking to recapture something thought lost from a past Golden Age.
  • In fact, it's likelier that kids of that day were forbidden by proper parents from hanging out at the Globe Theater.
  • Actually, I could make guesses, but they might well be spectacularly wrong and a guy doesn't want that haunting him ten years from now.
  • A very, very few people, however, were freed from this sustenance lifestyle, either by their fortuitous birth or outstanding ability.
  • War, poverty, misery, and nearly one hundred million people dead came from what essentially was a single wrong turn.
  • Scholars today are pretty sure that in the case of Delphi, the oracle was inadvertently breathing gases that rose from the cave in which she sat.
  • In the ancient world, man wanted guidance from the gods on what he should do.
  • Let me illustrate this one from my own life.
  • I define wisdom as deriving a course of action from applying a value system to a situation.
  • Knowledge often consists of the rolled-up conclusions from many pieces of data.
  • Does illegal immigration take jobs from citizens?
  • We will be completely insulated from the collecting and researching of data so that we can focus entirely on turning data into knowledge.
  • Or to continue with fictional cases: Why does gasoline made from oil refined at one refinery burn more efficiently?
  • Imagine what can be culled from this data.
  • So the salesperson says, "If you like that suit, then come over here and try this one from Ralph Lauren."
  • Any time you can move data collection from humans to computers, you get vast improvements in efficiency.
  • Any time you can move data storage from brains to hard drives, you get vast improvements in efficiency.
  • Any time you can move data processing from intellects to CPUs, you get vast improvements in efficiency.
  • Every sale from the point the robot was turned on to when the sun finally burns out will be perfectly remembered.
  • An American originally from New Orleans, Jim Haynes lives in Paris.
  • Once Jim extends the invitation, he memorizes all the individuals' names, where they are from, what they do for a living, information about their families, and so forth.
  • He is also from Austin, and he's in Internet publishing, too.
  • And from every experience they have had in their lives, we would be able to infer what was successful and what was not successful.
  • You could learn from their success and you could learn from their failure.
  • You are not from there, and you want to go out for Italian food for dinner.
  • The system has data from all their GPS records and infers that to drive across town several times for a place is a stronger vote than eating at the corner restaurant.
  • The system will weigh heavily the choices of people with Italian last names, and people who own restaurants—all these different factors, millions and millions of factors, all from the passively recorded life experiences of a billion people.
  • But I contend that only matters of degree separate it from the weightier matters we conventionally associate with wisdom.
  • Every time you buy a book from Amazon, its employees use your data—information about what you did on their site in the privacy of your own home—to try to sell other people more products.
  • And no one is concerned or even notices much, because your association with that data is so removed from you.
  • We cannot fashion them from machinery.
  • We never will have the opportunity to learn from the details of their lives and the trillions upon trillions of trial-and-error learning that humankind has repeated again and again.
  • And then everyone can benefit, equally and perpetually, from everyone else's knowledge.
  • They learn from trial and error.
  • As we move out from that defined center, we come to disorders and disabilities—impairments of bodily systems that are brought about by injury, disease, or genetics.
  • After these syndromes, we come to the entire spectrum of mental illnesses, from depression to paranoia.
  • Is it possible to replace all our organs with freshly grown new ones created from our own cells?
  • By the end of disease, we accomplish all that the preceding paragraphs describe—the full spectrum of human ailments, vanquished from the globe.
  • It was recognized as the flu, although records describe conditions which were highly likely to have been polio.
  • During his campaign and his time in office, the extent of the effect of his polio was kept from the public, but the fact he had the disease was commonly known.
  • With a grant from the National Foundation for Infant Paralysis, he went to work on a polio vaccine.
  • Parents kept their children at home, especially in the summer, and certainly away from public swimming areas.
  • At present, there are about one hundred new cases reported per month around the world, infecting about the same number of people as die from lightning strikes.
  • So if its person-to-person transmission can be interrupted, it truly can be eradicated from the planet.
  • Aside from two laboratory samples, one in the United States and one in Russia, it does not exist on the planet.
  • We read about it in vivid detail, from around the year 900, in the writings of the Persian physician Muhammad ibn Zakariya al-Razi.
  • The second was that the disease clearly passed from person to person, though by what mechanism was not clear.
  • A practitioner took a scab from someone with a mild case, made an incision in the skin of a healthy person, and infected that person with the scab.
  • After variolation, sometimes people died from the smallpox they caught.
  • In 1796, he extracted fluid from the pox on the hand of a dairymaid named Sarah Nelmes—who had caught the condition from her cow Blossom—and injected the fluid into a cut in eight-year-old James Phipps's arm.
  • We can draw lessons and encouragement from the histories of polio and smallpox, on several counts.
  • Expect solutions in the future to come from countries you couldn't find on a map today.
  • (The use of such practices continued into the scientific age: While Jenner was inoculating people with his new smallpox vaccine, doctors were draining half a gallon of blood from George Washington for his sore throat, a procedure that hastened his death.
  • In 1543, Andreas Vesalius published On the Fabric of the Human Body, which corrected errors from antiquity and advanced the medical sciences.
  • From that point, medicine would never be the same.
  • The computers would then see that most people who got better bought their radishes in stores stocked from certain farms.
  • Not long from now, computers will systematically look through trillions upon trillions of pieces of data for these associations.
  • Let's look at this from its beginning.
  • In fact, if you laid out all the DNA in your body, it would stretch from the sun to Pluto.
  • Additionally, we have deciphered the genome of diseases, from SARS to influenza.
  • All scientific material from the past is making its way online.
  • More data will come online, from satellite images to sensor readings.
  • You might remember the story of Kyle MacDonald who famously traded up from one red paperclip to a house, one small exchange at a time between July 2005 and July 2006.
  • Going from zero to one puppy might increase your utility a great amount.
  • From one to two, a bit less.
  • I take things from my attic and my garage and sell them to people who value them more than I do.
  • To the extent that I get accurate information from other consumers of the product, I will tend to make better choices.
  • In 1958, an American economist named Leonard Read wrote an essay called "I, Pencil," written from the pencil's point of view, about how no one on the planet knows how to make a pencil.
  • From mining the clay to make the lead, to the lacquer applied to the pencil, to the rubber eraser, to the metal band holding the eraser to the yellow paint, no one person knows how to make a complete pencil.
  • But if each of ten people specialized on just one-tenth of the task, they could together make 48,000, an increase in per-person productivity from one pin a day to 4,800 pins per day.
  • For instance, you may manufacture widgets from lightweight plastic.
  • You figure out how to make your widget from this new plastic.
  • The cost derives from the application of huge amounts of energy, intelligence, and technology to obtain and process the raw materials: digging and smelting to create high-grade steel, harvesting and refining and molding to make rubber parts, and so on.
  • Everyone knows water evaporates, rises, then falls to the earth as rain—but no one can even guess how much energy could be captured from this if we only knew how.
  • I don't mean that in a motivational poster kind of way but in a literal sense: Failures (and what we learn from them) will help build the energy solutions for our future.
  • He works from home and has a night job remotely monitoring real-time security cameras after hours at an office building.
  • Clearly, from a "big picture" standpoint, you should stick with the Oreos.
  • The business looks at this new country and decides to move there because, from their standpoint, they can save costs and be more efficient.
  • But realize, no new net efficiencies are gained from this move.
  • He is freed from being a stand-in for a machine.
  • Have I convinced you that replacing people with machines frees people from the bondage of doing machine work?
  • Once someone has something, no one should be able to take it from him or her.
  • I might enjoy that kind of banter with a real person I will never meet, talking to me from a distant state.
  • They still have the hand-operated machine from the 1940s that was used to make the first Legos, but it is of course now a museum piece.
  • Similarly, they require little power, so they either can be powered cheaply or can power themselves from their environment, with a little heat or sunlight.
  • Windows that can't be broken and can switch from opaque to clear.
  • Coatings that keep wood buildings from burning.
  • Let that sink in: By dividing work up among people so they could specialize, we went from bows and arrows to Apollo moon missions.
  • Robots are free from the physical limits our human bodies have.
  • Taken together, those findings suggest that almost all economic growth in the last 120-plus years was from technology.
  • That would be like the price of a Mercedes falling from $50,000 to a nickel.
  • In the past two centuries with very little technology, we've come from whale oil and wood to solar and nuclear.
  • So, let's say on average the pan is worth $2,000 to everyone who uses it—all the way from the people who just think it is "cool" to the people who it saves from food poisoning to the people whose lives and houses it saves.
  • About clothes, and how robots will weave garments that never wear out from materials not yet invented that will cost very little.
  • Beyond Robin Hood: Why radical approaches to wealth redistribution don't work History has witnessed numerous attempts, through radical methods, to raise up the poor by extracting wealth from the rich.
  • One is to hyperinflate currency, which is a massive transfer of wealth from creditors to debtors.
  • A third radical method of redistribution is called land reform, which is actually a polite term for taking land from one person and giving it to another.
  • Where I come from the term is "thievery," but believe it or not, they don't call it that.
  • Cynics view this as the rich paying off the poor to keep them from revolting.
  • This usually comes in the form of protecting their citizenry from crime.
  • They would say, If government is obligated to protect its citizens from a foreign invader, then it is obligated to protect them from a criminal.
  • In a heated moment the phrase "jack-booted thug" slips out, and it is all downhill from there.
  • This is simply returning to the people a portion of income from land that is publicly owned.
  • They may have just moved to Alaska from another state.
  • They aren't responsible for the oil being in Alaska and do nothing to extract the oil from the earth.
  • Pretend there is a spectrum of jobs from the best in the world down to the worst and everyone agrees on the order.
  • The farmers had to learn what it meant to be paid by the hour and to take instructions from supervisors; how to do a task and then the next day, learn a completely new task and do it instead.
  • They will take advantage of the freedom from financial want that the modern age gives them and will focus on improving themselves and the world they live in.
  • Freed from worry about losing a job they do not enjoy, encouraged to follow their dreams and passions, I believe most will want to do just that.
  • This pattern suggests freedom from financial want would be bad.
  • Remember Chad from earlier chapters?
  • We control the temperature of our surroundings, eat food from around the world, and own possessions no king could have imagined.
  • As we transition from one set of economic realities to another, there will be severe disruptions along the way.
  • Or these jobs can be divorced from economic realities, as the struggling painter or actor decides simply to do what he loves and live off the minimum income afforded by this planet-wide prosperity.
  • I almost cut this entire section from the book.
  • Structural famine exists when enough food is technically on hand or able to be imported, but some portion of the population is economically separated from it.
  • People riot when convinced that food is unjustly being kept from them.
  • Penalty for vagrancy rose over the years from time served in stocks, to whipping, to branding, and then to death.
  • The thought was that the overseer, being local, would be able to separate the lazy from the truly needy.
  • The second way people choose a nutritional theory is to develop it from their overall social and political understanding of the world.
  • If you think "Western Medicine" is a business whose goal is to keep you sick to sell you medicines, you will tend to move away from genetically modified foods and favor organic.
  • Again, this is because without compelling, widely accepted facts, we use things we've learned from other parts of our lives to make our decisions.
  • So our ability to find cause and effect in that—and to really discern fact from fallacy, what's good from what's bad for us—is highly suspect.
  • Well, in the developed world, the percent of people needed to farm fell from more than 90 percent to today's 4 percent.
  • Instead, the poorest nations should simply resign themselves to importing their food from abroad and instead get jobs working in cities in factories.
  • In that case, the subsidy goes straight from the taxpayer in the other country to the purchaser of the subsidized crop.
  • (Well, I personally have not; I have regressed from this state.
  • The 2000s saw the rise of commercially viable seeds created by transgenesis, that is, the insertion of DNA from one species into another species.
  • This was a guy from a small town in Iowa who failed his 1933 entrance exam to the University of Minnesota.
  • Plants themselves are pretty inefficient machines, at least from the standpoint of being good food sources for us.
  • From our point of view, the job of the plant is to convert sunlight into energy and store that energy in a tasty way; then when we eat the plant, we get that energy.
  • From our standpoint, the plant wastes all the rest of its energy on riotous living: growing roots and leaves, soaking up water, separating carbon molecules from oxygen ones.
  • From our standpoint, the plant wastes all the rest of its energy on riotous living: growing roots and leaves, soaking up water, separating carbon molecules from oxygen ones.
  • One guy from Iowa came along with some garbage bags and saved a billion lives.
  • How long will it be before the driver controls them remotely from his office?
  • My daughter, the family gardener, only plants heirloom produce from non-hybrid seeds.
  • Every week, I buy my milk from a small local dairy on the day it comes forth from the cow.
  • I buy my eggs from a farmer whose chickens roam free.
  • I buy my pecans from someone who picks and shells them himself.
  • My favorite cookbook, Apicius, is a 1,500-year-old collection of recipes from ancient Rome.
  • Second, the real promise of GM crops will not necessarily come about from the food industry.
  • Finally, we get to the fourth order of GMO: being able to splice genes from one species into another species, a process known as transgenesis.
  • Wouldn't that be something: Plants that would convert nitrogen from the atmosphere directly into ammonia they could use or plants that gave off the odor of other plants that pests avoid?
  • If you worry about gas emissions from cows contributing to climate change, lobby for a cow that doesn't have gas.
  • By taking this "Absolutely no GMOs" stance they completely remove themselves from the debate and as such have no voice in the discussion about what direction to take GM: what are safe testing practices, what factors will we optimize for, and the whole host of questions that face us on this, the eve of a momentous leap forward.
  • Sunscreens for plants protects them from ultraviolet and infrared radiation.
  • The principle here is to agree to buy a certain amount of a commodity at a certain price from farmers in these countries.
  • You can install Boinc software on your computer, choose a project you want your computer to work on when you are away from it, and maybe do your bit to change the world.
  • According to the Center for Systemic Peace's tally, the world went from just twenty democracies in 1946 to ninety-two in 2009.
  • The word "unalienable" (or "inalienable"—they are interchangeable) means, "unable to be taken away from or given away by the possessor."
  • The right is inseparable from its possessor.
  • During this three-year period, conveniently named by the Chinese "The Three Years of Natural Disasters," no one really knows how many people died; estimates range from fifteen million to a high of more than forty-five million.
  • I don't recall ever being in a department store, drinking from the water fountain, and having the staff look at me disapprovingly because I was running up the water bill.
  • In using the phrase, "Necessitous men are not free men," Roosevelt was actually quoting from a decision in a well-known 1762 English legal case.
  • Roosevelt is saying that freedom itself cannot exist apart from some amount of economic liberty.
  • To elevate food to the status of a human right does not require government to administer it—far from it.
  • The farmer replies, "You can't get there from here."
  • I know our world seems far from ending war.
  • My goal is to explain how we can all get there from here.
  • The Third Servile War occurred in the Roman Republic from 73 BC to 71 BC.
  • The only thing that separates us from that world is this thing called civilization.
  • In terms of murders per one hundred thousand inhabitants, England fell from roughly twenty-three in the 1300s to about one today.
  • The Netherlands and Belgium fell from forty-seven in 1300s to about one today.
  • Germany and Switzerland fell from thirty-seven in the 1300s to about one today.
  • Early in his presidency, in a 1953 address that would become known as his "Cross of Iron" speech, he declared, "Every gun that is made, every warship launched, every rocket fired, signifies in the final sense a theft from those who hunger and are not fed, those who are cold and are not clothed.
  • Their aim, he said, was nothing less than "the lifting, from the backs and from the hearts of men, of their burden of arms and of fears, so that they may find before them a golden age of freedom and of peace."
  • That's a bold statement, coming from a sitting president and former general.
  • Those asking it didn't offer a means for the world to escape from war.
  • By far, the world's bloodiest century was the twentieth century, which saw one hundred million people die from war.
  • This means that non-military manufacturing interests in the United States no longer profit as in the past from war.
  • Is this situation really preferable from a business standpoint?
  • If you are a masseuse, your massage oils might come from Indonesia.
  • In the modern age, money is once again represented by bits, but a different kind altogether: Money went from gold to paper and is now digital.
  • Arrangements like this are commonplace, although largely hidden from view.
  • In fact, virtually everyone should have wondered why he was fighting soldiers from places he couldn't find on a map.
  • From the northwest angle of Nova Scotia, viz., that angle which is formed by a line drawn due north from the source of St. Croix River to the highlands; along the said highlands which divide those rivers that empty themselves into the river St. Lawrence ...
  • From the northwest angle of Nova Scotia, viz., that angle which is formed by a line drawn due north from the source of St. Croix River to the highlands; along the said highlands which divide those rivers that empty themselves into the river St. Lawrence ...
  • Now, in most places you can smoke in your car, in your home, and in remote places away from civilized people.
  • This is starkly different than if violence breaks out in a distant, unreal place where the only flow of information is from official sources.
  • We tend to regard information that comes to us through our friend network as more authentic and reliable than information we receive from traditional media.
  • In the sorting through of the facts from a multiplicity of new sources, truth can be determined.
  • You still can buy it from the government's bookstore; a recent one ran about two thousand pages and cost about $200.
  • Then Latin became somewhat universal, from a Western viewpoint, as Rome's reach spread.
  • These nations will play a substantial role in shaping this new English, as they bring grammatical structure, idioms, and nuanced words from their native tongue.
  • Nations will maintain their own traditions, holidays, music, idioms, diets, and a thousand things that make them different from other nations.
  • Keeping that one comes at a large financial price: Learn proficiency at two languages or remain separate from the world economy.
  • They will simply disappear from daily use.
  • On the other end of the education spectrum, college degrees are up: A recent Harvard University study reports that 6.7 percent of the world has a college degree, up from 5.9 percent in 2000.
  • I have never met someone who returned from another country saying, Man, those guys are such jerks.
  • The world is developing a shared popular culture with elements drawn from around the globe.
  • From the way I have written this, it is clear where my sympathies lie.
  • We value our humanity, and insofar as life in the future seems different from our life today, it somehow seems less human.
  • Anything different doesn't seem as human to us and we instinctively recoil from it.
  • But first we must go further back, from Shakespeare at the end of the sixteenth century to Plato around 370 BC.
  • He told Simonides he was only going to pay him half the fee and if he wanted the other half, he should collect it from Castor and Pollux.
  • From those adventures, though, I did learn (the hard way) to think ahead about what could possibly go wrong.
  • So technology supports quality of life (from vaccines to Volvos) and generates wealth.
  • Instead of relearning things over the course of centuries, people will be able to learn from the choices others have made.
  • They all flow naturally from our daily and historical experience.
  • The benefits of civilization—from wealth to individual liberty and self-determination, from better health to safety and peace—all outweigh what its proponents can offer.
  • So, far from reaching that point the pessimists foretold—where we have exhausted the meager resources of earth and find ourselves dwindling away—something entirely different is happening.
  • From the garden it looked like an arbour.
  • The Keller homestead, where the family lived, was a few steps from our little rose-bower.
  • But I cannot remember any instance in which this feeling prevented me from repeating the naughtiness when I failed to get what I wanted.
  • Many of them were so tame that they would eat from my hand and let me feel them.
  • One big gobbler snatched a tomato from me one day and ran away with it.
  • When I was about five years old we moved from the little vine-covered house to a large new one.
  • I remember his caressing touch as he led me from tree to tree, from vine to vine, and his eager delight in whatever pleased me.
  • We lived a long way from any school for the blind or the deaf, and it seemed unlikely that any one would come to such an out-of-the-way place as Tuscumbia to teach a child who was both deaf and blind.
  • I guessed vaguely from my mother's signs and from the hurrying to and fro in the house that something unusual was about to happen, so I went to the door and waited on the steps.
  • I learned how the sun and the rain make to grow out of the ground every tree that is pleasant to the sight and good for food, how birds build their nests and live and thrive from land to land, how the squirrel, the deer, the lion and every other creature finds food and shelter.
  • One day my teacher and I were returning from a long ramble.
  • Our last halt was under a wild cherry tree a short distance from the house.
  • A strange odour came up from the earth.
  • I felt absolutely alone, cut off from my friends and the firm earth.
  • I longed for my teacher's return; but above all things I wanted to get down from that tree.
  • Its delicate blossoms shrank from the slightest earthly touch; it seemed as if a tree of paradise had been transplanted to earth.
  • I asked, pointing in the direction from which the heat came.
  • From the beginning of my education Miss Sullivan made it a practice to speak to me as she would speak to any hearing child; the only difference was that she spelled the sentences into my hand instead of speaking them.
  • From the printed slip it was but a step to the printed book.
  • Oh, the delight with which I gathered up the fruit in my pinafore, pressed my face against the smooth cheeks of the apples, still warm from the sun, and skipped back to the house!
  • From the first I was not interested in the science of numbers.
  • My teacher is so near to me that I scarcely think of myself apart from her.
  • I feel that her being is inseparable from my own, and that the footsteps of my life are in hers.
  • I was persuaded, however, to content myself with the gifts from the tree and leave the others until morning.
  • Every morning after breakfast I prepared his bath, made his cage clean and sweet, filled his cups with fresh seed and water from the well-house, and hung a spray of chickweed in his swing.
  • How different this journey was from the one I had made to Baltimore two years before!
  • One day spent with the blind children made me feel thoroughly at home in my new environment, and I looked eagerly from one pleasant experience to another as the days flew swiftly by.
  • Their kindness to me was the seed from which many pleasant memories have since grown.
  • It was hard, smooth sand, very different from the loose, sharp sand, mingled with kelp and shells, at Brewster.
  • Mr. Endicott told me about the great ships that came sailing by from Boston, bound for Europe.
  • The waves seemed to be playing a game with me, and tossed me from one to another in their wild frolic.
  • After I had recovered from my first experience in the water, I thought it great fun to sit on a big rock in my bathing-suit and feel wave after wave dash against the rock, sending up a shower of spray which quite covered me.
  • I spent the autumn months with my family at our summer cottage, on a mountain about fourteen miles from Tuscumbia.
  • Three frolicsome little streams ran through it from springs in the rocks above, leaping here and tumbling there in laughing cascades wherever the rocks tried to bar their way.
  • Here were great oaks and splendid evergreens with trunks like mossy pillars, from the branches of which hung garlands of ivy and mistletoe, and persimmon trees, the odour of which pervaded every nook and corner of the wood--an illusive, fragrant something that made the heart glad.
  • In places the wild muscadine and scuppernong vines stretched from tree to tree, making arbours which were always full of butterflies and buzzing insects.
  • It was delightful to lose ourselves in the green hollows of that tangled wood in the late afternoon, and to smell the cool, delicious odours that came up from the earth at the close of day.
  • I could also feel the stamping of the horses, which they had ridden out from town and hitched under the trees, where they stood all night, neighing loudly, impatient to be off.
  • A fire was kindled at the bottom of a deep hole in the ground, big sticks were laid crosswise at the top, and meat was hung from them and turned on spits.
  • I called him Black Beauty, as I had just read the book, and he resembled his namesake in every way, from his glossy black coat to the white star on his forehead.
  • I had to feel for the rails with my toe; but I was not afraid, and got on very well, until all at once there came a faint "puff, puff" from the distance.
  • I felt the hot breath from the engine on my face, and the smoke and ashes almost choked us.
  • Hour by hour the flakes dropped silently, softly from their airy height to the earth, and the country became more and more level.
  • In the evening a wind from the northeast sprang up, and the flakes rushed hither and thither in furious melee.
  • In places the shore of the lake rises abruptly from the water's edge.
  • I could not be despondent while I anticipated the delight of talking to my mother and reading her responses from her lips.
  • I thought then that I was "making up a story," as children say, and I eagerly sat down to write it before the ideas should slip from me.
  • It was suggested that I should change the title from "Autumn Leaves" to "The Frost King," which I did.
  • This was the pinnacle of my happiness, from which I was in a little while dashed to earth.
  • I represent my teacher as saying to me of the golden autumn leaves, "Yes, they are beautiful enough to comfort us for the flight of summer"--an idea direct from Miss Canby's story.
  • In a composition which I wrote about the old cities of Greece and Italy, I borrowed my glowing descriptions, with variations, from sources I have forgotten.
  • It is certain that I cannot always distinguish my own thoughts from those I read, because what I read becomes the very substance and texture of my mind.
  • Every day in imagination I made a trip round the world, and I saw many wonders from the uttermost parts of the earth--marvels of invention, treasuries of industry and skill and all the activities of human life actually passed under my finger tips.
  • I also went on board a Viking ship which lay a short distance from the little craft.
  • At a little distance from this ship there was a model of the Santa Maria, which I also examined.
  • In the electrical building we examined the telephones, autophones, phonographs, and other inventions, and he made me understand how it is possible to send a message on wires that mock space and outrun time, and, like Prometheus, to draw fire from the sky.
  • From these relics I learned more about the progress of man than I have heard or read since.
  • I had read many books before, but never from a critical point of view.
  • In the finals, no one read my work over to me, and in the preliminaries I offered subjects with some of which I was in a measure familiar before my work in the Cambridge school; for at the beginning of the year I had passed examinations in English, History, French and German, which Mr. Gilman gave me from previous Harvard papers.
  • In the end the difference of opinion between Mr. Gilman and Miss Sullivan resulted in my mother's withdrawing my sister Mildred and me from the Cambridge school.
  • Miss Sullivan and I spent the rest of the winter with our friends, the Chamberlins in Wrentham, twenty-five miles from Boston.
  • From February to July, 1898, Mr. Keith came out to Wrentham twice a week, and taught me algebra, geometry, Greek and Latin.
  • I had taken to heart the words of the wise Roman who said, "To be banished from Rome is but to live outside of Rome."
  • While my days at Radcliffe were still in the future, they were encircled with a halo of romance, which they have lost; but in the transition from romantic to actual I have learned many things I should never have known had I not tried the experiment.
  • I read my first connected story in May, 1887, when I was seven years old, and from that day to this I have devoured everything in the shape of a printed page that has come within the reach of my hungry finger tips.
  • I was permitted to spend a part of each day in the Institution library, and to wander from bookcase to bookcase, and take down whatever book my fingers lighted upon.
  • We were sitting together in a hammock which swung from two solemn pines at a short distance from the house.
  • From "Little Lord Fauntleroy" I date the beginning of my true interest in books.
  • From "Greek Heroes" to the Iliad was no day's journey, nor was it altogether pleasant.
  • Still there is much in the Bible against which every instinct of my being rebels, so much that I regret the necessity which has compelled me to read it through from beginning to end.
  • She knows her life is in his hands; there is no one to protect her from his wrath.
  • Yet how different is the life of these simple country folks from that of the Persian capital!
  • I cannot tell exactly when I began Lamb's "Tales from Shakespeare"; but I know that I read them at first with a child's understanding and a child's wonder.
  • No barrier of the senses shuts me out from the sweet, gracious discourse of my book-friends.
  • I trust that my readers have not concluded from the preceding chapter on books that reading is my only pleasure; my pleasures and amusements are many and varied.
  • Whether it comes from the trees which have been heated by the sun, or from the water, I can never discover.
  • There was a regatta in the Northwest Arm, in which the boats from the different warships were engaged.
  • Tacking and jibbing, we wrestled with opposing winds that drove us from side to side with impetuous fury.
  • Mr. Chamberlin initiated me into the mysteries of tree and wild-flower, until with the little ear of love I heard the flow of sap in the oak, and saw the sun glint from leaf to leaf.
  • The children who crowd these grimy alleys, half-clad and underfed, shrink away from your outstretched hand as if from a blow.
  • Each checker has a hole in the middle in which a brass knob can be placed to distinguish the king from the commons.
  • The jar made by shifting the men from one hole to another tells me when it is my turn.
  • In imagination I can hear Homer singing, as with unsteady, hesitating steps he gropes his way from camp to camp--singing of life, of love, of war, of the splendid achievements of a noble race.
  • Mr. Jefferson let me touch his face so that I could imagine how he looked on waking from that strange sleep of twenty years, and he showed me how poor old Rip staggered to his feet.
  • He had a book of his poems in raised print from which I read "In School Days."
  • I also recited "Laus Deo," and as I spoke the concluding verses, he placed in my hands a statue of a slave from whose crouching figure the fetters were falling, even as they fell from Peter's limbs when the angel led him forth out of prison.
  • When I find my work particularly difficult and discouraging, she writes me letters that make me feel glad and brave; for she is one of those from whom we learn that one painful duty fulfilled makes the next plainer and easier.
  • I could not keep pace with all these literary folk as they glanced from subject to subject and entered into deep dispute, or made conversation sparkle with epigrams and happy witticisms.
  • I read from Mark Twain's lips one or two of his good stories.
  • I received from them gifts that have the gentle concurrence of the heart, books containing their own thoughts, soul-illumined letters, and photographs that I love to have described again and again.
  • So these selections from Miss Keller's correspondence are made with two purposes--to show her development and to preserve the most entertaining and significant passages from several hundred letters.
  • From the letters after the year 1892 I have culled in the spirit of one making an anthology, choosing the passages best in style and most important from the point of view of biography.
  • From the letters after the year 1892 I have culled in the spirit of one making an anthology, choosing the passages best in style and most important from the point of view of biography.
  • Twenty-five days later, while she was on a short visit away from home, she wrote to her mother.
  • It came from New York.
  • I was very happy to receive pretty book and nice candy and two letters from you.
  • My dear Miss Moore Are you very glad to receive a nice letter from your darling little friend?
  • With much love and two kisses From your little friend HELEN A. KELLER.
  • West Newton is not far from Boston and we went there in the steam cars very quickly.
  • From your dear little daughter.
  • My dear uncle Morrie,--I think you will be very glad to receive a letter from your dear little friend Helen.
  • With much love and many kisses, from your little friend.
  • From your darling little friend HELEN A. KELLER.
  • With much love from your little friend HELEN A. KELLER.
  • Astronomer comes from the Latin word astra, which means stars; and astronomers are men who study the stars, and tell us about them.
  • Teacher says she can see Venus from our window, and it is a large and beautiful star.
  • It came from Japan.
  • A lady brought her to me from Paris.
  • With much love and kisses, from your Affectionate cousin HELEN A. KELLER.
  • My Dear Mr. Anagnos:--You cannot imagine how delighted I was to receive a letter from you last evening.
  • I hope you will please write to me from all the cities you visit.
  • When you come home from Europe I hope you will be all well and very happy to get home again.
  • The doll cried, too, and stretched out its arms from among the green branches, and looked distressed.
  • Already she began to see quite plainly the little elves in their tall pointed hats, dancing down the dusky alleys, and peeping from between the bushes, and they seemed to come nearer and nearer; and she stretched her hands up towards the tree in which the doll sat and they laughed, and pointed their fingers at her.
  • With much love and many kisses, from your affectionate little friend, HELEN ADAMS KELLER.
  • During the summer Miss Sullivan was away from Helen for three months and a half, the first separation of teacher and pupil.
  • Not far from the mill there was an old house, with many trees growing close to it.
  • From your affectionate little pupil, HELEN A. KELLER.
  • From your loving sister, HELEN A. KELLER.
  • My Dear Mr. Wade:--I have just received a letter from my mother, telling me that the beautiful mastiff puppy you sent me had arrived in Tuscumbia safely.
  • I shall be happy to have a letter from you when you like to write to me.
  • From your loving little friend, HELEN A. KELLER.
  • From your loving little friend, HELEN A. KELLER.
  • I had a lovely letter from the poet Whittier.
  • I was delighted to receive the flowers from home.
  • With much love, from your darling child, HELEN A. KELLER.
  • I shall always keep them, and it will make me very happy to think that you found them, on that far away island, from which Columbus sailed to discover our dear country.
  • A few days ago I received a little box of English violets from Lady Meath.
  • With loving greeting to the little cousins, and Mrs. Hale and a sweet kiss for yourself, From your little friend, HELEN A. KELLER.
  • They live a gay life, flitting from flower to flower, sipping the drops of honeydew, without a thought for the morrow.
  • From your loving little friend, HELEN A. KELLER.
  • From your loving little friend, HELEN A. KELLER.
  • I am glad also to know, from the questions which you ask me, what you are thinking about.
  • It is from the power of love which is in our own hearts.
  • All the love that is in our hearts comes from him, as all the light which is in the flowers comes from the sun.
  • I did not imagine, when I studied about the forests of Maine, that a strong and beautiful ship would go sailing all over the world, carrying wood from those rich forests, to build pleasant homes and schools and churches in distant countries.
  • With much love, from your little friend, HELEN A. KELLER.
  • We surprised our dear friends, however, for they did not expect us Saturday; but when the bell rung Miss Marrett guessed who was at the door, and Mrs. Hopkins jumped up from the breakfast table and ran to the door to meet us; she was indeed much astonished to see us.
  • This evening they are going to entertain their friends with readings from your poems and music.
  • From your little friend HELEN A. KELLER.
  • Of course the sun did not shine, but we had great open wood fires in the rooms, which were all very sweet with roses and other flowers, which were sent to me from distant friends; and fruits of all kinds from California and other places.
  • From here he was to be sent to an almshouse, for at that time there was no other place for him in Pennsylvania.
  • She began to solicit contributions from her friends, and saved her pennies.
  • Helen asked that the contributions, which people were sending from all over America and England, be devoted to Tommy's education.
  • From your loving little friend, HELEN A. KELLER.
  • Sweet Mother Nature can have no secrets from me when my poet is near.
  • From your loving little friend, HELEN KELLER.
  • From your little friend, HELEN KELLER.
  • With much love and a kiss, from your little friend, HELEN A. KELLER.
  • From your little friend HELEN KELLER.
  • This wonderful world with all its sunlight and beauty was hidden from me, and I had never dreamed of its loveliness.
  • I received several, and I do not know which was from you.
  • Teacher and I are always delighted to hear from you.
  • Japan must indeed be a paradise for children to judge from the great number of playthings which are manufactured there.
  • A spiral stairway leads from the base of this pedestal to the torch.
  • The last act affected us most deeply, and we all wept, wondering how the executioner could have the heart to tear the King from his loving wife's arms.
  • Then the interference of Mr. Gilman resulted in Mrs. Keller's withdrawing Miss Helen and her sister, Miss Mildred, from the school.
  • I have only ridden a "sociable," which is very different from the ordinary tandem.
  • She had previously obtained permission from General Loring, Supt. of the Museum, for me to touch the statues, especially those which represented my old friends in the "Iliad" and "Aeneid."
  • She looked as if she had just risen from the foam of the sea, and her loveliness was like a strain of heavenly music.
  • My friend said, she would sometime show me the copies of the marbles brought away by Lord Elgin from the Parthenon.
  • You will be glad to hear that the books from England are coming now.
  • However, I am glad that I am not debarred from all pleasure in the pictures.
  • How could they--they can see and hear, and I suppose they could not understand matters from my point of view....
  • I stood in the middle of the church, where the vibrations from the great organ were strongest, and I felt the mighty waves of sound beat against me, as the great billows beat against a little ship at sea.
  • I am now the proud owner of about fifteen new books, which we ordered from Louisville.
  • Among them are "Henry Esmond," "Bacon's Essays" and extracts from "English Literature."
  • Perhaps next week I shall have some more books, "The Tempest," "A Midsummer Night's Dream" and possibly some selections from Green's history of England.
  • They were very kind; but I could not help feeling that they spoke more from a business than a humanitarian point of view.
  • The dear, sweet little girl, it makes my heart ache to think how utterly she is cut off from all that is good and desirable in life.
  • I was much surprised to hear all this; for I judged from your letters that Katie was a very precocious girl....
  • I have had a letter from Mrs. Thaw with regard to the possibility of doing something for these children.
  • A little bird had already sung the good news in my ear; but it was doubly pleasant to have it straight from you.
  • She cannot know in detail how she was taught, and her memory of her childhood is in some cases an idealized memory of what she has learned later from her teacher and others.
  • That is why her teacher's records may be found to differ in some particulars from Miss Keller's account.
  • Her good friend, Mr. William Wade, had a complete braille copy made for her from the magazine proofs.
  • In this way she is able to get the meaning of those half sentences which we complete unconsciously from the tone of the voice or the twinkle of the eye.
  • Sometimes she puts her hand on a singer's throat to feel the muscular thrill and contraction, and from this she gets genuine pleasure.
  • It is amusing to read in one of the magazines of 1895 that Miss Keller "has a just and intelligent appreciation of different composers from having literally felt their music, Schumann being her favourite."
  • Miss Sullivan, who knows her pupil's mind, selects from the passing landscape essential elements, which give a certain clearness to Miss Keller's imagined view of an outer world that to our eyes is confused and overloaded with particulars.
  • When she returns from a walk and tells some one about it, her descriptions are accurate and vivid.
  • A comparative experience drawn from written descriptions and from her teacher's words has kept her free from errors in her use of terms of sound and vision.
  • Many of the detached incidents and facts of our daily life pass around and over her unobserved; but she has enough detailed acquaintance with the world to keep her view of it from being essentially defective.
  • Most that she knows at first hand comes from her sense of touch.
  • The small letters are about three-sixteenths of an inch high, and are raised from the page the thickness of the thumbnail.
  • The facsimile on page xv [omitted from etext] gives an idea of how the raised dots look.
  • For Miss Keller to spell a sentence in the manual alphabet impresses it on her mind just as we learn a thing from having heard it many times and can call back the memory of its sound.
  • She means everything so thoroughly that her very quotations, her echoes from what she has read, are in truth original.
  • After Laura's education had progressed for two months with the use only of raised letters, Dr. Howe sent one of his teachers to learn the manual alphabet from a deaf-mute.
  • She taught it to Laura, and from that time on the manual alphabet was the means of communicating with her.
  • From a scientific standpoint it is unfortunate that it was impossible to keep such a complete record of Helen Keller's development.
  • When she first wrote from Tuscumbia to Mr. Michael Anagnos, Dr. Howes son-in-law and his successor as Director of the Perkins Institution, about her work with her pupil, the Boston papers began at once to publish exaggerated accounts of Helen Keller.
  • This with the extracts from her letters, scattered through the report, is the first valid source of information about Helen Keller.
  • So she consented to the publication of extracts from letters which she wrote during the first year of her work with her pupil.
  • In 1886 she graduated from the Perkins Institution.
  • The only time she had to prepare herself for the work with her pupil was from August, 1886, when Captain Keller wrote, to February, 1887.
  • I do not doubt that she derived from them much pleasure and not a little profit.
  • Here follow in order Miss Sullivan's letters and the most important passages from the reports.
  • The drive from the station to the house, a distance of one mile, was very lovely and restful.
  • Her face flushed, and when her mother attempted to take the bag from her, she grew very angry.
  • Somehow I had expected to see a pale, delicate child--I suppose I got the idea from Dr. Howe's description of Laura Bridgman when she came to the Institution.
  • She is unresponsive and even impatient of caresses from any one except her mother.
  • I shall not attempt to conquer her by force alone; but I shall insist on reasonable obedience from the start.
  • Then I took the doll, meaning to give it back to her when she had made the letters; but she thought I meant to take it from her, and in an instant she was in a temper, and tried to seize the doll.
  • Helen was lying on the floor, kicking and screaming and trying to pull my chair from under me.
  • Since I wrote you, Helen and I have gone to live all by ourselves in a little garden-house about a quarter of a mile from her home, only a short distance from Ivy Green, the Keller homestead.
  • But I soon found that I was cut off from all the usual approaches to the child's heart.
  • I told her that in my opinion the child ought to be separated from the family for a few weeks at least--that she must learn to depend on and obey me before I could make any headway.
  • Our meals are brought from the house, and we usually eat on the piazza.
  • Her father looks in at us morning and evening as he goes to and from his office, and sees her contentedly stringing her beads or making horizontal lines on her sewing-card, and exclaims, "How quiet she is!"
  • The hour from twelve to one is devoted to the learning of new words.
  • Often, when the weather is fine, we drive from four to six, or go to see her aunt at Ivy Green or her cousins in the town.
  • She has flitted from object to object, asking the name of everything and kissing me for very gladness.
  • I see an improvement in Helen day to day, almost from hour to hour.
  • Soon after, she began to vary her steps from large to small, and little mincing steps were "very small."
  • The other day a friend brought her a new doll from Memphis, and I thought I would see if I could make Helen understand that she must not break it.
  • The doctor says her mind is too active; but how are we to keep her from thinking?
  • It's queer how ready people always are with advice in any real or imaginary emergency, and no matter how many times experience has shown them to be wrong, they continue to set forth their opinions, as if they had received them from the Almighty!
  • She stood very still for a moment, and it was evident from her face, which was flushed and troubled, that a struggle was going on in her mind.
  • Helen's pencil-writing is excellent, as you will see from the enclosed letter, which she wrote for her own amusement.
  • I had a letter from Laura Bridgman last Sunday.
  • From the beginning, I HAVE MADE IT A PRACTICE TO ANSWER ALL HELEN'S QUESTIONS TO THE BEST OF MY ABILITY IN A WAY INTELLIGIBLE TO HER, and at the same time truthfully.
  • I reminded her of the corn, beans and watermelon-seed she had planted in the spring, and told her that the tall corn in the garden, and the beans and watermelon vines had grown from those seeds.
  • I made her understand that all life comes from an egg.
  • Helen had a letter this morning from her uncle, Doctor Keller.
  • There are several near Tuscumbia; one very large one from which the town got its name.
  • Mrs. Keller and I watched the nursery comedy from the door.
  • I had two letters from Mr. Anagnos last week.
  • You will see from her letter that she uses many pronouns correctly.
  • She moved her finger from one printed character to another as I formed each letter on my fingers.
  • On another occasion while walking with me she seemed conscious of the presence of her brother, although we were distant from him.
  • Some of them cried, and the wild man of Borneo shrank from her sweet little face in terror.
  • I HAVE TRIED FROM THE BEGINNING TO TALK NATURALLY TO HELEN AND TO TEACH HER TO TELL ME ONLY THINGS THAT INTEREST HER AND ASK QUESTIONS ONLY FOR THE SAKE OF FINDING OUT WHAT SHE WANTS TO KNOW.
  • How ridiculous it is to say I had drunk so copiously of the noble spirit of Dr. Howe that I was fired with the desire to rescue from darkness and obscurity the little Alabamian!
  • It was nothing but excitement from first to last--drives, luncheons, receptions, and all that they involve when you have an eager, tireless child like Helen on your hands.
  • Helen was greatly interested in the boat, and insisted on being shown every inch of it from the engine to the flag on the flagstaff.
  • I had letter from Robert.
  • He said Dear Helen, Robert was glad to get a letter from dear, sweet little Helen.
  • We are just back from church.
  • When the wine was passed to our neighbour, he was obliged to stand up to prevent her taking it away from him.
  • Finally she got up from the table and went through the motion of picking seaweed and shells, and splashing in the water, holding up her skirts higher than was proper under the circumstances.
  • The next word that you receive from me will be in a yellow envelope, and it will tell you when we shall reach Boston.
  • Dr. Keller distributed the extracts from the report that Mr. Anagnos sent me, and he could have disposed of a thousand if he had had them.
  • This extract from one of Miss Sullivan's letters is added because it contains interesting casual opinions stimulated by observing the methods of others.
  • Helen certainly derives great pleasure from the exercise of these senses.
  • It is impossible for any one with whom Helen is conversing to be particularly happy or sad, and withhold the knowledge of this fact from her.
  • The wounded leg soon became so much worse that the horse was suspended from a beam.
  • We explained that it was done to keep Pearl from running away.
  • Helen expressed a great deal of sympathy, and at every opportunity during the day she would find Pearl and carry the burden from place to place.
  • Sitting beside her in the car, I describe what I see from the window--hills and valleys and the rivers; cotton-fields and gardens in which strawberries, peaches, pears, melons, and vegetables are growing; herds of cows and horses feeding in broad meadows, and flocks of sheep on the hillside; the cities with their churches and schools, hotels and warehouses, and the occupations of the busy people.
  • From Miss Sullivan's part of this report I give her most important comments and such biographical matter as does not appear elsewhere in the present volume.
  • These extracts Mr. Anagnos took from Miss Sullivan's notes and memoranda.
  • One day, while her pony and her donkey were standing side by side, Helen went from one to the other, examining them closely.
  • She has one advantage over ordinary children, that nothing from without distracts her attention from her studies.
  • She will guess the meanings of the new words from their connection with others which are already intelligible to her.
  • I have found it a convenient medium of communicating with Helen when she is at some distance from me, for it enables me to talk with her by tapping upon the floor with my foot.
  • "Were did I come from?" and "Where shall I go when I die?" were questions Helen asked when she was eight years old.
  • I think my mother got me from heaven, but I do not know where that place is.
  • After May, 1890, it was evident to me that she had reached a point where it was impossible to keep from her the religious beliefs held by those with whom she was in daily contact.
  • I then asked her, "Can you think of your soul as separate from your body?"
  • She shrinks from the thought of death with evident dismay.
  • The fact that sin exists, and that great misery results from it, dawned gradually upon her mind as she understood more and more clearly the lives and experiences of those around her.
  • She got the language from the language itself, and this is, next to hearing the language spoken, the way for any one to get a foreign tongue, more vital and, in the end, easier than our schoolroom method of beginning with the grammar.
  • In the same way she played with Latin, learning not only from the lessons her first Latin teacher gave her, but from going over and over the words of a text, a game she played by herself.
  • When she is telling a child's story, or one with pathos in it, her voice runs into pretty slurs from one tone to another.
  • Her friends grow accustomed to her speech and forget that it is different from that of any one else.
  • She at once resolved to learn to speak, and from that day to this she has never wavered in that resolution.
  • From the first she was not content to be drilled in single sounds, but was impatient to pronounce words and sentences.
  • But there was satisfaction in seeing from day to day the evidence of growing mastery and the possibility of final success.
  • It seems, however, that, while she was still suffering from severe pain, she noticed the movements of her mother's lips.
  • These words she had caught without instruction from the lips of friends.
  • The ability to read the lips helps Miss Keller in getting corrections of her pronunciation from Miss Sullivan and others, just as it was the means of her learning to speak at all, but it is rather an accomplishment than a necessity.
  • It brings me into closer and tenderer relationship with those I love, and makes it possible for me to enjoy the sweet companionship of a great many persons from whom I should be entirely cut off if I could not talk.
  • But the extracts from Miss Sullivan's letters and from her reports, although they are clear and accurate, have not the beauty which distinguishes Miss Keller's English.
  • In Captain Keller's library she found excellent books, Lamb's "Tales from Shakespeare," and better still Montaigne.
  • For it was Dr. Bell who first saw the principles that underlie Miss Sullivan's method, and explained the process by which Helen Keller absorbed language from books.
  • Language was her liberator, and from the first she cherished it.
  • Miss Keller has given her account of it, and the whole matter was discussed in the first Volta Bureau Souvenir from which I quote at length:
  • About the same time, in a letter to a friend, in which she makes mention of her Southern home, she gives so close a reproduction from a poem by one of her favourite authors that I will give extracts from Helen's letter and from the poem itself:
  • In a letter to a friend at the Perkins Institution, dated May 17, 1889, she gives a reproduction from one of Hans Christian Andersen's stories, which I had read to her not long before.
  • The original story was read to her from a copy of "Andersen's Stories," published by Leavitt & Allen Bros., and may be found on p. 97 of Part I. in that volume.
  • The pictures the language paints on her memory appear to make an indelible impression; and many times, when an experience comes to her similar in character, the language starts forth with wonderful accuracy, like the reflection from a mirror.
  • The anemone, the wild violet, the hepatica, and the funny little curled-up ferns all peeped out at us from beneath the brown leaves.
  • Careful examination was made of the books in raised print in the library of the Perkins Institution to learn if any extracts from this volume could be found there; but nothing was discovered.
  • This became a difficult task, as her publishers in Philadelphia had retired from business many years ago; however, it was eventually discovered that her residence is at Wilmington, Delaware, and copies of the second edition of the book, 1889, were obtained from her.
  • Can you tell me in what paper the article appeared accusing Helen of plagiarism, and giving passages from both stories?
  • Some were red, some white, and others pale pink, and they were just peeping out of the green leaves, as rosy-faced children peep out from their warm beds in wintertime before they are quite willing to get up.
  • Teacher and I have just returned from our walk.
  • Some were red, some white, and others were delicate pink, and they were peeping out from between the green leaves like beautiful little fairies.
  • The Frost Fairies [From "Birdie and his Fairy Friends"] by Margaret T. Canby
  • Of course, he soon noticed the brightness of the leaves, and discovered the cause, too, when he caught sight of the broken jars and vases from which the melted treasure was still dropping.
  • At a little distance from the palace we might easily mistake it for a mountain whose peaks were mounting heavenward to receive the last kiss of the departing day.
  • Then they began to wander merrily about searching for nuts, climbing trees, peeping curiously into the empty birds' nests, and playing hide and seek from behind the trees.
  • Of course, he had not gone far when he noticed the brightness of the leaves, and he quickly guessed the cause when he saw the broken jars from which the treasure was still dropping.
  • Their pleasure banished the anger from King Frost's heart and the frown from his brow, and he, too, began to admire the painted trees.
  • When the fairies heard this, they were greatly relieved and came forth from their hiding-places, confessed their fault, and asked their master's forgiveness.
  • The following letter from Mr. Anagnos is reprinted from the American Annals of the Deaf, April, 1892:
  • I hasten to assure you that Helen could not have received any idea of the story from any of her relations or friends here, none of whom can communicate with her readily enough to impress her with the details of a story of that character.
  • With most of us the contributions from different sources are blended, crossed and confused.
  • A child with but few sources may keep distinct what he draws from each.
  • The reason that we do not observe this process in ordinary children is, because we seldom observe them at all, and because they are fed from so many sources that the memories are confused and mutually destructive.
  • A remarkable example is a paragraph from Miss Keller's sketch in the Youth's Companion.
  • The deaf child who has only the sign language of De l'Epee is an intellectual Philip Nolan, an alien from all races, and his thoughts are not the thoughts of an Englishman, or a Frenchman, or a Spaniard.
  • From the early sketch I take a few passages which seem to me, without making very much allowance for difference in time, almost as good as anything she has written since:
  • There is no affectation about them, and as they come straight from your heart, so they go straight to mine.
  • There is no reason why she should strike from her vocabulary all words of sound and vision.
  • It is true, on the other hand, that in her descriptions, she is best from the point of view of art when she is faithful to her own sensations; and this is precisely true of all artists.
  • It seems worth while, however, to quote from some of her chance bits of writing, which are neither so informal as her letters nor so carefully composed as her story of her life.
  • These extracts are from her exercises in her course in composition, where she showed herself at the beginning of her college life quite without rival among her classmates.
  • What mysterious force guided the seedling from the dark earth up to the light, through leaf and stem and bud, to glorious fulfilment in the perfect flower?
  • My house is not resplendent with ivory and gold; nor is it adorned with marble arches, resting on graceful columns brought from the quarries of distant Africa.
  • I am too grateful for all these blessings to wish for more from princes, or from the gods.
  • My little Sabine farm is dear to me; for here I spend my happiest days, far from the noise and strife of the world.
  • Without a touch of remorse you drive the father from his land, clasping to his bosom his household gods and his half-naked children.
  • From the top of the hill where I stood I saw my army surging over a sunlit plain like angry breakers, and as they moved, I saw the green of fields, like the cool hollows between billows.
  • I would wake with a start or struggle frantically to escape from my tormentor.
  • At all events, I slipped down from the bed and nestled close to the fire which had not flickered out.
  • Man has invented, not only houses, but clothes and cooked food; and possibly from the accidental discovery of the warmth of fire, and the consequent use of it, at first a luxury, arose the present necessity to sit by it.
  • No doubt, many of my townsmen have met me returning from this enterprise, farmers starting for Boston in the twilight, or woodchoppers going to their work.
  • It is said that a flood-tide, with a westerly wind, and ice in the Neva, would sweep St. Petersburg from the face of the earth.
  • It is only the serious eye peering from and the sincere life passed within it which restrain laughter and consecrate the costume of any people.
  • From the cave we have advanced to roofs of palm leaves, of bark and boughs, of linen woven and stretched, of grass and straw, of boards and shingles, of stones and tiles.
  • When I think of the benefactors of the race, whom we have apotheosized as messengers from heaven, bearers of divine gifts to man, I do not see in my mind any retinue at their heels, any carload of fashionable furniture.
  • The best works of art are the expression of man's struggle to free himself from this condition, but the effect of our art is merely to make this low state comfortable and that higher state to be forgotten.
  • I walked about the outside, at first unobserved from within, the window was so deep and high.
  • Mrs. C. came to the door and asked me to view it from the inside.
  • At length, in the beginning of May, with the help of some of my acquaintances, rather to improve so good an occasion for neighborliness than from any necessity, I set up the frame of my house.
  • All very well perhaps from his point of view, but only a little better than the common dilettantism.
  • I do not mean that exactly, but I mean something which he might think a good deal like that; I mean that they should not play life, or study it merely, while the community supports them at this expensive game, but earnestly live it from beginning to end.
  • Our inventions are wont to be pretty toys, which distract our attention from serious things.
  • The dead and for the most part unmerchantable wood behind my house, and the driftwood from the pond, have supplied the remainder of my fuel.
  • It appears from the above estimate, that my food alone cost me in money about twenty-seven cents a week.
  • Pray, for what do we move ever but to get rid of our furniture, our exuviæ: at last to go from this world to another newly furnished, and leave this to be burned?
  • I look upon England today as an old gentleman who is travelling with a great deal of baggage, trumpery which has accumulated from long housekeeping, which he has not the courage to burn; great trunk, little trunk, bandbox, and bundle.
  • During this fast they abstain from the gratification of every appetite and passion whatever.
  • On the fourth morning, the high priest, by rubbing dry wood together, produces new fire in the public square, from whence every habitation in the town is supplied with the new and pure flame.
  • But I have since learned that trade curses everything it handles; and though you trade in messages from heaven, the whole curse of trade attaches to the business.
  • The laborer's day ends with the going down of the sun, and he is then free to devote himself to his chosen pursuit, independent of his labor; but his employer, who speculates from month to month, has no respite from one end of the year to the other.
  • The youth may build or plant or sail, only let him not be hindered from doing that which he tells me he would like to do.
  • Probably I should not consciously and deliberately forsake my particular calling to do the good which society demands of me, to save the universe from annihilation; and I believe that a like but infinitely greater steadfastness elsewhere is all that now preserves it.
  • There is no odor so bad as that which arises from goodness tainted.
  • I want the flower and fruit of a man; that some fragrance be wafted over from him to me, and some ripeness flavor our intercourse.
  • From what southern plains comes up the voice of wailing?
  • Wherever I sat, there I might live, and the landscape radiated from me accordingly.
  • I discovered many a site for a house not likely to be soon improved, which some might have thought too far from the village, but to my eyes the village was too far from it.
  • The upright white hewn studs and freshly planed door and window casings gave it a clean and airy look, especially in the morning, when its timbers were saturated with dew, so that I fancied that by noon some sweet gum would exude from them.
  • But in other directions, even from this point, I could not see over or beyond the woods which surrounded me.
  • Though the view from my door was still more contracted, I did not feel crowded or confined in the least.
  • Poetry and art, and the fairest and most memorable of the actions of men, date from such an hour.
  • The oldest Egyptian or Hindoo philosopher raised a corner of the veil from the statue of the divinity; and still the trembling robe remains raised, and I gaze upon as fresh a glory as he did, since it was I in him that was then so bold, and it is he in me that now reviews the vision.
  • But when the several nations of Europe had acquired distinct though rude written languages of their own, sufficient for the purposes of their rising literatures, then first learning revived, and scholars were enabled to discern from that remoteness the treasures of antiquity.
  • It may be translated into every language, and not only be read but actually breathed from all human lips;--not be represented on canvas or in marble only, but be carved out of the breath of life itself.
  • One who has just come from reading perhaps one of the best English books will find how many with whom he can converse about it?
  • Or suppose he comes from reading a Greek or Latin classic in the original, whose praises are familiar even to the so-called illiterate; he will find nobody at all to speak to, but must keep silence about it.
  • Alas! what with foddering the cattle and tending the store, we are kept from school too long, and our education is sadly neglected.
  • They were not time subtracted from my life, but so much over and above my usual allowance.
  • When my floor was dirty, I rose early, and, setting all my furniture out of doors on the grass, bed and bedstead making but one budget, dashed water on the floor, and sprinkled white sand from the pond on it, and then with a broom scrubbed it clean and white; and by the time the villagers had broken their fast the morning sun had dried my house sufficiently to allow me to move in again, and my meditations were almost uninterupted.
  • It was pleasant to see my whole household effects out on the grass, making a little pile like a gypsy's pack, and my three-legged table, from which I did not remove the books and pen and ink, standing amid the pines and hickories.
  • My house was on the side of a hill, immediately on the edge of the larger wood, in the midst of a young forest of pitch pines and hickories, and half a dozen rods from the pond, to which a narrow footpath led down the hill.
  • The whistle of the locomotive penetrates my woods summer and winter, sounding like the scream of a hawk sailing over some farmer's yard, informing me that many restless city merchants are arriving within the circle of the town, or adventurous country traders from the other side.
  • If the snow lies deep, they strap on his snowshoes, and, with the giant plow, plow a furrow from the mountains to the seaboard, in which the cars, like a following drill-barrow, sprinkle all the restless men and floating merchandise in the country for seed.
  • Here goes lumber from the Maine woods, which did not go out to sea in the last freshet, risen four dollars on the thousand because of what did go out or was split up; pine, spruce, cedar--first, second, third, and fourth qualities, so lately all of one quality, to wave over the bear, and moose, and caribou.
  • And hark! here comes the cattle-train bearing the cattle of a thousand hills, sheepcots, stables, and cow-yards in the air, drovers with their sticks, and shepherd boys in the midst of their flocks, all but the mountain pastures, whirled along like leaves blown from the mountains by the September gales.
  • But now one answers from far woods in a strain made really melodious by distance--Hoo hoo hoo, hoorer hoo; and indeed for the most part it suggested only pleasing associations, whether heard by day or night, summer or winter.
  • Even the sailor on the Atlantic and Pacific is awakened by his voice; but its shrill sound never roused me from my slumbers.
  • The bullfrogs trump to usher in the night, and the note of the whip-poor-will is borne on the rippling wind from over the water.
  • These small waves raised by the evening wind are as remote from storm as the smooth reflecting surface.
  • The thick wood is not just at our door, nor the pond, but somewhat is always clearing, familiar and worn by us, appropriated and fenced in some way, and reclaimed from Nature.
  • My nearest neighbor is a mile distant, and no house is visible from any place but the hill-tops within half a mile of my own.
  • In one heavy thunder-shower the lightning struck a large pitch pine across the pond, making a very conspicuous and perfectly regular spiral groove from top to bottom, an inch or more deep, and four or five inches wide, as you would groove a walking-stick.
  • What sort of space is that which separates a man from his fellows and makes him solitary?
  • God is alone--but the devil, he is far from being alone; he sees a great deal of company; he is legion.
  • One inconvenience I sometimes experienced in so small a house, the difficulty of getting to a sufficient distance from my guest when we began to utter the big thoughts in big words.
  • When the night arrived, to quote their own words--He laid us on the bed with himself and his wife, they at the one end and we at the other, it being only planks laid a foot from the ground and a thin mat upon them.
  • In this respect, my company was winnowed by my mere distance from town.
  • Half-witted men from the almshouse and elsewhere came to see me; but I endeavored to make them exercise all the wit they had, and make their confessions to me; in such cases making wit the theme of our conversation; and so was compensated.
  • It seemed that from such a basis of truth and frankness as the poor weak-headed pauper had laid, our intercourse might go forward to something better than the intercourse of sages.
  • Men who did not know when their visit had terminated, though I went about my business again, answering them from greater and greater remoteness.
  • Men of business, even farmers, thought only of solitude and employment, and of the great distance at which I dwelt from something or other; and though they said that they loved a ramble in the woods occasionally, it was obvious that they did not.
  • When I was four years old, as I well remember, I was brought from Boston to this my native town, through these very woods and this field, to the pond.
  • But this was not corn, and so it was safe from such enemies as he.
  • This was one of the great days; though the sky had from my clearing only the same everlastingly great look that it wears daily, and I saw no difference in it.
  • When they were growing, I used to hoe from five o'clock in the morning till noon, and commonly spent the rest of the day about other affairs.
  • This broad field which I have looked at so long looks not to me as the principal cultivator, but away from me to influences more genial to it, which water and make it green.
  • After hoeing, or perhaps reading and writing, in the forenoon, I usually bathed again in the pond, swimming across one of its coves for a stint, and washed the dust of labor from my person, or smoothed out the last wrinkle which study had made, and for the afternoon was absolutely free.
  • I hardly ever failed, when I rambled through the village, to see a row of such worthies, either sitting on a ladder sunning themselves, with their bodies inclined forward and their eyes glancing along the line this way and that, from time to time, with a voluptuous expression, or else leaning against a barn with their hands in their pockets, like caryatides, as if to prop it up.
  • For the most part I escaped wonderfully from these dangers, either by proceeding at once boldly and without deliberation to the goal, as is recommended to those who run the gauntlet, or by keeping my thoughts on high things, like Orpheus, who, "loudly singing the praises of the gods to his lyre, drowned the voices of the Sirens, and kept out of danger."
  • It was very pleasant, when I stayed late in town, to launch myself into the night, especially if it was dark and tempestuous, and set sail from some bright village parlor or lecture room, with a bag of rye or Indian meal upon my shoulder, for my snug harbor in the woods, having made all tight without and withdrawn under hatches with a merry crew of thoughts, leaving only my outer man at the helm, or even tying up the helm when it was plain sailing.
  • Sometimes, after staying in a village parlor till the family had all retired, I have returned to the woods, and, partly with a view to the next day's dinner, spent the hours of midnight fishing from a boat by moonlight, serenaded by owls and foxes, and hearing, from time to time, the creaking note of some unknown bird close at hand.
  • The surrounding hills rise abruptly from the water to the height of forty to eighty feet, though on the southeast and east they attain to about one hundred and one hundred and fifty feet respectively, within a quarter and a third of a mile.
  • But, looking directly down into our waters from a boat, they are seen to be of very different colors.
  • Walden is blue at one time and green at another, even from the same point of view.
  • Viewed from a hilltop it reflects the color of the sky; but near at hand it is of a yellowish tint next the shore where you can see the sand, then a light green, which gradually deepens to a uniform dark green in the body of the pond.
  • In some lights, viewed even from a hilltop, it is of a vivid green next the shore.
  • This is that portion, also, where in the spring, the ice being warmed by the heat of the sun reflected from the bottom, and also transmitted through the earth, melts first and forms a narrow canal about the still frozen middle.
  • It licks its chaps from time to time.
  • If the name was not derived from that of some English locality--Saffron Walden, for instance--one might suppose that it was called originally Walled-in Pond.
  • In the winter, all water which is exposed to the air is colder than springs and wells which are protected from it.
  • You may see from a boat, in calm weather, near the sandy eastern shore, where the water is eight or ten feet deep, and also in some other parts of the pond, some circular heaps half a dozen feet in diameter by a foot in height, consisting of small stones less than a hen's egg in size, where all around is bare sand.
  • The forest has never so good a setting, nor is so distinctly beautiful, as when seen from the middle of a small lake amid hills which rise from the water's edge; for the water in which it is reflected not only makes the best foreground in such a case, but, with its winding shore, the most natural and agreeable boundary to it.
  • There Nature has woven a natural selvage, and the eye rises by just gradations from the low shrubs of the shore to the highest trees.
  • From a hilltop you can see a fish leap in almost any part; for not a pickerel or shiner picks an insect from this smooth surface but it manifestly disturbs the equilibrium of the whole lake.
  • From a hilltop you can see a fish leap in almost any part; for not a pickerel or shiner picks an insect from this smooth surface but it manifestly disturbs the equilibrium of the whole lake.
  • It is wonderful with what elaborateness this simple fact is advertised--this piscine murder will out--and from my distant perch I distinguish the circling undulations when they are half a dozen rods in diameter.
  • It is continually receiving new life and motion from above.
  • The hills which form its shores are so steep, and the woods on them were then so high, that, as you looked down from the west end, it had the appearance of an amphitheatre for some land of sylvan spectacle.
  • I have said that Walden has no visible inlet nor outlet, but it is on the one hand distantly and indirectly related to Flint's Pond, which is more elevated, by a chain of small ponds coming from that quarter, and on the other directly and manifestly to Concord River, which is lower, by a similar chain of ponds through which in some other geological period it may have flowed, and by a little digging, which God forbid, it can be made to flow thither again.
  • Since the wood-cutters, and the railroad, and I myself have profaned Walden, perhaps the most attractive, if not the most beautiful, of all our lakes, the gem of the woods, is White Pond;--a poor name from its commonness, whether derived from the remarkable purity of its waters or the color of its sands.
  • Perhaps it might be called Yellow Pine Lake, from the following circumstance.
  • As near as he could remember, it stood twelve or fifteen rods from the shore, where the water was thirty or forty feet deep.
  • Instead of the white lily, which requires mud, or the common sweet flag, the blue flag (Iris versicolor) grows thinly in the pure water, rising from the stony bottom all around the shore, where it is visited by hummingbirds in June; and the color both of its bluish blades and its flowers and especially their reflections, is in singular harmony with the glaucous water.
  • She flourishes most alone, far from the towns where they reside.
  • The chickens, which had also taken shelter here from the rain, stalked about the room like members of the family, too humanized, methought, to roast well.
  • But the only true America is that country where you are at liberty to pursue such a mode of life as may enable you to do without these, and where the state does not endeavor to compel you to sustain the slavery and war and other superfluous expenses which directly or indirectly result from the use of such things.
  • Rise free from care before the dawn, and seek adventures.
  • Men come tamely home at night only from the next field or street, where their household echoes haunt, and their life pines because it breathes its own breath over again; their shadows, morning and evening, reach farther than their daily steps.
  • We should come home from far, from adventures, and perils, and discoveries every day, with new experience and character.
  • I have actually fished from the same kind of necessity that the first fishers did.
  • Such a one might make a good shepherd's dog, but is far from being the Good Shepherd.
  • Who has not sometimes derived an inexpressible satisfaction from his food in which appetite had no share?
  • Possibly we may withdraw from it, but never change its nature.
  • "That in which men differ from brute beasts," says Mencius, "is a thing very inconsiderable; the common herd lose it very soon; superior men preserve it carefully."
  • But the notes of the flute came home to his ears out of a different sphere from that he worked in, and suggested work for certain faculties which slumbered in him.
  • Sometimes I had a companion in my fishing, who came through the village to my house from the other side of the town, and the catching of the dinner was as much a social exercise as the eating of it.
  • Was that a farmer's noon horn which sounded from beyond the woods just now?
  • I have water from the spring, and a loaf of brown bread on the shelf.--Hark!
  • This event happened previous to the expulsion of the tyrant Christiern the Second from Sweden.
  • Once I was surprised to see a cat walking along the stony shore of the pond, for they rarely wander so far from home.
  • He led me at once to the widest part of the pond, and could not be driven from it.
  • How surprised must the fishes be to see this ungainly visitor from another sphere speeding his way amid their schools!
  • And gradually from week to week the character of each tree came out, and it admired itself reflected in the smooth mirror of the lake.
  • The wasps came by thousands to my lodge in October, as to winter quarters, and settled on my windows within and on the walls overhead, sometimes deterring visitors from entering.
  • Like the wasps, before I finally went into winter quarters in November, I used to resort to the northeast side of Walden, which the sun, reflected from the pitch pine woods and the stony shore, made the fireside of the pond; it is so much pleasanter and wholesomer to be warmed by the sun while you can be, than by an artificial fire.
  • Many of the villages of Mesopotamia are built of second-hand bricks of a very good quality, obtained from the ruins of Babylon, and the cement on them is older and probably harder still.
  • My dwelling was small, and I could hardly entertain an echo in it; but it seemed larger for being a single apartment and remote from neighbors.
  • All the attractions of a house were concentrated in one room; it was kitchen, chamber, parlor, and keeping-room; and whatever satisfaction parent or child, master or servant, derive from living in a house, I enjoyed it all.
  • As if only the savage dwelt near enough to Nature and Truth to borrow a trope from them.
  • I brought over some whiter and cleaner sand for this purpose from the opposite shore of the pond in a boat, a sort of conveyance which would have tempted me to go much farther if necessary.
  • In lathing I was pleased to be able to send home each nail with a single blow of the hammer, and it was my ambition to transfer the plaster from the board to the wall neatly and rapidly.
  • These bubbles are from an eightieth to an eighth of an inch in diameter, very clear and beautiful, and you see your face reflected in them through the ice.
  • It is now many years that men have resorted to the forest for fuel and the materials of the arts: the New Englander and the New Hollander, the Parisian and the Celt, the farmer and Robin Hood, Goody Blake and Harry Gill; in most parts of the world the prince and the peasant, the scholar and the savage, equally require still a few sticks from the forest to warm them and cook their food.
  • As for the axe, I was advised to get the village blacksmith to "jump" it; but I jumped him, and, putting a hickory helve from the woods into it, made it do.
  • Stumps thirty or forty years old, at least, will still be sound at the core, though the sapwood has all become vegetable mould, as appears by the scales of the thick bark forming a ring level with the earth four or five inches distant from the heart.
  • It would be easy to cut their threads any time with a little sharper blast from the north.
  • Where now firm open fields stretch from the village to the woods, it then ran through a maple swamp on a foundation of logs, the remnants of which, doubtless, still underlie the present dusty highway, from the Stratton, now the Alms-House Farm, to Brister's Hill.
  • Cato's half-obliterated cellar-hole still remains, though known to few, being concealed from the traveller by a fringe of pines.
  • Not long since I read his epitaph in the old Lincoln burying-ground, a little on one side, near the unmarked graves of some British grenadiers who fell in the retreat from Concord--where he is styled "Sippio Brister"--Scipio Africanus he had some title to be called--"a man of color," as if he were discolored.
  • He gazed into the cellar from all sides and points of view by turns, always lying down to it, as if there was some treasure, which he remembered, concealed between the stones, where there was absolutely nothing but a heap of bricks and ashes.
  • I had read of the potter's clay and wheel in Scripture, but it had never occurred to me that the pots we use were not such as had come down unbroken from those days, or grown on trees like gourds somewhere, and I was pleased to hear that so fictile an art was ever practiced in my neighborhood.
  • Deliver me from a city built on the site of a more ancient city, whose materials are ruins, whose gardens cemeteries.
  • When the farmers could not get to the woods and swamps with their teams, and were obliged to cut down the shade trees before their houses, and, when the crust was harder, cut off the trees in the swamps, ten feet from the ground, as it appeared the next spring.
  • Nor was it much better by the carriage road from Brister's Hill.
  • Sometimes, notwithstanding the snow, when I returned from my walk at evening I crossed the deep tracks of a woodchopper leading from my door, and found his pile of whittlings on the hearth, and my house filled with the odor of his pipe.
  • We waded so gently and reverently, or we pulled together so smoothly, that the fishes of thought were not scared from the stream, nor feared any angler on the bank, but came and went grandly, like the clouds which float through the western sky, and the mother-o'-pearl flocks which sometimes form and dissolve there.
  • There was one other with whom I had "solid seasons," long to be remembered, at his house in the village, and who looked in upon me from time to time; but I had no more for society there.
  • I often performed this duty of hospitality, waited long enough to milk a whole herd of cows, but did not see the man approaching from the town.
  • When the ponds were firmly frozen, they afforded not only new and shorter routes to many points, but new views from their surfaces of the familiar landscape around them.
  • They passed over the pond toward Fair Haven, seemingly deterred from settling by my light, their commodore honking all the while with a regular beat.
  • A little flock of these titmice came daily to pick a dinner out of my woodpile, or the crumbs at my door, with faint flitting lisping notes, like the tinkling of icicles in the grass, or else with sprightly day day day, or more rarely, in spring-like days, a wiry summery phe-be from the woodside.
  • Whichever side you walk in the woods the partridge bursts away on whirring wings, jarring the snow from the dry leaves and twigs on high, which comes sifting down in the sunbeams like golden dust, for this brave bird is not to be scared by winter.
  • It is frequently covered up by drifts, and, it is said, "sometimes plunges from on wing into the soft snow, where it remains concealed for a day or two."
  • And perhaps at evening I see the hunters returning with a single brush trailing from their sleigh for a trophy, seeking their inn.
  • Late in the afternoon, as he was resting in the thick woods south of Walden, he heard the voice of the hounds far over toward Fair Haven still pursuing the fox; and on they came, their hounding cry which made all the woods ring sounding nearer and nearer, now from Well Meadow, now from the Baker Farm.
  • One had her form under my house all winter, separated from me only by the flooring, and she startled me each morning by her hasty departure when I began to stir--thump, thump, thump, striking her head against the floor timbers in her hurry.
  • The night veils without doubt a part of this glorious creation; but day comes to reveal to us this great work, which extends from earth even into the plains of the ether.
  • He would perhaps have placed alder branches over the narrow holes in the ice, which were four or five rods apart and an equal distance from the shore, and having fastened the end of the line to a stick to prevent its being pulled through, have passed the slack line over a twig of the alder, a foot or more above the ice, and tied a dry oak leaf to it, which, being pulled down, would show when he had a bite.
  • A factory-owner, hearing what depth I had found, thought that it could not be true, for, judging from his acquaintance with dams, sand would not lie at so steep an angle.
  • No doubt many a smiling valley with its stretching cornfields occupies exactly such a "horrid chasm," from which the waters have receded, though it requires the insight and the far sight of the geologist to convince the unsuspecting inhabitants of this fact.
  • In order to see how nearly I could guess, with this experience, at the deepest point in a pond, by observing the outlines of a surface and the character of its shores alone, I made a plan of White Pond, which contains about forty-one acres, and, like this, has no island in it, nor any visible inlet or outlet; and as the line of greatest breadth fell very near the line of least breadth, where two opposite capes approached each other and two opposite bays receded, I ventured to mark a point a short distance from the latter line, but still on the line of greatest length, as the deepest.
  • Our notions of law and harmony are commonly confined to those instances which we detect; but the harmony which results from a far greater number of seemingly conflicting, but really concurring, laws, which we have not detected, is still more wonderful.
  • At one rod from the shore its greatest fluctuation, when observed by means of a level on land directed toward a graduated staff on the ice, was three quarters of an inch, though the ice appeared firmly attached to the shore.
  • When such holes freeze, and a rain succeeds, and finally a new freezing forms a fresh smooth ice over all, it is beautifully mottled internally by dark figures, shaped somewhat like a spider's web, what you may call ice rosettes, produced by the channels worn by the water flowing from all sides to a centre.
  • I did not know whether they had come to sow a crop of winter rye, or some other kind of grain recently introduced from Iceland.
  • To speak literally, a hundred Irishmen, with Yankee overseers, came from Cambridge every day to get out the ice.
  • Like the water, the Walden ice, seen near at hand, has a green tint, but at a distance is beautifully blue, and you can easily tell it from the white ice of the river, or the merely greenish ice of some ponds, a quarter of a mile off.
  • Sometimes one of those great cakes slips from the ice-man's sled into the village street, and lies there for a week like a great emerald, an object of interest to all passers.
  • I have noticed that a portion of Walden which in the state of water was green will often, when frozen, appear from the same point of view blue.
  • In the morning I bathe my intellect in the stupendous and cosmogonal philosophy of the Bhagvat-Geeta, since whose composition years of the gods have elapsed, and in comparison with which our modern world and its literature seem puny and trivial; and I doubt if that philosophy is not to be referred to a previous state of existence, so remote is its sublimity from our conceptions.
  • A thermometer thrust into the middle of Walden on the 6th of March, 1847, stood at 32º, or freezing point; near the shore at 33º; in the middle of Flint's Pond, the same day, at 32º; at a dozen rods from the shore, in shallow water, under ice a foot thick, at 36º.
  • When the warmer days come, they who dwell near the river hear the ice crack at night with a startling whoop as loud as artillery, as if its icy fetters were rent from end to end, and within a few days see it rapidly going out.
  • At length the sun's rays have attained the right angle, and warm winds blow up mist and rain and melt the snowbanks, and the sun, dispersing the mist, smiles on a checkered landscape of russet and white smoking with incense, through which the traveller picks his way from islet to islet, cheered by the music of a thousand tinkling rills and rivulets whose veins are filled with the blood of winter which they are bearing off.
  • The whole bank, which is from twenty to forty feet high, is sometimes overlaid with a mass of this kind of foliage, or sandy rupture, for a quarter of a mile on one or both sides, the produce of one spring day.
  • Thus, also, you pass from the lumpish grub in the earth to the airy and fluttering butterfly.
  • The fingers and toes flow to their extent from the thawing mass of the body.
  • The lip--labium, from labor (?)--laps or lapses from the sides of the cavernous mouth.
  • The cheeks are a slide from the brows into the valley of the face, opposed and diffused by the cheek bones.
  • Fresh curls spring from the baldest brow.
  • Its throes will heave our exuviae from their graves.
  • The faint silvery warblings were heard over the partially bare and moist fields from the bluebird, the song sparrow, and the red-wing, as if the last flakes of winter tinkled as they fell!
  • It is almost identical with that, for in the growing days of June, when the rills are dry, the grass-blades are their channels, and from year to year the herds drink at this perennial green stream, and the mower draws from it betimes their winter supply.
  • A great field of ice has cracked off from the main body.
  • I hear a song sparrow singing from the bushes on the shore,--olit, olit, olit,--chip, chip, chip, che char,--che wiss, wiss, wiss.
  • It is glorious to behold this ribbon of water sparkling in the sun, the bare face of the pond full of glee and youth, as if it spoke the joy of the fishes within it, and of the sands on its shore.
  • The change from storm and winter to serene and mild weather, from dark and sluggish hours to bright and elastic ones, is a memorable crisis which all things proclaim.
  • As it grew darker, I was startled by the honking of geese flying low over the woods, like weary travellers getting in late from Southern lakes, and indulging at last in unrestrained complaint and mutual consolation.
  • But when I stood on the shore they at once rose up with a great flapping of wings at the signal of their commander, and when they had got into rank circled about over my head, twenty-nine of them, and then steered straight to Canada, with a regular honk from the leader at intervals, trusting to break their fast in muddier pools.
  • In like manner the evil which one does in the interval of a day prevents the germs of virtues which began to spring up again from developing themselves and destroys them.
  • As soon as the breath of evening does not suffice longer to preserve them, then the nature of man does not differ much from that of the brute.
  • England and France, Spain and Portugal, Gold Coast and Slave Coast, all front on this private sea; but no bark from them has ventured out of sight of land, though it is without doubt the direct way to India.
  • I had not lived there a week before my feet wore a path from my door to the pond-side; and though it is five or six years since I trod it, it is still quite distinct.
  • You are defended from being a trifler.
  • Often, in the repose of my mid-day, there reaches my ears a confused tintinnabulum from without.
  • I sat at a table where were rich food and wine in abundance, and obsequious attendance, but sincerity and truth were not; and I went away hungry from the inhospitable board.
  • If I have unjustly wrested a plank from a drowning man, I must restore it to him though I drown myself.
  • But no: I find that the respectable man, so called, has immediately drifted from his position, and despairs of his country, when his country has more reason to despair of him.
  • After the first blush of sin comes its indifference; and from immoral it becomes, as it were, unmoral, and not quite unnecessary to that life which we have made.
  • And have not the same reasons prevented the State from resisting the Union, which have prevented them from resisting the State?
  • Action from principle--the perception and the performance of right--changes things and relations; it is essentially revolutionary, and does not consist wholly with anything which was.
  • It not only divides states and churches, it divides families; ay, it divides the individual, separating the diabolical in him from the divine.
  • I do not hesitate to say, that those who call themselves Abolitionists should at once effectually withdraw their support, both in person and property, from the government of Massachusetts, and not wait till they constitute a majority of one, before they suffer the right to prevail through them.
  • Thus his moral ground is taken from under his feet.
  • If I had known how to name them, I should then have signed off in detail from all the societies which I never signed on to; but I did not know where to find a complete list.
  • I saw that the State was half-witted, that it was timid as a lone woman with her silver spoons, and that it did not know its friends from its foes, and I lost all my remaining respect for it, and pitied it.
  • My neighbors did not thus salute me, but first looked at me, and then at one another, as if I had returned from a long journey.
  • I simply wish to refuse allegiance to the State, to withdraw and stand aloof from it effectually.
  • If they pay the tax from a mistaken interest in the individual taxed, to save his property, or prevent his going to jail, it is because they have not considered wisely how far they let their private feelings interfere with the public good.
  • Associations formed elsewhere, springing from a feeling of humanity, or any other cause, have nothing whatever to do with it.
  • They have never received any encouragement from me, and they never will.
  • "Charming!" whispered the little princess, sticking the needle into her work as if to testify that the interest and fascination of the story prevented her from going on with it.
  • Everything about him, from his weary, bored expression to his quiet, measured step, offered a most striking contrast to his quiet, little wife.
  • He turned away from her with a grimace that distorted his handsome face, kissed Anna Pavlovna's hand, and screwing up his eyes scanned the whole company.
  • Pierre, who from the moment Prince Andrew entered the room had watched him with glad, affectionate eyes, now came up and took his arm.
  • This is what I expected from you--I knew your kindness!
  • "From what I have heard," said Pierre, blushing and breaking into the conversation, "almost all the aristocracy has already gone over to Bonaparte's side."
  • Pierre reaching the house first went into Prince Andrew's study like one quite at home, and from habit immediately lay down on the sofa, took from the shelf the first book that came to his hand (it was Caesar's Commentaries), and resting on his elbow, began reading it in the middle.
  • Pierre removed his feet from the sofa.
  • Everything from the table napkins to the silver, china, and glass bore that imprint of newness found in the households of the newly married.
  • From the third room came sounds of laughter, the shouting of familiar voices, the growling of a bear, and general commotion.
  • Another voice, from a man of medium height with clear blue eyes, particularly striking among all these drunken voices by its sober ring, cried from the window: "Come here; part the bets!"
  • A bottle here, said Anatole, taking a glass from the table he went up to Pierre.
  • Pierre drank one glass after another, looking from under his brows at the tipsy guests who were again crowding round the window, and listening to their chatter.
  • The window frame which prevented anyone from sitting on the outer sill was being forced out by two footmen, who were evidently flurried and intimidated by the directions and shouts of the gentlemen around.
  • Fifty imperials... that I will drink a whole bottle of rum without taking it from my mouth, sitting outside the window on this spot" (he stooped and pointed to the sloping ledge outside the window) "and without holding on to anything.
  • Oh! he muttered, looking down from the window at the stones of the pavement.
  • "Shut up!" cried Dolokhov, pushing him away from the window.
  • Dolokhov's back in his white shirt, and his curly head, were lit up from both sides.
  • One of the footmen who had stooped to pick up some broken glass remained in that position without taking his eyes from the window and from Dolokhov's back.
  • Pierre hid his face, from which a faint smile forgot to fade though his features now expressed horror and fear.
  • Pierre took his hands from his eyes.
  • One hand moved as if to clutch the window sill, but refrained from touching it.
  • Devil take you! came from different sides.
  • And he caught the bear, took it in his arms, lifted it from the ground, and began dancing round the room with it.
  • A languor of motion and speech, resulting from weakness, gave her a distinguished air which inspired respect.
  • The countess reflected a moment and took a pinch from a gold snuffbox with her husband's portrait on it.
  • "Why do you say this young man is so rich?" asked the countess, turning away from the girls, who at once assumed an air of inattention.
  • The count jumped up and, swaying from side to side, spread his arms wide and threw them round the little girl who had run in.
  • Escaping from her father she ran to hide her flushed face in the lace of her mother's mantilla--not paying the least attention to her severe remark--and began to laugh.
  • Natasha, raising her face for a moment from her mother's mantilla, glanced up at her through tears of laughter, and again hid her face.
  • The two young men, the student and the officer, friends from childhood, were of the same age and both handsome fellows, though not alike.
  • This Buonaparte has turned all their heads; they all think of how he rose from an ensign and became Emperor.
  • Boris paused in the middle of the room, looked round, brushed a little dust from the sleeve of his uniform, and going up to a mirror examined his handsome face.
  • Natasha, very still, peered out from her ambush, waiting to see what he would do.
  • Would you like to kiss me? she whispered almost inaudibly, glancing up at him from under her brows, smiling, and almost crying from excitement.
  • The countess wished to have a tête-à-tête talk with the friend of her childhood, Princess Anna Mikhaylovna, whom she had not seen properly since she returned from Petersburg.
  • "You have a room of your own," and she took the inkstand from Nicholas.
  • "My dear Boris," said the mother, drawing her hand from beneath her old mantle and laying it timidly and tenderly on her son's arm, "be affectionate and attentive to him.
  • "Princess Drubetskaya to see Prince Vasili Sergeevich," he called to a footman dressed in knee breeches, shoes, and a swallow-tail coat, who ran downstairs and looked over from the halfway landing.
  • They entered the large hall, from which one of the doors led to the apartments assigned to Prince Vasili.
  • She drew her wool down through the canvas and, scarcely able to refrain from laughing, stooped as if trying to make out the pattern.
  • For a long time Pierre could not understand, but when he did, he jumped up from the sofa, seized Boris under the elbow in his quick, clumsy way, and, blushing far more than Boris, began to speak with a feeling of mingled shame and vexation.
  • And Boris, having apparently relieved himself of an onerous duty and extricated himself from an awkward situation and placed another in it, became quite pleasant again.
  • "Adieu, ma bonne," answered Prince Vasili turning away from her.
  • When Anna Mikhaylovna returned from Count Bezukhov's the money, all in clean notes, was lying ready under a handkerchief on the countess' little table, and Anna Mikhaylovna noticed that something was agitating her.
  • "Annette, for heaven's sake don't refuse me," the countess began, with a blush that looked very strange on her thin, dignified, elderly face, and she took the money from under the handkerchief.
  • This is for Boris from me, for his outfit.
  • From time to time he went out to ask: "Hasn't she come yet?"
  • The latter, a fresh, rosy officer of the Guards, irreproachably washed, brushed, and buttoned, held his pipe in the middle of his mouth and with red lips gently inhaled the smoke, letting it escape from his handsome mouth in rings.
  • "Marya Dmitrievna?" came her voice from there.
  • She took a pair of pear-shaped ruby earrings from her huge reticule and, having given them to the rosy Natasha, who beamed with the pleasure of her saint's-day fete, turned away at once and addressed herself to Pierre.
  • She turned away and gave her hand to the count, who could hardly keep from laughing.
  • From behind the crystal decanters and fruit vases, the count kept glancing at his wife and her tall cap with its light-blue ribbons, and busily filled his neighbors' glasses, not neglecting his own.
  • The countess in turn, without omitting her duties as hostess, threw significant glances from behind the pineapples at her husband whose face and bald head seemed by their redness to contrast more than usual with his gray hair.
  • These latter the butler thrust mysteriously forward, wrapped in a napkin, from behind the next man's shoulders and whispered: "Dry Madeira"...
  • Nicholas sat at some distance from Sonya, beside Julie Karagina, to whom he was again talking with the same involuntary smile.
  • Then with the unerring official memory that characterized him he repeated from the opening words of the manifesto:
  • Marya Dmitrievna's deep voice suddenly inquired from the other end of the table.
  • The count, holding his cards fanwise, kept himself with difficulty from dropping into his usual after-dinner nap, and laughed at everything.
  • "Really, truly!" answered Natasha, pushing in a crisp lock that had strayed from under her friend's plaits.
  • He had not finished the last verse before the young people began to get ready to dance in the large hall, and the sound of the feet and the coughing of the musicians were heard from the gallery.
  • Everyone stood up respectfully when the Military Governor, having stayed about half an hour alone with the dying man, passed out, slightly acknowledging their bows and trying to escape as quickly as possible from the glances fixed on him by the doctors, clergy, and relatives of the family.
  • The second princess had just come from the sickroom with her eyes red from weeping and sat down beside Dr. Lorrain, who was sitting in a graceful pose under a portrait of Catherine, leaning his elbow on a table.
  • While he was getting down from the carriage steps two men, who looked like tradespeople, ran hurriedly from the entrance and hid in the shadow of the wall.
  • I have loved you like a son from the first.
  • From the passage they went into a large, dimly lit room adjoining the count's reception room.
  • Anna Mikhaylovna with just the same movement raised her shoulders and eyes, almost closing the latter, sighed, and moved away from the doctor to Pierre.
  • Pierre's mind was in such a confused state that the word "stroke" suggested to him a blow from something.
  • Anna Mikhaylovna stepped forward and, stooping over the dying man, beckoned to Lorrain from behind her back.
  • Catch hold from underneath.
  • "But, my dear princess," answered Anna Mikhaylovna blandly but impressively, blocking the way to the bedroom and preventing the other from passing, "won't this be too much for poor Uncle at a moment when he needs repose?
  • "Vile woman!" shouted the princess, darting unexpectedly at Anna Mikhaylovna and snatching the portfolio from her.
  • And bursting into tears she hid her face in her handkerchief and rushed from the room.
  • Though in the new reign he was free to return to the capitals, he still continued to live in the country, remarking that anyone who wanted to see him could come the hundred miles from Moscow to Bald Hills, while he himself needed no one and nothing.
  • With those about him, from his daughter to his serfs, the prince was sharp and invariably exacting, so that without being a hardhearted man he inspired such fear and respect as few hardhearted men would have aroused.
  • After a few more turns of the lathe he removed his foot from the pedal, wiped his chisel, dropped it into a leather pouch attached to the lathe, and, approaching the table, summoned his daughter.
  • "For tomorrow!" said he, quickly finding the page and making a scratch from one paragraph to another with his hard nail.
  • "Wait a bit, here's a letter for you," said the old man suddenly, taking a letter addressed in a woman's hand from a bag hanging above the table, onto which he threw it.
  • "Yes, it's from Julie," replied the princess with a timid glance and a timid smile.
  • She turned to go, but he stopped her with a gesture and took an uncut book from the high desk.
  • My father has not spoken to me of a suitor, but has only told me that he has received a letter and is expecting a visit from Prince Vasili.
  • I have had a letter from my brother, who announces his speedy arrival at Bald Hills with his wife.
  • It was a convoy of conscripts enrolled from our people and starting to join the army.
  • From the far side of the house through the closed doors came the sound of difficult passages--twenty times repeated--of a sonata by Dussek.
  • Before they reached the room from which the sounds of the clavichord came, the pretty, fair haired Frenchwoman, Mademoiselle Bourienne, rushed out apparently beside herself with delight.
  • They went up to the door of the sitting room from which came the sound of the oft-repeated passage of the sonata.
  • The old man made a departure from his usual routine in honor of his son's arrival: he gave orders to admit him to his apartments while he dressed for dinner.
  • You know me: I am busy from morning till night and abstemious, so of course I am well.
  • What about Austria? said he, rising from his chair and pacing up and down the room followed by Tikhon, who ran after him, handing him different articles of clothing.
  • Prince Andrew, seeing that his father insisted, began--at first reluctantly, but gradually with more and more animation, and from habit changing unconsciously from Russian to French as he went on--to explain the plan of operation for the coming campaign.
  • He explained how an army, ninety thousand strong, was to threaten Prussia so as to bring her out of her neutrality and draw her into the war; how part of that army was to join some Swedish forces at Stralsund; how two hundred and twenty thousand Austrians, with a hundred thousand Russians, were to operate in Italy and on the Rhine; how fifty thousand Russians and as many English were to land at Naples, and how a total force of five hundred thousand men was to attack the French from different sides.
  • The head butler, napkin on arm, was scanning the setting of the table, making signs to the footmen, and anxiously glancing from the clock to the door by which the prince was to enter.
  • Princess Mary could not understand the boldness of her brother's criticism and was about to reply, when the expected footsteps were heard coming from the study.
  • At that moment the great clock struck two and another with a shrill tone joined in from the drawing room.
  • The prince stood still; his lively glittering eyes from under their thick, bushy eyebrows sternly scanned all present and rested on the little princess.
  • He asked about mutual acquaintances, and she became still more animated and chattered away giving him greetings from various people and retelling the town gossip.
  • "The past always seems good," said he, "but did not Suvorov himself fall into a trap Moreau set him, and from which he did not know how to escape?"
  • He listened, refraining from a reply, and involuntarily wondered how this old man, living alone in the country for so many years, could know and discuss so minutely and acutely all the recent European military and political events.
  • Only those things he always kept with him remained in his room; a small box, a large canteen fitted with silver plate, two Turkish pistols and a saber--a present from his father who had brought it from the siege of Ochakov.
  • With his hands behind him he paced briskly from corner to corner of the room, looking straight before him and thoughtfully shaking his head.
  • Rays of gentle light shone from her large, timid eyes.
  • This very sentence about Countess Zubova and this same laugh Prince Andrew had already heard from his wife in the presence of others some five times.
  • "I also wanted to ask you," continued Prince Andrew, "if I'm killed and if I have a son, do not let him be taken away from you--as I said yesterday... let him grow up with you....
  • From the study, like pistol shots, came the frequent sound of the old man angrily blowing his nose.
  • On October 11, 1805, one of the infantry regiments that had just reached Braunau had halted half a mile from the town, waiting to be inspected by the commander-in-chief.
  • The commander of the regiment was an elderly, choleric, stout, and thick-set general with grizzled eyebrows and whiskers, and wider from chest to back than across the shoulders.
  • A member of the Hofkriegsrath from Vienna had come to Kutuzov the day before with proposals and demands for him to join up with the army of the Archduke Ferdinand and Mack, and Kutuzov, not considering this junction advisable, meant, among other arguments in support of his view, to show the Austrian general the wretched state in which the troops arrived from Russia.
  • The regimental commander walked with his jerky steps to the front of the regiment and examined it from a distance.
  • When the eager but misrepeated words had reached their destination in a cry of: "The general to the third company," the missing officer appeared from behind his company and, though he was a middle-aged man and not in the habit of running, trotted awkwardly stumbling on his toes toward the general.
  • Kutuzov and the Austrian general were talking in low voices and Kutuzov smiled slightly as treading heavily he stepped down from the carriage just as if those two thousand men breathlessly gazing at him and the regimental commander did not exist.
  • Nesvitski could hardly keep from laughter provoked by a swarthy hussar officer who walked beside him.
  • Kutuzov walked slowly and languidly past thousands of eyes which were starting from their sockets to watch their chief.
  • "We all have our weaknesses," said Kutuzov smiling and walking away from him.
  • Prince Andrew stepped forward from among the suite and said in French:
  • The shapely figure of the fair-haired soldier, with his clear blue eyes, stepped forward from the ranks, went up to the commander in chief, and presented arms.
  • "A cup of vodka for the men from me," he added so that the soldiers could hear.
  • And from the different ranks some twenty men ran to the front.
  • In the second file from the right flank, beside which the carriage passed the company, a blue- eyed soldier involuntarily attracted notice.
  • The hussar cornet of Kutuzov's suite who had mimicked the regimental commander, fell back from the carriage and rode up to Dolokhov.
  • "She let the hawk fly upward from her wide right sleeve," went the song, arousing an involuntary sensation of courage and cheerfulness.
  • Zherkov touched his horse with the spurs; it pranced excitedly from foot to foot uncertain with which to start, then settled down, galloped past the company, and overtook the carriage, still keeping time to the song.
  • On returning from the review, Kutuzov took the Austrian general into his private room and, calling his adjutant, asked for some papers relating to the condition of the troops on their arrival, and the letters that had come from the Archduke Ferdinand, who was in command of the advanced army.
  • And, in fact, the last letter he had received from Mack's army informed him of a victory and stated strategically the position of the army was very favorable.
  • Look here, my dear fellow, get from Kozlovski all the reports from our scouts.
  • Here are two letters from Count Nostitz and here is one from His Highness the Archduke Ferdinand and here are these," he said, handing him several papers, "make a neat memorandum in French out of all this, showing all the news we have had of the movements of the Austrian army, and then give it to his excellency."
  • From Vienna Kutuzov wrote to his old comrade, Prince Andrew's father.
  • Some, a minority, acknowledged him to be different from themselves and from everyone else, expected great things of him, listened to him, admired, and imitated him, and with them Prince Andrew was natural and pleasant.
  • Any news from Mack?
  • The general with the bandaged head bent forward as though running away from some danger, and, making long, quick strides with his thin legs, went up to Kutuzov.
  • The Pavlograd Hussars were stationed two miles from Braunau.
  • His landlord, who in a waistcoat and a pointed cap, pitchfork in hand, was clearing manure from the cowhouse, looked out, and his face immediately brightened on seeing Rostov.
  • They plucked me last night, came Denisov's voice from the next room.
  • The lieutenant never looked the man he was speaking to straight in the face; his eyes continually wandered from one object to another.
  • "Don't like bowwowing from my own fellows, I don't," growled Denisov.
  • And Denisov went to the bed to get the purse from under the pillow.
  • The headquarters were situated two miles away from Salzeneck, and Rostov, without returning home, took a horse and rode there.
  • "Well, young man?" he said with a sigh, and from under his lifted brows he glanced into Rostov's eyes.
  • As soon as Rostov heard them, an enormous load of doubt fell from him.
  • Every muscle of Telyanin's pale, terrified face began to quiver, his eyes still shifted from side to side but with a downward look not rising to Rostov's face, and his sobs were audible.
  • And the staff captain rose and turned away from Rostov.
  • No one shall hear a word from me," said Rostov in an imploring voice, "but I can't apologize, by God I can't, do what you will!
  • On the opposite side the enemy could be seen by the naked eye, and from their battery a milk-white cloud arose.
  • In a moment the men came running gaily from their campfires and began loading.
  • At the same instant the sun came fully out from behind the clouds, and the clear sound of the solitary shot and the brilliance of the bright sunshine merged in a single joyous and spirited impression.
  • Halfway across stood Prince Nesvitski, who had alighted from his horse and whose big body was jammed against the railings.
  • Sometimes through the monotonous waves of men, like a fleck of white foam on the waves of the Enns, an officer, in a cloak and with a type of face different from that of the men, squeezed his way along; sometimes like a chip of wood whirling in the river, an hussar on foot, an orderly, or a townsman was carried through the waves of infantry; and sometimes like a log floating down the river, an officers' or company's baggage wagon, piled high, leather covered, and hemmed in on all sides, moved across the bridge.
  • See, here's an officer jammed in too-- different voices were saying in the crowd, as the men looked at one another, and all pressed toward the exit from the bridge.
  • "Nesvitski, Nesvitski! you numskull!" came a hoarse voice from behind him.
  • "The squadwon can't pass," shouted Vaska Denisov, showing his white teeth fiercely and spurring his black thoroughbred Arab, which twitched its ears as the bayonets touched it, and snorted, spurting white foam from his bit, tramping the planks of the bridge with his hoofs, and apparently ready to jump over the railings had his rider let him.
  • I'll hack you with my saber! he shouted, actually drawing his saber from its scabbard and flourishing it.
  • It was calm, and at intervals the bugle calls and the shouts of the enemy could be heard from the hill.
  • Every face, from Denisov's to that of the bugler, showed one common expression of conflict, irritation, and excitement, around chin and mouth.
  • After his dismissal from headquarters Zherkov had not remained in the regiment, saying he was not such a fool as to slave at the front when he could get more rewards by doing nothing on the staff, and had succeeded in attaching himself as an orderly officer to Prince Bagration.
  • He now came to his former chief with an order from the commander of the rear guard.
  • These were the questions each man of the troops on the high ground above the bridge involuntarily asked himself with a sinking heart--watching the bridge and the hussars in the bright evening light and the blue tunics advancing from the other side with their bayonets and guns.
  • The hussars ran back to the men who held their horses; their voices sounded louder and calmer, the stretchers disappeared from sight.
  • And Denisov rode up to a group that had stopped near Rostov, composed of the colonel, Nesvitski, Zherkov, and the officer from the suite.
  • Austrian troops that had escaped capture at Ulm and had joined Kutuzov at Braunau now separated from the Russian army, and Kutuzov was left with only his own weak and exhausted forces.
  • Despite his apparently delicate build Prince Andrew could endure physical fatigue far better than many very muscular men, and on the night of the battle, having arrived at Krems excited but not weary, with dispatches from Dokhturov to Kutuzov, he was sent immediately with a special dispatch to Brunn.
  • "Away from the smell of powder, they probably think it easy to gain victories!" he thought.
  • "From General Field Marshal Kutuzov?" he asked.
  • These sayings were prepared in the inner laboratory of his mind in a portable form as if intentionally, so that insignificant society people might carry them from drawing room to drawing room.
  • From politeness and to start conversation, they asked him a few questions about the army and the battle, and then the talk went off into merry jests and gossip.
  • Besides, unless His Majesty the Emperor derogates from the principle of our alliance...
  • From where to where, Your Majesty?
  • From Durrenstein to Krems.
  • But where do you come from not to know what every coachman in the town knows?
  • I come from the archduchess'.
  • And in proof of the conclusiveness of his opinion all the wrinkles vanished from his face.
  • Prince Andrew took a horse and a Cossack from a Cossack commander, and hungry and weary, making his way past the baggage wagons, rode in search of the commander-in-chief and of his own luggage.
  • All along the sides of the road fallen horses were to be seen, some flayed, some not, and broken-down carts beside which solitary soldiers sat waiting for something, and again soldiers straggling from their companies, crowds of whom set off to the neighboring villages, or returned from them dragging sheep, fowls, hay, and bulging sacks.
  • Seeing Prince Andrew she leaned out from behind the apron and, waving her thin arms from under the woolen shawl, cried:
  • Prince Andrew moved toward the door from whence voices were heard.
  • Prince Andrew glanced at Kutuzov's face only a foot distant from him and involuntarily noticed the carefully washed seams of the scar near his temple, where an Ismail bullet had pierced his skull, and the empty eye socket.
  • The spy reported that the French, after crossing the bridge at Vienna, were advancing in immense force upon Kutuzov's line of communication with the troops that were arriving from Russia.
  • If Kutuzov decided to retreat along the road from Krems to Olmutz, to unite with the troops arriving from Russia, he risked being forestalled on that road by the French who had crossed the Vienna bridge, and encumbered by his baggage and transport, having to accept battle on the march against an enemy three times as strong, who would hem him in from two sides.
  • The night he received the news, Kutuzov sent Bagration's vanguard, four thousand strong, to the right across the hills from the Krems-Znaim to the Vienna-Znaim road.
  • To be able to crush it absolutely he awaited the arrival of the rest of the troops who were on their way from Vienna, and with this object offered a three days' truce on condition that both armies should remain in position without moving.
  • A truce was Kutuzov's sole chance of gaining time, giving Bagration's exhausted troops some rest, and letting the transport and heavy convoys (whose movements were concealed from the French) advance if but one stage nearer Znaim.
  • On all sides they saw rain-soaked officers with dejected faces who seemed to be seeking something, and soldiers dragging doors, benches, and fencing from the village.
  • Prince Andrew smiled involuntarily as he looked at the artillery officer Tushin, who silent and smiling, shifting from one stockinged foot to the other, glanced inquiringly with his large, intelligent, kindly eyes from Prince Andrew to the staff officer.
  • Several battalions of soldiers, in their shirt sleeves despite the cold wind, swarmed in these earthworks like a host of white ants; spadefuls of red clay were continually being thrown up from behind the bank by unseen hands.
  • Just behind it they came upon some dozens of soldiers, continually replaced by others, who ran from the entrenchment.
  • They had to hold their noses and put their horses to a trot to escape from the poisoned atmosphere of these latrines.
  • From there the French could already be seen.
  • You can see everything from there; let's go there, Prince.
  • The soldiers lifted the canteen lids to their lips with reverential faces, emptied them, rolling the vodka in their mouths, and walked away from the sergeant major with brightened expressions, licking their lips and wiping them on the sleeves of their greatcoats.
  • After passing a chasseur regiment and in the lines of the Kiev grenadiers--fine fellows busy with similar peaceful affairs--near the shelter of the regimental commander, higher than and different from the others, Prince Andrew came out in front of a platoon of grenadiers before whom lay a naked man.
  • A young officer with a bewildered and pained expression on his face stepped away from the man and looked round inquiringly at the adjutant as he rode by.
  • Dolokhov had come from the left flank where their regiment was stationed, with his captain.
  • Ouh! ouh! came peals of such healthy and good-humored laughter from the soldiers that it infected the French involuntarily, so much so that the only thing left to do seemed to be to unload the muskets, explode the ammunition, and all return home as quickly as possible.
  • Having ridden round the whole line from right flank to left, Prince Andrew made his way up to the battery from which the staff officer had told him the whole field could be seen.
  • It was true that a view over nearly the whole Russian position and the greater part of the enemy's opened out from this battery.
  • To the left from that village, amid the smoke, was something resembling a battery, but it was impossible to see it clearly with the naked eye.
  • He imagined only important possibilities: "If the enemy attacks the right flank," he said to himself, "the Kiev grenadiers and the Podolsk chasseurs must hold their position till reserves from the center come up.
  • Suddenly, however, he was struck by a voice coming from the shed, and its tone was so sincere that he could not but listen.
  • Mounting his horse again Prince Andrew lingered with the battery, looking at the puff from the gun that had sent the ball.
  • From the bottom of the slope, where the parleys had taken place, came the report of musketry.
  • As he approached, a ringing shot issued from it deafening him and his suite, and in the smoke that suddenly surrounded the gun they could see the gunners who had seized it straining to roll it quickly back to its former position.
  • Prince Bagration ordered two battalions from the center to be sent to reinforce the right flank.
  • "Please, your excellency, for God's sake!" he kept saying, glancing for support at an officer of the suite who turned away from him.
  • While he was speaking, the curtain of smoke that had concealed the hollow, driven by a rising wind, began to move from right to left as if drawn by an invisible hand, and the hill opposite, with the French moving about on it, opened out before them.
  • One could already see the soldiers' shaggy caps, distinguish the officers from the men, and see the standard flapping against its staff.
  • "Glad to do our best, your ex'len-lency!" came a confused shout from the ranks.
  • The head of the French column, with its officers leading, appeared from below the hill.
  • Suddenly one shot after another rang out from the French, smoke appeared all along their uneven ranks, and musket shots sounded.
  • Zherkov, not removing his hand from his cap, turned his horse about and galloped off.
  • From privates to general they were not expecting a battle and were engaged in peaceful occupations, the cavalry feeding the horses and the infantry collecting wood.
  • They were cut off from the line of retreat on the left by the French.
  • The command to form up rang out and the sabers whizzed as they were drawn from their scabbards.
  • "If only they would be quick!" thought Rostov, feeling that at last the time had come to experience the joy of an attack of which he had so often heard from his fellow hussars.
  • From behind him Bondarchuk, an hussar he knew, jolted against him and looked angrily at him.
  • Blood was flowing from his head; he struggled but could not rise.
  • For more than ten seconds he stood not moving from the spot or realizing the situation.
  • He did not now run with the feeling of doubt and conflict with which he had trodden the Enns bridge, but with the feeling of a hare fleeing from the hounds.
  • But at that moment the French who were attacking, suddenly and without any apparent reason, ran back and disappeared from the outskirts, and Russian sharpshooters showed themselves in the copse.
  • Dolokhov breathed heavily from weariness and spoke in abrupt sentences.
  • The horses were replaced by others from a reserve gun carriage, the wounded were carried away, and the four guns were turned against the ten-gun battery.
  • Little Tushin, moving feebly and awkwardly, kept telling his orderly to "refill my pipe for that one!" and then, scattering sparks from it, ran forward shading his eyes with his small hand to look at the French.
  • Amid the smoke, deafened by the incessant reports which always made him jump, Tushin not taking his pipe from his mouth ran from gun to gun, now aiming, now counting the charges, now giving orders about replacing dead or wounded horses and harnessing fresh ones, and shouting in his feeble voice, so high pitched and irresolute.
  • Only when a man was killed or wounded did he frown and turn away from the sight, shouting angrily at the men who, as is always the case, hesitated about lifting the injured or dead.
  • The enemy's guns were in his fancy not guns but pipes from which occasional puffs were blown by an invisible smoker.
  • "Now then, Matvevna, dear old lady, don't let me down!" he was saying as he moved from the gun, when a strange, unfamiliar voice called above his head: "Captain Tushin!
  • All to retire! he shouted from a distance.
  • Blood was gushing from its leg as from a spring.
  • He decided to have the guns removed from their positions and withdrawn in his presence.
  • Together with Tushin, stepping across the bodies and under a terrible fire from the French, he attended to the removal of the guns.
  • He was placed on "Matvevna," the gun from which they had removed the dead officer.
  • Did he thank us? came eager questions from all sides.
  • From pain, cold, and damp, a feverish shivering shook his whole body.
  • From all sides were heard the footsteps and talk of the infantry, who were walking, driving past, and settling down all around.
  • They were quarreling and fighting desperately, each trying to snatch from the other a boot they were both holding on to.
  • Tushin rose and, buttoning his greatcoat and pulling it straight, walked away from the fire.
  • He had not seen the hussars all that day, but had heard about them from an infantry officer.
  • Tushin appeared at the threshold and made his way timidly from behind the backs of the generals.
  • You might have taken some from the covering troops.
  • Prince Andrew looked at Tushin from under his brows and his fingers twitched nervously.
  • He tried to get away from them, but they would not for an instant let his shoulder move a hair's breadth.
  • Schemes and devices for which he never rightly accounted to himself, but which formed the whole interest of his life, were constantly shaping themselves in his mind, arising from the circumstances and persons he met.
  • Pierre, on unexpectedly becoming Count Bezukhov and a rich man, felt himself after his recent loneliness and freedom from cares so beset and preoccupied that only in bed was he able to be by himself.
  • She could not refrain from weeping at these words.
  • From that day the eldest princess quite changed toward Pierre and began knitting a striped scarf for him.
  • From the death of Count Bezukhov he did not let go his hold of the lad.
  • Here is something I have received from the chancellor.
  • It is high time for you to get away from these terrible recollections.
  • By "what was due from the Ryazan estate" Prince Vasili meant several thousand rubles quitrent received from Pierre's peasants, which the prince had retained for himself.
  • It comes from her heart.
  • That's a good thing, but don't move from Prince Vasili's.
  • This rescript began with the words: "Sergey Kuzmich, From all sides reports reach me," etc.
  • And again his handkerchief, and again: 'Sergey Kuzmich, From all sides,'... and tears, till at last somebody else was asked to read it.
  • "Kuzmich... From all sides... and then tears," someone repeated laughing.
  • "Don't be unkind," cried Anna Pavlovna from her end of the table holding up a threatening finger.
  • Only now and then detached ideas and impressions from the world of reality shot unexpectedly through his mind.
  • I traveled from Moscow with Prince Vasili.
  • "Yes, from Olmutz," he answered, with a sigh.
  • Some, as if unwilling to distract her from an important occupation, came up to her for a moment and made haste to go away, refusing to let her see them off.
  • "Well, Lelya?" he asked, turning instantly to his daughter and addressing her with the careless tone of habitual tenderness natural to parents who have petted their children from babyhood, but which Prince Vasili had only acquired by imitating other parents.
  • "Sergey Kuzmich--From all sides-" he said, unbuttoning the top button of his waistcoat.
  • Old Prince Nicholas Bolkonski received a letter from Prince Vasili in November, 1805, announcing that he and his son would be paying him a visit.
  • And now, from the hints contained in his letter and given by the little princess, he saw which way the wind was blowing, and his low opinion changed into a feeling of contemptuous ill will.
  • The little princess and Mademoiselle Bourienne had already received from Masha, the lady's maid, the necessary report of how handsome the minister's son was, with his rosy cheeks and dark eyebrows, and with what difficulty the father had dragged his legs upstairs while the son had followed him like an eagle, three steps at a time.
  • "No really, my dear, this dress is not pretty," said Lise, looking sideways at Princess Mary from a little distance.
  • The little princess, taking the dress from the maid, came up to Princess Mary.
  • The more she tried to hide this feeling from others and even from herself, the stronger it grew.
  • The question was whether he could ever bring himself to part from his daughter and give her to a husband.
  • "And so they are writing from Potsdam already?" he said, repeating Prince Vasili's last words.
  • "Well, do you think I shall prevent her, that I can't part from her?" said the old prince angrily.
  • "Let her marry, it's all the same to me!" he screamed in the same piercing tone as when parting from his son.
  • Mademoiselle Bourienne knew a story, heard from her aunt but finished in her own way, which she liked to repeat to herself.
  • Turning from Princess Mary he went up and kissed Mademoiselle Bourienne's hand.
  • The old prince knew that if he told his daughter she was making a mistake and that Anatole meant to flirt with Mademoiselle Bourienne, Princess Mary's self-esteem would be wounded and his point (not to be parted from her) would be gained, so pacifying himself with this thought, he called Tikhon and began to undress.
  • My desire is never to leave you, Father, never to separate my life from yours.
  • Anna Mikhaylovna sat down beside him, with her own handkerchief wiped the tears from his eyes and from the letter, then having dried her own eyes she comforted the count, and decided that at dinner and till teatime she would prepare the countess, and after tea, with God's help, would inform her.
  • A letter from Nikolenka!
  • From all he says one should be glad and not cry.
  • The universal experience of ages, showing that children do grow imperceptibly from the cradle to manhood, did not exist for the countess.
  • For more than a week preparations were being made, rough drafts of letters to Nicholas from all the household were written and copied out, while under the supervision of the countess and the solicitude of the count, money and all things necessary for the uniform and equipment of the newly commissioned officer were collected.
  • The Guards, just arrived from Russia, spent the night ten miles from Olmutz and next morning were to come straight to the review, reaching the field at Olmutz by ten o'clock.
  • That day Nicholas Rostov received a letter from Boris, telling him that the Ismaylov regiment was quartered for the night ten miles from Olmutz and that he wanted to see him as he had a letter and money for him.
  • Boris, during the campaign, had made the acquaintance of many persons who might prove useful to him, and by a letter of recommendation he had brought from Pierre had become acquainted with Prince Andrew Bolkonski, through whom he hoped to obtain a post on the commander-in-chief's staff.
  • He went to his bed, drew a purse from under the clean pillow, and sent for wine.
  • Do go somewhere, anywhere... to the devil!" he exclaimed, and immediately seizing him by the shoulder and looking amiably into his face, evidently wishing to soften the rudeness of his words, he added, "Don't be hurt, my dear fellow; you know I speak from my heart as to an old acquaintance."
  • He could not tell them simply that everyone went at a trot and that he fell off his horse and sprained his arm and then ran as hard as he could from a Frenchman into the wood.
  • In spite of Prince Andrew's disagreeable, ironical tone, in spite of the contempt with which Rostov, from his fighting army point of view, regarded all these little adjutants on the staff of whom the newcomer was evidently one, Rostov felt confused, blushed, and became silent.
  • From early morning the smart clean troops were on the move, forming up on the field before the fortress.
  • From the direction of Olmutz in front of them, a group was seen approaching.
  • Then, like the crowing of cocks at sunrise, this was repeated by others from various sides and all became silent.
  • Hurrah!" thundered from all sides, one regiment after another greeting the Tsar with the strains of the march, and then "Hurrah!"... Then the general march, and again "Hurrah!
  • To Rostov every word sounded like a voice from heaven.
  • Farther and farther he rode away, stopping at other regiments, till at last only his white plumes were visible to Rostov from amid the suites that surrounded the Emperors.
  • When the Emperor had passed nearly all the regiments, the troops began a ceremonial march past him, and Rostov on Bedouin, recently purchased from Denisov, rode past too, at the rear of his squadron--that is, alone and in full view of the Emperor.
  • He has had a letter from Prince Kuragin about me.
  • He turned away and waited impatiently for Prince Andrew's return from the commander-in- chief's room.
  • Under cover of obtaining help of this kind for another, which from pride he would never accept for himself, he kept in touch with the circle which confers success and which attracted him.
  • God grant that the one that will result from it will be as victorious!
  • And do you know, my dear fellow, it seems to me that Bonaparte has decidedly lost bearings, you know that a letter was received from him today for the Emperor.
  • At dawn on the sixteenth of November, Denisov's squadron, in which Nicholas Rostov served and which was in Prince Bagration's detachment, moved from the place where it had spent the night, advancing into action as arranged, and after going behind other columns for about two thirds of a mile was stopped on the highroad.
  • One of them was leading by the bridle a fine large French horse he had taken from the prisoner.
  • He felt it not only from the sound of the hoofs of the approaching cavalcade, but because as he drew near everything grew brighter, more joyful, more significant, and more festive around him.
  • A gentle, mild light poured from them.
  • The Emperor, surrounded by his suite of officers and courtiers, was riding a bobtailed chestnut mare, a different one from that which he had ridden at the review, and bending to one side he gracefully held a gold lorgnette to his eyes and looked at a soldier who lay prone, with blood on his uncovered head.
  • In the highest army circles from midday on the nineteenth, a great, excitedly bustling activity began which lasted till the morning of the twentieth, when the memorable battle of Austerlitz was fought.
  • By evening, the adjutants had spread it to all ends and parts of the army, and in the night from the nineteenth to the twentieth, the whole eighty thousand allied troops rose from their bivouacs to the hum of voices, and the army swayed and started in one enormous mass six miles long.
  • Bolkonski took the opportunity to go in to get some details of the coming action from Dolgorukov.
  • He is a man in a gray overcoat, very anxious that I should call him 'Your Majesty,' but who, to his chagrin, got no title from me!
  • "I will do so," said Prince Andrew, moving away from the map.
  • On the way home, Prince Andrew could not refrain from asking Kutuzov, who was sitting silently beside him, what he thought of tomorrow's battle.
  • "Since Prince Bagration is not coming, we may begin," said Weyrother, hurriedly rising from his seat and going up to the table on which an enormous map of the environs of Brunn was spread out.
  • And suddenly, at this thought of death, a whole series of most distant, most intimate, memories rose in his imagination: he remembered his last parting from his father and his wife; he remembered the days when he first loved her.
  • Over there, where the shouting came from, a fire flared up and went out again, then another, and all along the French line on the hill fires flared up and the shouting grew louder and louder.
  • "From the direction, it must be the enemy," repeated Rostov.
  • I saw them this evening on that knoll; if they had retreated they would have withdrawn from that too....
  • Rostov spurred his horse, called to Sergeant Fedchenko and two other hussars, told them to follow him, and trotted downhill in the direction from which the shouting came.
  • Bagration called to him from the hill not to go beyond the stream, but Rostov pretended not to hear him and did not stop but rode on and on, continually mistaking bushes for trees and gullies for men and continually discovering his mistakes.
  • As soon as an Austrian officer showed himself near a commanding officer's quarters, the regiment began to move: the soldiers ran from the fires, thrust their pipes into their boots, their bags into the carts, got their muskets ready, and formed rank.
  • The column moved forward without knowing where and unable, from the masses around them, the smoke and the increasing fog, to see either the place they were leaving or that to which they were going.
  • The cause of the confusion was that while the Austrian cavalry was moving toward our left flank, the higher command found that our center was too far separated from our right flank and the cavalry were all ordered to turn back to the right.
  • The whole French army, and even Napoleon himself with his staff, were not on the far side of the streams and hollows of Sokolnitz and Schlappanitz beyond which we intended to take up our position and begin the action, but were on this side, so close to our own forces that Napoleon with the naked eye could distinguish a mounted man from one on foot.
  • From information he had received the evening before, from the sound of wheels and footsteps heard by the outposts during the night, by the disorderly movement of the Russian columns, and from all indications, he saw clearly that the allies believed him to be far away in front of them, and that the columns moving near Pratzen constituted the center of the Russian army, and that that center was already sufficiently weakened to be successfully attacked.
  • From information he had received the evening before, from the sound of wheels and footsteps heard by the outposts during the night, by the disorderly movement of the Russian columns, and from all indications, he saw clearly that the allies believed him to be far away in front of them, and that the columns moving near Pratzen constituted the center of the Russian army, and that that center was already sufficiently weakened to be successfully attacked.
  • When the sun had entirely emerged from the fog, and fields and mist were aglow with dazzling light--as if he had only awaited this to begin the action--he drew the glove from his shapely white hand, made a sign with it to the marshals, and ordered the action to begin.
  • Nothing was visible in the valley to the left into which our troops had descended and from whence came the sounds of firing.
  • Along the road from Pratzen galloped what looked like a squadron of horsemen in various uniforms.
  • The two generals and the adjutant took hold of the field glass, trying to snatch it from one another.
  • But at that very instant a cloud of smoke spread all round, firing was heard quite close at hand, and a voice of naive terror barely two steps from Prince Andrew shouted, Brothers!
  • Blood was flowing from his cheek.
  • Having by a great effort got away to the left from that flood of men, Kutuzov, with his suite diminished by more than half, rode toward a sound of artillery fire near by.
  • A mounted general separated himself from the infantry and approached Kutuzov.
  • After this volley the regimental commander clutched at his leg; several soldiers fell, and a second lieutenant who was holding the flag let it fall from his hands.
  • But before he had finished speaking, Prince Andrew, feeling tears of shame and anger choking him, had already leapt from his horse and run to the standard.
  • A sergeant of the battalion ran up and took the flag that was swaying from its weight in Prince Andrew's hands, but he was immediately killed.
  • On being relieved from picket duty Rostov had managed to get a few hours' sleep before morning and felt cheerful, bold, and resolute, with elasticity of movement, faith in his good fortune, and generally in that state of mind which makes everything seem possible, pleasant, and easy.
  • They were our uhlans who with disordered ranks were returning from the attack.
  • He could see nothing more, for immediately afterwards cannon began firing from somewhere and smoke enveloped everything.
  • "Can you imagine it?" and he began describing how the Guards, having taken up their position and seeing troops before them, thought they were Austrians, and all at once discovered from the cannon balls discharged by those troops that they were themselves in the front line and had unexpectedly to go into action.
  • Count! shouted Berg who ran up from the other side as eager as Boris.
  • Rostov kept asking everyone he could stop, but got no answer from anyone.
  • He rode on to the region where the greatest number of men had perished in fleeing from Pratzen.
  • In the village of Hosjeradek there were Russian troops retiring from the field of battle, who though still in some confusion were less disordered.
  • Some said the report that the Emperor was wounded was correct, others that it was not, and explained the false rumor that had spread by the fact that the Emperor's carriage had really galloped from the field of battle with the pale and terrified Ober-Hofmarschal Count Tolstoy, who had ridden out to the battlefield with others in the Emperor's suite.
  • One officer told Rostov that he had seen someone from headquarters behind the village to the left, and thither Rostov rode, not hoping to find anyone but merely to ease his conscience.
  • Only a little earth crumbled from the bank under the horse's hind hoofs.
  • Better die a thousand times than risk receiving an unkind look or bad opinion from him, Rostov decided; and sorrowfully and with a heart full despair he rode away, continually looking back at the Tsar, who still remained in the same attitude of indecision.
  • His despair was all the greater from feeling that his own weakness was the cause of his grief.
  • From one of the drivers he learned that Kutuzov's staff were not far off, in the village the vehicles were going to.
  • After five o'clock it was only at the Augesd Dam that a hot cannonade (delivered by the French alone) was still to be heard from numerous batteries ranged on the slopes of the Pratzen Heights, directed at our retreating forces.
  • It flopped into something moist, and the general fell from his horse in a pool of blood.
  • Crowds of soldiers from the dam began running onto the frozen pond.
  • The nearest soldiers shrank back, the gun driver stopped his horse, but from behind still came the shouts: Onto the ice, why do you stop?
  • Suddenly he again felt that he was alive and suffering from a burning, lacerating pain in his head.
  • "The ammunition for the guns in position is exhausted, Your Majesty," said an adjutant who had come from the batteries that were firing at Augesd.
  • Prokofy, the footman, who was so strong that he could lift the back of the carriage from behind, sat plaiting slippers out of cloth selvedges.
  • Rostov, rubbing his eyes that seemed glued together, raised his disheveled head from the hot pillow.
  • A rustle of starched petticoats and the whispering and laughter of girls' voices came from the adjoining room.
  • Vera's remark was correct, as her remarks always were, but, like most of her observations, it made everyone feel uncomfortable, not only Sonya, Nicholas, and Natasha, but even the old countess, who--dreading this love affair which might hinder Nicholas from making a brilliant match-- blushed like a girl.
  • On his return to Moscow from the army, Nicholas Rostov was welcomed by his home circle as the best of sons, a hero, and their darling Nikolenka; by his relations as a charming, attractive, and polite young man; by his acquaintances as a handsome lieutenant of hussars, a good dancer, and one of the best matches in the city.
  • During Rostov's short stay in Moscow, before rejoining the army, he did not draw closer to Sonya, but rather drifted away from her.
  • We can't get them from anyone else.
  • Pierre has arrived, and now we shall get anything we want from his hothouses.
  • He has forwarded me a letter from Boris.
  • Yes, I pity him from my heart, and shall try to give him what consolation I can.
  • The men who set the tone in conversation--Count Rostopchin, Prince Yuri Dolgorukov, Valuev, Count Markov, and Prince Vyazemski--did not show themselves at the club, but met in private houses in intimate circles, and the Moscovites who took their opinions from others--Ilya Rostov among them--remained for a while without any definite opinion on the subject of the war and without leaders.
  • By his age he should have belonged to the younger men, but by his wealth and connections he belonged to the groups of old and honored guests, and so he went from one group to another.
  • Someone obligingly took the dish from Bagration (or he would, it seemed, have held it till evening and have gone in to dinner with it) and drew his attention to the verses.
  • The door opened, and from the dining room came the resounding strains of the polonaise:
  • Pierre recalled how Helene had smilingly expressed disapproval of Dolokhov's living at their house, and how cynically Dolokhov had praised his wife's beauty to him and from that time till they came to Moscow had not left them for a day.
  • He was just going to take it when Dolokhov, leaning across, snatched it from his hand and began reading it.
  • I challenge you! he ejaculated, and, pushing back his chair, he rose from the table.
  • Can't I go away from here, run away, bury myself somewhere? passed through his mind.
  • The smoke, rendered denser by the mist, prevented him from seeing anything for an instant, but there was no second report as he had expected.
  • It all comes from that!
  • Anatole used to come to borrow money from her and used to kiss her naked shoulders.
  • The slur on my name and honor--that's all apart from myself.
  • "Louis XVI was executed because they said he was dishonorable and a criminal," came into Pierre's head, "and from their point of view they were right, as were those too who canonized him and died a martyr's death for his sake.
  • He resolved to go away next day and leave a letter informing her of his intention to part from her forever.
  • Pierre leaped up from the sofa and rushed staggering toward her.
  • God knows what he would have done at that moment had Helene not fled from the room.
  • The gazettes from which the old prince first heard of the defeat at Austerlitz stated, as usual very briefly and vaguely, that after brilliant engagements the Russians had had to retreat and had made their withdrawal in perfect order.
  • It was as if joy--a supreme joy apart from the joys and sorrows of this world--overflowed the great grief within her.
  • "Father," she said, "do not turn away from me, let us weep together."
  • Blackguards! shrieked the old man, turning his face away from her.
  • "Mary," she said, moving away from the embroidery frame and lying back, "give me your hand."
  • "Has anything come from Andrew?" she asked.
  • She had determined not to tell her and persuaded her father to hide the terrible news from her till after her confinement, which was expected within a few days.
  • "But how is it the doctor from Moscow is not here yet?" said the princess.
  • Five minutes later Princess Mary from her room heard something heavy being carried by.
  • The men servants were carrying the large leather sofa from Prince Andrew's study into the bedroom.
  • "Very good!" said the prince closing the door behind him, and Tikhon did not hear the slightest sound from the study after that.
  • "I expected help from you and I get none, none from you either!" said her eyes.
  • A woman came from the bedroom with a frightened face and became confused when she saw Prince Andrew.
  • You can't! said a terrified voice from within.
  • Then suddenly a terrible shriek--it could not be hers, she could not scream like that--came from the bedroom.
  • He spent the greater part of his time away from home, at dinners, parties, and balls.
  • From the point of view of the old countess and of society it was out of the question for her to refuse him.
  • He came out from behind the chairs, clasped his partner's hand firmly, threw back his head, and advanced his foot, waiting for the beat.
  • For two days after that Rostov did not see Dolokhov at his own or at Dolokhov's home: on the third day he received a note from him:
  • I lose to the others but win from you.
  • He let the eight hundred remain and laid down a seven of hearts with a torn corner, which he had picked up from the floor.
  • Those broad, reddish hands, with hairy wrists visible from under the shirt cuffs, laid down the pack and took up a glass and a pipe that were handed him.
  • One tormenting impression did not leave him: that those broad- boned reddish hands with hairy wrists visible from under the shirt sleeves, those hands which he loved and hated, held him in their power.
  • "You owe forty-three thousand, Count," said Dolokhov, and stretching himself he rose from the table.
  • He knew what a shock he would inflict on his father and mother by the news of this loss, he knew what a relief it would be to escape it all, and felt that Dolokhov knew that he could save him from all this shame and sorrow, but wanted now to play with him as a cat does with a mouse.
  • The young people, after returning from the theater, had had supper and were grouped round the clavichord.
  • Come here, dear! called the old countess from the drawing room.
  • Nicholas turned away from her.
  • But, though she noticed it, she was herself in such high spirits at that moment, so far from sorrow, sadness, or self-reproach, that she purposely deceived herself as young people often do.
  • At that moment she was oblivious of her surroundings, and from her smiling lips flowed sounds which anyone may produce at the same intervals and hold for the same time, but which leave you cold a thousand times and the thousand and first time thrill you and make you weep.
  • And this something was apart from everything else in the world and above everything in the world.
  • It was long since Rostov had felt such enjoyment from music as he did that day.
  • A quarter of an hour later the old count came in from his club, cheerful and contented.
  • It was plain that he was lying and only wanted to get more money from the traveler.
  • Pierre flushed and, hurriedly putting his legs down from the bed, bent forward toward the old man with a forced and timid smile.
  • Only by laying stone on stone with the cooperation of all, by the millions of generations from our forefather Adam to our own times, is that temple reared which is to be a worthy dwelling place of the Great God, he added, and closed his eyes.
  • "He exists, but to understand Him is hard," the Mason began again, looking not at Pierre but straight before him, and turning the leaves of his book with his old hands which from excitement he could not keep still.
  • With my whole soul I wish to be what you would have me be, but I have never had help from anyone....
  • The traveler was Joseph Alexeevich Bazdeev, as Pierre saw from the postmaster's book.
  • From there they passed into another room.
  • This short man had on a white leather apron which covered his chest and part of his legs; he had on a kind of necklace above which rose a high white ruffle, outlining his rather long face which was lit up from below.
  • What do you seek from us?
  • "In the seventh place, try, by the frequent thought of death," the Rhetor said, "to bring yourself to regard it not as a dreaded foe, but as a friend that frees the soul grown weary in the labors of virtue from this distressful life, and leads it to its place of recompense and peace."
  • (He now felt so glad to be free from his own lawlessness and to submit his will to those who knew the indubitable truth.)
  • He listened to the Rhetor in silence, feeling from all he said that his ordeal was about to begin.
  • The Mason drew the shirt back from Pierre's left breast, and stooping down pulled up the left leg of his trousers to above the knee.
  • He was conducted from that room along passages that turned backwards and forwards and was at last brought to the doors of the Lodge.
  • But the swords were drawn back from him and he was at once blindfolded again.
  • In the President's chair sat a young man he did not know, with a peculiar cross hanging from his neck.
  • This silence was broken by one of the brethren, who led Pierre up to the rug and began reading to him from a manuscript book an explanation of all the figures on it: the sun, the moon, a hammer, a plumb line, a trowel, a rough stone and a squared stone, a pillar, three windows, and so on.
  • They were very long, and Pierre, from joy, agitation, and embarrassment, was not in a state to understand what was being read.
  • He finished and, getting up, embraced and kissed Pierre, who, with tears of joy in his eyes, looked round him, not knowing how to answer the congratulations and greetings from acquaintances that met him on all sides.
  • The meeting was at an end, and on reaching home Pierre felt as if he had returned from a long journey on which he had spent dozens of years, had become completely changed, and had quite left behind his former habits and way of life.
  • Now and then his attention wandered from the book and the Square and he formed in imagination a new plan of life.
  • I said so even at the time when everybody was in raptures about him, when he had just returned from abroad, and when, if you remember, he posed as a sort of Marat at one of my soirees.
  • The novelty Anna Pavlovna was setting before her guests that evening was Boris Drubetskoy, who had just arrived as a special messenger from the Prussian army and was aide-de-camp to a very important personage.
  • Boris, speaking with deliberation, told them in pure, correct French many interesting details about the armies and the court, carefully abstaining from expressing an opinion of his own about the facts he was recounting.
  • It seemed as if from some words Boris had spoken that evening about the Prussian army, Helene had suddenly found it necessary to see him.
  • Princess Mary had ceased taking lessons in mathematics from her father, and when the old prince was at home went to his study with the wet nurse and little Prince Nicholas (as his grandfather called him).
  • Soon after Prince Andrew's return the old prince made over to him a large estate, Bogucharovo, about twenty-five miles from Bald Hills.
  • The old man, roused by activity, expected the best results from the new campaign, while Prince Andrew on the contrary, taking no part in the war and secretly regretting this, saw only the dark side.
  • "If you please, your excellency, Petrusha has brought some papers," said one of the nursemaids to Prince Andrew who was sitting on a child's little chair while, frowning and with trembling hands, he poured drops from a medicine bottle into a wineglass half full of water.
  • "My dear," said Princess Mary, addressing her brother from beside the cot where she was standing, "better wait a bit... later..."
  • "Petrusha has come with papers from your father," whispered the maid.
  • Have received another letter about the Preussisch-Eylau battle from Petenka--he took part in it--and it's all true.
  • It was a closely written letter of two sheets from Bilibin.
  • On the 4th, the first courier arrives from Petersburg.
  • Then he bursts into one of his wild furies and rages at everyone and everything, seizes the letters, opens them, and reads those from the Emperor addressed to others.
  • My removal from the army does not produce the slightest stir--a blind man has left it.
  • In short, we retreat after the battle but send a courier to Petersburg with news of a victory, and General Bennigsen, hoping to receive from Petersburg the post of commander in chief as a reward for his victory, does not give up the command of the army to General Buxhowden.
  • So energetically do we pursue this aim that after crossing an unfordable river we burn the bridges to separate ourselves from our enemy, who at the moment is not Bonaparte but Buxhowden.
  • Just as he went in he saw that the nurse was hiding something from him with a scared look and that Princess Mary was no longer by the cot.
  • In the dim shadow of the curtain her luminous eyes shone more brightly than usual from the tears of joy that were in them.
  • Each made the other a warning gesture and stood still in the dim light beneath the curtain as if not wishing to leave that seclusion where they three were shut off from all the world.
  • He felt that these consultations were detached from real affairs and did not link up with them or make them move.
  • In another place the women with infants in arms met him to thank him for releasing them from hard work.
  • Returning from his journey through South Russia in the happiest state of mind, Pierre carried out an intention he had long had of visiting his friend Bolkonski, whom he had not seen for two years.
  • They rose from the table and sat down in the entrance porch which served as a veranda.
  • "Come, let's argue then," said Prince Andrew, "You talk of schools," he went on, crooking a finger, "education and so forth; that is, you want to raise him" (pointing to a peasant who passed by them taking off his cap) "from his animal condition and awaken in him spiritual needs, while it seems to me that animal happiness is the only happiness possible, and that is just what you want to deprive him of.
  • It would be different if you grudged losing a laborer--that's how I regard him--but you want to cure him from love of him.
  • But as soon as he thought of what he should say, he felt that Prince Andrew with one word, one argument, would upset all his teaching, and he shrank from beginning, afraid of exposing to possible ridicule what to him was precious and sacred.
  • If I see, clearly see, that ladder leading from plant to man, why should I suppose it breaks off at me and does not go farther and farther?
  • Ivanushka, sipping out of her saucer, looked with sly womanish eyes from under her brows at the young men.
  • Such a brightness on the face like the light of heaven, and from the blessed Mother's cheek it drops and drops....
  • Drain the blood from men's veins and put in water instead, then there will be no more war!
  • Old women's nonsense--old women's nonsense! he repeated, but still he patted Pierre affectionately on the shoulder, and then went up to the table where Prince Andrew, evidently not wishing to join in the conversation, was looking over the papers his father had brought from town.
  • When returning from his leave, Rostov felt, for the first time, how close was the bond that united him to Denisov and the whole regiment.
  • The Pavlograd regiment had had only two men wounded in action, but had lost nearly half its men from hunger and sickness.
  • In the hospitals, death was so certain that soldiers suffering from fever, or the swelling that came from bad food, preferred to remain on duty, and hardly able to drag their legs went to the front rather than to the hospitals.
  • Despite their pale swollen faces and tattered uniforms, the hussars formed line for roll call, kept things in order, groomed their horses, polished their arms, brought in straw from the thatched roofs in place of fodder, and sat down to dine round the caldrons from which they rose up hungry, joking about their nasty food and their hunger.
  • One morning, between seven and eight, returning after a sleepless night, he sent for embers, changed his rain-soaked underclothes, said his prayers, drank tea, got warm, then tidied up the things on the table and in his own corner, and, his face glowing from exposure to the wind and with nothing on but his shirt, lay down on his back, putting his arms under his head.
  • "I've taken twansports from the infantwy by force!" he said.
  • From the regimental commander's, Denisov rode straight to the staff with a sincere desire to act on this advice.
  • A deep saucer of black blood was taken from his hairy arm and only then was he able to relate what had happened to him.
  • But at noon the adjutant of the regiment came into Rostov's and Denisov's dugout with a grave and serious face and regretfully showed them a paper addressed to Major Denisov from the regimental commander in which inquiries were made about yesterday's occurrence.
  • Every day, letters of inquiry and notices from the court arrived, and on the first of May, Denisov was ordered to hand the squadron over to the next in seniority and appear before the staff of his division to explain his violence at the commissariat office.
  • Perhaps at another time Denisov would not have left the regiment for so slight a wound, but now he took advantage of it to excuse himself from appearing at the staff and went into hospital.
  • But Rostov bowed himself away from the doctor and asked the assistant to show him the way.
  • Just then a commissariat soldier, a hospital orderly, came in from the next room, marching stiffly, and drew up in front of Rostov.
  • His neighbor on the other side, who lay motionless some distance from him with his head thrown back, was a young soldier with a snub nose.
  • "Here, here," and Tushin led him into the next room, from whence came sounds of several laughing voices.
  • On Rostov's inquiry as to how the matter stood, he at once produced from under his pillow a paper he had received from the commission and the rough draft of his answer to it.
  • His hospital companions, who had gathered round Rostov--a fresh arrival from the world outside--gradually began to disperse as soon as Denisov began reading his answer.
  • "Yes, wait a bit," said Denisov, glancing round at the officers, and taking his papers from under his pillow he went to the window, where he had an inkpot, and sat down to write.
  • "It seems it's no use knocking one's head against a wall!" he said, coming from the window and giving Rostov a large envelope.
  • Zhilinski, a Pole brought up in Paris, was rich, and passionately fond of the French, and almost every day of the stay at Tilsit, French officers of the Guard and from French headquarters were dining and lunching with him and Boris.
  • Rostov, in common with the whole army from which he came, was far from having experienced the change of feeling toward Napoleon and the French- -who from being foes had suddenly become friends--that had taken place at headquarters and in Boris.
  • No, I only wonder how you managed to get away from your regiment.
  • The look of annoyance had already disappeared from Boris' face: having evidently reflected and decided how to act, he very quietly took both Rostov's hands and led him into the next room.
  • "Well then, go, go, go..." said Rostov, and refusing supper and remaining alone in the little room, he walked up and down for a long time, hearing the lighthearted French conversation from the next room.
  • A broad staircase led straight up from the entry, and to the right he saw a closed door.
  • "I come from Major Denisov," answered Rostov.
  • The members of his suite, guessing at once what he wanted, moved about and whispered as they passed something from one to another, and a page--the same one Rostov had seen the previous evening at Boris'--ran forward and, bowing respectfully over the outstretched hand and not keeping it waiting a moment, laid in it an Order on a red ribbon.
  • Rostov stood at that corner for a long time, watching the feast from a distance.
  • The smell of the food the Preobrazhenskis were eating and a sense of hunger recalled him from these reflections; he had to get something to eat before going away.
  • All the plans Pierre had attempted on his estates--and constantly changing from one thing to another had never accomplished--were carried out by Prince Andrew without display and without perceptible difficulty.
  • He was not thinking of anything, but looked absent-mindedly and cheerfully from side to side.
  • Look at those cramped dead firs, ever the same, and at me too, sticking out my broken and barked fingers just where they have grown, whether from my back or my sides: as they have grown so I stand, and I do not believe in your hopes and your lies.
  • As he passed through the forest Prince Andrew turned several times to look at that oak, as if expecting something from it.
  • Ahead of the rest and nearer to him ran a dark- haired, remarkably slim, pretty girl in a yellow chintz dress, with a white handkerchief on her head from under which loose locks of hair escaped.
  • From time to time he heard a soft rustle and at times a sigh.
  • That same August the Emperor was thrown from his caleche, injured his leg, and remained three weeks at Peterhof, receiving Speranski every day and no one else.
  • Then suddenly the grating sound of a harsh voice was heard from the other side of the door, and the officer--with pale face and trembling lips--came out and passed through the waiting room, clutching his head.
  • I do not approve of it, said Arakcheev, rising and taking a paper from his writing table.
  • The newcomer wore a blue swallow-tail coat with a cross suspended from his neck and a star on his left breast.
  • Speranski did not shift his eyes from one face to another as people involuntarily do on entering a large company and was in no hurry to speak.
  • I began the service from the lower grade.
  • * "If you regard the question from that point of view."
  • Had Speranski sprung from the same class as himself and possessed the same breeding and traditions, Bolkonski would soon have discovered his weak, human, unheroic sides; but as it was, Speranski's strange and logical turn of mind inspired him with respect all the more because he did not quite understand him.
  • Joseph Alexeevich was not in Petersburg--he had of late stood aside from the affairs of the Petersburg lodges, and lived almost entirely in Moscow.
  • Often after collecting alms, and reckoning up twenty to thirty rubles received for the most part in promises from a dozen members, of whom half were as well able to pay as himself, Pierre remembered the masonic vow in which each Brother promised to devote all his belongings to his neighbor, and doubts on which he tried not to dwell arose in his soul.
  • He did not think of doubting Freemasonry itself, but suspected that Russian Masonry had taken a wrong path and deviated from its original principles.
  • A solemn meeting of the lodge of the second degree was convened, at which Pierre promised to communicate to the Petersburg Brothers what he had to deliver to them from the highest leaders of their order.
  • We are very far from that.
  • At that meeting he was struck for the first time by the endless variety of men's minds, which prevents a truth from ever presenting itself identically to two persons.
  • It was just then that he received a letter from his wife, who implored him to see her, telling him how grieved she was about him and how she wished to devote her whole life to him.
  • At the end of the letter she informed him that in a few days she would return to Petersburg from abroad.
  • I have just returned from my benefactor, and hasten to write down what I have experienced.
  • From morning till late at night, except when he eats his very plain food, he is working at science.
  • He was that absent-minded crank, a grand seigneur husband who was in no one's way, and far from spoiling the high tone and general impression of the drawing room, he served, by the contrast he presented to her, as an advantageous background to his elegant and tactful wife.
  • Among the many young men who frequented her house every day, Boris Drubetskoy, who had already achieved great success in the service, was the most intimate friend of the Bezukhov household since Helene's return from Erfurt.
  • That is why I should really like to save him from evil and lead him into the path of truth, but evil thoughts of him did not leave me.
  • His coming vexed me from the first, and I said something disagreeable to him.
  • And I awoke and found in my mind the text from the Gospel: The life was the light of men.
  • That day I received a letter from my benefactor in which he wrote about "conjugal duties."
  • I had a dream from which I awoke with a throbbing heart.
  • I saw that I was in Moscow in my house, in the big sitting room, and Joseph Alexeevich came in from the drawing room.
  • And looking at those drawings I dreamed I felt that I was doing wrong, but could not tear myself away from them.
  • Country neighbors from Otradnoe, impoverished old squires and their daughters, Peronskaya a maid of honor, Pierre Bezukhov, and the son of their district postmaster who had obtained a post in Petersburg.
  • All this time Natasha sat silent, glancing up at him from under her brows.
  • From day to day he became more and more entangled.
  • These visits of Natasha's at night before the count returned from his club were one of the greatest pleasures of both mother, and daughter.
  • "Little countess!" the count's voice called from behind the door.
  • From the carriages emerged men wearing uniforms, stars, and ribbons, while ladies in satin and ermine cautiously descended the carriage steps which were let down for them with a clatter, and then walked hurriedly and noiselessly over the baize at the entrance.
  • When her hair was done, Natasha, in her short petticoat from under which her dancing shoes showed, and in her mother's dressing jacket, ran up to Sonya, scrutinized her, and then ran to her mother.
  • Give me my thimble, Miss, from there...
  • Don't come in, Papa! she cried to her father as he opened the door--speaking from under the filmy skirt which still covered her whole face.
  • "If you please, Miss! allow me," said the maid, who on her knees was pulling the skirt straight and shifting the pins from one side of her mouth to the other with her tongue.
  • Natasha looked in the mirrors and could not distinguish her reflection from the others.
  • Then the crowd hastily retired from the drawing-room door, at which the Emperor reappeared talking to the hostess.
  • Prince Andrew, in the white uniform of a cavalry colonel, wearing stockings and dancing shoes, stood looking animated and bright in the front row of the circle not far from the Rostovs.
  • But either from fatigue or want of sleep he was ill-disposed for work and could get nothing done.
  • Prince Andrew had never before heard Speranski's famous laugh, and this ringing, high-pitched laughter from a statesman made a strange impression on him.
  • He went to bed from habit, but soon realized that he could not sleep.
  • He decided that he must attend to his son's education by finding a tutor and putting the boy in his charge, then he ought to retire from the service and go abroad, and see England, Switzerland and Italy.
  • Berg, closely buttoned up in his new uniform, sat beside his wife explaining to her that one always could and should be acquainted with people above one, because only then does one get satisfaction from acquaintances.
  • See how I managed from my first promotion.
  • She was silent, and not only less pretty than at the ball, but only redeemed from plainness by her look of gentle indifference to everything around.
  • He pointed to his manuscript book with that air of escaping from the ills of life with which unhappy people look at their work.
  • Natasha had no desire to go out anywhere and wandered from room to room like a shadow, idle and listless.
  • Things are nice as it is, she said to herself, and she began walking up and down the room, not stepping simply on the resounding parquet but treading with each step from the heel to the toe (she had on a new and favorite pair of shoes) and listening to the regular tap of the heel and creak of the toe as gladly as she had to the sounds of her own voice.
  • I have loved you from the very first moment I saw you.
  • "You know that from the very day you first came to Otradnoe I have loved you," she cried, quite convinced that she spoke the truth.
  • From that day Prince Andrew began to frequent the Rostovs' as Natasha's affianced lover.
  • At first the family felt some constraint in intercourse with Prince Andrew; he seemed a man from another world, and for a long time Natasha trained the family to get used to him, proudly assuring them all that he only appeared to be different, but was really just like all of them, and that she was not afraid of him and no one else ought to be.
  • I cannot take him away from his grandfather, and besides...
  • I have known him from childhood.
  • But a fortnight after his departure, to the surprise of those around her, she recovered from her mental sickness just as suddenly and became her old self again, but with a change in her moral physiognomy, as a child gets up after a long illness with a changed expression of face.
  • Religion, and religion alone, can--I will not say comfort us--but save us from despair.
  • The good he has done to everybody here, from his peasants up to the gentry, is incalculable.
  • In the middle of the summer Princess Mary received an unexpected letter from Prince Andrew in Switzerland in which he gave her strange and surprising news.
  • I want nothing from him.
  • Often, listening to the pilgrims' tales, she was so stimulated by their simple speech, mechanical to them but to her so full of deep meaning, that several times she was on the point of abandoning everything and running away from home.
  • Nicholas Rostov experienced this blissful condition to the full when, after 1807, he continued to serve in the Pavlograd regiment, in which he already commanded the squadron he had taken over from Denisov.
  • Reading these letters, Nicholas felt a dread of their wanting to take him away from surroundings in which, protected from all the entanglements of life, he was living so calmly and quietly.
  • In 1810 he received letters from his parents, in which they told him of Natasha's engagement to Bolkonski, and that the wedding would be in a year's time because the old prince made difficulties.
  • But in the spring of that year, he received a letter from his mother, written without his father's knowledge, and that letter persuaded him to return.
  • The count was so weak, and trusted Mitenka so much, and was so good-natured, that everybody took advantage of him and things were going from bad to worse.
  • The right thing now was, if not to retire from the service, at any rate to go home on leave.
  • She exhaled happiness and love from the time Nicholas returned, and the faithful, unalterable love of this girl had a gladdening effect on him.
  • She did not seem at all like a girl in love and parted from her affianced husband.
  • And don't attach importance to her being so bright: that's because she's living through the last days of her girlhood, but I know what she is like every time we receive a letter from him!
  • The countess, who heard at once from the maids what had happened at the lodge, was calmed by the thought that now their affairs would certainly improve, but on the other hand felt anxious as to the effect this excitement might have on her son.
  • "Devil take all these peasants, and money matters, and carryings forward from page to page," he thought.
  • But once the countess called her son and informed him that she had a promissory note from Anna Mikhaylovna for two thousand rubles, and asked him what he thought of doing with it.
  • Another borzoi, a dog, catching sight of his master from the garden path, arched his back and, rushing headlong toward the porch with lifted tail, began rubbing himself against his legs.
  • "What orders, your excellency?" said the huntsman in his deep bass, deep as a proto-deacon's and hoarse with hallooing--and two flashing black eyes gazed from under his brows at his master, who was silent.
  • (This meant that the she-wolf, about whom they both knew, had moved with her cubs to the Otradnoe copse, a small place a mile and a half from the house.)
  • Daniel himself felt this, and as usual stood just inside the door, trying to speak softly and not move, for fear of breaking something in the master's apartment, and he hastened to say all that was necessary so as to get from under that ceiling, out into the open under the sky once more.
  • Having finished his inquiries and extorted from Daniel an opinion that the hounds were fit (Daniel himself wished to go hunting), Nicholas ordered the horses to be saddled.
  • They'll take the cubs from under your very nose.
  • Leaped a fearful place; what a sight when they rushed from the covert... the horse worth a thousand rubles and the rider beyond all price!
  • The other day when he came out from Mass in full uniform, Michael Sidorych...
  • After the cry of the hounds came the deep tones of the wolf call from Daniel's hunting horn; the pack joined the first three hounds and they could be heard in full cry, with that peculiar lift in the note that indicates that they are after a wolf.
  • The count and Simon galloped out of the wood and saw on their left a wolf which, softly swaying from side to side, was coming at a quiet lope farther to the left to the very place where they were standing.
  • The wolf paused, turned its heavy forehead toward the dogs awkwardly, like a man suffering from the quinsy, and, still slightly swaying from side to side, gave a couple of leaps and with a swish of its tail disappeared into the skirt of the wood.
  • At the same instant, with a cry like a wail, first one hound, then another, and then another, sprang helter-skelter from the wood opposite and the whole pack rushed across the field toward the very spot where the wolf had disappeared.
  • He made thousands of different conjectures as to where and from what side the beast would come and how he would set upon it.
  • He prayed with that passionate and shamefaced feeling with which men pray at moments of great excitement arising from trivial causes.
  • Karay finished scratching his hindquarters and, cocking his ears, got up with quivering tail from which tufts of matted hair hung down.
  • Nicholas asked himself as the wolf approached him coming from the copse.
  • The reddish Lyubim rushed forward from behind Milka, sprang impetuously at the wolf, and seized it by its hindquarters, but immediately jumped aside in terror.
  • A long, yellowish young borzoi, one Nicholas did not know, from another leash, rushed impetuously at the wolf from in front and almost knocked her over.
  • But the wolf jumped up more quickly than anyone could have expected and, gnashing her teeth, flew at the yellowish borzoi, which, with a piercing yelp, fell with its head on the ground, bleeding from a gash in its side.
  • Thanks to the delay caused by this crossing of the wolf's path, the old dog with its felted hair hanging from its thigh was within five paces of it.
  • That instant, when Nicholas saw the wolf struggling in the gully with the dogs, while from under them could be seen her gray hair and outstretched hind leg and her frightened choking head, with her ears laid back (Karay was pinning her by the throat), was the happiest moment of his life.
  • With his hand on his saddlebow, he was ready to dismount and stab the wolf, when she suddenly thrust her head up from among that mass of dogs, and then her forepaws were on the edge of the gully.
  • She clicked her teeth (Karay no longer had her by the throat), leaped with a movement of her hind legs out of the gully, and having disengaged herself from the dogs, with tail tucked in again, went forward.
  • "Uncle's" huntsman was galloping from the other side across the wolf's path and his borzois once more stopped the animal's advance.
  • Already, at the beginning of this chase, Daniel, hearing the ulyulyuing, had rushed out from the wood.
  • Now they drew close to the fox which began to dodge between the field in sharper and sharper curves, trailing its brush, when suddenly a strange white borzoi dashed in followed by a black one, and everything was in confusion; the borzois formed a star-shaped figure, scarcely swaying their bodies and with tails turned away from the center of the group.
  • Then from that spot came the sound of a horn, with the signal agreed on in case of a fight.
  • Nicholas, though he had never seen Ilagin, with his usual absence of moderation in judgment, hated him cordially from reports of his arbitrariness and violence, and regarded him as his bitterest foe.
  • The huntsman stood halfway up the knoll holding up his whip and the gentlefolk rode up to him at a footpace; the hounds that were far off on the horizon turned away from the hare, and the whips, but not the gentlefolk, also moved away.
  • The pack on leash rushed downhill in full cry after the hare, and from all sides the borzois that were not on leash darted after the hounds and the hare.
  • When he jumped up he did not run at once, but pricked his ears listening to the shouting and trampling that resounded from all sides at once.
  • From behind Erza rushed the broad- haunched, black-spotted Milka and began rapidly gaining on the hare.
  • "Once she had missed it and turned it away, any mongrel could take it," Ilagin was saying at the same time, breathless from his gallop and his excitement.
  • Toward evening Ilagin took leave of Nicholas, who found that they were so far from home that he accepted "Uncle's" offer that the hunting party should spend the night in his little village of Mikhaylovna.
  • A score of women serfs, old and young, as well as children, popped out from the back entrance to have a look at the hunters who were arriving.
  • Leading from the study was a passage in which a partition with ragged curtains could be seen.
  • From behind this came women's laughter and whispers.
  • They looked at one another (now that the hunt was over and they were in the house, Nicholas no longer considered it necessary to show his manly superiority over his sister), Natasha gave him a wink, and neither refrained long from bursting into a peal of ringing laughter even before they had a pretext ready to account for it.
  • "Uncle" too was in high spirits and far from being offended by the brother's and sister's laughter (it could never enter his head that they might be laughing at his way of life) he himself joined in the merriment.
  • She went to the table, set down the tray, and with her plump white hands deftly took from it the bottles and various hors d'oeuvres and dishes and arranged them on the table.
  • Involuntarily Rostov recalled all the good he had heard about him from his father and the neighbors.
  • It was the custom for Mitka to play the balalayka in the huntsmen's room when "Uncle" returned from the chase.
  • The tune, played with precision and in exact time, began to thrill in the hearts of Nicholas and Natasha, arousing in them the same kind of sober mirth as radiated from Anisya Fedorovna's whole being.
  • Natasha threw off the shawl from her shoulders, ran forward to face "Uncle," and setting her arms akimbo also made a motion with her shoulders and struck an attitude.
  • Where, how, and when had this young countess, educated by an emigree French governess, imbibed from the Russian air she breathed that spirit and obtained that manner which the pas de chale * would, one would have supposed, long ago have effaced?
  • From her feminine point of view she could see only one solution, namely, for Nicholas to marry a rich heiress.
  • The countess had written direct to Julie's mother in Moscow suggesting a marriage between their children and had received a favorable answer from her.
  • Though she blamed herself for it, she could not refrain from grumbling at and worrying Sonya, often pulling her up without reason, addressing her stiffly as "my dear," and using the formal "you" instead of the intimate "thou" in speaking to her.
  • Her voice broke, tears gushed from her eyes, and she turned quickly to hide them and left the room.
  • There an old maidservant was grumbling at a young girl who stood panting, having just run in through the cold from the serfs' quarters.
  • What she drew from the guitar would have had no meaning for other listeners, but in her imagination a whole series of reminiscences arose from those sounds.
  • She sat behind the bookcase with her eyes fixed on a streak of light escaping from the pantry door and listened to herself and pondered.
  • "Mr. Dimmler, please play my favorite nocturne by Field," came the old countess' voice from the drawing room.
  • The mummers (some of the house serfs) dressed up as bears, Turks, innkeepers, and ladies--frightening and funny--bringing in with them the cold from outside and a feeling of gaiety, crowded, at first timidly, into the anteroom, then hiding behind one another they pushed into the ballroom where, shyly at first and then more and more merrily and heartily, they started singing, dancing, and playing Christmas games.
  • Melyukova was a widow, who, with her family and their tutors and governesses, lived three miles from the Rostovs.
  • Natasha was foremost in setting a merry holiday tone, which, passing from one to another, grew stronger and reached its climax when they all came out into the frost and got into the sleighs, talking, calling to one another, laughing, and shouting.
  • Two of the troykas were the usual household sleighs, the third was the old count's with a trotter from the Orlov stud as shaft horse, the fourth was Nicholas' own with a short shaggy black shaft horse.
  • It was so light that he could see the moonlight reflected from the metal harness disks and from the eyes of the horses, who looked round in alarm at the noisy party under the shadow of the porch roof.
  • The shaft horse swayed from side to side, moving his ears as if asking: "Isn't it time to begin now?"
  • From that sleigh one could hear the shouts, laughter, and voices of the mummers.
  • The whistling sound of the runners on the snow and the voices of girls shrieking were heard from different sides.
  • The mummers from the count's.
  • Pelageya Danilovna Melyukova, a broadly built, energetic woman wearing spectacles, sat in the drawing room in a loose dress, surrounded by her daughters whom she was trying to keep from feeling dull.
  • Hussars, ladies, witches, clowns, and bears, after clearing their throats and wiping the hoarfrost from their faces in the vestibule, came into the ballroom where candles were hurriedly lighted.
  • Halfway lay some snow-covered piles of firewood and across and along them a network of shadows from the bare old lime trees fell on the snow and on the path.
  • From the back porch came the sound of feet descending the steps, the bottom step upon which snow had fallen gave a ringing creak and he heard the voice of an old maidservant saying, Straight, straight, along the path, Miss.
  • When they all drove back from Pelageya Danilovna's, Natasha, who always saw and noticed everything, arranged that she and Madame Schoss should go back in the sleigh with Dimmler, and Sonya with Nicholas and the maids.
  • On the way back Nicholas drove at a steady pace instead of racing and kept peering by that fantastic all-transforming light into Sonya's face and searching beneath the eyebrows and mustache for his former and his present Sonya from whom he had resolved never to be parted again.
  • "Sonya, is it well with thee?" he asked from time to time.
  • She sat a long time looking at the receding line of candles reflected in the glasses and expecting (from tales she had heard) to see a coffin, or him, Prince Andrew, in that last dim, indistinctly outlined square.
  • She began blinking rapidly and moved away from the looking glasses.
  • Natasha set to work to effect a reconciliation, and so far succeeded that Nicholas received a promise from his mother that Sonya should not be troubled, while he on his side promised not to undertake anything without his parents' knowledge.
  • Firmly resolved, after putting his affairs in order in the regiment, to retire from the army and return and marry Sonya, Nicholas, serious, sorrowful, and at variance with his parents, but, as it seemed to him, passionately in love, left at the beginning of January to rejoin his regiment.
  • After Nicholas had gone things in the Rostov household were more depressing than ever, and the countess fell ill from mental agitation.
  • Sonya was unhappy at the separation from Nicholas and still more so on account of the hostile tone the countess could not help adopting toward her.
  • But the countess' health obliged them to delay their departure from day to day.
  • Natasha, who had borne the first period of separation from her betrothed lightly and even cheerfully, now grew more agitated and impatient every day.
  • Her letters to him, far from giving her any comfort, seemed to her a wearisome and artificial obligation.
  • Moscow society, from the old women down to the children, received Pierre like a long-expected guest whose place was always ready awaiting him.
  • From reading he passed to sleeping, from sleeping to gossip in drawing rooms of the club, from gossip to carousals and women; from carousals back to gossip, reading, and wine.
  • From reading he passed to sleeping, from sleeping to gossip in drawing rooms of the club, from gossip to carousals and women; from carousals back to gossip, reading, and wine.
  • "Nothing is trivial, and nothing is important, it's all the same--only to save oneself from it as best one can," thought Pierre.
  • Another lately added sorrow arose from the lessons she gave her six year-old nephew.
  • After dinner, when the footman handed coffee and from habit began with the princess, the prince suddenly grew furious, threw his stick at Philip, and instantly gave instructions to have him conscripted for the army.
  • Metivier, shrugging his shoulders, went up to Mademoiselle Bourienne who at the sound of shouting had run in from an adjoining room.
  • Incidents were related evidently confirming the opinion that everything was going from bad to worse, but whether telling a story or giving an opinion the speaker always stopped, or was stopped, at the point beyond which his criticism might touch the sovereign himself.
  • He shifts the Dukes about as I might move my serfs from Bald Hills to Bogucharovo or my Ryazan estates.
  • He said this because on his journey from Petersburg he had had the honor of being presented to the Duke.
  • Because I have noticed that when a young man comes on leave from Petersburg to Moscow it is usually with the object of marrying an heiress.
  • Ah! from suffering there is no other refuge.
  • "And how I pity her mother," she went on; "today she showed me her accounts and letters from Penza (they have enormous estates there), and she, poor thing, has no one to help her, and they do cheat her so!"
  • "My dear," said Anna Mikhaylovna to her son, "I know from a reliable source that Prince Vasili has sent his son to Moscow to get him married to Julie.
  • From early in the morning, wearing a dressing jacket, she attended to her household affairs, and then she drove out: on holy days to church and after the service to jails and prisons on affairs of which she never spoke to anyone.
  • She had not yet gone to bed when the Rostovs arrived and the pulley of the hall door squeaked from the cold as it let in the Rostovs and their servants.
  • You've grown plumper and prettier, she remarked, drawing Natasha (whose cheeks were glowing from the cold) to her by the hood.
  • He ran away from her and she came galloping after him.
  • She held her hand a couple of feet from the ground.
  • Natasha remained silent, from shyness Marya Dmitrievna supposed, but really because she disliked anyone interfering in what touched her love of Prince Andrew, which seemed to her so apart from all human affairs that no one could understand it.
  • From the first glance Princess Mary did not like Natasha.
  • God is my witness, I did not know, muttered the old man, and after looking Natasha over from head to foot he went out.
  • I can't bear this waiting and I shall cry in a minute! and she turned away from the glass, making an effort not to cry.
  • He looked at the Rostovs from under his brows and said something, smiling, to his betrothed.
  • "And where has he sprung from?" he asked, turning to Shinshin.
  • He was in the Caucasus and ran away from there.
  • As she looked and thought, the strangest fancies unexpectedly and disconnectedly passed through her mind: the idea occurred to her of jumping onto the edge of the box and singing the air the actress was singing, then she wished to touch with her fan an old gentleman sitting not far from her, then to lean over to Helene and tickle her.
  • "Mais charmante!" said he, evidently referring to Natasha, who did not exactly hear his words but understood them from the movement of his lips.
  • In the second act there was scenery representing tombstones, there was a round hole in the canvas to represent the moon, shades were raised over the footlights, and from horns and contrabass came deep notes while many people appeared from right and left wearing black cloaks and holding things like daggers in their hands.
  • She was so pleased by praise from this brilliant beauty that she blushed with pleasure.
  • I had heard about you from my page, Drubetskoy.
  • She sang something mournfully, addressing the queen, but the king waved his arm severely, and men and women with bare legs came in from both sides and began dancing all together.
  • "Let me introduce my brother to you," said Helene, her eyes shifting uneasily from Natasha to Anatole.
  • While saying this he never removed his smiling eyes from her face, her neck, and her bare arms.
  • Ought I to put it right? she asked herself, and she could not refrain from turning round.
  • In the fourth act there was some sort of devil who sang waving his arm about, till the boards were withdrawn from under him and he disappeared down below.
  • As Shinshin had remarked, from the time of his arrival Anatole had turned the heads of the Moscow ladies, especially by the fact that he slighted them and plainly preferred the gypsy girls and French actresses--with the chief of whom, Mademoiselle George, he was said to be on intimate relations.
  • He believed this so firmly that others, looking at him, were persuaded of it too and did not refuse him either a leading place in society or money, which he borrowed from anyone and everyone and evidently would not repay.
  • Apart from the advantage he derived from Anatole, the very process of dominating another's will was in itself a pleasure, a habit, and a necessity to Dolokhov.
  • Marya Dmitrievna talked to the count about something which they concealed from Natasha.
  • After she had gone, a dressmaker from Madame Suppert-Roguet waited on the Rostovs, and Natasha, very glad of this diversion, having shut herself into a room adjoining the drawing room, occupied herself trying on the new dresses.
  • She looked at Natasha's dresses and praised them, as well as a new dress of her own made of "metallic gauze," which she had received from Paris, and advised Natasha to have one like it.
  • "Adorable! divine! delicious!" was heard from every side.
  • She only felt herself again completely borne away into this strange senseless world--so remote from her old world--a world in which it was impossible to know what was good or bad, reasonable or senseless.
  • You are enchanting... from the moment I saw you I have never ceased...
  • She so wanted a word from him that would explain to her what had happened and to which she could find no answer.
  • It was a letter from Princess Mary.
  • That's awful... and to escape from these dreadful thoughts she went to Sonya and began sorting patterns with her.
  • Only," she thought, "to tell Prince Andrew what has happened or to hide it from him are both equally impossible.
  • And how could she have a love letter from him in her hand?
  • Clutching her breast to keep herself from choking, Sonya, pale and trembling with fear and agitation, sat down in an armchair and burst into tears.
  • I can't hide it from you any longer.
  • Sonya burst into sobs and ran from the room.
  • At Kamenka a relay of horses was to wait which would take them to the Warsaw highroad, and from there they would hasten abroad with post horses.
  • Anatole had a passport, an order for post horses, ten thousand rubles he had taken from his sister and another ten thousand borrowed with Dolokhov's help.
  • Anatole, with uniform unbuttoned, walked to and fro from the room where the witnesses were sitting, through the study to the room behind, where his French valet and others were packing the last of his things.
  • Dolokhov shouted to him from the other room.
  • More than once when Anatole's regiment was stationed at Tver he had taken him from Tver in the evening, brought him to Moscow by daybreak, and driven him back again the next night.
  • In their service he risked his skin and his life twenty times a year, and in their service had lost more horses than the money he had from them would buy.
  • Only a couple of times a year--when he knew from their valets that they had money in hand--he would turn up of a morning quite sober and with a deep bow would ask them to help him.
  • "Do you know, one Christmas I drove from Tver," said Anatole, smilingly at the recollection and turning to Makarin who gazed rapturously at him with wide-open eyes.
  • Ah, Prince, how sorry I am to part from you!
  • Hard as it may be, I'll tell them all to hold their tongues and will hide it from the count.
  • I shall die! she muttered, wrenching herself from Marya Dmitrievna's hands with a vicious effort and sinking down again into her former position.
  • Marya Dmitrievna went on admonishing her for some time, enjoining on her that it must all be kept from her father and assuring her that nobody would know anything about it if only Natasha herself would undertake to forget it all and not let anyone see that something had happened.
  • Next day Count Rostov returned from his estate near Moscow in time for lunch as he had promised.
  • He was in very good spirits; the affair with the purchaser was going on satisfactorily, and there was nothing to keep him any longer in Moscow, away from the countess whom he missed.
  • From the pretense of illness, from his daughter's distress, and by the embarrassed faces of Sonya and Marya Dmitrievna, the count saw clearly that something had gone wrong during his absence, but it was so terrible for him to think that anything disgraceful had happened to his beloved daughter, and he so prized his own cheerful tranquillity, that he avoided inquiries and tried to assure himself that nothing particularly had happened; and he was only dissatisfied that her indisposition delayed their return to the country.
  • From the pretense of illness, from his daughter's distress, and by the embarrassed faces of Sonya and Marya Dmitrievna, the count saw clearly that something had gone wrong during his absence, but it was so terrible for him to think that anything disgraceful had happened to his beloved daughter, and he so prized his own cheerful tranquillity, that he avoided inquiries and tried to assure himself that nothing particularly had happened; and he was only dissatisfied that her indisposition delayed their return to the country.
  • When he returned to Moscow Pierre was handed a letter from Marya Dmitrievna asking him to come and see her on a matter of great importance relating to Andrew Bolkonski and his betrothed.
  • He could not reconcile the charming impression he had of Natasha, whom he had known from a child, with this new conception of her baseness, folly, and cruelty.
  • "Things get worse from hour to hour!" ejaculated Marya Dmitrievna.
  • After hearing the details of Anatole's marriage from Pierre, and giving vent to her anger against Anatole in words of abuse, Marya Dmitrievna told Pierre why she had sent for him.
  • Natasha looked from one to the other as a hunted and wounded animal looks at the approaching dogs and sportsmen.
  • Pierre laughed and said it was nonsense for he had just come from the Rostovs'.
  • Pierre, taking him by the arm, pulled him toward himself and was leading him from the room.
  • He seized Anatole by the collar of his uniform with his big hand and shook him from side to side till Anatole's face showed a sufficient degree of terror.
  • "You're a scoundrel and a blackguard, and I don't know what deprives me from the pleasure of smashing your head with this!" said Pierre, expressing himself so artificially because he was talking French.
  • Pierre drove to Marya Dmitrievna's to tell her of the fulfillment of her wish that Kuragin should be banished from Moscow.
  • Old Prince Bolkonski heard all the rumors current in the town from Mademoiselle Bourienne and had read the note to Princess Mary in which Natasha had broken off her engagement.
  • Some days after Anatole's departure Pierre received a note from Prince Andrew, informing him of his arrival and asking him to come to see him.
  • As soon as he reached Moscow, Prince Andrew had received from his father Natasha's note to Princess Mary breaking off her engagement (Mademoiselle Bourienne had purloined it from Princess Mary and given it to the old prince), and he heard from him the story of Natasha's elopement, with additions.
  • Prince Andrew went to one and took out a small casket, from which he drew a packet wrapped in paper.
  • I have received a refusal from Countess Rostova and have heard reports of your brother-in-law having sought her hand, or something of that kind.
  • He took the packet from the table and handed it to Pierre.
  • "Home!" said Pierre, and despite twenty-two degrees of frost Fahrenheit he threw open the bearskin cloak from his broad chest and inhaled the air with joy.
  • Millions of men, renouncing their human feelings and reason, had to go from west to east to slay their fellows, just as some centuries previously hordes of men had come from the east to the west, slaying their fellows.
  • Every act of theirs, which appears to them an act of their own will, is in an historical sense involuntary and is related to the whole course of history and predestined from eternity.
  • Before leaving, Napoleon showed favor to the emperor, kings, and princes who had deserved it, reprimanded the kings and princes with whom he was dissatisfied, presented pearls and diamonds of his own--that is, which he had taken from other kings--to the Empress of Austria, and having, as his historian tells us, tenderly embraced the Empress Marie Louise--who regarded him as her husband, though he had left another wife in Paris--left her grieved by the parting which she seemed hardly able to bear.
  • The army was moving from west to east, and relays of six horses carried him in the same direction.
  • He mounted it and rode at a gallop to one of the bridges over the Niemen, deafened continually by incessant and rapturous acclamations which he evidently endured only because it was impossible to forbid the soldiers to express their love of him by such shouting, but the shouting which accompanied him everywhere disturbed him and distracted him from the military cares that had occupied him from the time he joined the army.
  • The colonel of the Polish uhlans, a handsome old man, flushed and, fumbling in his speech from excitement, asked the aide-de-camp whether he would be permitted to swim the river with his uhlans instead of seeking a ford.
  • For him it was no new conviction that his presence in any part of the world, from Africa to the steppes of Muscovy alike, was enough to dumfound people and impel them to insane self-oblivion.
  • The majority struggled back to the bank from which they had started.
  • Nothing was ready for the war that everyone expected and to prepare for which the Emperor had come from Petersburg.
  • Countess Bezukhova was present among other Russian ladies who had followed the sovereign from Petersburg to Vilna and eclipsed the refined Polish ladies by her massive, so-called Russian type of beauty.
  • Boris, coolly looking at Helene's dazzling bare shoulders which emerged from a dark, gold-embroidered, gauze gown, talked to her of old acquaintances and at the same time, unaware of it himself and unnoticed by others, never for an instant ceased to observe the Emperor who was in the same room.
  • Arakcheev looked at the Emperor from under his brow and, sniffing with his red nose, stepped forward from the crowd as if expecting the Emperor to address him.
  • Boris was thus the first to learn the news that the French army had crossed the Niemen and, thanks to this, was able to show certain important personages that much that was concealed from others was usually known to him, and by this means he rose higher in their estimation.
  • Yesterday I learned that, despite the loyalty with which I have kept my engagements with Your Majesty, your troops have crossed the Russian frontier, and I have this moment received from Petersburg a note, in which Count Lauriston informs me, as a reason for this aggression, that Your Majesty has considered yourself to be in a state of war with me from the time Prince Kuragin asked for his passports.
  • It still depends on Your Majesty to preserve humanity from the calamity of another war.
  • The sun was only just appearing from behind the clouds, the air was fresh and dewy.
  • A herd of cattle was being driven along the road from the village, and over the fields the larks rose trilling, one after another, like bubbles rising in water.
  • Balashev looked around him, awaiting the arrival of an officer from the village.
  • The Russian Cossacks and bugler and the French hussars looked silently at one another from time to time.
  • A French colonel of hussars, who had evidently just left his bed, came riding from the village on a handsome sleek gray horse, accompanied by two hussars.
  • Balashev was only two horses' length from the equestrian with the bracelets, plumes, necklaces, and gold embroidery, who was galloping toward him with a theatrically solemn countenance, when Julner, the French colonel, whispered respectfully: "The King of Naples!"
  • He dismounted, took Balashev's arm, and moving a few steps away from his suite, which waited respectfully, began to pace up and down with him, trying to speak significantly.
  • He referred to the fact that the Emperor Napoleon had resented the demand that he should withdraw his troops from Prussia, especially when that demand became generally known and the dignity of France was thereby offended.
  • Balashev rode on, supposing from Murat's words that he would very soon be brought before Napoleon himself.
  • Davout glanced at him silently and plainly derived pleasure from the signs of agitation and confusion which appeared on Balashev's face.
  • Napoleon received Balashev in the very house in Vilna from which Alexander had dispatched him on his mission.
  • Balashev went into a small reception room, one door of which led into a study, the very one from which the Russian Emperor had dispatched him on his mission.
  • He heard hurried footsteps beyond the door, both halves of it were opened rapidly; all was silent and then from the study the sound was heard of other steps, firm and resolute--they were those of Napoleon.
  • I have received the letter you brought from the Emperor Alexander and am very glad to see you.
  • Without moving from where he stood he began speaking in a louder tone and more hurriedly than before.
  • Instead of the demand of four months earlier to withdraw from Pomerania, only a withdrawal beyond the Niemen was now demanded.
  • He went in silence from one corner of the room to the other and again stopped in front of Balashev.
  • Oh, what a splendid reign! he repeated several times, then paused, drew from his pocket a gold snuffbox, lifted it to his nose, and greedily sniffed at it.
  • Balashev, feeling it incumbent on him to reply, said that from the Russian side things did not appear in so gloomy a light.
  • Balashev said that in Russia the best results were expected from the war.
  • From all the windows of the streets through which he rode, rugs, flags, and his monogram were displayed, and the Polish ladies, welcoming him, waved their handkerchiefs to him.
  • So little was his rejoinder appreciated that Napoleon did not notice it at all and naively asked Balashev through what towns the direct road from there to Moscow passed.
  • Anatole Kuragin promptly obtained an appointment from the Minister of War and went to join the army in Moldavia.
  • Dessalles, the tutor he had brought from Switzerland, was wearing a coat of Russian cut and talking broken Russian to the servants, but was still the same narrowly intelligent, conscientious, and pedantic preceptor.
  • Prince Andrew, without replying, put him down from his knee and went out of the room.
  • "Then it must be so!" thought Prince Andrew as he drove out of the avenue from the house at Bald Hills.
  • The first army, with which was the Emperor, occupied the fortified camp at Drissa; the second army was retreating, trying to effect a junction with the first one from which it was said to be cut off by large French forces.
  • Barclay de Tolly was quartered nearly three miles from the Emperor.
  • His mind was occupied by the interests of the center that was conducting a gigantic war, and he was glad to be free for a while from the distraction caused by the thought of Kuragin.
  • Already from his military experience and what he had seen in the Austrian campaign, he had come to the conclusion that in war the most deeply considered plans have no significance and that all depends on the way unexpected movements of the enemy--that cannot be foreseen--are met, and on how and by whom the whole matter is handled.
  • But this was only the external condition; the essential significance of the presence of the Emperor and of all these people, from a courtier's point of view (and in an Emperor's vicinity all became courtiers), was clear to everyone.
  • The members of this party were those who had demanded an advance from Vilna into Poland and freedom from all prearranged plans.
  • This view was very general in the upper army circles and found support also in Petersburg and from the chancellor, Rumyantsev, who, for other reasons of state, was in favor of peace.
  • From among all these parties, just at the time Prince Andrew reached the army, another, a ninth party, was being formed and was beginning to raise its voice.
  • Prince Andrew did not catch what he said and would have passed on, but Chernyshev introduced him to Pfuel, remarking that Prince Andrew was just back from Turkey where the war had terminated so fortunately.
  • From this short interview with Pfuel, Prince Andrew, thanks to his Austerlitz experiences, was able to form a clear conception of the man.
  • He passed into the next room, and the deep, querulous sounds of his voice were at once heard from there.
  • The first to speak was General Armfeldt who, to meet the difficulty that presented itself, unexpectedly proposed a perfectly new position away from the Petersburg and Moscow roads.
  • Young Count Toll objected to the Swedish general's views more warmly than anyone else, and in the course of the dispute drew from his side pocket a well-filled notebook, which he asked permission to read to them.
  • In answer to Toll, Paulucci suggested an advance and an attack, which, he urged, could alone extricate us from the present uncertainty and from the trap (as he called the Drissa camp) in which we were situated.
  • From the tone in which the courtiers addressed him and the way Paulucci had allowed himself to speak of him to the Emperor, but above all from a certain desperation in Pfuel's own expressions, it was clear that the others knew, and Pfuel himself felt, that his fall was at hand.
  • From the tone in which the courtiers addressed him and the way Paulucci had allowed himself to speak of him to the Emperor, but above all from a certain desperation in Pfuel's own expressions, it was clear that the others knew, and Pfuel himself felt, that his fall was at hand.
  • Though he concealed the fact under a show of irritation and contempt, he was evidently in despair that the sole remaining chance of verifying his theory by a huge experiment and proving its soundness to the whole world was slipping away from him.
  • Before the beginning of the campaign, Rostov had received a letter from his parents in which they told him briefly of Natasha's illness and the breaking off of her engagement to Prince Andrew (which they explained by Natasha's having rejected him) and again asked Nicholas to retire from the army and return home.
  • On receiving this letter, Nicholas did not even make any attempt to get leave of absence or to retire from the army, but wrote to his parents that he was sorry Natasha was ill and her engagement broken off, and that he would do all he could to meet their wishes.
  • Nothing but honor could keep me from returning to the country.
  • It was, in fact, only the commencement of the campaign that prevented Rostov from returning home as he had promised and marrying Sonya.
  • The troops retired from Vilna for various complicated reasons of state, political and strategic.
  • I have come from the staff, Count.
  • The doctor, whether from lack of means or because he did not like to part from his young wife in the early days of their marriage, took her about with him wherever the hussar regiment went and his jealousy had become a standing joke among the hussar officers.
  • Why, the water streams from them!
  • They had hardly begun to play before the doctor's disheveled head suddenly appeared from behind Mary Hendrikhovna.
  • Seeing his gloomy face as he frowned at his wife, the officers grew still merrier, and some of them could not refrain from laughter, for which they hurriedly sought plausible pretexts.
  • As they left the tavern in the twilight of the dawn, Rostov and Ilyin both glanced under the wet and glistening leather hood of the doctor's cart, from under the apron of which his feet were sticking out, and in the middle of which his wife's nightcap was visible and her sleepy breathing audible.
  • Now he rode beside Ilyin under the birch trees, occasionally plucking leaves from a branch that met his hand, sometimes touching his horse's side with his foot, or, without turning round, handing a pipe he had finished to an hussar riding behind him, with as calm and careless an air as though he were merely out for a ride.
  • He knew from experience the tormenting expectation of terror and death the cornet was suffering and knew that only time could help him.
  • A few minutes later it reappeared brighter still from behind the top of the cloud, tearing its edge.
  • Walk, march! came the order from in front.
  • As they took the places vacated by the uhlans, bullets came from the front, whining and whistling, but fell spent without taking effect.
  • Drawing himself up, he viewed the field of battle opening out before him from the hill, and with his whole soul followed the movement of the uhlans.
  • The officer fell, not so much from the blow--which had but slightly cut his arm above the elbow--as from the shock to his horse and from fright.
  • He hurriedly but vainly tried to get his foot out of the stirrup and did not remove his frightened blue eyes from Rostov's face.
  • "But what on earth is worrying me?" he asked himself as he rode back from the general.
  • Doctors came to see her singly and in consultation, talked much in French, German, and Latin, blamed one another, and prescribed a great variety of medicines for all the diseases known to them, but the simple idea never occurred to any of them that they could not know the disease Natasha was suffering from, as no disease suffered by a live man can be known, for every living person has his own peculiarities and always has his own peculiar, personal, novel, complicated disease, unknown to medicine--not a disease of the lungs, liver, skin, heart, nerves, and so on mentioned in medical books, but a disease consisting of one of the innumerable combinations of the maladies of those organs.
  • She kept away from everyone in the house and felt at ease only with her brother Petya.
  • From habit she scrutinized the ladies' dresses, condemned the bearing of a lady standing close by who was not crossing herself properly but in a cramped manner, and again she thought with vexation that she was herself being judged and was judging others, and suddenly, at the sound of the service, she felt horrified at her own vileness, horrified that the former purity of her soul was again lost to her.
  • The gates of the sanctuary screen were closed, the curtain was slowly drawn, and from behind it a soft mysterious voice pronounced some words.
  • Take me, take me! prayed Natasha, with impatient emotion in her heart, not crossing herself but letting her slender arms hang down as if expecting some invisible power at any moment to take her and deliver her from herself, from her regrets, desires, remorse, hopes, and sins.
  • Then came the prayer just received from the Synod--a prayer for the deliverance of Russia from hostile invasion.
  • From the day when Pierre, after leaving the Rostovs' with Natasha's grateful look fresh in his mind, had gazed at the comet that seemed to be fixed in the sky and felt that something new was appearing on his own horizon--from that day the problem of the vanity and uselessness of all earthly things, that had incessantly tormented him, no longer presented itself.
  • From the day when Pierre, after leaving the Rostovs' with Natasha's grateful look fresh in his mind, had gazed at the comet that seemed to be fixed in the sky and felt that something new was appearing on his own horizon--from that day the problem of the vanity and uselessness of all earthly things, that had incessantly tormented him, no longer presented itself.
  • But latterly, when more and more disquieting reports came from the seat of war and Natasha's health began to improve and she no longer aroused in him the former feeling of careful pity, an ever- increasing restlessness, which he could not explain, took possession of him.
  • In the morning, when he went to call at Rostopchin's he met there a courier fresh from the army, an acquaintance of his own, who often danced at Moscow balls.
  • Among these letters was one from Nicholas Rostov to his father.
  • Pierre, from club habit, always left both hat and stick in the anteroom.
  • Just then Petya came running in from the drawing room.
  • Well, and what news from the army?
  • "No, after dinner," said the old count, evidently expecting much enjoyment from that reading.
  • I don't know, I am very far from having military tastes, but in these times no one can answer for himself.
  • May the ruin he hopes to bring upon us recoil on his own head, and may Europe delivered from bondage glorify the name of Russia!
  • Before Shinshin had time to utter the joke he was ready to make on the count's patriotism, Natasha jumped up from her place and ran to her father.
  • But the count had already recovered from his excitement.
  • But in spite of this he continued to struggle desperately forward, and from between the backs of those in front he caught glimpses of an open space with a strip of red cloth spread out on it; but just then the crowd swayed back--the police in front were pushing back those who had pressed too close to the procession: the Emperor was passing from the palace to the Cathedral of the Assumption--and Petya unexpectedly received such a blow on his side and ribs and was squeezed so hard that suddenly everything grew dim before his eyes and he lost consciousness.
  • Suddenly the sound of a firing of cannon was heard from the embankment, to celebrate the signing of peace with the Turks, and the crowd rushed impetuously toward the embankment to watch the firing.
  • At last four men in uniforms and sashes emerged from the cathedral doors.
  • Seeing this the Emperor had a plateful of biscuits brought him and began throwing them down from the balcony.
  • He did not know why, but he had to have a biscuit from the Tsar's hand and he felt that he must not give way.
  • He did not go straight home from the Kremlin, but called on his friend Obolenski, who was fifteen and was also entering the regiment.
  • The retired naval man was speaking very boldly, as was evident from the expression on the faces of the listeners and from the fact that some people Pierre knew as the meekest and quietest of men walked away disapprovingly or expressed disagreement with him.
  • Pierre pushed his way into the middle of the group, listened, and convinced himself that the man was indeed a liberal, but of views quite different from his own.
  • Adraksin was in uniform, and whether as a result of the uniform or from some other cause Pierre saw before him quite a different man.
  • Not only was Pierre's attempt to speak unsuccessful, but he was rudely interrupted, pushed aside, and people turned away from him as from a common enemy.
  • Millions will pour forth from there"--he pointed to the merchants' hall--"but our business is to supply men and not spare ourselves...
  • As became known later, he had scarcely begun to address the merchants before tears gushed from his eyes and he concluded in a trembling voice.
  • But all these hints at what happened, both from the French side and the Russian, are advanced only because they fit in with the event.
  • Despite his seniority in rank Bagration, in this contest of magnanimity, took his orders from Barclay, but, having submitted, agreed with him less than ever.
  • This general, hating Barclay, rode to visit a friend of his own, a corps commander, and, having spent the day with him, returned to Barclay and condemned, as unsuitable from every point of view, the battleground he had not seen.
  • Princess Mary noticed to her surprise that during this illness the old prince not only excluded her from his room, but did not admit Mademoiselle Bourienne either.
  • On August 1, a second letter was received from Prince Andrew.
  • To this letter the old prince had replied affectionately, and from that time had kept the Frenchwoman at a distance.
  • "There was a letter from Prince Andrew today," he said to Princess Mary- -"Haven't you read it?"
  • I?... said the prince as if unpleasantly awakened, and not taking his eyes from the plan of the building.
  • That's not right! cried the prince, and himself pushed it a few inches from the corner and then closer in again.
  • He had the letter taken from his pocket and the table--on which stood a glass of lemonade and a spiral wax candle--moved close to the bed, and putting on his spectacles he began reading.
  • Bald Hills, Prince Nicholas Bolkonski's estate, lay forty miles east from Smolensk and two miles from the main road to Moscow.
  • The same evening that the prince gave his instructions to Alpatych, Dessalles, having asked to see Princess Mary, told her that, as the prince was not very well and was taking no steps to secure his safety, though from Prince Andrew's letter it was evident that to remain at Bald Hills might be dangerous, he respectfully advised her to send a letter by Alpatych to the Provincial Governor at Smolensk, asking him to let her know the state of affairs and the extent of the danger to which Bald Hills was exposed.
  • Having received all his orders Alpatych, wearing a white beaver hat--a present from the prince--and carrying a stick as the prince did, went out accompanied by his family.
  • "To his Honor Baron Asch, from General-in-Chief Prince Bolkonski," he announced with such solemnity and significance that the official turned to him and took the letters.
  • From this you will see that you have a perfect right to reassure the inhabitants of Smolensk, for those defended by two such brave armies may feel assured of victory.
  • (Instructions from Barclay de Tolly to Baron Asch, the civil governor of Smolensk, 1812.)
  • Carts piled high with household utensils, chairs, and cupboards kept emerging from the gates of the yards and moving along the streets.
  • From the host's room came the sounds of a child crying, the despairing sobs of a woman, and the hoarse angry shouting of Ferapontov.
  • "You brute, you murderer!" screamed a thin, pale woman who, with a baby in her arms and her kerchief torn from her head, burst through the door at that moment and down the steps into the yard.
  • The noise of wheels, hoofs, and bells was heard from the gateway as a little trap passed out.
  • From different sides came whistling sounds and the thud of cannon balls and bursting shells falling on the town.
  • But these sounds were hardly heard in comparison with the noise of the firing outside the town and attracted little attention from the inhabitants.
  • At that moment the pitiful wailing of women was heard from different sides, the frightened baby began to cry, and people crowded silently with pale faces round the cook.
  • On two sides black curling clouds of smoke rose and spread from the fires.
  • Through the streets soldiers in various uniforms walked or ran confusedly in different directions like ants from a ruined ant-hill.
  • Prince Andrew in his riding cloak, mounted on a black horse, was looking at Alpatych from the back of the crowd.
  • The fire died down for a moment and wreaths of black smoke rolled from under the roof.
  • From Smolensk the troops continued to retreat, followed by the enemy.
  • The cattle lowed from hunger, finding no food on the sun-parched meadows.
  • As soon as he came across a former acquaintance or anyone from the staff, he bristled up immediately and grew spiteful, ironical, and contemptuous.
  • But despite this, thanks to his regiment, Prince Andrew had something to think about entirely apart from general questions.
  • Riding past the pond where there used always to be dozens of women chattering as they rinsed their linen or beat it with wooden beetles, Prince Andrew noticed that there was not a soul about and that the little washing wharf, torn from its place and half submerged, was floating on its side in the middle of the pond.
  • The old man was still sitting in the ornamental garden, like a fly impassive on the face of a loved one who is dead, tapping the last on which he was making the bast shoe, and two little girls, running out from the hot house carrying in their skirts plums they had plucked from the trees there, came upon Prince Andrew.
  • Believing their danger past, they sprang from their ambush and, chirruping something in their shrill little voices and holding up their skirts, their bare little sunburned feet scampered merrily and quickly across the meadow grass.
  • But not far from Bald Hills he again came out on the road and overtook his regiment at its halting place by the dam of a small pond.
  • The dust always hung motionless above the buzz of talk that came from the resting troops.
  • He longed to get into that water, however dirty it might be, and he glanced round at the pool from whence came sounds of shrieks and laughter.
  • "Flesh, bodies, cannon fodder!" he thought, and he looked at his own naked body and shuddered, not from cold but from a sense of disgust and horror he did not himself understand, aroused by the sight of that immense number of bodies splashing about in the dirty pond.
  • On the seventh of August Prince Bagration wrote as follows from his quarters at Mikhaylovna on the Smolensk road:
  • The "man of great merit," despite his desire to obtain the post of director, could not refrain from reminding Prince Vasili of his former opinion.
  • As soon as he said this both Prince Vasili and Anna Pavlovna turned away from him and glanced sadly at one another with a sigh at his naivete.
  • A good chessplayer having lost a game is sincerely convinced that his loss resulted from a mistake he made and looks for that mistake in the opening, but forgets that at each stage of the game there were similar mistakes and that none of his moves were perfect.
  • How much more complex than this is the game of war, which occurs under certain limits of time, and where it is not one will that manipulates lifeless objects, but everything results from innumerable conflicts of various wills!
  • From Vyazma Napoleon ordered a direct advance on Moscow.
  • On the march from Vyazma to Tsarevo-Zaymishche he rode his light bay bobtailed ambler accompanied by his Guards, his bodyguard, his pages, and aides-de-camp.
  • After the return of Alpatych from Smolensk the old prince suddenly seemed to awake as from a dream.
  • He ordered the militiamen to be called up from the villages and armed, and wrote a letter to the commander-in- chief informing him that he had resolved to remain at Bald Hills to the last extremity and to defend it, leaving to the commander-in-chief's discretion to take measures or not for the defense of Bald Hills, where one of Russia's oldest generals would be captured or killed, and he announced to his household that he would remain at Bald Hills.
  • Trying to convict her, he told her she had worn him out, had caused his quarrel with his son, had harbored nasty suspicions of him, making it the object of her life to poison his existence, and he drove her from his study telling her that if she did not go away it was all the same to him.
  • She sat by the window listening to his voice which reached her from the garden.
  • Thoughts that had not entered her mind for years--thoughts of a life free from the fear of her father, and even the possibility of love and of family happiness--floated continually in her imagination like temptations of the devil.
  • She had noticed with what dissatisfaction he turned from the look she sometimes involuntarily fixed on him.
  • Princess Mary's heart beat so violently at this news that she grew pale and leaned against the wall to keep from falling.
  • Princess Mary could not quite make out what he had said, but from his look it was clear that he had uttered a tender caressing word such as he had never used to her before.
  • "Thank you... daughter dear!... for all, for all... forgive!... thank you!... forgive!... thank you!..." and tears began to flow from his eyes.
  • "I have a letter from him," she replied.
  • And he began to sob, and again tears flowed from his eyes.
  • They all drew back from the bed, making way for her.
  • They differed from them in speech, dress, and disposition.
  • Alpatych also knew that on the previous day another peasant had even brought from the village of Visloukhovo, which was occupied by the French, a proclamation by a French general that no harm would be done to the inhabitants, and if they remained they would be paid for anything taken from them.
  • As proof of this the peasant had brought from Visloukhovo a hundred rubles in notes (he did not know that they were false) paid to him in advance for hay.
  • But this he was unable to do, for he received tidings that the French had unexpectedly advanced, and had barely time to remove his own family and valuables from his estate.
  • Alpatych, arriving from the devastated Bald Hills estate, sent for his Dron on the day of the prince's funeral and told him to have twelve horses got ready for the princess' carriages and eighteen carts for the things to be removed from Bogucharovo.
  • Alpatych named certain peasants he knew, from whom he told him to take the carts.
  • His excellency Prince Andrew himself gave me orders to move all the people away and not leave them with the enemy, and there is an order from the Tsar about it too.
  • Alpatych repeated, withdrawing his hand from his bosom and solemnly pointing to the floor at Dron's feet.
  • Take the keys from me and discharge me, for Christ's sake!
  • Having wrung a submissive "I understand" from Dron, Alpatych contented himself with that, though he not only doubted but felt almost certain that without the help of troops the carts would not be forthcoming.
  • Without saying anything of this to the princess, Alpatych had his own belongings taken out of the carts which had arrived from Bald Hills and had those horses got ready for the princess' carriages.
  • Someone spoke her name in a soft and tender voice from the garden and kissed her head.
  • She said her only consolation was the fact that the princess allowed her to share her sorrow, that all the old misunderstandings should sink into nothing but this great grief; that she felt herself blameless in regard to everyone, and that he, from above, saw her affection and gratitude.
  • Mademoiselle Bourienne took from her reticule a proclamation (not printed on ordinary Russian paper) of General Rameau's, telling people not to leave their homes and that the French authorities would afford them proper protection.
  • "From whom did you get this?" she asked.
  • The old valet Tikhon, with sunken, emaciated face that bore the stamp of inconsolable grief, replied: "Yes, Princess" to all Princess Mary's questions and hardly refrained from sobbing as he looked at her.
  • "Dronushka," she said, regarding as a sure friend this Dronushka who always used to bring a special kind of gingerbread from his visit to the fair at Vyazma every year and smilingly offer it to her, "Dronushka, now since our misfortune..." she began, but could not go on.
  • To Princess Mary it was strange that now, at a moment when such sorrow was filling her soul, there could be rich people and poor, and the rich could refrain from helping the poor.
  • Order the keys to be taken from me, said he.
  • Go away yourself, alone... came from various sides of the crowd.
  • For a long time that night Princess Mary sat by the open window of her room hearing the sound of the peasants' voices that reached her from the village, but it was not of them she was thinking.
  • Toward midnight the voices began to subside, a cock crowed, the full moon began to show from behind the lime trees, a fresh white dewy mist began to rise, and stillness reigned over the village and the house.
  • From behind the door I heard how he lay down on his bed groaning and loudly exclaimed, 'My God!'
  • Two tall old peasants with wrinkled faces and scanty beards emerged from the tavern, smiling, staggering, and singing some incoherent song, and approached the officers.
  • At that moment, on the road leading from the big house, two women and a man in a white hat were seen coming toward the officers.
  • Lavrushka, however, ran up to Karp and seized him by the arms from behind.
  • "Shall I call up our men from beyond the hill?" he called out.
  • When her carriage drove out of the house, he mounted and accompanied her eight miles from Bogucharovo to where the road was occupied by our troops.
  • From the field beyond the village came now sounds of regimental music and now the roar of many voices shouting "Hurrah!" to the new commander-in-chief.
  • Two orderlies, a courier and a major-domo, stood near by, some ten paces from Prince Andrew, availing themselves of Kutuzov's absence and of the fine weather.
  • Prince Andrew knew Denisov from what Natasha had told him of her first suitor.
  • Of late he had received so many new and very serious impressions--such as the retreat from Smolensk, his visit to Bald Hills, and the recent news of his father's death--and had experienced so many emotions, that for a long time past those memories had not entered his mind, and now that they did, they did not act on him with nearly their former strength.
  • In the midst of his explanation shouts were heard from the army, growing more incoherent and more diffused, mingling with music and songs and coming from the field where the review was held.
  • Denisov came from those parts and knew the country well.
  • His plan seemed decidedly a good one, especially from the strength of conviction with which he spoke.
  • And from that hut, while Denisov was speaking, a general with a portfolio under his arm really did appear.
  • He took some gold pieces from his trouser pocket and put them on the dish for her.
  • Kutuzov suddenly cried in an agitated voice, evidently picturing vividly to himself from Prince Andrew's story the condition Russia was in.
  • On his way home from Vorontsovo, as he was passing the Bolotnoe Place Pierre, seeing a large crowd round the Lobnoe Place, stopped and got out of his trap.
  • The flogging was only just over, and the executioner was releasing from the flogging bench a stout man with red whiskers, in blue stockings and a green jacket, who was moaning piteously.
  • He was told that there in Perkhushkovo the earth trembled from the firing, but nobody could answer his questions as to who had won.
  • The Russian army, they say, in its retreat from Smolensk sought out for itself the best position for a general engagement and found such a position at Borodino.
  • The Russians, they say, fortified this position in advance on the left of the highroad (from Moscow to Smolensk) and almost at a right angle to it, from Borodino to Utitsa, at the very place where the battle was fought.
  • To anyone who looks at the field of Borodino without thinking of how the battle was actually fought, this position, protected by the river Kolocha, presents itself as obvious for an army whose object was to prevent an enemy from advancing along the Smolensk road to Moscow.
  • Napoleon, riding to Valuevo on the twenty-fourth, did not see (as the history books say he did) the position of the Russians from Utitsa to Borodino (he could not have seen that position because it did not exist), nor did he see an advanced post of the Russian army, but while pursuing the Russian rearguard he came upon the left flank of the Russian position--at the Shevardino Redoubt--and unexpectedly for the Russians moved his army across the Kolocha.
  • By crossing to the other side of the Kolocha to the left of the highroad, Napoleon shifted the whole forthcoming battle from right to left (looking from the Russian side) and transferred it to the plain between Utitsa, Semenovsk, and Borodino--a plain no more advantageous as a position than any other plain in Russia--and there the whole battle of the twenty-sixth of August took place.
  • (Poniatowski's action against Utitsa, and Uvarov's on the right flank against the French, were actions distinct from the main course of the battle.)
  • The battle of Borodino was not fought on a chosen and entrenched position with forces only slightly weaker than those of the enemy, but, as a result of the loss of the Shevardino Redoubt, the Russians fought the battle of Borodino on an open and almost unentrenched position, with forces only half as numerous as the French; that is to say, under conditions in which it was not merely unthinkable to fight for ten hours and secure an indecisive result, but unthinkable to keep an army even from complete disintegration and flight.
  • The peasant drivers, shouting and lashing their horses, kept crossing from side to side.
  • The sunshine from behind the hill did not penetrate into the cutting and there it was cold and damp, but above Pierre's head was the bright August sunshine and the bells sounded merrily.
  • Can one see from there?...
  • Yet from among these men twenty thousand are doomed to die, and they wonder at my hat!
  • Pierre stepped out of his carriage and, passing the toiling militiamen, ascended the knoll from which, according to the doctor, the battlefield could be seen.
  • From above on the left, bisecting that amphitheater, wound the Smolensk highroad, passing through a village with a white church some five hundred paces in front of the knoll and below it.
  • A church procession was coming up the hill from Borodino.
  • From behind them came the sound of church singing.
  • Pierre recognized him at once by his peculiar figure, which distinguished him from everybody else.
  • Pierre stopped some thirty paces from Kutuzov, talking to Boris.
  • You will see everything best from where Count Bennigsen will be.
  • I should like to start from the Moskva River and ride round the whole position.
  • Though Kutuzov had dismissed all unnecessary men from the staff, Boris had contrived to remain at headquarters after the changes.
  • From Gorki, Bennigsen descended the highroad to the bridge which, when they had looked at it from the hill, the officer had pointed out as being the center of our position and where rows of fragrant new-mown hay lay by the riverside.
  • From Gorki, Bennigsen descended the highroad to the bridge which, when they had looked at it from the hill, the officer had pointed out as being the center of our position and where rows of fragrant new-mown hay lay by the riverside.
  • They then crossed the hollow to Semenovsk, where the soldiers were dragging away the last logs from the huts and barns.
  • At last those mounted men rode away from the mound and disappeared.
  • From the fleches they rode still farther to the left, along a road winding through a thick, low-growing birch wood.
  • Like the gentle dove in the fable she was to pine apart from me....
  • But Napoleon came and swept him aside, unconscious of his existence, as he might brush a chip from his path, and his Bald Hills and his whole life fell to pieces.
  • Princess Mary says it is a trial sent from above.
  • The red-nosed Captain Timokhin, formerly Dolokhov's squadron commander, but now from lack of officers a battalion commander, shyly entered the shed followed by an adjutant and the regimental paymaster.
  • Why, when we were retreating from Sventsyani we dare not touch a stick or a wisp of hay or anything.
  • He could apparently not refrain from expressing the thoughts that had suddenly occurred to him.
  • And we said so because we had nothing to fight for there, we wanted to get away from the battlefield as soon as we could.
  • After they had gone Pierre approached Prince Andrew and was about to start a conversation when they heard the clatter of three horses' hoofs on the road not far from the shed, and looking in that direction Prince Andrew recognized Wolzogen and Clausewitz accompanied by a Cossack.
  • Napoleon, frowning, looked at him from under his brows.
  • But though Napoleon knew that de Beausset had to say something of this kind, and though in his lucid moments he knew it was untrue, he was pleased to hear it from him.
  • A present to Your Majesty from the Empress.
  • At a single gesture from him everyone went out on tiptoe, leaving the great man to himself and his emotion.
  • Having listened to a suggestion from Davout, who was now called Prince d'Eckmuhl, to turn the Russian left wing, Napoleon said it should not be done, without explaining why not.
  • After giving these and other commands he returned to his tent, and the dispositions for the battle were written down from his dictation.
  • General Campan's division did not seize the first fortification but was driven back, for on emerging from the wood it had to reform under grapeshot, of which Napoleon was unaware.
  • On returning from a second inspection of the lines, Napoleon remarked:
  • He was so much interested in that task that he was unable to sleep, and in spite of his cold which had grown worse from the dampness of the evening, he went into the large division of the tent at three o'clock in the morning, loudly blowing his nose.
  • The night was dark and damp, a scarcely perceptible moisture was descending from above.
  • The sun, just bursting forth from behind a cloud that had concealed it, was shining, with rays still half broken by the clouds, over the roofs of the street opposite, on the dew- besprinkled dust of the road, on the walls of the houses, on the windows, the fence, and on Pierre's horses standing before the hut.
  • Telling the groom to follow him with the horses, Pierre went down the street to the knoll from which he had looked at the field of battle the day before.
  • It was the same panorama he had admired from that spot the day before, but now the whole place was full of troops and covered by smoke clouds from the guns, and the slanting rays of the bright sun, rising slightly to the left behind Pierre, cast upon it through the clear morning air penetrating streaks of rosy, golden-tinted light and long dark shadows.
  • The smoke of the guns mingled with this mist, and over the whole expanse and through that mist the rays of the morning sun were reflected, flashing back like lightning from the water, from the dew, and from the bayonets of the troops crowded together by the riverbanks and in Borodino.
  • From the left, over fields and bushes, those large balls of smoke were continually appearing followed by their solemn reports, while nearer still, in the hollows and woods, there burst from the muskets small cloudlets that had no time to become balls, but had their little echoes in just the same way.
  • From the left, over fields and bushes, those large balls of smoke were continually appearing followed by their solemn reports, while nearer still, in the hollows and woods, there burst from the muskets small cloudlets that had no time to become balls, but had their little echoes in just the same way.
  • Kutuzov was saying to a general who stood beside him, not taking his eye from the battlefield.
  • He did not notice the sound of the bullets whistling from every side, or the projectiles that flew over him, did not see the enemy on the other side of the river, and for a long time did not notice the killed and wounded, though many fell near him.
  • We can get a view from there and in our battery it is still bearable, said the adjutant.
  • You'll see everything from there and it's less dangerous, and I'll come for you.
  • In contrast with the dread felt by the infantrymen placed in support, here in the battery where a small number of men busy at their work were separated from the rest by a trench, everyone experienced a common and as it were family feeling of animation.
  • Moreover, his whole attention was engrossed by watching the family circle--separated from all else-- formed by the men in the battery.
  • "To the fifth gun, wheel it up!" came shouts from one side.
  • From the battery they could be seen running back past it carrying their wounded on their muskets.
  • After this from amid the ranks of infantry to the right of the battery came the sound of a drum and shouts of command, and from the battery one saw how those ranks of infantry moved forward.
  • A few minutes later crowds of wounded men and stretcher-bearers came back from that direction.
  • The senior officer moved with big, rapid strides from one gun to another with a frowning face.
  • Beside himself with terror Pierre jumped up and ran back to the battery, as to the only refuge from the horrors that surrounded him.
  • On entering the earthwork he noticed that there were men doing something there but that no shots were being fired from the battery.
  • He saw the senior officer lying on the earth wall with his back turned as if he were examining something down below and that one of the soldiers he had noticed before was struggling forward shouting "Brothers!" and trying to free himself from some men who were holding him by the arm.
  • The prisoners were brought down from the battery and among them was a wounded French general, whom the officers surrounded.
  • Crowds of wounded- -some known to Pierre and some unknown--Russians and French, with faces distorted by suffering, walked, crawled, and were carried on stretchers from the battery.
  • On the field between Borodino and the fleches, beside the wood, the chief action of the day took place on an open space visible from both sides and was fought in the simplest and most artless way.
  • The battle began on both sides with a cannonade from several hundred guns.
  • Then when the whole field was covered with smoke, two divisions, Campan's and Dessaix's, advanced from the French right, while Murat's troops advanced on Borodino from their left.
  • But not only was it impossible to make out what was happening from where he was standing down below, or from the knoll above on which some of his generals had taken their stand, but even from the fleches themselves--in which by this time there were now Russian and now French soldiers, alternately or together, dead, wounded, alive, frightened, or maddened-- even at those fleches themselves it was impossible to make out what was taking place.
  • The handsome boy adjutant with the long hair sighed deeply without removing his hand from his hat and galloped back to where men were being slaughtered.
  • Before Belliard was out of sight, a messenger from another part of the battlefield galloped up.
  • The adjutant bent his head affirmatively and began to report, but the Emperor turned from him, took a couple of steps, stopped, came back, and called Berthier.
  • From all sides adjutants continued to arrive at a gallop and as if by agreement all said the same thing.
  • Napoleon stopped his horse and again fell into the reverie from which Berthier had aroused him.
  • He could not stop what was going on before him and around him and was supposed to be directed by him and to depend on him, and from its lack of success this affair, for the first time, seemed to him unnecessary and horrible.
  • "At eight hundred leagues from France, I will not have my Guard destroyed!" he said, and turning his horse rode back to Shevardino.
  • He gave no orders, but only assented to or dissented from what others suggested.
  • Soon after the duke's departure--before he could possibly have reached Semenovsk--his adjutant came back from him and told Kutuzov that the duke asked for more troops.
  • When Scherbinin came galloping from the left flank with news that the French had captured the fleches and the village of Semenovsk, Kutuzov, guessing by the sounds of the battle and by Scherbinin's looks that the news was bad, rose as if to stretch his legs and, taking Scherbinin's arm, led him aside.
  • On the faces of all who came from the field of battle, and of those who stood around him, Kutuzov noticed an expression of extreme tension.
  • Wolzogen had come from Barclay de Tolly to report on the progress of affairs on the left flank.
  • I have not considered it right to conceal from your Serene Highness what I have seen.
  • While Kutuzov was talking to Raevski and dictating the order of the day, Wolzogen returned from Barclay and said that General Barclay wished to have written confirmation of the order the field marshal had given.
  • The tales passing from mouth to mouth at different ends of the army did not even resemble what Kutuzov had said, but the sense of his words spread everywhere because what he said was not the outcome of cunning calculations, but of a feeling that lay in the commander-in-chief's soul as in that of every Russian.
  • Toward two o'clock the regiment, having already lost more than two hundred men, was moved forward into a trampled oatfield in the gap between Semenovsk and the Knoll Battery, where thousands of men perished that day and on which an intense, concentrated fire from several hundred enemy guns was directed between one and two o'clock.
  • Without moving from that spot or firing a single shot the regiment here lost another third of its men.
  • From in front and especially from the right, in the unlifting smoke the guns boomed, and out of the mysterious domain of smoke that overlay the whole space in front, quick hissing cannon balls and slow whistling shells flew unceasingly.
  • From in front and especially from the right, in the unlifting smoke the guns boomed, and out of the mysterious domain of smoke that overlay the whole space in front, quick hissing cannon balls and slow whistling shells flew unceasingly.
  • At times, as if to allow them a respite, a quarter of an hour passed during which the cannon balls and shells all flew overhead, but sometimes several men were torn from the regiment in a minute and the slain were continually being dragged away and the wounded carried off.
  • Some built little houses of the tufts in the plowed ground, or plaited baskets from the straw in the cornfield.
  • But the liveliest attention was attracted by occurrences quite apart from, and unconnected with, the battle.
  • Ah, they don't see it! came identical shouts from the ranks all along the regiment.
  • Yells and shrieks of laughter rose from the whole regiment.
  • Prince Andrew, pale and gloomy like everyone in the regiment, paced up and down from the border of one patch to another, at the edge of the meadow beside an oatfield, with head bowed and arms behind his back.
  • The killed were dragged from the front, the wounded carried away, and the ranks closed up.
  • He listened with weary ears to the ever-recurring sounds, distinguishing the whistle of flying projectiles from the booming of the reports, glanced at the tiresomely familiar faces of the men of the first battalion, and waited.
  • Five paces from him, a cannon ball tore up the dry earth and disappeared.
  • From the other side a battalion commander rode up.
  • "Look out!" came a frightened cry from a soldier and, like a bird whirring in rapid flight and alighting on the ground, a shell dropped with little noise within two steps of Prince Andrew and close to the battalion commander's horse.
  • At one and the same moment came the sound of an explosion, a whistle of splinters as from a breaking window frame, a suffocating smell of powder, and Prince Andrew started to one side, raising his arm, and fell on his chest.
  • From the right side of his abdomen, blood was welling out making a large stain on the grass.
  • Prince Andrew opened his eyes and looked up at the speaker from the stretcher into which his head had sunk deep and again his eyelids drooped.
  • The horses were eating oats from their movable troughs and sparrows flew down and pecked the grains that fell.
  • From the tents came now loud angry cries and now plaintive groans.
  • Two steps from him, leaning against a branch and talking loudly and attracting general attention, stood a tall, handsome, black-haired noncommissioned officer with a bandaged head.
  • "We kicked him out from there so that he chucked everything, we grabbed the King himself!" cried he, looking around him with eyes that glittered with fever.
  • After turning his head from right to left for some time, he sighed and looked down.
  • The pitiful groans from all sides and the torturing pain in his thigh, stomach, and back distracted him.
  • And suddenly a new unexpected memory from that realm of pure and loving childhood presented itself to him.
  • He rode hurriedly from the battlefield and returned to the Shevardino knoll, where he sat on his campstool, his sallow face swollen and heavy, his eyes dim, his nose red, and his voice hoarse, involuntarily listening, with downcast eyes, to the sounds of firing.
  • Never to the end of his life could he understand goodness, beauty, or truth, or the significance of his actions which were too contrary to goodness and truth, too remote from everything human, for him ever to be able to grasp their meaning.
  • Those ideas were stolen from me.
  • The Imperial army, strictly speaking, was one third composed of Dutch, Belgians, men from the borders of the Rhine, Piedmontese, Swiss, Genevese, Tuscans, Romans, inhabitants of the Thirty-second Military Division, of Bremen, of Hamburg, and so on: it included scarcely a hundred and forty thousand who spoke French.
  • Crowds of men of various arms, wounded and unwounded, with frightened faces, dragged themselves back to Mozhaysk from the one army and back to Valuevo from the other.
  • The cannon balls flew just as swiftly and cruelly from both sides, crushing human bodies, and that terrible work which was not done by the will of a man but at the will of Him who governs men and worlds continued.
  • By the time Achilles has covered the distance that separated him from the tortoise, the tortoise has covered one tenth of that distance ahead of him: when Achilles has covered that tenth, the tortoise has covered another one hundredth, and so on forever.
  • But however small the units it takes, we feel that to take any unit disconnected from others, or to assume a beginning of any phenomenon, or to say that the will of many men is expressed by the actions of any one historic personage, is in itself false.
  • It needs no critical exertion to reduce utterly to dust any deductions drawn from history.
  • Men leave their customary pursuits, hasten from one side of Europe to the other, plunder and slaughter one another, triumph and are plunged in despair, and for some years the whole course of life is altered and presents an intensive movement which first increases and then slackens.
  • The Russian army and people avoided a collision till Smolensk was reached, and again from Smolensk to Borodino.
  • Behind it were seven hundred miles of hunger-stricken, hostile country; ahead were a few dozen miles separating it from its goal.
  • The activity of a commander-in-chief does not at all resemble the activity we imagine to ourselves when we sit at ease in our studies examining some campaign on the map, with a certain number of troops on this and that side in a certain known locality, and begin our plans from some given moment.
  • A commander-in-chief is never dealing with the beginning of any event--the position from which we always contemplate it.
  • For instance, on the twenty-eighth it is suggested to him to cross to the Kaluga road, but just then an adjutant gallops up from Miloradovich asking whether he is to engage the French or retire.
  • At Drissa and at Smolensk and most palpably of all on the twenty-fourth of August at Shevardino and on the twenty- sixth at Borodino, and each day and hour and minute of the retreat from Borodino to Fili.
  • On the Poklonny Hill, four miles from the Dorogomilov gate of Moscow, Kutuzov got out of his carriage and sat down on a bench by the roadside.
  • A great crowd of generals gathered round him, and Count Rostopchin, who had come out from Moscow, joined them.
  • From all this talk he saw only one thing: that to defend Moscow was a physical impossibility in the full meaning of those words, that is to say, so utterly impossible that if any senseless commander were to give orders to fight, confusion would result but the battle would still not take place.
  • One terrible question absorbed him and to that question he heard no reply from anyone.
  • "My head, be it good or bad, must depend on itself," said he, rising from the bench, and he rode to Fili where his carriages were waiting.
  • Malasha looked down from the oven with shy delight at the faces, uniforms, and decorations of the generals, who one after another came into the room and sat down on the broad benches in the corner under the icons.
  • They waited for him from four till six o'clock and did not begin their deliberations all that time but talked in low tones of other matters.
  • Admitting the view of Barclay and others that a defensive battle at Fili was impossible, but imbued with Russian patriotism and the love of Moscow, he proposed to move troops from the right to the left flank during the night and attack the French right flank the following day.
  • Some of the generals, in low tones and in a strain very different from the way they had spoken during the council, communicated something to their commander-in-chief.
  • At that very time, in circumstances even more important than retreating without a battle, namely the evacuation and burning of Moscow, Rostopchin, who is usually represented as being the instigator of that event, acted in an altogether different manner from Kutuzov.
  • "It is disgraceful to run away from danger; only cowards are running away from Moscow," they were told.
  • Helene, having returned with the court from Vilna to Petersburg, found herself in a difficult position.
  • Had she attempted concealment, or tried to extricate herself from her awkward position by cunning, she would have spoiled her case by acknowledging herself guilty.
  • She confessed to him, and he absolved her from her sins.
  • And as it always happens in contests of cunning that a stupid person gets the better of cleverer ones, Helene--having realized that the main object of all these words and all this trouble was, after converting her to Catholicism, to obtain money from her for Jesuit institutions (as to which she received indications)-before parting with her money insisted that the various operations necessary to free her from her husband should be performed.
  • You swerved from it.
  • Toward the end of the battle of Borodino, Pierre, having run down from Raevski's battery a second time, made his way through a gully to Knyazkovo with a crowd of soldiers, reached the dressing station, and seeing blood and hearing cries and groans hurried on, still entangled in the crowds of soldiers.
  • The one thing he now desired with his whole soul was to get away quickly from the terrible sensations amid which he had lived that day and return to ordinary conditions of life and sleep quietly in a room in his own bed.
  • Filled with fright he opened his eyes and lifted his head from under his cloak.
  • They, those strange men he had not previously known, stood out clearly and sharply from everyone else.
  • I could have run away from my father, as I wanted to.
  • He felt ashamed, and with one arm covered his legs from which his cloak had in fact slipped.
  • Count Rostopchin had only that morning returned to town from his summer villa at Sokolniki.
  • Though this news was being concealed from the inhabitants, the officials--the heads of the various government departments--knew that Moscow would soon be in the enemy's hands, just as Count Rostopchin himself knew it, and to escape personal responsibility they had all come to the governor to ask how they were to deal with their various departments.
  • As Pierre was entering the reception room a courier from the army came out of Rostopchin's private room.
  • He could only have had it from the Postmaster.
  • And the count wanted him to say it was from Klyucharev?
  • Say from whom you had it.' 'I have seen no papers, I made it up myself.'
  • It has now come to my knowledge that you lent him your carriage for his removal from town, and that you have even accepted papers from him for safe custody.
  • They all had business with Pierre and wanted decisions from him.
  • When he awoke next morning the major-domo came to inform him that a special messenger, a police officer, had come from Count Rostopchin to know whether Count Bezukhov had left or was leaving the town.
  • The thought that both her sons were at the war, had both gone from under her wing, that today or tomorrow either or both of them might be killed like the three sons of one of her acquaintances, struck her that summer for the first time with cruel clearness.
  • He got Petya transferred from Obolenski's regiment to Bezukhov's, which was in training near Moscow.
  • At the end of August the Rostovs received another letter from Nicholas.
  • Though she concealed from him her intention of keeping him under her wing, Petya guessed her designs, and instinctively fearing that he might give way to emotion when with her--might "become womanish" as he termed it to himself--he treated her coldly, avoided her, and during his stay in Moscow attached himself exclusively to Natasha for whom he had always had a particularly brotherly tenderness, almost lover-like.
  • Owing to the count's customary carelessness nothing was ready for their departure by the twenty-eighth of August and the carts that were to come from their Ryazan and Moscow estates to remove their household belongings did not arrive till the thirtieth.
  • From the twenty-eighth till the thirty-first all Moscow was in a bustle and commotion.
  • The head of the family, Count Ilya Rostov, continually drove about the city collecting the current rumors from all sides and gave superficial and hasty orders at home about the preparations for their departure.
  • The countess watched the things being packed, was dissatisfied with everything, was constantly in pursuit of Petya who was always running away from her, and was jealous of Natasha with whom he spent all his time.
  • Nicholas' letter in which he mentioned Princess Mary had elicited, in her presence, joyous comments from the countess, who saw an intervention of Providence in this meeting of the princess and Nicholas.
  • Petya was not at home, he had gone to visit a friend with whom he meant to obtain a transfer from the militia to the active army.
  • She was roused from her reverie by the talk of the maids in the next room (which was theirs) and by the sound of their hurried footsteps going to the back porch.
  • The old count, suddenly setting to work, kept passing from the yard to the house and back again, shouting confused instructions to the hurrying people, and flurrying them still more.
  • There was also much china standing on the tables, and still more was being brought in from the storeroom.
  • We have a house of our own in Moscow, but it's a long way from here, and there's nobody living in it.
  • And the old servant got down from the box and went up to the cart.
  • As to the serfs the only indication was that three out of their huge retinue disappeared during the night, but nothing was stolen; and as to the value of their possessions, the thirty peasant carts that had come in from their estates and which many people envied proved to be extremely valuable and they were offered enormous sums of money for them.
  • Not only were huge sums offered for the horses and carts, but on the previous evening and early in the morning of the first of September, orderlies and servants sent by wounded officers came to the Rostovs' and wounded men dragged themselves there from the Rostovs' and from neighboring houses where they were accommodated, entreating the servants to try to get them a lift out of Moscow.
  • On the first of September he had come to Moscow from the army.
  • From the anteroom Berg ran with smooth though impatient steps into the drawing room, where he embraced the count, kissed the hands of Natasha and Sonya, and hastened to inquire after "Mamma's" health.
  • I tell you, Papa" (he smote himself on the breast as a general he had heard speaking had done, but Berg did it a trifle late for he should have struck his breast at the words "Russian army"), "I tell you frankly that we, the commanders, far from having to urge the men on or anything of that kind, could hardly restrain those... those... yes, those exploits of antique valor," he went on rapidly.
  • Just then the countess came in from the sitting room with a weary and dissatisfied expression.
  • Berg hurriedly jumped up, kissed her hand, asked about her health, and, swaying his head from side to side to express sympathy, remained standing beside her.
  • He got up from his chair and went to the door.
  • The news that carts were to be had spread to the neighboring houses, from which wounded men began to come into the Rostovs' yard.
  • They unloaded the wardrobe cart and sent it to take wounded men from a house two doors off.
  • Sonya too was busy all this time, but the aim of her efforts was quite different from Natasha's.
  • In Kudrino, from the Nikitski, Presnya, and Podnovinsk Streets came several other trains of vehicles similar to the Rostovs', and as they passed along the Sadovaya Street the carriages and carts formed two rows abreast.
  • But the coachman could not stop, for from the Meshchanski Street came more carts and carriages, and the Rostovs were being shouted at to move on and not block the way.
  • When he was informed that among others awaiting him in his reception room there was a Frenchman who had brought a letter from his wife, the Countess Helene, he felt suddenly overcome by that sense of confusion and hopelessness to which he was apt to succumb.
  • He felt that everything was now at an end, all was in confusion and crumbling to pieces, that nobody was right or wrong, the future held nothing, and there was no escape from this position.
  • His major-domo came in a second time to say that the Frenchman who had brought the letter from the countess was very anxious to see him if only for a minute, and that someone from Bazdeev's widow had called to ask Pierre to take charge of her husband's books, as she herself was leaving for the country.
  • From the landing where Pierre stood there was a second staircase leading to the back entrance.
  • As it was sealed up so it has remained, but Sophia Danilovna gave orders that if anyone should come from you they were to have the books.
  • All the rest of that day Pierre spent alone in his benefactor's study, and Gerasim heard him pacing restlessly from one corner to another and talking to himself.
  • At daybreak, however, those nearing the town at the Dorogomilov bridge saw ahead of them masses of soldiers crowding and hurrying across the bridge, ascending on the opposite side and blocking the streets and alleys, while endless masses of troops were bearing down on them from behind, and an unreasoning hurry and alarm overcame them.
  • Moscow seen from the Poklonny Hill lay spaciously spread out with her river, her gardens, and her churches, and she seemed to be living her usual life, her cupolas glittering like stars in the sunlight.
  • From that point of view he gazed at the Oriental beauty he had not seen before.
  • One word from me, one movement of my hand, and that ancient capital of the Tsars would perish.
  • Yes, here it lies before me, but why is the deputation from the city so long in appearing? he wondered.
  • The bees circle round a queenless hive in the hot beams of the midday sun as gaily as around the living hives; from a distance it smells of honey like the others, and bees fly in and out in the same way.
  • From the alighting board, instead of the former spirituous fragrant smell of honey and venom, and the warm whiffs of crowded life, comes an odor of emptiness and decay mingling with the smell of honey.
  • They do not sting, but crawl away from danger.
  • In a third place a crowd of bees, crushing one another, attack some victim and fight and smother it, and the victim, enfeebled or killed, drops from above slowly and lightly as a feather, among the heap of corpses.
  • The Russian troops were passing through Moscow from two o'clock at night till two in the afternoon and bore away with them the wounded and the last of the inhabitants who were leaving.
  • While the troops, dividing into two parts when passing around the Kremlin, were thronging the Moskva and the Stone bridges, a great many soldiers, taking advantage of the stoppage and congestion, turned back from the bridges and slipped stealthily and silently past the church of Vasili the Beatified and under the Borovitski gate, back up the hill to the Red Square where some instinct told them they could easily take things not belonging to them.
  • Shouldn't we put a cordon round to prevent the rest from running away?
  • From one open shop came the sound of blows and vituperation, and just as the officer came up to it a man in a gray coat with a shaven head was flung out violently.
  • The officer pounced on the soldiers who were in the shops, but at that moment fearful screams reached them from the huge crowd on the Moskva bridge and the officer ran out into the square.
  • What is it? he asked, but his comrade was already galloping off past Vasili the Beatified in the direction from which the screams came.
  • The huge courtyard of the Rostovs' house was littered with wisps of hay and with dung from the horses, and not a soul was to be seen there.
  • While still a few steps from the officer she unfolded the kerchief and took out of it a white twenty- five-ruble assignat and hastily handed it to him.
  • From an unfinished house on the Varvarka, the ground floor of which was a dramshop, came drunken shouts and songs.
  • These men, who under the leadership of the tall lad were drinking in the dramshop that morning, had brought the publican some skins from the factory and for this had had drink served them.
  • The publican was fighting one of the smiths at the door, and when the workmen came out the smith, wrenching himself free from the tavern keeper, fell face downward on the pavement.
  • The tall lad, standing in the porch, turned his bleared eyes from the publican to the smith and back again as if considering whom he ought to fight now.
  • "I daresay you would like to bind me!" shouted the publican, pushing away the men advancing on him, and snatching his cap from his head he flung it on the ground.
  • It was around him that the people chiefly crowded, expecting answers from him to the questions that occupied all their minds.
  • When the crowd collected round him he seemed confused, but at the demand of the tall lad who had pushed his way up to him, he began in a rather tremulous voice to read the sheet from the beginning.
  • The tall youth moved his lips and swayed from side to side.
  • After supper he lay down on a sofa without undressing, and was awakened soon after midnight by a courier bringing him a letter from Kutuzov.
  • Why were bundles of useless papers from the government offices, and Leppich's balloon and other articles removed?
  • Not only did it seem to him (as to all administrators) that he controlled the external actions of Moscow's inhabitants, but he also thought he controlled their mental attitude by means of his broadsheets and posters, written in a coarse tone which the people despise in their own class and do not understand from those in authority.
  • When, awakened from his sleep, he received that cold, peremptory note from Kutuzov, he felt the more irritated the more he felt himself to blame.
  • All that night Count Rostopchin issued orders, for which people came to him from all parts of Moscow.
  • From the Consistory, from the Senate, from the University, from the Foundling Hospital, the Suffragan has sent... asking for information....
  • From the Consistory, from the Senate, from the University, from the Foundling Hospital, the Suffragan has sent... asking for information....
  • From the governor of the prison... from the superintendent of the lunatic asylum...
  • From the governor of the prison... from the superintendent of the lunatic asylum...
  • "Oh, tell that blockhead," he said in reply to the question from the Registrar's Department, "that he should remain to guard his documents.
  • "Is my carriage ready?" asked Rostopchin, stepping back from the window.
  • The crowd moved eagerly from the balcony toward the porch.
  • "Ah!" said Rostopchin, hurriedly turning away his eyes from the young man in the fur-lined coat and pointing to the bottom step of the porch.
  • Like the seventh and last wave that shatters a ship, that last irresistible wave burst from the rear and reached the front ranks, carrying them off their feet and engulfing them all.
  • The crowd shrank back from it.
  • Planning beforehand what he would say to Kutuzov, Rostopchin turned angrily in his caleche and gazed sternly from side to side.
  • Swaying from side to side on his long, thin legs in his fluttering dressing gown, this lunatic was running impetuously, his gaze fixed on Rostopchin, shouting something in a hoarse voice and making signs to him to stop.
  • Thrice have they slain me, thrice have I risen from the dead.
  • Kutuzov slightly shook his head and not taking his penetrating gaze from Rostopchin's face muttered softly:
  • About the middle of the Arbat Street, near the Church of the Miraculous Icon of St. Nicholas, Murat halted to await news from the advanced detachment as to the condition in which they had found the citadel, le Kremlin.
  • These words went from one to another in the crowd.
  • The guns emerged at a trot from the column following Murat and advanced up the Arbat.
  • The sound of three more shots came from the gate.
  • One shot struck a French soldier's foot, and from behind the screens came the strange sound of a few voices shouting.
  • To all of them from the marshal to the least soldier, that place was not the Vozdvizhenka, Mokhavaya, or Kutafyev Street, nor the Troitsa Gate (places familiar in Moscow), but a new battlefield which would probably prove sanguinary.
  • The cries from the gates ceased.
  • Together with that sound came a solitary human cry from the gateway and amid the smoke appeared the figure of a bareheaded man in a peasant's coat.
  • No residents were left in Moscow, and the soldiers--like water percolating through sand--spread irresistibly through the city in all directions from the Kremlin into which they had first marched.
  • The few inhabitants who had remained invited commanding officers to their houses, hoping thereby to secure themselves from being plundered.
  • Moreover, at this moment Pierre was supported in his design and prevented from renouncing it by what he had already done in that direction.
  • If he were now to leave Moscow like everyone else, his flight from home, the peasant coat, the pistol, and his announcement to the Rostovs that he would remain in Moscow would all become not merely meaningless but contemptible and ridiculous, and to this Pierre was very sensitive.
  • Suddenly a fresh sound, a piercing feminine scream, reverberated from the porch and the cook came running into the vestibule.
  • Pierre moved away from the door.
  • In reply to his last question Pierre again explained who Makar Alexeevich was and how just before their arrival that drunken imbecile had seized the loaded pistol which they had not had time to recover from him, and begged the officer to let the deed go unpunished.
  • He also brought a bottle of kvass, taken from the kitchen for them to try.
  • Yes, my dear Monsieur Pierre, I owe you a fine votive candle for saving me from that maniac....
  • Gazing at the high starry sky, at the moon, at the comet, and at the glow from the fire, Pierre experienced a joyful emotion.
  • And suddenly remembering his intention he grew dizzy and felt so faint that he leaned against the fence to save himself from falling.
  • The glow of the first fire that began on the second of September was watched from the various roads by the fugitive Muscovites and by the retreating troops, with many different feelings.
  • The Rostov party spent the night at Mytishchi, fourteen miles from Moscow.
  • She moved simply to be farther away from the wounded man.
  • "Oh, how terrible," said Sonya returning from the yard chilled and frightened.
  • You can see it from the window, she said to her cousin, evidently wishing to distract her mind.
  • Her head moved from side to side from habit, but her eyes, feverishly wide, looked fixedly before her.
  • But in the yard there was a light from the fire at Little Mytishchi a mile and a half away, and through the night came the noise of people shouting at a tavern Mamonov's Cossacks had set up across the street, and the adjutant's unceasing moans could still be heard.
  • For a long time Natasha listened attentively to the sounds that reached her from inside and outside the room and did not move.
  • Natasha did not move, though her little bare foot, thrust out from under the quilt, was growing cold on the bare floor.
  • Stepping cautiously from one foot to the other she ran like a kitten the few steps to the door and grasped the cold door handle.
  • She passed the valet, the snuff fell from the candle wick, and she saw Prince Andrew clearly with his arms outside the quilt, and such as she had always seen him.
  • The doctor and valet lifted the cloak with which he was covered and, making wry faces at the noisome smell of mortifying flesh that came from the wound, began examining that dreadful place.
  • A healthy man can tear himself away from the deepest reflections to say a civil word to someone who comes in and can then return again to his own thoughts.
  • All the powers of his mind were more active and clearer than ever, but they acted apart from his will.
  • "Oh, how oppressive this continual delirium is," thought Prince Andrew, trying to drive that face from his imagination.
  • "What's this?" said the doctor, rising from his bed.
  • Like a somnambulist aroused from her sleep Natasha went out of the room and, returning to her hut, fell sobbing on her bed.
  • Pierre's way led through side streets to the Povarskoy and from there to the church of St. Nicholas on the Arbat, where he had long before decided that the deed should be done.
  • Occasionally curly tongues of flame rose from under the roofs of the houses.
  • He stopped as if awakening from a dream and lifted his head.
  • The woman's husband, a short, round- shouldered man in the undress uniform of a civilian official, with sausage-shaped whiskers and showing under his square-set cap the hair smoothly brushed forward over his temples, with expressionless face was moving the trunks, which were placed one on another, and was dragging some garments from under them.
  • Another man would have rescued her from the fire.
  • From the expression of his animated face the woman saw that this man might help her.
  • One of its sides had fallen in, another was on fire, and bright flames issued from the openings of the windows and from under the roof.
  • It had a peculiarly strong effect on him because at the sight of the fire he felt himself suddenly freed from the ideas that had weighed him down.
  • Get along! said several voices, and one of the soldiers, evidently afraid that Pierre might want to take from them some of the plate and bronzes that were in the drawer, moved threateningly toward him.
  • "A child?" shouted a Frenchman from above.
  • Glowing with the heat and from running, he felt at that moment more strongly than ever the sense of youth, animation, and determination that had come on him when he ran to save the child.
  • She was sitting on some bundles a little behind the old woman, and looked from under her long lashes with motionless, large, almond-shaped eyes at the ground before her.
  • While Pierre was running the few steps that separated him from the Frenchman, the tall marauder in the frieze gown was already tearing from her neck the necklace the young Armenian was wearing, and the young woman, clutching at her neck, screamed piercingly.
  • Shouts of approval were heard from the crowd around, and at the same moment a mounted patrol of French uhlans appeared from round the corner.
  • "Do you speak French?" the officer asked again, keeping at a distance from Pierre.
  • A little man in Russian civilian clothes rode out from the ranks, and by his clothes and manner of speaking Pierre at once knew him to be a French salesman from one of the Moscow shops.
  • "She is bringing me my daughter whom I have just saved from the flames," said he.
  • At Anna Pavlovna's on the twenty-sixth of August, the very day of the battle of Borodino, there was a soiree, the chief feature of which was to be the reading of a letter from His Lordship the Bishop when sending the Emperor an icon of the Venerable Sergius.
  • They all knew very well that the enchanting countess' illness arose from an inconvenience resulting from marrying two husbands at the same time, and that the Italian's cure consisted in removing such inconvenience; but in Anna Pavlovna's presence no one dared to think of this or even appear to know it.
  • It was Kutuzov's report, written from Tatarinova on the day of the battle.
  • Kutuzov wrote that the Russians had not retreated a step, that the French losses were much heavier than ours, and that he was writing in haste from the field of battle before collecting full information.
  • It is very difficult for events to be reflected in their real strength and completeness amid the conditions of court life and far from the scene of action.
  • But next day no news arrived from the army and the public mood grew anxious.
  • It was said that Prince Vasili and the old count had turned upon the Italian, but the latter had produced such letters from the unfortunate deceased that they had immediately let the matter drop.
  • On the third day after Kutuzov's report a country gentleman arrived from Moscow, and news of the surrender of Moscow to the French spread through the whole town.
  • As long as this news remained unofficial it was possible to doubt it, but the next day the following communication was received from Count Rostopchin:
  • Nine days after the abandonment of Moscow, a messenger from Kutuzov reached Petersburg with the official announcement of that event.
  • I see, Colonel, from all that is happening, that Providence requires great sacrifices of us...
  • Conceal nothing from me, I wish to know absolutely how things are.
  • In Petersburg and in the provinces at a distance from Moscow, ladies, and gentlemen in militia uniforms, wept for Russia and its ancient capital and talked of self-sacrifice and so on; but in the army which retired beyond Moscow there was little talk or thought of Moscow, and when they caught sight of its burned ruins no one swore to be avenged on the French, but they thought about their next pay, their next quarters, of Matreshka the vivandiere, and like matters.
  • When--free from soldiers, wagons, and the filthy traces of a camp--he saw villages with peasants and peasant women, gentlemen's country houses, fields where cattle were grazing, posthouses with stationmasters asleep in them, he rejoiced as though seeing all this for the first time.
  • From the commander of the militia he drove to the governor.
  • The women and girls flirted with him and, from the first day, the people concerned themselves to get this fine young daredevil of an hussar married and settled down.
  • She has heard from her niece how you rescued her...
  • When he had parted from Malvintseva Nicholas wished to return to the dancing, but the governor's little wife placed her plump hand on his sleeve and, saying that she wanted to have a talk with him, led him to her sitting room, from which those who were there immediately withdrew so as not to be in her way.
  • On reaching Moscow after her meeting with Rostov, Princess Mary had found her nephew there with his tutor, and a letter from Prince Andrew giving her instructions how to get to her Aunt Malvintseva at Voronezh.
  • From the time Rostov entered, her face became suddenly transformed.
  • He felt that the being before him was quite different from, and better than, anyone he had met before, and above all better than himself.
  • Princess Mary, having learned of her brother's wound only from the Gazette and having no definite news of him, prepared (so Nicholas heard, he had not seen her again himself) to set off in search of Prince Andrew.
  • "Oh, that would be so dread..." she began and, prevented by agitation from finishing, she bent her head with a movement as graceful as everything she did in his presence and, looking up at him gratefully, went out, following her aunt.
  • To be free, released from Sonya...
  • "From the governor," said Lavrushka in a sleepy voice.
  • Nicholas took the two letters, one of which was from his mother and the other from Sonya.
  • This unexpected and, as it seemed to Nicholas, quite voluntary letter from Sonya freed him from the knot that fettered him and from which there had seemed no escape.
  • Both letters were written from Troitsa.
  • The other, from the countess, described their last days in Moscow, their departure, the fire, and the destruction of all their property.
  • Sonya's letter written from Troitsa, which had come as an answer to Nicholas' prayer, was prompted by this: the thought of getting Nicholas married to an heiress occupied the old countess' mind more and more.
  • She was glad to find escape from them in practical activity.
  • But when she heard of Prince Andrew's presence in their house, despite her sincere pity for him and for Natasha, she was seized by a joyful and superstitious feeling that God did not intend her to be separated from Nicholas.
  • Sonya suddenly almost screamed, catching her companion's arm and stepping back from the door.
  • "Sonya!" said the countess, raising her eyes from her letter as her niece passed, "Sonya, won't you write to Nicholas?"
  • When asked what he was doing when he was arrested, Pierre replied in a rather tragic manner that he was restoring to its parents a child he had saved from the flames.
  • He passed four days in the coach house near the Crimean bridge and during that time learned, from the talk of the French soldiers, that all those confined there were awaiting a decision which might come any day from the marshal.
  • What marshal this was, Pierre could not learn from the soldiers.
  • He felt it in the merry sounds of regimental music he heard from the left side of the field, and felt and realized it especially from the list of prisoners the French officer had read out when he came that morning.
  • He and the other prisoners were taken to the right side of the Virgin's Field, to a large white house with an immense garden not far from the convent.
  • Apart from conditions of war and law, that look established human relations between the two men.
  • The adjutant, also, had evidently had no evil intent though he might have refrained from coming in.
  • Twelve sharpshooters with muskets stepped out of the ranks with a firm regular tread and halted eight paces from the post.
  • Pierre did not take his eyes from him and did not miss his slightest movement.
  • The soldiers dragged it awkwardly from the post and began pushing it into the pit.
  • This one, a young soldier, his face deadly pale, his shako pushed back, and his musket resting on the ground, still stood near the pit at the spot from which he had fired.
  • He swayed like a drunken man, taking some steps forward and back to save himself from falling.
  • After the execution Pierre was separated from the rest of the prisoners and placed alone in a small, ruined, and befouled church.
  • He heard what they said, but did not understand the meaning of the words and made no kind of deduction from or application of them.
  • He took a potato, drew out his clasp knife, cut the potato into two equal halves on the palm of his hand, sprinkled some salt on it from the rag, and handed it to Pierre.
  • Sounds of crying and screaming came from somewhere in the distance outside, and flames were visible through the cracks of the shed, but inside it was quiet and dark.
  • He did not, and could not, understand the meaning of words apart from their context.
  • His words and actions flowed from him as evenly, inevitably, and spontaneously as fragrance exhales from a flower.
  • When Princess Mary heard from Nicholas that her brother was with the Rostovs at Yaroslavl she at once prepared to go there, in spite of her aunt's efforts to dissuade her--and not merely to go herself but to take her nephew with her.
  • That she had not heard from Prince Andrew himself, Princess Mary attributed to his being too weak to write or to his considering the long journey too hard and too dangerous for her and his son.
  • But the very difficulties and preoccupations of the journey, which she took so actively in hand, saved her for a while from her grief and gave her strength.
  • "I have found out everything, your excellency: the Rostovs are staying at the merchant Bronnikov's house, in the Square not far from here, right above the Volga," said the courier.
  • But she felt oppressed by the fact that the mood of everyone around her was so far from what was in her own heart.
  • She felt that from her she would be able to understand and learn everything.
  • In his words, his tone, and especially in that calm, almost antagonistic look could be felt an estrangement from everything belonging to this world, terrible in one who is alive.
  • Princess Mary heard his words but they had no meaning for her, except as a proof of how far away he now was from everything living.
  • With a great effort he tried to return to life and to see things from their point of view.
  • She was sitting in an armchair placed sideways, screening the light of the candle from him, and was knitting a stocking.
  • He looked at her without moving and saw that she wanted to draw a deep breath after stooping, but refrained from doing so and breathed cautiously.
  • He seized the door, making a final effort to hold it back--to lock it was no longer possible--but his efforts were weak and clumsy and the door, pushed from behind by that terror, opened and closed again.
  • Once again it pushed from outside.
  • And all at once it grew light in his soul and the veil that had till then concealed the unknown was lifted from his spiritual vision.
  • From that day an awakening from life came to Prince Andrew together with his awakening from sleep.
  • From that day an awakening from life came to Prince Andrew together with his awakening from sleep.
  • And compared to the duration of life it did not seem to him slower than an awakening from sleep compared to the duration of a dream.
  • They both saw that he was sinking slowly and quietly, deeper and deeper, away from them, and they both knew that this had to be so and that it was right.
  • The countess and Sonya cried from pity for Natasha and because he was no more.
  • If the position of the Russian army really began to improve from the time of that march, it does not at all follow that the march was the cause of it.
  • Lanskoy informed the commander-in-chief that the army supplies were for the most part stored along the Oka in the Tula and Ryazan provinces, and that if they retreated on Nizhni the army would be separated from its supplies by the broad river Oka, which cannot be crossed early in winter.
  • This was the first indication of the necessity of deviating from what had previously seemed the most natural course--a direct retreat on Nizhni-Novgorod.
  • Having crossed over, by a forced march, to the Tula road beyond the Pakhra, the Russian commanders intended to remain at Podolsk and had no thought of the Tarutino position; but innumerable circumstances and the reappearance of French troops who had for a time lost touch with the Russians, and projects of giving battle, and above all the abundance of provisions in Kaluga province, obliged our army to turn still more to the south and to cross from the Tula to the Kaluga road and go to Tarutino, which was between the roads along which those supplies lay.
  • That movement from the Nizhni to the Ryazan, Tula, and Kaluga roads was so natural that even the Russian marauders moved in that direction, and demands were sent from Petersburg for Kutuzov to take his army that way.
  • At Tarutino Kutuzov received what was almost a reprimand from the Emperor for having moved his army along the Ryazan road, and the Emperor's letter indicated to him the very position he had already occupied near Kaluga.
  • But he continued to exert all his powers to restrain his troops from attacking.
  • The Russian army was commanded by Kutuzov and his staff, and also by the Emperor from Petersburg.
  • Kutuzov only replied that movements arranged from a distance were always difficult to execute.
  • The war went on independently of them, as it had to go: that is, never in the way people devised, but flowing always from the essential attitude of the masses.
  • From General Wintzingerode's reports, I see that an enemy corps of ten thousand men is moving on the Petersburg road.
  • That readiness will not weaken in me, but I and Russia have a right to expect from you all the zeal, firmness, and success which your intellect, military talent, and the courage of the troops you command justify us in expecting.
  • But by the time this letter, which proved that the real relation of the forces had already made itself felt in Petersburg, was dispatched, Kutuzov had found himself unable any longer to restrain the army he commanded from attacking and a battle had taken place.
  • While still at a distance he heard as he rode the merry sounds of a soldier's dance song proceeding from the house.
  • Ermolov came forward with a frown on his face and, hearing what the officer had to say, took the papers from him without a word.
  • He was in a state of physical suffering as if from corporal punishment, and could not avoid expressing it by cries of anger and distress.
  • This detachment halted at the outskirts of a forest, on the path leading from the village of Stromilova to Dmitrovsk.
  • Toward dawn, Count Orlov-Denisov, who had dozed off, was awakened by a deserter from the French army being brought to him.
  • He said that Murat was spending the night less than a mile from where they were, and that if they would let him have a convoy of a hundred men he would capture him alive.
  • They disappeared into the forest, and Count Orlov-Denisov, having seen Grekov off, returned, shivering from the freshness of the early dawn and excited by what he had undertaken on his own responsibility, and began looking at the enemy camp, now just visible in the deceptive light of dawn and the dying campfires.
  • How could one capture a commander-in-chief from among such a mass of troops!
  • One desperate, frightened yell from the first French soldier who saw the Cossacks, and all who were in the camp, undressed and only just waking up, ran off in all directions, abandoning cannons, muskets, and horses.
  • Toll, who in this battle played the part of Weyrother at Austerlitz, galloped assiduously from place to place, finding everything upside down everywhere.
  • "I prefer not to take lessons from anyone, but I can die with my men as well as anybody," he said, and advanced with a single division.
  • Meanwhile another column was to have attacked the French from the front, but Kutuzov accompanied that column.
  • Order after order and plan after plan were issued by him from the time he entered Moscow till the time he left it.
  • A paternal administration, chosen from among yourselves, will form your municipality or city government.
  • You, peaceful inhabitants of Moscow, artisans and workmen whom misfortune has driven from the city, and you scattered tillers of the soil, still kept out in the fields by groundless fear, listen!
  • Your fellow countrymen are emerging boldly from their hiding places on finding that they are respected.
  • And lastly you too, peasants, come from the forests where you are hiding in terror, return to your huts without fear, in full assurance that you will find protection!
  • (2) Such supplies will be bought from them at such prices as seller and buyer may agree on, and if a seller is unable to obtain a fair price he will be free to take his goods back to his village and no one may hinder him under any pretense.
  • (3) Sunday and Wednesday of each week are appointed as the chief market days and to that end a sufficient number of troops will be stationed along the highroads on Tuesdays and Saturdays at such distances from the town as to protect the carts.
  • But as food was too precious to be given to foreigners, who were for the most part enemies, Napoleon preferred to supply them with money with which to purchase food from outside, and had paper rubles distributed to them.
  • That army, like a herd of cattle run wild and trampling underfoot the provender which might have saved it from starvation, disintegrated and perished with each additional day it remained in Moscow.
  • Fleeing from Moscow the soldiers took with them everything they had stolen.
  • To study the skillful tactics and aims of Napoleon and his army from the time it entered Moscow till it was destroyed is like studying the dying leaps and shudders of a mortally wounded animal.
  • Napoleon, under pressure from his whole army, did the same thing.
  • A French corporal, with coat unbuttoned in a homely way, a skullcap on his head, and a short pipe in his mouth, came from behind a corner of the shed and approached Pierre with a friendly wink.
  • Those dreadful moments he had lived through at the executions had as it were forever washed away from his imagination and memory the agitating thoughts and feelings that had formerly seemed so important.
  • His eyes, prominent from the emaciation of his face, gazed inquiringly at his comrades who were paying no attention to him, and he moaned regularly and quietly.
  • Pierre, girt with a rope round his waist and wearing shoes Karataev had made for him from some leather a French soldier had torn off a tea chest and brought to have his boots mended with, went up to the sick man and squatted down beside him.
  • Moreover, just as Pierre was speaking a sharp rattle of drums was suddenly heard from both sides.
  • The officer prisoners were separated from the soldiers and told to march in front.
  • The officers, who had come from the other sheds, were all strangers to Pierre and much better dressed than he.
  • From the words of his comrades who saw better than he did, he found that this was the body of a man, set upright against the palings with its face smeared with soot.
  • From the bridge they had a view of endless lines of moving baggage trains before and behind them.
  • When they had crossed the Crimean bridge the prisoners moved a few steps forward, halted, and again moved on, and from all sides vehicles and men crowded closer and closer together.
  • They advanced the few hundred paces that separated the bridge from the Kaluga road, taking more than an hour to do so, and came out upon the square where the streets of the Transmoskva ward and the Kaluga road converge, and the prisoners jammed close together had to stand for some hours at that crossway.
  • From all sides, like the roar of the sea, were heard the rattle of wheels, the tramp of feet, and incessant shouts of anger and abuse.
  • Why, those are settings taken from some icons, by heaven!...
  • From the moment Pierre had recognized the appearance of the mysterious force nothing had seemed to him strange or dreadful: neither the corpse smeared with soot for fun nor these women hurrying away nor the burned ruins of Moscow.
  • During the hour Pierre watched them they all came flowing from the different streets with one and the same desire to get on quickly; they all jostled one another, began to grow angry and to fight, white teeth gleamed, brows frowned, ever the same words of abuse flew from side to side, and all the faces bore the same swaggeringly resolute and coldly cruel expression that had struck Pierre that morning on the corporal's face when the drums were beating.
  • For a long time, oaths, angry shouts, and fighting could be heard from all sides.
  • Several soldiers ran toward the cart from different sides: some beat the carriage horses on their heads, turning them aside, others fought among themselves, and Pierre saw that one German was badly wounded on the head by a sword.
  • It seemed that all these men, now that they had stopped amid fields in the chill dusk of the autumn evening, experienced one and the same feeling of unpleasant awakening from the hurry and eagerness to push on that had seized them at the start.
  • This spite increased still more when, on calling over the roll of prisoners, it was found that in the bustle of leaving Moscow one Russian soldier, who had pretended to suffer from colic, had escaped.
  • Suddenly he burst out into a fit of his broad, good-natured laughter, so loud that men from various sides turned with surprise to see what this strange and evidently solitary laughter could mean.
  • Pierre stopped laughing, got up, went farther away from the inquisitive man, and looked around him.
  • In the early days of October another envoy came to Kutuzov with a letter from Napoleon proposing peace and falsely dated from Moscow, though Napoleon was already not far from Kutuzov on the old Kaluga road.
  • That same evening a house serf who had come from Borovsk said he had seen an immense army entering the town.
  • From all these reports it was evident that where they had expected to meet a single division there was now the whole French army marching from Moscow in an unexpected direction--along the Kaluga road.
  • From all these reports it was evident that where they had expected to meet a single division there was now the whole French army marching from Moscow in an unexpected direction--along the Kaluga road.
  • "But this is very important, from General Dokhturov," said Bolkhovitinov, entering the open door which he had found by feeling in the dark.
  • From whom? came a sleepy voice.
  • From Dokhturov and from Alexey Petrovich.
  • From Dokhturov and from Alexey Petrovich.
  • On Konovnitsyn's handsome, resolute face with cheeks flushed by fever, there still remained for an instant a faraway dreamy expression remote from present affairs, but then he suddenly started and his face assumed its habitual calm and firm appearance.
  • From whom? he asked immediately but without hurry, blinking at the light.
  • They are like children from whom one can't get any sensible account of what has happened because they all want to show how well they can fight.
  • It seems to them that when they have thought of two or three contingencies" (he remembered the general plan sent him from Petersburg) "they have foreseen everything.
  • To such customary routine belonged his conversations with the staff, the letters he wrote from Tarutino to Madame de Stael, the reading of novels, the distribution of awards, his correspondence with Petersburg, and so on.
  • Kutuzov sat up with one leg hanging down from the bed and his big paunch resting against the other which was doubled under him.
  • Each of them desired nothing more than to give himself up as a prisoner to escape from all this horror and misery; but on the one hand the force of this common attraction to Smolensk, their goal, drew each of them in the same direction; on the other hand an army corps could not surrender to a company, and though the French availed themselves of every convenient opportunity to detach themselves and to surrender on the slightest decent pretext, such pretexts did not always occur.
  • What is the use of that, when a third of their army has melted away on the road from Moscow to Vyazma without any battle?
  • But drawing from his aged wisdom what they could understand, he told them of the golden bridge, and they laughed at and slandered him, flinging themselves on, rending and exulting over the dying beast.
  • So according to history it has been found from the most ancient times, and so it is to our own day.
  • One can imagine what confusion and obscurity would result from such an account of the duel.
  • The burning of towns and villages, the retreats after battles, the blow dealt at Borodino and the renewed retreat, the burning of Moscow, the capture of marauders, the seizure of transports, and the guerrilla war were all departures from the rules.
  • One of the most obvious and advantageous departures from the so-called laws of war is the action of scattered groups against men pressed together in a mass.
  • This contradiction arises from the fact that military science assumes the strength of an army to be identical with its numbers.
  • They gathered the fallen leaves that dropped of themselves from that withered tree--the French army--and sometimes shook that tree itself.
  • Now only the commanders of detachments with staffs, and moving according to rules at a distance from the French, still regarded many things as impossible.
  • On October 22 it was moving from the village of Mikulino to that of Shamshevo.
  • To the left of the road between Mikulino and Shamshevo there were large forests, extending in some places up to the road itself though in others a mile or more back from it.
  • That morning, Cossacks of Denisov's party had seized and carried off into the forest two wagons loaded with cavalry saddles, which had stuck in the mud not far from Mikulino where the forest ran close to the road.
  • It was necessary to let the French reach Shamshevo quietly without alarming them and then, after joining Dolokhov who was to come that evening to a consultation at a watchman's hut in the forest less than a mile from Shamshevo, to surprise the French at dawn, falling like an avalanche on their heads from two sides, and rout and capture them all at one blow.
  • In their rear, more than a mile from Mikulino where the forest came right up to the road, six Cossacks were posted to report if any fresh columns of French should show themselves.
  • All that he now wanted to know was what troops these were and to learn that he had to capture a "tongue"--that is, a man from the enemy column.
  • Denisov in a felt cloak and a sheepskin cap from which the rain ran down was riding a thin thoroughbred horse with sunken sides.
  • Like his horse, which turned its head and laid its ears back, he shrank from the driving rain and gazed anxiously before him.
  • Steam rose from them.
  • "From the general," said the officer.
  • The rain had stopped, and only the mist was falling and drops from the trees.
  • From the spot where the peasant was standing they could see the French.
  • In the village, in the house, in the garden, by the well, by the pond, over all the rising ground, and all along the road uphill from the bridge leading to the village, not more than five hundred yards away, crowds of men could be seen through the shimmering mist.
  • Denisov turned away from him frowning and addressed the esaul, conveying his own conjectures to him.
  • While they were talking in undertones the crack of a shot sounded from the low ground by the pond, a puff of white smoke appeared, then another, and the sound of hundreds of seemingly merry French voices shouting together came up from the slope.
  • He was a peasant from Pokrovsk, near the river Gzhat.
  • Denisov then relieved him from drudgery and began taking him with him when he went out on expeditions and had him enrolled among the Cossacks.
  • "Yes, we saw from the hill how you took to your heels through the puddles!" said the esaul, screwing up his glittering eyes.
  • Petya badly wanted to laugh, but noticed that they all refrained from laughing.
  • He turned his eyes rapidly from Tikhon's face to the esaul's and Denisov's, unable to make out what it all meant.
  • Petya, having left his people after their departure from Moscow, joined his regiment and was soon taken as orderly by a general commanding a large guerrilla detachment.
  • I bought a capital one from our sutler!
  • When the boy had entered the hut, Petya sat down at a distance from him, considering it beneath his dignity to pay attention to him.
  • The arrival of Dolokhov diverted Petya's attention from the drummer boy, to whom Denisov had had some mutton and vodka given, and whom he had had dressed in a Russian coat so that he might be kept with their band and not sent away with the other prisoners.
  • Petya had heard in the army many stories of Dolokhov's extraordinary bravery and of his cruelty to the French, so from the moment he entered the hut Petya did not take his eyes from him, but braced himself up more and more and held his head high, that he might not be unworthy even of such company.
  • And without waiting for an answer from the sentinel, who had stepped aside, Dolokhov rode up the incline at a walk.
  • "If you were counting on the evening soup, you have come too late," said a voice from behind the fire with a repressed laugh.
  • That officer did not take his eyes from Dolokhov and again asked to what regiment he belonged.
  • Dolokhov, as if he had not heard the question, did not reply, but lighting a short French pipe which he took from his pocket began asking the officer in how far the road before them was safe from Cossacks.
  • "Those brigands are everywhere," replied an officer from behind the fire.
  • The rain was over, but drops were still falling from the trees.
  • The Cossack bent forward from under the wagon to get a closer look at Petya.
  • Perhaps he was really sitting on a wagon, but it might very well be that he was not sitting on a wagon but on a terribly high tower from which, if he fell, he would have to fall for a whole day or a whole month, or go on falling and never reach the bottom.
  • The melody grew and passed from one instrument to another.
  • He closed his eyes, and, from all sides as if from a distance, sounds fluttered, grew into harmonies, separated, blended, and again all mingled into the same sweet and solemn hymn.
  • And from an unknown depth rose increasingly triumphant sounds.
  • And at first from afar he heard men's voices and then women's.
  • With a solemn triumphal march there mingled a song, the drip from the trees, and the hissing of the saber, "Ozheg-zheg-zheg..." and again the horses jostled one another and neighed, not disturbing the choir but joining in it.
  • Petya shook himself, jumped up, took a ruble from his pocket and gave it to Likhachev; then he flourished the saber, tested it, and sheathed it.
  • In an instant the tramp of horses galloping forward was heard, shouts came from various sides, and then more shots.
  • In front of him soldiers, probably Frenchmen, were running from right to left across the road.
  • From the midst of that crowd terrible screams arose.
  • Cossacks, hussars, and ragged Russian prisoners, who had come running from both sides of the road, were shouting something loudly and incoherently.
  • "Too late again!" flashed through Petya's mind and he galloped on to the place from which the rapid firing could be heard.
  • The shots came from the yard of the landowner's house he had visited the night before with Dolokhov.
  • "Killed?" cried Denisov, recognizing from a distance the unmistakably lifeless attitude--very familiar to him--in which Petya's body was lying.
  • From Vyazma onwards the French army, which had till then moved in three columns, went on as a single group.
  • The road along which they moved was bordered on both sides by dead horses; ragged men who had fallen behind from various regiments continually changed about, now joining the moving column, now again lagging behind it.
  • Of the three hundred and thirty men who had set out from Moscow fewer than a hundred now remained.
  • On the third day after leaving Moscow Karataev again fell ill with the fever he had suffered from in the hospital in Moscow, and as he grew gradually weaker Pierre kept away from him.
  • When he did so and heard the subdued moaning with which Karataev generally lay down at the halting places, and when he smelled the odor emanating from him which was now stronger than before, Pierre moved farther away and did not think about him.
  • While imprisoned in the shed Pierre had learned not with his intellect but with his whole being, by life itself, that man is created for happiness, that happiness is within him, in the satisfaction of simple human needs, and that all unhappiness arises not from privation but from superfluity.
  • All around lay the flesh of different animals--from men to horses--in various stages of decomposition; and as the wolves were kept off by the passing men the dog could eat all it wanted.
  • Pierre walked along, looking from side to side, counting his steps in threes, and reckoning them off on his fingers.
  • This something was a most subtle spiritual deduction from a conversation with Karataev the day before.
  • A paper has come from the Tsar!' so they began looking for him," here Karataev's lower jaw trembled, "but God had already forgiven him--he was dead!
  • From all sides came shouts of command, and from the left came smartly dressed cavalrymen on good horses, passing the prisoners at a trot.
  • From all sides came shouts of command, and from the left came smartly dressed cavalrymen on good horses, passing the prisoners at a trot.
  • From behind, where Karataev had been sitting, came the sound of a shot.
  • And it grows, merges, disappears from the surface, sinks to the depths, and again emerges.
  • And without linking up the events of the day or drawing a conclusion from them, Pierre closed his eyes, seeing a vision of the country in summertime mingled with memories of bathing and of the liquid, vibrating globe, and he sank into water so that it closed over his head.
  • "Filez, filez!" * Dolokhov kept saying, having adopted this expression from the French, and when his eyes met those of the prisoners they flashed with a cruel light.
  • From Moscow to Vyazma the French army of seventy-three thousand men not reckoning the Guards (who did nothing during the whole war but pillage) was reduced to thirty-six thousand, though not more than five thousand had fallen in battle.
  • Berthier wrote to his Emperor (we know how far commanding officers allow themselves to diverge from the truth in describing the condition of an army) and this is what he said:
  • In such a state of affairs, whatever your ultimate plans may be, the interest of Your Majesty's service demands that the army should be rallied at Smolensk and should first of all be freed from ineffectives, such as dismounted cavalry, unnecessary baggage, and artillery material that is no longer in proportion to the present forces.
  • November 9: twenty miles from Smolensk.
  • Expecting the enemy from behind and not in front, the French separated in their flight and spread out over a distance of twenty-four hours.
  • Seeing their enemy unexpectedly the French fell into confusion and stopped short from the sudden fright, but then they resumed their flight, abandoning their comrades who were farther behind.
  • From the time they turned onto the Kaluga road to the day their leader fled from the army, none of the movements of the crowd had any sense.
  • From the time they turned onto the Kaluga road to the day their leader fled from the army, none of the movements of the crowd had any sense.
  • Similarly profound considerations are given for his retreat from Smolensk to Orsha.
  • And lastly, the final departure of the great Emperor from his heroic army is presented to us by the historians as something great and characteristic of genius.
  • The explanation of this strange fact given by Russian military historians (to the effect that Kutuzov hindered an attack) is unfounded, for we know that he could not restrain the troops from attacking at Vyazma and Tarutino.
  • The Russian military historians in so far as they submit to claims of logic must admit that conclusion, and in spite of their lyrical rhapsodies about valor, devotion, and so forth, must reluctantly admit that the French retreat from Moscow was a series of victories for Napoleon and defeats for Kutuzov.
  • The source of this contradiction lies in the fact that the historians studying the events from the letters of the sovereigns and the generals, from memoirs, reports, projects, and so forth, have attributed to this last period of the war of 1812 an aim that never existed, namely that of cutting off and capturing Napoleon with his marshals and his army.
  • But not even that could be said for those who drew up this project, for it was not they who had suffered from the trampled beds.
  • The people had a single aim: to free their land from invasion.
  • They carefully guarded their open wounds from any rough and painful contact.
  • Only when alone together were they free from such outrage and pain.
  • Natasha remained alone and, from the time Princess Mary began making preparations for departure, held aloof from her too.
  • And she ran out of the room, with difficulty refraining from tears of vexation and irritation rather than of sorrow.
  • She now saw him from the commencement of that scene and relived what she had then felt.
  • Besides a feeling of aloofness from everybody Natasha was feeling a special estrangement from the members of her own family.
  • Princess Mary, pale and with quivering chin, came out from that room and taking Natasha by the arm said something to her.
  • They saw that she alone was able to restrain her mother from unreasoning despair.
  • Petya's death had torn from her half her life.
  • The wound had begun to heal from within.
  • To that end Kutuzov's activity was directed during the whole campaign from Moscow to Vilna--not casually or intermittently but so consistently that he never once deviated from it.
  • Prince Eugene of Wurttemberg fired from a hill over the French crowds that were running past, and demanded reinforcements which did not arrive.
  • Kutuzov never talked of "forty centuries looking down from the Pyramids," of the sacrifices he offered for the fatherland, or of what he intended to accomplish or had accomplished; in general he said nothing about himself, adopted no pose, always appeared to be the simplest and most ordinary of men, and said the simplest and most ordinary things.
  • Beginning with the battle of Borodino, from which time his disagreement with those about him began, he alone said that the battle of Borodino was a victory, and repeated this both verbally and in his dispatches and reports up to the time of his death.
  • And only that feeling placed him on that highest human pedestal from which he, the commander-in-chief, devoted all his powers not to slaying and destroying men but to saving and showing pity on them.
  • "What were you saying?" he asked the general, who continuing his report directed the commander-in-chief's attention to some standards captured from the French and standing in front of the Preobrazhensk regiment.
  • "Ah, the standards!" said Kutuzov, evidently detaching himself with difficulty from the thoughts that preoccupied him.
  • Thousands of eyes were looking at him from all sides awaiting a word from him.
  • One part of it dispersed and waded knee-deep through the snow into a birch forest to the right of the village, and immediately the sound of axes and swords, the crashing of branches, and merry voices could be heard from there.
  • A third section scattered through the village arranging quarters for the staff officers, carrying out the French corpses that were in the huts, and dragging away boards, dry wood, and thatch from the roofs, for the campfires, or wattle fences to serve for shelter.
  • The wattle wall the men had brought was set up in a semicircle by the Eighth Company as a shelter from the north, propped up by musket rests, and a campfire was built before it.
  • Fetch some more wood! shouted a red-haired and red-faced man, screwing up his eyes and blinking because of the smoke but not moving back from the fire.
  • "Was it from the cold?" asked someone.
  • From the cold indeed!
  • If it had been from the cold, ours would not have rotted either.
  • "It must be from their food," said the sergeant major.
  • That peasant near Mozhaysk where the battle was said the men were all called up from ten villages around and they carted for twenty days and still didn't finish carting the dead away.
  • From a campfire a hundred paces off came a sound of general, merry laughter.
  • Why talk rubbish, lout that you are--a real peasant! came rebukes from all sides addressed to the jesting soldier.
  • Ha, ha, ha! rose their rough, joyous laughter from all sides.
  • When the bridges broke down, unarmed soldiers, people from Moscow and women with children who were with the French transport, all--carried on by vis inertiae-- pressed forward into boats and into the ice-covered water and did not, surrender.
  • As long as they remained with their own people each might hope for help from his fellows and the definite place he held among them.
  • The French perished from the conditions to which the Russian army was itself exposed.
  • It was impossible to take bread and clothes from our hungry and indispensable soldiers to give to the French who, though not harmful, or hated, or guilty, were simply unnecessary.
  • And he understood this not merely from the attitude of the court.
  • From the habit of fifty years all this had a physically agitating effect on the old general.
  • The Emperor with a rapid glance scanned Kutuzov from head to foot, frowned for an instant, but immediately mastering himself went up to the old man, extended his arms and embraced him.
  • So naturally, simply, and gradually--just as he had come from Turkey to the Treasury in Petersburg to recruit the militia, and then to the army when he was needed there--now when his part was played out, Kutuzov's place was taken by a new and necessary performer.
  • The movement of peoples from west to east was to be succeeded by a movement of peoples from east to west, and for this fresh war another leader was necessary, having qualities and views differing from Kutuzov's and animated by different motives.
  • Scarcely any impression was left on Pierre's mind by all that happened to him from the time of his rescue till his illness.
  • Just then he was only anxious to get away as quickly as possible from places where people were killing one another, to some peaceful refuge where he could recover himself, rest, and think over all the strange new facts he had learned; but on reaching Orel he immediately fell ill.
  • To that question, "What for?" a simple answer was now always ready in his soul: "Because there is a God, that God without whose will not one hair falls from a man's head."
  • There were several prisoners from the French army in Orel, and the doctor brought one of them, a young Italian, to see Pierre.
  • You, who have suffered so from the French, do not even feel animosity toward them.
  • This was his acknowledgment of the impossibility of changing a man's convictions by words, and his recognition of the possibility of everyone thinking, feeling, and seeing things each from his own point of view.
  • The difference, and sometimes complete contradiction, between men's opinions and their lives, and between one man and another, pleased him and drew from him an amused and gentle smile.
  • But in January Savelich came from Moscow and gave him an account of the state of things there, and spoke of the estimate an architect had made of the cost of rebuilding the town and country houses, speaking of this as of a settled matter.
  • About the same time he received letters from Prince Vasili and other Petersburg acquaintances speaking of his wife's debts.
  • He felt himself not only free from social obligations but also from that feeling which, it seemed to him, he had aroused in himself.
  • On the third day after his arrival he heard from the Drubetskoys that Princess Mary was in Moscow.
  • A few minutes later the footman returned with Dessalles, who brought word from the princess that she would be very glad to see Pierre if he would excuse her want of ceremony and come upstairs to her apartment.
  • He spoke of you even at the very last, she went on, turning her eyes from Pierre to her companion with a shyness that surprised him for an instant.
  • All I know I heard at second hand from others.
  • She again glanced rapidly from Pierre's face to that of the lady in the black dress and said:
  • Pierre looked again at the companion's pale, delicate face with its black eyes and peculiar mouth, and something near to him, long forgotten and more than sweet, looked at him from those attentive eyes.
  • "Yes, is there a family free from sorrow now?" said Pierre, addressing Natasha.
  • Pierre hurriedly turned away from her and again addressed Princess Mary, asking about his friend's last days.
  • He did not purposely say things to please her, but whatever he was saying he regarded from her standpoint.
  • We knew nothing of it when we started from Moscow.
  • She got up quickly just as Nicholas entered, almost ran to the door which was hidden by curtains, struck her head against it, and rushed from the room with a moan either of pain or sorrow.
  • Princess Mary roused him from his abstraction by drawing his attention to her nephew who had entered the room.
  • Pierre admitted that it was true, and from that was gradually led by Princess Mary's questions and especially by Natasha's into giving a detailed account of his adventures.
  • By this time he had risen from the table and was pacing the room, Natasha following him with her eyes.
  • No, you can't understand what I learned from that illiterate man--that simple fellow.
  • I too should wish nothing but to relive it all from the beginning.
  • With a short coat and his hair cropped; just as if, well, just as if he had come straight from the bath...
  • Evidently it has to be so, said he to himself, and hastily undressing he got into bed, happy and agitated but free from hesitation or indecision.
  • Though Princess Mary and Natasha were evidently glad to see their visitor and though all Pierre's interest was now centered in that house, by the evening they had talked over everything and the conversation passed from one trivial topic to another and repeatedly broke off.
  • From that evening she seemed to have forgotten all that had happened to her.
  • The sea of history was not driven spasmodically from shore to shore as previously.
  • Historic figures were not borne by the waves from one shore to another as before.
  • The commencement of that movement was the movement from west to east.
  • And by chance an escape from this dangerous position presents itself in the form of an aimless and senseless expedition to Africa.
  • His childishly rash, uncalled-for, and ignoble departure from Africa, leaving his comrades in distress, is set down to his credit, and again the enemy's fleet twice lets him slip past.
  • That city is taken; the Russian army suffers heavier losses than the opposing armies had suffered in the former war from Austerlitz to Wagram.
  • But suddenly instead of those chances and that genius which hitherto had so consistently led him by an uninterrupted series of successes to the predestined goal, an innumerable sequence of inverse chances occur--from the cold in his head at Borodino to the sparks which set Moscow on fire, and the frosts--and instead of genius, stupidity and immeasurable baseness become evident.
  • A countermovement is then accomplished from east to west with a remarkable resemblance to the preceding movement from west to east.
  • The man who ten years before and a year later was considered an outlawed brigand is sent to an island two days' sail from France, which for some reason is presented to him as his dominion, and guards are given to him and millions of money are paid him.
  • But the wave they feel to be rising does not come from the quarter they expect.
  • It rises again from the same point as before--Paris.
  • The last backwash of the movement from the west occurs: a backwash which serves to solve the apparently insuperable diplomatic difficulties and ends the military movement of that period of history.
  • What was needed for him who, overshadowing others, stood at the head of that movement from east to west?
  • A poet admires the bee sucking from the chalice of a flower and says it exists to suck the fragrance of flowers.
  • A beekeeper, seeing the bee collect pollen from flowers and carry it to the hive, says that it exists to gather honey.
  • The events of the previous year: the burning of Moscow and the flight from it, the death of Prince Andrew, Natasha's despair, Petya's death, and the old countess' grief fell blow after blow on the old count's head.
  • He realized from the first that he would not get up again, despite the doctor's encouragement.
  • Having borrowed money from his brother-in-law, Nicholas tried to hide his wretched condition from him.
  • From reports current in town she learned how the Rostovs were situated, and how "the son has sacrificed himself for his mother," as people were saying.
  • You hide everything from me.
  • Well, I have asked you, and now I won't interfere any more since you have secrets from your mother.
  • Excuse me, good-by! and suddenly she began to cry and was hurrying from the room.
  • Having started farming from necessity, he soon grew so devoted to it that it became his favorite and almost his sole occupation.
  • At first he watched the serfs, trying to understand their aims and what they considered good and bad, and only pretended to direct them and give orders while in reality learning from them their methods, their manner of speech, and their judgment of what was good and bad.
  • He was hard alike on the lazy, the depraved, and the weak, and tried to get them expelled from the commune.
  • Countess Mary was jealous of this passion of her husband's and regretted that she could not share it; but she could not understand the joys and vexations he derived from that world, to her so remote and alien.
  • His means increased rapidly; serfs from neighboring estates came to beg him to buy them, and long after his death the memory of his administration was devoutly preserved among the serfs.
  • Once in summer he had sent for the village elder from Bogucharovo, a man who had succeeded to the post when Dron died and who was accused of dishonesty and various irregularities.
  • She never cried from pain or vexation, but always from sorrow or pity, and when she wept her radiant eyes acquired an irresistible charm.
  • He understood what she was weeping about, but could not in his heart at once agree with her that what he had regarded from childhood as quite an everyday event was wrong.
  • The tears flowed faster still from the countess' eyes.
  • The whole summer, from spring sowing to harvest, he was busy with the work on his farm.
  • From the time of his marriage Sonya had lived in his house.
  • 'To him that hath shall be given, and from him that hath not shall be taken away.'
  • Perhaps she lacks egotism, I don't know, but from her is taken away, and everything has been taken away.
  • She waited on the old countess, petted and spoiled the children, was always ready to render the small services for which she had a gift, and all this was unconsciously accepted from her with insufficient gratitude.
  • When her husband took his place she concluded, from the rapid manner in which after taking up his table napkin he pushed back the tumbler and wineglass standing before him, that he was out of humor, as was sometimes the case when he came in to dinner straight from the farm--especially before the soup.
  • She concluded from his tone that he was vexed with her and wished to end the conversation.
  • She knew her remarks sounded unnatural, but could not refrain from asking some more questions.
  • Countess Mary looked round, saw little Andrew following her, felt that Sonya was right, and for that very reason flushed and with evident difficulty refrained from saying something harsh.
  • From the room in which Nicholas was sleeping came the sound of his even breathing, every slightest tone of which was familiar to his wife.
  • And at that moment little Andrew shouted from outside the door: Papa!
  • Countess Mary moved away from the door and took the boy back to the nursery.
  • Five minutes later little black-eyed three-year-old Natasha, her father's pet, having learned from her brother that Papa was asleep and Mamma was in the sitting room, ran to her father unobserved by her mother.
  • "Natasha, Natasha!" came Countess Mary's frightened whisper from the door.
  • Out of breath, he took the laughing child quickly from his shoulder and pressed her to his heart.
  • She felt that the allurements instinct had formerly taught her to use would now be merely ridiculous in the eyes of her husband, to whom she had from the first moment given herself up entirely--that is, with her whole soul, leaving no corner of it hidden from him.
  • These questions, then as now, existed only for those who see nothing in marriage but the pleasure married people get from one another, that is, only the beginnings of marriage and not its whole significance, which lies in the family.
  • Discussions and questions of that kind, which are like the question of how to get the greatest gratification from one's dinner, did not then and do not now exist for those for whom the purpose of a dinner is the nourishment it affords; and the purpose of marriage is the family.
  • From the very first days of their married life Natasha had announced her demands.
  • Their way of life and place of residence, their acquaintances and ties, Natasha's occupations, the children's upbringing, were all selected not merely with regard to Pierre's expressed wishes, but to what Natasha from the thoughts he expressed in conversation supposed his wishes to be.
  • Thus in a time of trouble ever memorable to him after the birth of their first child who was delicate, when they had to change the wet nurse three times and Natasha fell ill from despair, Pierre one day told her of Rousseau's view, with which he quite agreed, that to have a wet nurse is unnatural and harmful.
  • A flood of brilliant, joyful light poured from her transfigured face.
  • From broken remarks about Natasha and his father, from the emotion with which Pierre spoke of that dead father, and from the careful, reverent tenderness with which Natasha spoke of him, the boy, who was only just beginning to guess what love is, derived the notion that his father had loved Natasha and when dying had left her to his friend.
  • From broken remarks about Natasha and his father, from the emotion with which Pierre spoke of that dead father, and from the careful, reverent tenderness with which Natasha spoke of him, the boy, who was only just beginning to guess what love is, derived the notion that his father had loved Natasha and when dying had left her to his friend.
  • Natasha, who was sitting opposite to him with her eldest daughter on her lap, turned her sparkling eyes swiftly from her husband to the things he showed her.
  • She wanted nothing from life but tranquillity, and that tranquillity only death could give her.
  • She would begin to say something to her in a low tone from the other end of the room.
  • The children with their tutors and governesses had had tea and their voices were audible from the next room.
  • The melancholy silence that followed was broken by the sounds of the children's voices and laughter from the next room.
  • Nicholas and Denisov rose, asked for their pipes, smoked, went to fetch more tea from Sonya--who sat weary but resolute at the samovar--and questioned Pierre.
  • The questions put by these two kept the conversation from changing its ordinary character of gossip about the higher government circles.
  • "Well, you know whom," said Pierre, with a meaning glance from under his brows.
  • It is only to prevent some Pugachev or other from killing my children and yours, and Arakcheev from sending me off to some Military Settlement.
  • The boy with the thin neck stretching out from the turn-down collar-- whom everyone had forgotten--gazed at Pierre with even greater and more rapturous joy.
  • And evidently suppressing his vexation with difficulty, he turned away from the boy.
  • Is it for my own pleasure that I am at the farm or in the office from morning to night?
  • "You know, Mary, today Elias Mitrofanych" (this was his overseer) "came back from the Tambov estate and told me they are already offering eighty thousand rubles for the forest."
  • Besides this feeling which absorbed her altogether and hindered her from following the details of her husband's plans, thoughts that had no connection with what he was saying flitted through her mind.
  • You won't escape!--from that moment this conversation began, contrary to all the laws of logic and contrary to them because quite different subjects were talked about at one and the same time.
  • I only wanted to tell you about Petya: today nurse was coming to take him from me, and he laughed, shut his eyes, and clung to me.
  • He had awaked from a terrible dream.
  • I loved you, but I have orders from Arakcheev and will kill the first of you who moves forward.
  • At the basis of the works of all the modern historians from Gibbon to Buckle, despite their seeming disagreements and the apparent novelty of their outlooks, lie those two old, unavoidable assumptions.
  • In 1789 a ferment arises in Paris; it grows, spreads, and is expressed by a movement of peoples from west to east.
  • Several times it moves eastward and collides with a countermovement from the east westward.
  • In 1812 it reaches its extreme limit, Moscow, and then, with remarkable symmetry, a countermovement occurs from east to west, attracting to it, as the first movement had done, the nations of middle Europe.
  • And the exile, separated from the beloved France so dear to his heart, died a lingering death on that rock and bequeathed his great deeds to posterity.
  • The strangeness and absurdity of these replies arise from the fact that modern history, like a deaf man, answers questions no one has asked.
  • But not to speak of the intrinsic quality of histories of this kind (which may possibly even be of use to someone for something) the histories of culture, to which all general histories tend more and more to approximate, are significant from the fact that after seriously and minutely examining various religious, philosophic, and political doctrines as causes of events, as soon as they have to describe an actual historic event such as the campaign of 1812 for instance, they involuntarily describe it as resulting from an exercise of power--and say plainly that that was the result of Napoleon's will.
  • From this fundamental difference between the view held by history and that held by jurisprudence, it follows that jurisprudence can tell minutely how in its opinion power should be constituted and what power-- existing immutably outside time--is, but to history's questions about the meaning of the mutations of power in time it can answer nothing.
  • For us that movement of the peoples from west to east, without leaders, with a crowd of vagrants, and with Peter the Hermit, remains incomprehensible.
  • If the animals leading the herd change, this happens because the collective will of all the animals is transferred from one leader to another, according to whether the animal is or is not leading them in the direction selected by the whole herd.
  • So say the third class of historians who regard all historical persons, from monarchs to journalists, as the expression of their age.
  • Power, from the standpoint of experience, is merely the relation that exists between the expression of someone's will and the execution of that will by others.
  • No command ever appears spontaneously, or itself covers a whole series of occurrences; but each command follows from another, and never refers to a whole series of events but always to one moment only of an event.
  • Apart from that, the chief source of our error in this matter is due to the fact that in the historical accounts a whole series of innumerable, diverse, and petty events, such for instance as all those which led the French armies to Russia, is generalized into one event in accord with the result produced by that series of events.
  • Amid a long series of unexecuted orders of Napoleon's one series, for the campaign of 1812, was carried out--not because those orders differed in any way from the other, unexecuted orders but because they coincided with the course of events that led the French army into Russia; just as in stencil work this or that figure comes out not because the color was laid on from this side or in that way, but because it was laid on from all sides over the figure cut in the stencil.
  • To understand in what this dependence consists it is necessary to reinstate another omitted condition of every command proceeding not from the Deity but from a man, which is, that the man who gives the command himself takes part in the event.
  • The soldier himself does the stabbing, hacking, burning, and pillaging, and always receives orders for these actions from men above him; he himself never gives an order.
  • When an event is taking place people express their opinions and wishes about it, and as the event results from the collective activity of many people, some one of the opinions or wishes expressed is sure to be fulfilled if but approximately.
  • The man who worked most with his hands could not think so much about what he was doing, or reflect on or command what would result from the common activity; while the man who commanded more would evidently work less with his hands on account of his greater verbal activity.
  • Men went from the west to the east killing their fellow men, and the event was accompanied by phrases about the glory of France, the baseness of England, and so on.
  • These justifications release those who produce the events from moral responsibility.
  • These temporary aims are like the broom fixed in front of a locomotive to clear the snow from the rails in front: they clear men's moral responsibilities from their path.
  • But regarding him from within ourselves as what we are conscious of, we feel ourselves to be free.
  • This consciousness is a source of self-cognition quite apart from and independent of reason.
  • Having learned from experiment and argument that a stone falls downwards, a man indubitably believes this and always expects the law that he has learned to be fulfilled.
  • What is man's responsibility to society, the conception of which results from the conception of freedom?
  • Man's actions proceed from his innate character and the motives acting upon him.
  • But the same man apart from that connection appears to be free.
  • Our conception of the degree of freedom often varies according to differences in the point of view from which we regard the event, but every human action appears to us as a certain combination of freedom and inevitability.
  • The proportion of freedom to inevitability decreases and increases according to the point of view from which the action is regarded, but their relation is always one of inverse proportion.
  • In all these cases the conception of freedom is increased or diminished and the conception of compulsion is correspondingly decreased or increased, according to the point of view from which the action is regarded.
  • If we consider a man alone, apart from his relation to everything around him, each action of his seems to us free.
  • My action seems to me free; but asking myself whether I could raise my arm in every direction, I see that I raised it in the direction in which there was least obstruction to that action either from things around me or from the construction of my own body.
  • I lift it, but ask myself: could I have abstained from lifting my arm at the moment that has already passed?
  • But I am not now abstaining from doing so at the first moment when I asked the question.
  • That I did not lift my arm a moment later does not prove that I could have abstained from lifting it then.
  • But even if--imagining a man quite exempt from all influences, examining only his momentary action in the present, unevoked by any cause--we were to admit so infinitely small a remainder of inevitability as equaled zero, we should even then not have arrived at the conception of complete freedom in man, for a being uninfluenced by the external world, standing outside of time and independent of cause, is no longer a man.
  • Apart from these two concepts which in their union mutually define one another as form and content, no conception of life is possible.
  • Man's free will differs from every other force in that man is directly conscious of it, but in the eyes of reason it in no way differs from any other force.
  • From the standpoint from which the science of history now regards its subject on the path it now follows, seeking the causes of events in man's freewill, a scientific enunciation of those laws is impossible, for however man's free will may be restricted, as soon as we recognize it as a force not subject to law, the existence of law becomes impossible.
  • From the standpoint from which the science of history now regards its subject on the path it now follows, seeking the causes of events in man's freewill, a scientific enunciation of those laws is impossible, for however man's free will may be restricted, as soon as we recognize it as a force not subject to law, the existence of law becomes impossible.
  • From the time the law of Copernicus was discovered and proved, the mere recognition of the fact that it was not the sun but the earth that moves sufficed to destroy the whole cosmography of the ancients.
  • Happy hour is Monday through Friday from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m.
  • Louis' best Italian restaurants and is about a mile by bike trail from the Missouri Botanical Garden.
  • Blueberry Hill serves food daily from 11 a.m. to midnight; prices for most dishes are under $10, as of 2009.
  • Louis' famous restaurants aren't far from the metro's many bike trails and parks.
  • A meal in 2009 costs from $20 to $35 per person, including drinks and appetizers.
  • From soups and salads, to sandwiches and calzones, this place has it all.
  • With over 100 items to choose from, not including its pizza selection, you can easily rack your brain trying to decide what to get.
  • Open for lunch and dinner, Sonoma will run you from $15 to $25, as of 2009, on average per person, including drinks and appetizers.
  • From Chinese take-out to lavish catering halls, Holbrook has a variety of dining locations.
  • You can choose from dine-in and take-out for lunch and dinner.
  • You can choose from all-you-can-eat buffet dining or purchase pints and quarts a la carte.
  • Thomas Deluxe Grill Start off your day of outdoor activities with a healthy smoothie or freshly prepared juice from the R.
  • If you're up early for a hike or trekking adventure, choose breakfast items from the Power Breakfast menu served at 7 a.m.
  • Ask the sommelier to recommend something from Penne's extensive wine list.
  • Try a crusty panini filled with soppressata, fresh mozzerella, lettuce and tomato, or choose from more than a dozen others.
  • Pizza Rustica Restaurant & Bar Pizza Rustica may not grab you with its name alone, but one look at the menu and a whiff of smoke from the hardwood-fired oven should do the trick.
  • While there is neither a cliff nor a mile-long stairway in sight, you can work up an appetite walking the U Penn campus and strolling along the Schuylkill River where rowers from area schools buck the currents in their sleek eight-seaters.
  • It is a place to grab a quick lunch going to or coming from one of the parks or the seashore.
  • Massapequa is just across the bay from Jones Beach State Park with six and a half miles of beach, surf fishing and a boat basin.
  • The Bethpage Bikeway is a 14-mile loop trail that runs from Bethpage State Park to Merrick Road in Massapequa.
  • The depth of the bay goes from 4 feet 3 inches to 20 feet, and it is home to 85 different species of fish.
  • Part of the slow food movement, its foodstuffs are sourced from local farms, which makes Frascas an eco-friendly eatery.
  • Trail systems there like Arapaho Glacier and Arapaho Lakes range from easy to difficult, with several at altitudes of more than 14,000 feet.
  • The Mediterranean-inspired dishes include seasonal ingredients from the farmhouse gardens and greenhouses.
  • Outdoor adventures abound in the Hudson Valley, from horseback riding, hiking, camping, skiing, snowshoeing, fishing to canoeing and kayaking on the Hudson River.
  • Seattle, WA 98115(206) 525-7747www.casaditaliaseattle.com Piatti Restaurant Situated in University Village at the southern tip of Ravenna, Piatti is just one block from the scenic Burke-Gilman trail.
  • Gator's Plaza Cafe business hours are Tuesday through Saturday from 4 p.m. to 1 a.m.
  • It's only a short drive from Prattville attractions such as the Bass Pro Shop Outdoor World store.
  • Business hours are on Tuesday from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m.; Wednesday from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.; and on Thursday through Saturday from 11 a.m. to 8:30 p.m.
  • Business hours are on Tuesday from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m.; Wednesday from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.; and on Thursday through Saturday from 11 a.m. to 8:30 p.m.
  • Business hours are on Tuesday from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m.; Wednesday from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.; and on Thursday through Saturday from 11 a.m. to 8:30 p.m.
  • Patrons can choose to dine outside on the back porch, order carry out or pick up a frozen meal to go from the freezer case.
  • Refuel your body after a long day of outdoor activities in Prattville with a heaping plate of spicy Cajun food from some of the area's most popular Creole restaurants--Uncle Mick's Cajun Market and Cafe, Big Easy Creole Cafe or Gator's Plaza Cafe.
  • Metro Bis Rated as one of America's best restaurants both by the Zagat Survey and The New York Times, Metro Bis is home to co-owner renowned chef Christopher Prosperi, who works with a seasonal menu focusing on ingredients from local farms.
  • The churrascaria style Fogo de Chao uses a similar ordering system as the Brazilian Bull Steakhouse, and diners can choose from 15 cuts of meat.
  • From the desert botanical gardens to the world's largest city park, Phoenix, Arizona, is paradise for outdoor aficionados who crave the sun.
  • The wine list includes organic varieties, and specialty cocktails are served from the bar.
  • Otherwise, if you desire, you can order a platter directly from the menu, such as fried shrimp and irloin, a cheeseburger, ribeye steak or grilled chicken.
  • Eddy's Place is a short walk from the Salmon River.
  • Thursday nights feature Matthew's Margarita Madness, while Sunday brings in the house steel drum band from 3 p.m. to 6 p.m. with 50-cent shellfish such as oysters.
  • Music at night ranges from jazz to reggae, and the perfect view of Great South Bay offers a backdrop to your experience.
  • Selections range from a baked antipasto platter that includes baked clams, fried calamari, fried zucchini and other toothsome tidbits to Sacchetti Tartufi (pasta pockets stuffed with wild mushrooms).
  • Brasitas serves Latin American food, ranging from sweet corn tamales stuffed with shrimp to grilled skirt steak served with coconut sweet plantain puree.
  • Stamford's eateries serve everything from "gourmet natural" cuisine to Japanese to classic French dishes.
  • For those who love dancing, come on Saturday nights in which invites bands ranging from reggae to country.
  • Live entertainment is usually found at the restaurant during dinner hours, and patrons can choose from an extensive wine list.
  • The food served in the restaurant is fresh and cooked in Pacific Rim style, which is a style of cooking that incorporates local Pacific Island ingredients with cooking techniques from other cultures of the Pacific Islands.
  • Prices are mid-range with dishes under $10; expect to pay anywhere from $16 to $25 for some entrees.
  • After spending an action-packed day hiking or skiing, visitors can end the day with a hearty meal from one of the area's well loved restaurants.
  • Sacramento is home to numerous Indian restaurants, ranging from "fast food" to all-you-can eat buffets to relaxed, sit-down meals.
  • The regular dinner dining menu features entrees of sandwiches, pasta, pizza, burgers, ribs, seafood, pork, steak or chicken with prices ranging from $7.95 to $26.95.
  • On the general dining menu, guests may partake in a variety of Italian dishes, from ravioli, spaghetti lasagna, to seafood, chicken or sausage.
  • There is also an array of dessert items, like mango cheesecake, tempura banana and a range of ice cream flavors, from green tea to red bean to ginger.
  • The Toshi Japanese Restaurant features menu items including everything from beef negimaki to agedashidofu, ika maru, hamachi kama and spicy calamari salad.
  • You also get the opportunity to chose your own live Maine lobster right from the tank on-site.
  • Grilled over mesquite, the way the Apache Indians have cooked for thousands of years, the steak, poultry and seafood are cooked to order and the fresh meats are combined with vegetables and produce from local growers.
  • The bread is from the best bakery in New York (Sullivan Street Bakery).
  • New York City's West Village is known for its historic low-rise architecture, laid-back vibe and bohemian, if somewhat gentrified, charm, which makes it stand out from the grid of Manhattan.
  • Specializing in Italian food, the restaurant serves dishes from various regions in Italy including, linguini, rigatoni and lasagna.
  • Perfect for those dining on a budget, Yesterdays serves everything from buffalo wings to escargot at a reasonable price.
  • A city with a small-town feel, Warwick, New York is located in Orange County, only 50 miles from Manhattan.
  • The restaurant uses both local and imported fish from Japan to create their signature-style sushi and sashimi.
  • Autentica is located at 5507 NE 30th Ave.www.autenticaportland.com Nuestra Cocina Eat at Nuestra Cocina for a tasty Mexican meal full of juicy meats and sauces, with service from some of the friendliest waitstaffers in town.
  • After a delectable appetizer like, the seafood sampler for two or fried calamari, guests can choose from various types of steak.
  • The restaurant serves seafood, as well as steak, giving guests a wide variety of food from which to choose.
  • Roslyn is located approximately two miles from the Nassau County Museum of Art.
  • Spicy dishes are prepared to the customer's palate, ranging from mild to hot.
  • Choose from a vegetable shepherd's pie, several Indian dishes, a turkey melt, or just load up on the greens at the salad bar.
  • From maple-glazed tofu to squash soup and home-made bread, vegan and vegetarian food options at Stone Soup are flavorful and intriguing.
  • Using market-fresh ingredients from trusted local suppliers, the Udipi serves up delicious vegetarian meals that range from light and flavorful to rich and hearty.
  • Using market-fresh ingredients from trusted local suppliers, the Udipi serves up delicious vegetarian meals that range from light and flavorful to rich and hearty.
  • Tampa, FL 33612(813) 971-8483www.tajtampaindiancuisine.com Angithi Indian Cuisine Taking its name from an exotic spice, the Angithi is dedicated to preparing traditional Indian dishes in an authentic and equally traditional atmosphere.
  • Students can roll their own sushi alongside the chefs from the restaurant.
  • Lunch hours are Monday to Friday from 11:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m., and dinner is served Monday to Saturday from 5 to 9 p.m.
  • Lunch hours are Monday to Friday from 11:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m., and dinner is served Monday to Saturday from 5 to 9 p.m.
  • Those who dine in can also choose from a variety of martini drinks, beers, and wines to accompany their sushi dinners.
  • From grandma to toddlers, this restaurant attracts the locals time and time again.
  • The Brazilian barbecue price includes six meat choices, carved tableside, from the extensive menu.
  • A fixed price lunch or dinner menu offers three courses with a variety of dishes to choose from.
  • Though the town is small, there are a selection of restaurants to choose from, including seafood and barbecue spots, making it a good place to stop and refuel.
  • On its menu you can find everything from homemade corned beef hash to chicken and biscuits and homemade turkey meatloaf and mashed potatoes.
  • This cozy "home away from home" serves up breakfast, lunch and dinner seven days a week.
  • Hungry visitors to the area can enjoy everything from classic American cooking to dishes inspired by French and Asian cuisine.
  • TriBeCa, an acronym for Triangle Below Canal Street, runs from Canal Street south to Vesey Street and from Broadway to west of the Hudson River.
  • TriBeCa, an acronym for Triangle Below Canal Street, runs from Canal Street south to Vesey Street and from Broadway to west of the Hudson River.
  • Located by the Family Pavilion in Navy Pier, this restaurant appeals to families and spotlights movie memorabilia from the movie "Forrest Gump." While the restaurant's specialty remains shrimp, it also serves barbecued ribs and fresh fish.
  • From exploring Navy Pier to attending a sporting event at Wrigley Field, there are family-friendly restaurants along both, allowing you to enjoy the weather and the attractions.
  • For dessert, guests can choose from a list of sugary confections, like chocolate lava cake and apple bread pudding.
  • Hyde Park has received numerous awards from magazines and restaurant guides, including an "Extraordinary" rating from the Zagat Guide.
  • Hyde Park has received numerous awards from magazines and restaurant guides, including an "Extraordinary" rating from the Zagat Guide.
  • The restaurant is run by the Capdevila family, who emigrated from Cuba to the United States in 1962 on the Freedom Flights to Miami, Florida.
  • La Teresita Restaurant La Teresita Restaurant, centrally located in a Spanish neighborhood in Tampa and just a few minutes from the airport, offers traditional Cuban and Spanish food with plenty of spices and flavor.
  • From its beautiful, inviting waters to its tropical palm trees, Tampa, Florida is well known as a winter haven with welcomed sunshine, especially for those who live in bitterly cold climates.
  • Friday and Saturday nights present happy hour from 9 to 11 p.m. with two for one drafts and $2.50 mixed drinks, plus dance music until 2 a.m. 113 N.
  • Just a few miles from the center of town, hike, bike or boat the Erie Canal State Park and the NYS Barge Canal.
  • Prices in 2009 range from about $3.99 to $10.99. 8th Street Grill800 Marquette Ave.
  • Columbus Funny Bone145 Easton Town CenterColumbus, OH 43219(614) 471-5653 Ruby Tuesday Ruby Tuesday is open each day from 5 p.m. to 2:30 a.m., providing games, such as pool and arcade machines.
  • Happy hour is Monday through Friday from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. and dancing is Fridays and Saturdays after 11 p.m.
  • Vegetarian dishes include falafel (made from ground garbanzo and fava beans) as well as steamed fresh pumpkin stuffed with an assortment of veggies.
  • The menu features a number of tasty appetizers, from tangy lentil soup to tabbouleh (mint and parsley salad) to hummus and pita bread.
  • This popular restaurant employs a number of Moroccan chefs from Casablanca in order to capture those authentic flavors and recipes, while a friendly staff will ensure each diner's experience is a pleasant one.
  • Suffering from physical repercussions from that day, he and his family moved to Florida where his parents lived.
  • Suffering from physical repercussions from that day, he and his family moved to Florida where his parents lived.
  • Once the liquor ban lifted, it became a retreat from the then common overly formal restaurant décor.
  • From the vegan teenager to the picky-eater child, the entire family can share in this dining experience.
  • The wine list at Koozinas features several local selections from the Heron Hill Vineyards.
  • Dress is casual, and Koozinas is located approximately one mile from the lake.
  • They have an extensive menu with selections ranging from burgers to bruschetta.
  • The restaurant in Central Valley was actually reconstructed from a Japanese Gasho farmhouse shipped to the United States.
  • Choose from locations in Staten Island or Brooklyn.
  • Start with a tropical drink from the extensive menu, and maybe an appetizer or two, then choose the vegetables you want included with your choice of seafood, chicken or beef.
  • Choose from restaurants located in Manhasset, New York City or Westbury.
  • Choose from seafood, chicken or beef along with an array of vegetables--prepared dishes come with dipping sauces and steamed or chicken rice.
  • Rentals range from one to more than nine bedrooms, which cost anywhere from $1,000+ to $8,000+ per week; some have direct lake access, while others are set back into the land.
  • Rentals range from one to more than nine bedrooms, which cost anywhere from $1,000+ to $8,000+ per week; some have direct lake access, while others are set back into the land.
  • Cherokee Lanes 1149 Marietta Highway Canton, GA 30114(770) 345-2866 Wild West Bar and Grill The Wild West Bar and Grill is a great place to get away from the stress of your workweek.
  • Handcrafted furnishings include stately four-poster beds, along with indigenous rugs from the Southwest, fine art and hand-woven fabrics.
  • The Essex InnBox 248Essex, NY 12936(518) 963-8821theessexinn.com Turtle Island Cafe Turtle Island Cafe is in nearby Willsboro, New York, four miles from the Essex ferry dock.
  • The in-house bakery and pantry serve homemade breads and pastries, eggs and omelettes cooked with fresh herbs from the inn's gardens.
  • The restaurant opened in 2008, providing competition for The Dock House, and is situated a few blocks from the Essex ferry dock.
  • Other rumors name her as a prostitute from the 1920s who went missing while working at the hotel.
  • The restaurant also provides a separate bar area for a more relaxed dining experience and includes several varieties of martinis, a large selection of coffees and Ethiopian wines that are made from fermented honey.
  • Queen of Sheba Featuring traditional Ethiopian dishes, the Queen of Sheba Restaurant is located in midtown Manhattan, just a few blocks from Times Square.
  • Las Vegas offers visitors several AAA top-rated hotels to choose from so you can relax in a luxurious setting after a day of hiking through Red Rock Canyon or swimming in nearby Lake Mead.
  • A Five Diamond Award of Excellence rating from AAA means you'll be provided with the best possible hotel experience during your Las Vegas vacation--only .28 percent of all hotels reviewed by AAA receive the elite five diamond rating.
  • There is also a large Middle Eastern wine list to choose from.
  • The drinks list also comes from Lebanon and the rest of the Middle East.
  • With high acclaim from magazines like "Time Out" combined with authentic cooking and good service, this restaurant often has a wait.
  • From take out to fine dining, Arabic restaurants are most commonly found paired with Lebanese and Middle Eastern cuisines.
  • Khan's Mongolian Restaurant Located just a few blocks from Tackamark Park, the budget-friendly Khan's Mongolian Restaurant serves up large meals for an average price of $15.
  • Atlanta, GA 30324 (404) 261-0198 http://www.cocolocoatlanta.com 10 Degrees South Restaurants serving food from African countries is hardly rare, however, there aren't many restaurants that serve food from the country of South Africa.
  • Atlanta, GA 30324 (404) 261-0198 http://www.cocolocoatlanta.com 10 Degrees South Restaurants serving food from African countries is hardly rare, however, there aren't many restaurants that serve food from the country of South Africa.
  • The walls are dotted with from different Latin American artists.
  • Located on Piedmont Road, it is in walking distance from a Marta (Atlanta's subway system).
  • It isn't surprising then to find so many ethnic restaurants from which to choose.
  • Hemlock Cannon Beach, Oregon 97110(503) 436-2439www.driftwoodcannonbeach.com Newmans at 988 Newmans at 988 serves classic French and Italian cuisine with an emphasis on food from the Piedmont and Genoa regions of Italy.
  • Fishers, IN 46038(317) 863-2100maccoolsirishpub.com Claddagh Irish Pub Just a couple of blocks south of Carmel in Indianapolis, Claddagh Irish Pub offers a respite from the strip-mall laden North side of Indianapolis with a stone-facade Irish decor.
  • Boasting an authentic Irish pub experience, Fionn MacCool's hosts an Irish band with no cover charge every Friday and Saturday night from 9 p.m. to closing time.
  • Burgers are made from beef, turkey or vegetables and can be ordered in combination with a cold soda and your choice of regular, sweet potato, cajun or garlic fries.
  • Legal Sea Foods Located only steps from the famous Quincy Market, Legal Sea Foods offers a wide selection of fresh seafood, an elegant atmosphere and impeccable service for an unforgettable first-class dining experience.
  • Lin's China Jade (4050 SW Cedar Hills Blvd, Beaverton) is a magnet for Chinese-food lovers from across the city, pulling them west to its comfy booths.
  • Szechuan outpost Lucky Strike (12306 SE Powell Blvd) brings spicy flavors (the chiles are imported from China) that are sure to impress and have you begging for water.
  • Fares, which in November 2009 ranged from $29 to $42 for lunch and $58 for dinner, include the train ride, meal, tax and service charges.
  • In November 2009, entrees ranged in price from $12 to $14 for lighter fare and $19 to $29 for entrees and the buffet.
  • Grand Sunday Brunch, featuring piano entertainment, is held from 9 a.m. until 1 p.m Sundays.
  • In November 2009, entrees ranged in price from $18 to $30.
  • Be sure to sit in the main dining area on Salsa night so you can spot everyone from college students to octogenarians hitting the floor.
  • Damico and Sons comes highly recommended from many established local businesses including the University of Minnesota Alumni Association.
  • From a variety of soups and entrees to the famous chili shrimp and layered bread dishes, Rangoon offers a unique dining experience for patrons who are familiar with Burmese food as well as those who may be trying it for the first time.
  • Featuring more than 100 items on the menu (including the chef special which changes daily), Jade Harbor also offers a family meal menu, where groups from four to 10 people can be accommodated with a selection of customer favorites for one set price.
  • Jade Harbor boasts a full, reasonably priced menu (prices range from $2.50 to $18) that offers a variety of traditional Chinese dishes including over 20 noodle and rice plates and numerous seafood dishes.
  • Choose from creations such as the "Pierrepont," made with ham, lettuce, tomatoes, onions, BBQ sauce and provolone cheese.
  • Try Phoebe's New England clam chowder, or ask for the catch of the day, created from the freshest fish available.
  • Choose from salads or panini sandwiches for lunch.
  • Blackbird Cafe This restaurant features a menu filled with ingredients from local organic farms.
  • When you need a break from your activities, stop in Canton at one of these restaurants and enjoy a well-deserved meal.
  • The restaurant is open Tuesdays through Saturdays from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m.
  • Elmira, NY 14901(607) 734-1535morettisrestaurant.net Pietro & Son The Pietro & Son eatery is renowned for its pastas and pizzas, crafted with authentic recipes imported from Italy.
  • The city of Elmira is located on the southern edge of New York state and is just minutes from the border between New York and Pennsylvania.
  • The food is prepared with fresh produce from local farms, and the restaurant only uses regional products.
  • Cornwall, New York 12518(845) 534-9658thecanterburybrookinn.com The River Bank The River Bank is a highly rated restaurant and bar not far from West Point Military Academy.
  • Harriman State Park, nine miles from Cornwall, is the second-largest state park in New York and has more than 200 miles of hiking trails.
  • Though not far from America's biggest city, the town has many activities for outdoor lovers.
  • Cornwall, New York, approximately 50 miles from New York City, is a small city on the Hudson River.
  • The cuts of beef and veal are generous, and the wine list was expertly chosen and varies from some expensive reserve bottles to numerous affordable options.
  • Offering an extensive menu, the seafood is the freshest in the area ranging from pan fried walleye to shrimp scampi, as of 2009.
  • Entree prices in 2009 ranged from about $14 to $25.
  • Entree prices in 2009 ranged from about $27 to $29.
  • Serevan 6 Autumn LaneAmenia, NY(845) 373-9800 serevan.com Red Devon Market Bar and Restaurant The Red Devon is on the south shore of Hunns Lake and uses products from local farms.
  • Entree prices in 2009 ranged from about $17 to $29.
  • Entree prices in 2009 ranged from about $18.95 to $24.95.
  • Entree prices in 2009 ranged from about $15.99 to $26.95.
  • There are restaurants near the lakes and parks and the major roads, making getting to and from the outdoor activities easy and fast.
  • In some areas, this sub shop hasn't spread, however, so visitors from a town without a Blimpie will probably want to stop in for their favorite super-stacked subs or grilled panini.
  • From Chinese cuisine, to restaurants serving breakfast all day, both visitors and residents will be able to find something to eat on nearly every corner.
  • It is a diverse place to dine with ethnic eateries ranging from Portuguese to Japanese.
  • Y., a historic town located less than 20 miles from Manhattan, you are in for a treat.
  • Located half a mile from downtown, it offers a traditional menu for eating inside or taking out.
  • Denver is home to many restaurants, including Chinese restaurants that range from neighborhood dine-in/takeout operations to upscale establishments.
  • In addition to the provocative food selection, its wine menu features more than 550 wines from around the world.
  • Lacroix's menu is marked by a fusion of international cuisines from Spain, Portugal, Thailand, Japan and the United States and is overseen by chef Jason Cichonski.
  • These restaurants draw inspiration from the world's finest cuisines and are among the finest dining venues in the country.
  • Dress at Sullivan's varies from the little black dress to dressed-up jeans.
  • Sullivan's Steakhouse in Indianapolis features steaks in the $30 and up price range (2009), and a Sunday brunch from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.
  • Dress runs the gamut from professional to cocktail attire, and the price (2009) starts at about $30 for the entrees, served ala carte.
  • Indian Garden "Sensory overload" is the order of the day at Indian Garden, a safe bet for those who seldom stray from basic fare like tikka masala and vindaloo, and also for those who do.
  • Chandlers Steakhouse won many awards in 2008 and 2009, including "Best Fine Dining Award," "Award of Excellence from Wine Spectator" and "Best Classic Martini" in the Martini mix-off.
  • However, if you want to try something interesting and delicious, consider tempting your taste buds with a helping of Colombian fare from one of several authentic Colombian eateries in the Tampa region.
  • There are a number of restaurants around the Tampa area serving delectable food nightly, from international cuisine to BBQ and more.
  • With a casual atmosphere, wines from around the world and the tasty menu, Lasca's can't be missed.
  • Make sure to check out one of the happy hours, from 3 p.m. to 6 p.m. nightly.
  • Just a quarter of a mile from Charlotte Beach, diners can dine on seafood, burgers or wings.
  • Opened Wednesdays through Saturdays from 4 p.m. to 11 p.m., there is live entertainment every night in their outdoor area.
  • Whether you are strolling along the pier, boating or riding the carousel, you are just steps away from great BBQ, sushi, Italian and burgers.
  • Rodizio Steak House Rodizio's motto is "Feast your Fill from Milan to Brazil." With more than 17 different cuts of meat (with Italian spices) served on a skewer and sliced thinly by "Gauchos," your plate will be filled endlessly.
  • All dishes can be made in mild, medium or spicy varieties, and there is a daily lunch buffet that offers many of the dishes from the standard menu.5226 Bethel Center MallColumbus, Ohio 43220(614) 442-7705newindiarestaurant.com/
  • There is a private dining room that can handle parties from 20 to 75 people.427 East Main StreetColumbus, Ohio 43215 (614) 220-9390indianoven.com/ Taj Mahal Taj Mahal has been serving North Indian cuisine in Columbus for 25 years.
  • Indian Oven Located three miles from Columbus' Lou Berliner Athletic Complex, which has 32 game fields, a picnic area, a walking trail and a wildlife area, Indian Oven serves traditional dishes, as well as more modern recipes.
  • If you are looking for Indian food in Columbus, there are a few restaurants not far from local parks.
  • Situated in the middle of the state, Columbus, Ohio, is central to both Cleveland and Cincinnati and only two hours from Lake Erie.
  • Courtyard by Marriott Phoenix West Avondale The Courtyard by Marriott-Phoenix West Avondale is a well-appointed property that is located five miles from Cardinals Stadium.
  • There is a jogging trail a half mile from the hotel and a biking trail two miles away.
  • Hilton Netherland Plaza Located across from Fountain Square in downtown Cincinnati, the Hilton Netherland Plaza is a restored 1930's hotel decorated in art deco style.
  • Just up the interstate from Cincinnati is the Loveland Bike Trail, a scenic trail through the Cincinnati suburb of Loveland, and just across the Kentucky line, you will find the Union Kentucky and Big Bone Lick State Park recreation areas.
  • The menu is varied, offering many items from the Russian cuisine such as Georgian beef soup and a chicken cutlet Kiev; however, there are all kinds of other items to choose from with many fish dishes, as well as sushi.
  • The menu is varied, offering many items from the Russian cuisine such as Georgian beef soup and a chicken cutlet Kiev; however, there are all kinds of other items to choose from with many fish dishes, as well as sushi.
  • Brooklyn, NY 11235(718) 891-3111primorski.net/ Ocean View Café With a menu based on Russian cuisine, the Ocean View Café features an extensive and varied menu, everything from smoked fish to eggplant caviar to blintzes.
  • From Red Rocks Park, with its outdoor amphitheater that provides ideal acoustics to Rocky Mountain National Park, the area is a natural one-stop shop for hiking, biking, camping and backpacking.
  • Dinner ranges from escargots to specialty crepes and desserts.
  • Open for breakfast, lunch and dinner, the restaurant serves specialties from around the world.
  • Prices are under $10 for entrees from the adult menu and under $5 for the kids menu. 1680 Union Ave.
  • Guests can choose from a variety of foods, including butternut squash, roasted corn chowder, tuna with wasabi and streamed mussels and red curry.
  • Memphis, TN 38104(901) 722-8692 PF Chang's China Bistro PF Chang's offers a large menu to choose from, and the average price is about $10.
  • Additional Offerings The Oakland Flower Market also offers vases, cellophane and other supplies ranging from ribbons to candy to assistance in making flower arrangements.
  • Present Day Operations The Oakland Flower Market is open to the general public Mondays to Fridays from 6:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. and Saturdays from 6:30 a.m. to 2 p.m.
  • Present Day Operations The Oakland Flower Market is open to the general public Mondays to Fridays from 6:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. and Saturdays from 6:30 a.m. to 2 p.m.
  • Assiaggo's chef selects each day's ingredients personally from Seattle's famous Pike Place market.2010 Fourth Ave.
  • Wine enthusiasts enjoy choosing from the extensive collection (sold by the bottle).
  • Create your own pizza from the extensive checklist of toppings or choose from a menu of specialty pizzas.
  • Create your own pizza from the extensive checklist of toppings or choose from a menu of specialty pizzas.
  • Discount coupons for the Chinatown Restaurant can often be found in local magazines and newspapers, the California Entertainment coupon book and from employees standing on nearby street corners.
  • Chinatown Restaurant The Chinatown Restaurant's uncreative name belies its creative interior decor and inventive Asian cuisine, serving standard traditional Chinese food as well as dishes from northern China.
  • Choose from the fresh catches of the day, Italian specialties (gnocchi, cioppino, shrimp), meats (filet and prime rib), pastas and salads while enjoying your meal on their floating dock, patio or indoors.
  • The dinner menu includes entrees from seared Chesapeake rockfish with potato gnocchi, baby artichokes and wild mushrooms to a bistro filet with Belgian frites and roasted shallot Cabernet sauce.
  • Take in a more formal dining experience at the Chef's Tasting Table, where a five- or nine-course fixed-price menu features sustainably grown meat entrees and seasonal vegetables, some from the chef's own garden.
  • Or, slip away from the suburban bustle of this city in the greater Washington DC metropolitan area to hike the wooded trails of Upton Hill Regional Park.
  • The steaks are large, and the seafood is fresh, plus there are a lot of options to choose from.
  • The menu is filled with varied cuisine, from teriyaki chicken bowls to meatloaf to huevos rancheros.
  • Entree prices range from $14 to $45, as of 2009, and the restaurant is open for lunch and dinner seven days a week.
  • And with more than 125 wines to choose from, Taormina's menu is sure to satisfy every taste.
  • As of 2009, entree prices start at $19.95, and the restaurant is open daily for dinner from 5:30 p.m. to 11 p.m.
  • Visitors from all over the world flock to Oahu to swim, snorkel, scuba dive, surf, fish, hike and take in the Hawaiian sun.
  • Choose from specialty sandwiches (including vegetarian options), burgers and classic diner selections such as hot open-faced platters.
  • Hotel amenities include the Great American Grill, which serves breakfast, the Pavilion Pantry that offers ready-to-cook meals and beverages and room service from nearby Carrabba's Italian Grille.
  • The hotel is surrounded by a variety of restaurants, shopping malls and retail outlets, and it is 25 miles from downtown Atlanta.
  • With lots of Sublime on the stereo and an atmosphere that varies from mellow to frenzied, Tony's Smoke Shop is a good option for the 18-and-older crowd.
  • The Hall opens the Rathskeller restaurant to the public every Friday night from 5 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.
  • Wolff's features 14 beers on tap from Germany, Brazil and the Czech Republic, including pilsners, wheat beers and lagers.
  • From 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. on Thursday, Wolff's holds an all-you-can-eat potato pancake special, served with sour cream or apple sauce.
  • Victor's is open for breakfast Sunday and Monday from 8 a.m. until 2 p.m. and Tuesday through Saturday from 7 a.m. until 2:30 p.m.
  • Victor's is open for breakfast Sunday and Monday from 8 a.m. until 2 p.m. and Tuesday through Saturday from 7 a.m. until 2:30 p.m.
  • Options include omelets and scrambles made from organic eggs, as well as a chorizo hash and plenty of pancakes.
  • The bar has an extensive wine list and a list of beers from around the world, including Old Peculier Ale from England, Corsendonk Brown Ale from Belgium and Schneiderweiss from Germany.
  • The bar has an extensive wine list and a list of beers from around the world, including Old Peculier Ale from England, Corsendonk Brown Ale from Belgium and Schneiderweiss from Germany.
  • The bar has an extensive wine list and a list of beers from around the world, including Old Peculier Ale from England, Corsendonk Brown Ale from Belgium and Schneiderweiss from Germany.
  • The bar has an extensive wine list and a list of beers from around the world, including Old Peculier Ale from England, Corsendonk Brown Ale from Belgium and Schneiderweiss from Germany.
  • Average prices in 2009 range from about $9 to $18.95.
  • The bar offers speciality drinks, and beers come from the United States, England, Mexico, the Czech Republic, Germany, Japan, Holland, Italy and Australia.
  • Average prices for meals in 2009 range from $14 to $26.
  • People flock here from around the globe to taste the award-winning cuisine offered by the top chefs in the business.
  • Alternatively, work with the restaurant to design your own custom menu by mixing and matching items from each menu style.
  • Choose from one of their set catering menus or work with a chef to craft a custom menu that fits both your tastes and budget.
  • When you're done exploring the island, order a catered meal from one of Honolulu's several catering restaurants.
  • Children can select from the kids' menu: pancakes, chicken fingers and bit-size hamburgers.
  • From breakfast, lunch and dinner guests can order hamburgers, grilled chicken clubs, omelets and country style bacon.
  • Arista800 BagbyHouston, TX 77002(713) 278-4782cordua.com Feast The Feast has cappuccino-colored tables and soft lighting from small chandeliers.
  • Mark's wine list reflects a world-class selection, including wines from South Africa, Italy, Spain and Austria.
  • If you are in the mood for wine, you can select from a list of over 250 selections.
  • Welcomed by vibrant colors, guests can select from garlic tiger shrimp with lemon risotto or grilled lamb tenderloin with citrus pesto Quattro has an antipasto bar with 20 distinct antipasti.
  • Blue Pear Bistro opens Monday through Saturday from 4 p.m. to midnight.
  • Small eaters and gourmands will be satisfied, as you can choose from small and medium plates.
  • Experience dinner Monday through Thursday 5 to 9 p.m.; Saturday and Sunday from 5 to 10 p.m.
  • Eat lunch Monday through Saturday from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.
  • Meridith's American Bistro serves breakfast and lunch on Sunday from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.
  • Diners craving a side trip from Puget Sound to the Bayou will find that the city boasts a number of Cajun and Creole restaurants.
  • Regardless of whether you plan to walk or ride from Point A to Point TBD, you're bound to work up an appetite.
  • Diners can select from favorites, such as Fettuccine Alfredo, North Atlantic Salmon Fillet and Rib-eye Steak.
  • Diners can also choose from a large selection of salads and antipasti at this casual restaurant.
  • Mama's Vegetarian is open Sunday from noon to 7 p.m., Monday through Thursday from 11 a.m. to 9 p.m., and Friday from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.
  • Mama's Vegetarian is open Sunday from noon to 7 p.m., Monday through Thursday from 11 a.m. to 9 p.m., and Friday from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.
  • Mama's Vegetarian is open Sunday from noon to 7 p.m., Monday through Thursday from 11 a.m. to 9 p.m., and Friday from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.
  • The Hamifgash Restaurant is open Sunday through Thursday from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. and Friday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
  • The Hamifgash Restaurant is open Sunday through Thursday from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. and Friday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
  • The restaurant features a take-out lunch menu from which customers can order online.
  • Diners can enjoy the restaurant from 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. seven days a week.
  • From exploring caverns to trying your luck at extreme sports, there is something for everyone in Pennsylvania.
  • The restaurant also provides catering and is open from 7 a.m. to 9 p.m.
  • Monday through Friday and for dinner from 5 to 10:30 p.m. every day.
  • Gaucho Steakhouse is open for lunch from 11:30 a.m. to 2 p.m.
  • Kids under 10 can pick from the discounted kid's menu, which serves both breakfast and lunch dishes.
  • For breakfasts, diners can choose from one of 10 types of egg dishes, including eggs benedict, ham and eggs, Dave's three-egg omelet and steak and eggs.
  • The staff traditionally prepares food with a lighter touch, and its menus vary from season to season.
  • Baltimore, MD 21224(410) 563 7577eichenkranz.com Café Berlin Located 130 miles from Cumberland, this café has served fine German cuisine since 1986 in a cozy atmosphere that attracts politicians, staffers, tourists and neighborhood residents.
  • Sample the eatery's famous sauerbraten, which is made from the restaurant's secret recipe of fresh cubed beef, gingersnaps, gravy and fluffy potato dumplings.
  • Pittsburgh, PA 15212(412) 231-1899maxsalleghenytavern.com Eichenkranz This elegant 17th-century restaurant is situated 130 miles from Cumberland and provides diners with sumptuous German fare.
  • Max's main bar's happy hour is from 5 to 7 p.m. and features beer, wines and appetizers at special prices.
  • Max's Allegheny Tavern Situated 100 miles from Cumberland, this restaurant serves authentic German cuisine in Pittsburgh.
  • The Skinny Pancake is open Monday through Wednesday from 8 a.m. to 9 p.m., Thursday through Saturday from 8 a.m. to midnight and Sunday from 8 a.m. to 9 p.m.
  • The Skinny Pancake is open Monday through Wednesday from 8 a.m. to 9 p.m., Thursday through Saturday from 8 a.m. to midnight and Sunday from 8 a.m. to 9 p.m.
  • The Skinny Pancake is open Monday through Wednesday from 8 a.m. to 9 p.m., Thursday through Saturday from 8 a.m. to midnight and Sunday from 8 a.m. to 9 p.m.
  • The restaurant is open seven days a week from 8 a.m. to midnight.
  • Diners may choose from a selection of classic American fare, including burgers, cold sandwiches and platters.
  • Friday from 11:30 a.m. to 10 p.m., Saturday from noon to 10 p.m. and Sunday from 5 to 8 p.m.
  • Friday from 11:30 a.m. to 10 p.m., Saturday from noon to 10 p.m. and Sunday from 5 to 8 p.m.
  • Friday from 11:30 a.m. to 10 p.m., Saturday from noon to 10 p.m. and Sunday from 5 to 8 p.m.
  • Madera's is open Monday through Wednesday from 11:30 a.m. to 8 p.m., Thursday from 11:30 a.m. to 9 p.m.
  • Madera's is open Monday through Wednesday from 11:30 a.m. to 8 p.m., Thursday from 11:30 a.m. to 9 p.m.
  • Entrees range from $15 to $25 and dress ranges from casual to dressy.
  • Entrees range from $15 to $25 and dress ranges from casual to dressy.
  • This place is famous and is constantly winning awards from local food critics.
  • True to its name, Ella's features a variety of folk art, from the weird to the wacky and beyond; you'll have plenty to ponder while you're waiting for your meal.
  • Tampa Bay offers lots to the ambitious outdoor-oriented traveler, from hiking in the Lettuce Lake Park to ice skating at the Tampa Bay Skating Academy.
  • One of the favorites from the menu is the "bife con cebolla" which is a filet mignon sauteed in onions.
  • With cooks right at the table, you will be able to see your sushi personally prepared for you -- a good experience all the way around from the food to the preparation.
  • Friday and Saturday and Sunday from 12 p.m. to 9 p.m.
  • The Circle Landmark Restaurant & Lounge is open from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m.
  • When visiting for dinner, be sure to save room for a tasty selection from the pastry cart.
  • The town is a popular winter resort for individuals from New York and Northern New Jersey.
  • Entrée selections include chicken, veal, fish, eggplant, or pasta prepared in your choice of five cooking styles, and range in price from $14-$23.
  • Park and Orchard240 Hackensack StreetEast Rutherford, NJ 07073(201) 939-9292parkandorchard.com Sorrento Ristorante Sorrento Ristorante serves Italian cuisine for lunch Tuesday through Friday from 11:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m.
  • Weekday lunch hours are from 12:00 to 4:00 p.m., while dinner is served from 4:00-10:00 p.m.
  • Weekday lunch hours are from 12:00 to 4:00 p.m., while dinner is served from 4:00-10:00 p.m.
  • Dinner prices range from $5 for appetizers to $28 for filet mignon, and a children's menu is also available.
  • Lunch options include soups, salads, sandwiches, and a variety of entrees such as pasta, stir fry, steak, salmon, pot roast, and chicken, with prices ranging from $8-$22.
  • Breakfast is available any time of day, with dishes ranging from omelettes to eggs benedict priced from $6.95 and up.
  • Breakfast is available any time of day, with dishes ranging from omelettes to eggs benedict priced from $6.95 and up.
  • From doner kebabs and kofta meat to vegetarian shish kebab, everyone will find something worth savoring at this dependable Anaheim establishment.
  • Rather, they offer a variety of dishes from all over Turkey.
  • Doner G Unlike a lot of Turkish restaurants, Doner G doesn't confine itself to specialties from any one particular region.
  • Fort Myers, Florida 33931 (239) 437-8664fortmyersschnitzelhouse.com Heinrich's German Grill Heinrich's German Grill gets high marks from former diners for authenticity, with some going so far as to say it's the best German restaurant outside of Germany.
  • Most of the schnitzel dinners are priced in the $10 range and there are also inexpensive, but authentic beers from Austria and Germany.
  • This location has been owned by Mark Rebham since 1989, and he still makes everything from scratch: the gravy, the sausage, the stuffing, and the dumplings.
  • Mudbugs Cajun Cafe20 West Main StreetCarmel, IN 46032(317) 843-8380mudbugscajuncafe.com Zydeco's Located a bit farther from Kokomo than the others, Zydeco's is arguably the most famous Cajun eatery in the region.
  • Order from a chalkboard menu at the entrance and pay for your meal.
  • Tony's Italian Grille and Pub3674 Rte 3Thornton, NH, 03285(603) 745-3133 Country Cow Restaurant & Bar Just a 4 mile drive from Thornton, is Campton, New Hampshire, home of the Country Cow Restaurant & Bar.
  • Houston, TX 77084 (281) 463-8611 flordecuba.com El Meson Cuban Restaurant This Rice Village spot pairs Mexican, Cuban and Spanish food with a notable wine selection and offers a homey reprieve from the busy neighborhood.
  • At breakfast, choose from straightforward egg dishes like huevos con salchicas (sausage and eggs).
  • Osteria Rustico is open weekdays from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., and only accepts credit cards.
  • Choose from sandwiches like the Rustico with prosciutto, or the Caprese, a vegetarian-friendly creation with mozzarella.
  • New on the North End scene in 2009, Ducali offers starters such as Nachos Italiano made from pizza dough chips, light fare like salads and panini, and vegetarian and meat-topped Neapolitan-style pizzas alike.
  • Boston, MA 02114(617) 742-6210 joetecces.com Ducali Pizzeria & Bar Less than a five-minute walk from the TD Garden brings you to the urban-loft setting of Ducali Pizzeria & Bar.
  • Joe Tecce's Ristorante and Cafe Joe Tecce's Ristorante and Cafe is a mere third of a mile from the TD Garden and has been dishing up Neapolitan cuisine for over 60 years.
  • Only minutes from Boston's North End Italian district, the TD Garden is convenient to several Italian restaurants that will fit the bill.
  • The establishment also hosts private functions from bachelor parties to birthday parties for any size group.
  • Featuring a menu that is as varied as it is lengthy, Maggie's Krooked Cafe serves everything from eggs jardiniere to tofu to polenta to eggplant in a setting suitable for families, couples or singles.
  • Just 40 minutes up the Merritt Parkway from New York City, Fairfield County, Conn., is a beautiful suburban area composed of charming upscale communities and classic New England scenery.
  • Best known for their dosas--a crepe made from rice and black lentils--Devi also offers many other delicious treats such as a wide variety of chutneys both hot and cold, and a carrot halwa (semolina pudding) for dessert.
  • Taste of India Best known for its large buffet and reasonable prices, Taste of India serves traditional Indian fare with plenty to choose from in both vegetarian and non-vegetarian fare.
  • Cafe Gyro Basha is open Monday through Wednesday from 7:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m., Thursday and Friday from 7:00 a.m. to 4:00 a.m., and Saturday from 11:00 a.m. to 4:00 a.m.
  • Cafe Gyro Basha is open Monday through Wednesday from 7:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m., Thursday and Friday from 7:00 a.m. to 4:00 a.m., and Saturday from 11:00 a.m. to 4:00 a.m.
  • Cafe Gyro Basha is open Monday through Wednesday from 7:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m., Thursday and Friday from 7:00 a.m. to 4:00 a.m., and Saturday from 11:00 a.m. to 4:00 a.m.
  • The hours of King David's Restaurant are Monday through Thursday from 11:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m., Friday through Saturday from 11:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m., and Sundays from 12:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m.
  • The hours of King David's Restaurant are Monday through Thursday from 11:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m., Friday through Saturday from 11:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m., and Sundays from 12:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m.
  • The hours of King David's Restaurant are Monday through Thursday from 11:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m., Friday through Saturday from 11:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m., and Sundays from 12:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m.
  • The restaurant hours are Monday through Wednesday from 11:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m., and Thursday through Saturday from 11:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m.
  • The restaurant hours are Monday through Wednesday from 11:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m., and Thursday through Saturday from 11:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m.
  • They boast a selection of imported sake, shouchu, plum liqueur and beer sure to help comfort any achy muscles you might have from your active day.
  • The restaurant is also known for its Po Boy sandwiches, which range from catfish to barbecue pork.
  • Soul Fish Cafe Soul Fish Cafe's Midtown location puts it a short drive from Mud Island.
  • From walking on Beale Street, to cycling the city's more than 60 miles of bike routes, Memphis has plenty for the outdoor enthusiast to do.
  • The lunch buffet is served Monday through Friday from 11:15 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.
  • China Gourmet is open Sunday through Friday from 11:30 a.m. to 9 p.m. and from 4:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. on Saturday.
  • China Gourmet is open Sunday through Friday from 11:30 a.m. to 9 p.m. and from 4:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. on Saturday.
  • The hours are Sunday through Thursday from 11:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m., and Friday and Saturday from 11:00 a.m. to 10:30 p.m.
  • The hours are Sunday through Thursday from 11:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m., and Friday and Saturday from 11:00 a.m. to 10:30 p.m.
  • Foods from different regions of China as well as standard Chinese dishes like sesame chicken or broccoli and beef are also available.
  • Experience downhill skiing and snowboarding during the winter, only 30 minutes from downtown Boulder.
  • For a sweet treat, try the Evening Ice Cream Parlor, which has everything from to sundaes to egg creams.
  • Perfect for a day trip, Avon is only an hour's drive away from New York City, but with its boardwalk dotted by Victorian lamps and benches, it seems a world apart.
  • Specializing in sushi, Toyo's rolls are made to order, and the menu offerings will please everyone from the sushi first-timer to the seasoned veteran.
  • Choose from a wide variety of cooked to order steaks, including t-bone, rib eye, and even prime rib.
  • Hours are Tuesday through Sunday from 7 am-10 pm, and they are closed on Monday.
  • Diners at this restaurant, named after the Japanese city of Kobe that the restaurant's owners say is famous for its tender prime rib, can choose from a range of Japanese steak offerings, sushi and seafood.
  • Those who like spirits with their meal can choose from the Brews & BBQ menu, which pairs up popular menu items such as pulled pork sandwiches with a range of beer choices.
  • Families can benefit from serious savings on Tuesdays, when children eat free.
  • If you get hungry after your 18 holes, you can choose from three local steakhouses in the town.
  • This town of about 38,000 people is home to two local golf courses, Scherwood Golf and Briar Ridge Country Club, and is located a short drive from White Hawk Country Club's golf course in nearby Crown Point, Ind.
  • Located in the heart of the northwest Indiana region, about 35 miles from Chicago, Schererville, Ind., is a bit of a golf mecca.
  • Monday through Friday and from 6 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.
  • Choose from benedicts, omelets, French toast, waffles and pancakes.
  • Kalupa's Bakery This family-owned restaurant is open from 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. (with the bakery open until 7 p.m.) from Monday through Friday, from 7 a.m. to 5 p.m.
  • Kalupa's Bakery This family-owned restaurant is open from 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. (with the bakery open until 7 p.m.) from Monday through Friday, from 7 a.m. to 5 p.m.
  • Kalupa's Bakery This family-owned restaurant is open from 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. (with the bakery open until 7 p.m.) from Monday through Friday, from 7 a.m. to 5 p.m.
  • Many of the houses are from the turn-of-the-century era, lending the area an authentic old-fashioned charm.
  • Aside from being a regular restaurant, McGuire's provides patrons with live comedy routines.
  • If you travel a few miles north from Green Point, you will find a restaurant called Murtha's New York Steakhouse.
  • When you decide to emerge from the park, you can drive only a short distance before you reach a restaurant.
  • While you are in the park, it may be hard to remember that you are never far from the highway and still within the Bohemia city limits.
  • Eat dinner Monday through Thursday from 4 to 10 p.m.; Friday and Saturday from 4 to 11 p.m. and Sunday from 1 to 9 p.m.
  • Eat dinner Monday through Thursday from 4 to 10 p.m.; Friday and Saturday from 4 to 11 p.m. and Sunday from 1 to 9 p.m.
  • Eat dinner Monday through Thursday from 4 to 10 p.m.; Friday and Saturday from 4 to 11 p.m. and Sunday from 1 to 9 p.m.
  • Uva Bianca Restaurant and Wine Bar serves lunch from Monday through Saturday from 11 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
  • Uva Bianca Restaurant and Wine Bar serves lunch from Monday through Saturday from 11 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
  • Vic's Italian Restaurant opens Tuesday through Thursday from 11:30 a.m. to 11 p.m.; Friday and Saturday from 11:30 a.m. to midnight; Sunday noon to 11 p.m.
  • Vic's Italian Restaurant opens Tuesday through Thursday from 11:30 a.m. to 11 p.m.; Friday and Saturday from 11:30 a.m. to midnight; Sunday noon to 11 p.m.
  • Order your pizza either with a thin or thick crust and choose from toppings like meatballs, sausage and green peppers.
  • Take a break from the sun and hike in the shade of the forest in Allaire State Park, only seven miles away.
  • Dairy AshfordHouston, TX 77077(281) 497-8783‎ Rice Bowl Chinese/Indonesian Restaurant Bring your appetite and order from the Indonesian menu for excellent tasting meals and lots of it.
  • This family operated restaurant has been delighting patrons with its culinary offerings since 1954, and has garnered a reputation for excellent seafood, including fish from the Northern Atlantic, lobster, and clams.
  • The toppings range from old favorites like pepperoni to exotic options like asparagus.
  • If you prefer, the restaurant also features an extensive selection of wines from Germany, Austria, California and Oregon.
  • Annapolis, MD 21401(410) 841-5565http://www.reginasrestaurant.net Old Stein Inn The Old Stein Inn was opened (also in 1983) by German immigrants Karl and Ursula Selinger from Neustadt an der Weinstrasse, located in the Rhineland.
  • The Annapolis area is very cosmopolitan, as the city is about equidistant from the cities of Washington, D.
  • Cerro Grande Mexican Restaurant opens Monday through Thursday from 10:30 a.m. to 10 p.m., Friday from 10:30 a.m. to 11 p.m., Saturday from 11 a.m. to 10:30 p.m. and Sunday from 11 a.m. to 9:30 p.m.
  • Cerro Grande Mexican Restaurant opens Monday through Thursday from 10:30 a.m. to 10 p.m., Friday from 10:30 a.m. to 11 p.m., Saturday from 11 a.m. to 10:30 p.m. and Sunday from 11 a.m. to 9:30 p.m.
  • Cerro Grande Mexican Restaurant opens Monday through Thursday from 10:30 a.m. to 10 p.m., Friday from 10:30 a.m. to 11 p.m., Saturday from 11 a.m. to 10:30 p.m. and Sunday from 11 a.m. to 9:30 p.m.
  • Cerro Grande Mexican Restaurant opens Monday through Thursday from 10:30 a.m. to 10 p.m., Friday from 10:30 a.m. to 11 p.m., Saturday from 11 a.m. to 10:30 p.m. and Sunday from 11 a.m. to 9:30 p.m.
  • This dining establishment earned an Award of Excellence from Wine Spectator in 2006, 2007 and 2008.
  • Clarke's Landing Restaurant opens from 11:30 a.m. to 9 p.m., Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday and Sunday.
  • Children can order from the Kid's Corner, including Chicken Tenders for $5.
  • Take a two-mile hike on an unimproved trail from the parking lot and spend the day hunting for fossils along the beach.
  • It also has an adjacent lodge with all of the same amenities, but set away from the hustle and bustle of the hotel.
  • Nestled in the heart of County Wicklow, Arklow offers the beauty of the Irish countryside less than an hour away from Dublin.
  • Menu choices range from the typical (mostly fried) appetizers, burgers and salads to a full-entree menu that includes steaks, seafood and pasta.
  • Open daily from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. and from 4 to 8 p.m.
  • Open daily from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. and from 4 to 8 p.m.
  • The 5,300-acre park also contains everything from swimming holes to streams that house catfish and bass.
  • Chicago, IL 60654(312) 644-8664vongsthaikitchen.com Rain Forest Cafe Popular among younger diners, Chicago's version of the Rain Forest Cafe differs little from its fellows spread across the country.
  • Entries can be pricey--the tamarind beef tenderloin costs $22.95, but the food has earned raves from critics.6 W.
  • This cool, urban space features everything from spring rolls to tamarind barbecue pork satay to curries, pad Thai and miso-glazed salmon.
  • Huntington's Railroad Co. offers everything from a large appetizer, burger and pizza menu to pasta, chicken and fajitas options with reasonable, family-friendly prices.
  • Prices range from moderate to high, there is a children's menu and the restaurant is open for lunch and dinner every day.
  • Il Terrazzo Carmine Elliot Bay provides Seattle residents and visitors with a wide variety of water sports from sailing to fishing.
  • Most of the dinners range from $20 to $30 each, though some of them are pricier or less expensive.
  • From quick breakfasts to lunch and all possible snacks in between, this is quick stop, with available seating in the atrium of the Three First National Plaza.
  • From there, his passion spread, adding small twists to the developing branches, and filling neighborhood niches with varying Italian specialties.
  • Rosebud, a Chicago-based authentic Italian restaurant group, has 10 restaurants, spread out from the heart of the bustling loop into the laid-back outer suburbs.
  • The India House The only Indian restaurant in Moline, The India House (also known as the Great Indian Restaurant), provides fresh authentic cuisine from all corners of India.
  • If you order a bottle of wine, you will find 700 to choose from. 4 Olives Wine Bar3033 Anderson Ave.
  • A saloon is not a saloon without drinks, and So Long Saloon has a nice selection for you to choose from.
  • When you are ready to order a drink, you will have a selection of draft, bottled and canned beers to choose from.
  • Rock-A-Belly Bar & Grill Across from the Kansas State University campus, Rock-A-Belly Bar & Grill is a great place for food, drinks and fun.
  • Manhattan has five golf courses to choose from, along with outdoor activities, such as hiking, biking and horseback riding in Randolph State Park.
  • You may also order from the menu or order take-out from the buffets.
  • You may also order from the menu or order take-out from the buffets.
  • Taj Mahal Indian Cuisine11778 Springfield PikeCincinnati, OH 45246-2312(513) 671-3388 New Krishna Indian Restaurant New Krishna Indian Restaurant is just a seven-minute drive away from Springdale.
  • Only 4 miles from Springdale, you will find more than 16,000 acres of scenic greenery, containing 21 parks.
  • For non-steak eaters, choose from salmon and sea bass to ravioli and chicken.
  • Cliffs also features meals to share from the porterhouse for two-four to the rack of Colorado lamb for two.
  • Assembly serves all types of steaks, from filet and prime rib to porterhouse for two and t-bone.
  • Diners can choose from porterhouse, prime rib chops, NY strip, filet or a surf and turf combination.
  • Lunch specials are offered Monday through Friday from 10:30 a.m. through 2:30 p.m (excluding holidays), and include an order of pork fried rice and a choice of hot and sour, egg drop or wonton soup in addition to the main entree.
  • This setting naturally makes it a prime location for water sports, and you can enjoy anything from a relaxing afternoon of beachcombing to kayaking the Patuxent (rentals are available at the nearby Patuxent Adventure Center).
  • Lexington Park, Maryland, is located in southern Maryland, along the shores of the Patuxent River and just miles from the Chesapeake Bay.
  • Union City, New Jersey, has much to offer the active, sports-minded tourist---namely the Alameda Creek Trail, which extends from the hills to the bay.
  • The menu ranges from pasta and pizza to meat and fish dishes.
  • Bobby's Burger PalaceMonmouth Mall188 RT 35Eatontown, NJ 07724(732) 544-0200‎bobbysburgerpalace.com Chili's The Eatontown branch of this nationwide chain gets consistently high marks from locals and tourists alike.
  • There is quite a variety to choose from, as well---the Napa Valley burger, which comes with melted goat cheese and honey mustard, is delicious.
  • Located in a strip mall, it's not much from the outside, but the inside looks authentic.
  • Commercial BlvdFort Lauderdale, Florida(954)771-7342ambryrestaurant.com Old Vienna Restaurant Old Vienna Restaurant prides itself on using the freshest ingredients, and even the sauces are made from scratch in the restaurant's kitchen.
  • The restaurant opens at noon, four on weekends, and happy hour is from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. daily.
  • Guests can choose from a variety of pasta entrees, such as gnocchi, penne vodka, baked penne parmigiana and lasagna.
  • Cacciatore's Trattoria and Pizzeria1116 Rt. 52Carmel, NY 10512(845) 225-4695cacciatorestrattoria.com Cutillo's Restaurant Cutillo's Restaurant is a short drive from Carmel Lake.
  • Visitors can also choose from several specialty pizzas.
  • Guests can choose from a wide range of appetizers, including fried calamari, bruschetta and mini meatballs.
  • Abruzzi Trattoria Abruzzi Trattoria is located in Patterson, about 10 miles from Pawling Nature Reserve, and about 18 miles from Candlewood Lake.
  • Abruzzi Trattoria Abruzzi Trattoria is located in Patterson, about 10 miles from Pawling Nature Reserve, and about 18 miles from Candlewood Lake.
  • Travertine Grill1209 Van Buren AvenueSalton City, CA 92274(760) 394-0040 Calipatria Inn and Suites Steakhouse at the Inn Located just 8 miles from the Salton Sea, Calipatria Inn and Suites hotel operates an upscale steakhouse.
  • Known to many as a hangout for locals, the restaurant offers a full menu, with a range of choices from fajitas to fish and chips.
  • Baked goods are made from scratch using local, organic ingredients when possible.
  • Travel to Oklahoma and you'll find everything from the cool hills of Green Country to a swampy alligator home in the southeast corner, to metropolitan cities, to cattle country.
  • Broadway Haysville, KS 67060(316) 522-1113vfw6957.org Jim's Steak House Fans of this steak house come from as far away as Kansas City and have been filling its tables for more than 50 years.
  • Puffy's Steak and Ice House213 Main StreetMaple Hill, Kansas(785) 256-4329www.puffyssteakhouse.com/ VFW Post 6957 This Haysville VFW post pulls in hungry steak fans from Wichita and south central Kansas every Saturday night.
  • When at Ozumo, do as locals do and order from the Chef's Original Dishes.
  • All desserts here are made from scratch, so if you happen to save enough room from the main course, sample their sweets menu.
  • All desserts here are made from scratch, so if you happen to save enough room from the main course, sample their sweets menu.
  • If you find yourself worn out from a busy day of camping or hiking, try some of the restaurants in the county.
  • The Red Door is known for using fresh, organic ingredients from local farmers markets.
  • It serves the area Sunday through Thursday from 5 a.m. to midnight and until 1 a.m. during weekends.
  • Summit Brick Oven Pizza & Catering21 Union PlSummit, NJ 07901(908)598-0045summitbrickoven.com Fiorino Ristorante Cuisine from Tuscany is served at this Zagat-rated elegant, gourmet restaurant.
  • There is a happy hour menu every day from 4:00 to 6:30 p.m. with wine, appetizers, beer and drinks.
  • There is a great selection of desserts to choose from and great side dishes, soups and salads.
  • Glastonbury,Connecticut has a wide selection of quality restaurants to choose from in the area.
  • Diners can also enjoy numerous beer and wine selections and desserts from Kirker's; the desserts are made in-house.
  • The Inn has discounts on meals between 3 and 6 p.m. from Monday through Saturday, as well as a Tuesday night dining special, when six of the Inn's entrees are $12 from 6 to 8 p.m.
  • The Inn has discounts on meals between 3 and 6 p.m. from Monday through Saturday, as well as a Tuesday night dining special, when six of the Inn's entrees are $12 from 6 to 8 p.m.
  • The menu also includes a specialty cocktail drink list with margaritas and a wine list including varietals from Italy, France, Spain and New Zealand.
  • Owner Sean Godin's inspiration comes from recipes his grandmother first learned in the 1950s in Alaska, and sixty years later, the fresh fried taco shells are a hit with locals and tourists alike.
  • The menu offers high-end bar food, ranging from the Backyard BBQ Burger, laden with cheddar cheese, bacon and fried onions, to the Italian Stallion specialty pizza.
  • Guests can also choose from a variety of sandwiches such as jalapeno burgers, shrimp po' boys, BLTs and vegetarian California burgers.
  • Guests can choose from a variety of appetizers like French-fried onions, seafood fondeaux, Buffalo tenders and fried mushrooms.
  • There are many steak restaurants in the Seabrook area where you can have a good meal and take a break from sightseeing and recreational activities.
  • Diners can select from a wide variety of beef, chicken and seafood favorites or fill their plate at the scrumptious buffet.
  • From fancy to fast, and everything between, we've got you covered.
  • Lexington, KY 40515(859) 245-9504shamrocksky.com Lynagh's Irish Pub & Grill Located blocks from the University of Kentucky campus, this laid-back neighborhood pub is a convenient stop for cheap food and beer.
  • Choose from over 150 classic Chinese dishes, like pepper steak with onions or barbecue spare ribs with fried rice.
  • Tandoori Chef Situated in the heart of Hackensack, Tandoori Chef offers you exclusive dishes from North India.
  • Along with people from different ethnicities, the cuisines further exemplify the city's diversity.
  • Renton, WA 98055(425) 271-8300‎ Mediterranean Kitchen The Mediterranean Kitchen is one block southeast of Downtown Park in Bellevue, which is across Lake Washington from Seattle.
  • The restaurant not only serves authentic German and Hungarian foods, but also offers up more than 40 draft and bottled beers from the full service bar.
  • Thankfully, Noah's Restaurant is located only a few short blocks from Stonington Harbor.
  • A visit to the Poconos is a quick getaway for those from the city of Philadelphia and surrounding areas.
  • The Old Mill Inn also has a full bar, complete feature a listing of specialty cocktails, beer, and wine selections, including local varietals from Long Island's North Fork, as well as those from California, France, and Italy.
  • The Old Mill Inn also has a full bar, complete feature a listing of specialty cocktails, beer, and wine selections, including local varietals from Long Island's North Fork, as well as those from California, France, and Italy.
  • Guests also can choose from salads, fajitas, burritos or sausage sandwiches.
  • Choose from starters such as grilled lobster tail mojito with avocado salsa and plantain chips or Thai lettuce wraps.
  • Choose from a seasonal menu of small plates that may include seafood, wild mushrooms, steak, beef and roasted vegetables.
  • A little bit off the beaten path in Aurora on the east side of Denver, Bender's Brat Haus serves lunch from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
  • Lunch and dinner menus feature all things German from bratwurst, potato pancakes, krautburger, schnitzel, and steak to homemade cheesecakes and tortes.
  • The restaurant is open Monday to Friday from 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. and Saturday and Sunday from 10 a.m. to 12 midnight.
  • The restaurant is open Monday to Friday from 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. and Saturday and Sunday from 10 a.m. to 12 midnight.
  • Seattle WA 98121(206) 728-8595flyingfishrestaurant.com O'Asian Kitchen The O'Asian Kitchen is a modern Asian restaurant featuring dishes from many countries.
  • Seattle, WA 98102(206) 324-3160 pomodoro.net Le Pichet Le Pichet is a French restaurant that is open from 8 a.m. until midnight every night.
  • Seattle has six hiking trails within an hour's drive from the city.
  • Vegetarian dishes are also on the menu, if you want to stay away from meat.
  • From visiting the 16 historical sites on the Freedom Trail to walking the Franklin Park pedestrian paths, Boston has walking and hiking opportunities for everyone.
  • Highway A1AMelbourne Beach, Florida 32951(321) 727-3133cafecoconutcove.com Heidi's Jazz Club Heidi's Jazz Club in Cocoa Beach is just a short drive from Melbourne Beach on the A1A highway.
  • Enjoy classic Italian dishes like baked pasta and lasagna, or choose from their full menu of fresh fish, seafood, steaks and chicken.
  • Diners can choose from a variety of delicious entrees, including pastas, seafood dishes, poultry, steaks and more.
  • Clearwater's restaurants are varied and diverse, offering everything from fresh seafood to Mexican favorites.
  • From sunbathing on the area's award-winning beaches to boating, fishing and biking or jogging on the Pinellas Trail, the Clearwater area offers something for visitors of every age and interest to enjoy.
  • The restaurant is open daily from 6:30 a.m. to 8 p.m. and stays open until 9 p.m. on weekends.
  • Named "Best Chef" by the River Report 2 years in a row, Owner and Chef Peter Schott sources his ingredients from local growers and includes the names of the farms he works with on his menu.
  • The restaurant is open every day from 11 a.m. to 8 p.m., and closes at 9 p.m. on weekends.
  • Surrounded by forests and lakes, a visit to Narrowsburg can take you from the Tusten mountain trail overlooking the Delaware River to the locally owned restaurants that work with neighboring farms to create fresh, seasonal menus.
  • Their menu ranges from pizza to lobster cannelloni.
  • South Orange County has a wide variety of outdoor activities from surfing the waves of San Clemente, to hiking the trails in Laguna Canyon or kayaking in Dana Point.
  • Open 7 days a week from 11:30 AM to 9:30 PM, with closing extended to 10:30 PM on Friday and Saturday.
  • From the many TVs tuned to a variety of sporting events to the American menu heavy on steak, chicken, ribs and seafood, the Upper Sports Deck meets every expectation, making it a restaurant for food lovers as well as sports lovers.
  • Open 7 days a week from 10:00 AM to 10:00 PM, with closing extended to 11:00 PM on Friday and Saturday.
  • Established by settlers from Connecticut in the 1700s, Branchville, New Jersey grew quickly into a destination for city dwellers to relax in a more rural environment.
  • Hwy 68Embudo, NM 87531(505) 852-4707embudostation.com El Paragua This restaurant is located just 24 miles from Santa Fe.
  • Guests can also choose from sides such as macaroni and cheese, green chile polenta, potato salad and mashed potatoes.
  • The nightclub features an eclectic mix of live music, including jazz, blues, Latin and world music from local and national acts, plus a popular weekly Latin dance night where you can dance the night away.
  • From the famous Philly cheesesteak to classic Italian and Irish food, hungry visitors have plenty of dining choices.
  • Jamesons Char House1331 W Dundee RoadArlington Heights, IL 60005(847) 392-7100jamesonsdundee.com Morton's The Steakhouse For over 30 years, Morton's has been serving quality steaks, from filet mignon to porterhouse, prime rib and Chicago-style bone-in.
  • The inn, located 15 minutes from the mainland on Chebeague Island, is famous for its traditional cookout: the Chebeague Island Inn Lobster Bake.
  • Enjoy views of the bay as you dine inside or enjoy the ocean breezes from the sundeck.
  • Diners can choose from eating at the contemporary bar, in the VIP lounge or in the outdoor eating area where the views of Manhattan are accentuated by a cool breeze off the water.
  • Lunch hours are from 11:30 to 2:30 on weekdays or for dinner starting at 5:30 every night except Sunday when they open at 4:30.
  • During its more than 20 years in operation, this restaurant has received rave reviews from guests and critics alike.
  • The restaurant is known for two of its soups - a French Onion and a (Salmon) seafood chowder - and while the menu changes seasonally, there are always a dozen or so entrees from which to choose.
  • No. 9 Park9 Park StreetBoston, MA 02108(617) 742-9991no9park.com/ Mistral Bistro With a menu reflecting cuisine from France's Provençe region, the Mistral Bistro is one of Boston's finest upscale eateries.
  • From the dining room designed by C&J Katz, to a wine list chosen by award-winning sommelier Cat Silirie, to the menu designed by James Beard Award-Winning Chef Barbara Lynch, the restaurant exudes sophistication at every turn.
  • Seafood is prevalent throughout the menu, from the raw bar's offerings of littleneck clams and oysters to house specialty--broiled Boston schrod with hot crab.
  • The Locke-Ober focuses on fine American cuisine, reflecting fresh foods available from local suppliers.
  • Jean-Claude Pastries opens for breakfast and lunch, Wednesday through Sunday from 8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.
  • Chicago, IL 60654(312) 644-7700www.maggianos.com/locations/detail.asp?unit_id=001.025.0047 Marcello's Located at 645 North Ave., Marcello's Itailan restaurant and pizzeria is just a stone's throw from North Beach.
  • Astor Street The Astor Hotel in downtown Milwaukee dates from 1920 and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.
  • Willie G's is visually striking from the street--a large multi-story building in the Strand Historic District.
  • You can get permission from the preservation society to visit the Hudson-Athens Lighthouse in the middle of the river.10 Brick Row Extension Athens, NY 12015(518) 444-8080athensonthehudson.com
  • Greene County lies between the Hudson River and the Catskill Mountains, two hours from New York City.
  • The Grill uses herbs and vegetables from the resort's own garden in order to provide fresh meal ingredients.
  • Choose from Spanish food favorites like enchiladas, tacos and sopas, Visit the bar for a drink ranging from wine to an Orient Beach (Peach Bacardi, peaches and ginger liquor).
  • Choose from Spanish food favorites like enchiladas, tacos and sopas, Visit the bar for a drink ranging from wine to an Orient Beach (Peach Bacardi, peaches and ginger liquor).
  • Sakura's food is a vacation from the mundane, featuring bold, exotic flavors that will leave your yearning for more.
  • With a modern layout and spacious table settings, this streamlined restaurant is a complete escape from the hustle and bustle of everyday life.
  • Diners can select from the traditional beef, chicken, seafood or vegetable entrees.
  • Most boast an authentic Japanese dining experience in a comfortable setting, allowing diners to treat their palate to a culinary adventure without venturing too far from home.
  • From quaint, hole-in-the-wall restaurants that you could easily walk right by to imposing structures that command attention, the variety of settings and menu items is impressive.
  • The cuisine here is traditional of Northern India and made from fresh ingredients and spices making it a popular choice among the locals.
  • Whether you are looking for a familiar comfort of food from home or perhaps just looking to expand your culinary palate, these Indian restaurants in Altamonte Springs and surrounding areas are sure to delight your taste buds.
  • Just about everything on the menu is Portuguese, from the aperitivos (appetizers) to the peixe (fish), mariscos (seafood) and carnes (meats).
  • Children's, lunch and bar menus also are available, as is a specially priced early bird menu (offered from 4 to 6 p. m.
  • The wine list is very extensive, featuring more than 180 selections, ranging from an $18 Lancers Rose to a $750 Bertani 1962 Amarone.130 Ferry St.
  • Another New Jersey feature that make it such an appealing destination is its amazingly diverse population, with its sizable communities of immigrants from all over the globe.
  • From mountain biking along the Delaware and Raritan Canal to trout fishing in Big Flat Brook, beachcombing at Island Beach and hiking in High Point State Park, exploring the "hidden New Jersey" is sure to make for a delightful day in the great outdoors.
  • Order from the take out menu, grab a single slice at the counter or unwind in the dining area after walking along the Board and Green Old Mail Trail.
  • Less than .25 miles from Westbrook Town Beach, this restaurant offers indoor and outdoor seating.
  • Situated on the sandy banks of Long Island Sound, Westbrook Connecticut offers outdoor enthusiasts sandy beaches and activities from sailing and kayaking to hiking and saltwater fishing.
  • There even are eight egg roll options available, ranging from spring veggie, priced at 75 cents (as of November 2009) to crab ($2.55) and lobster ($2.95).217 Dix Ave.
  • The menu specializes in do-it-yourself combinations, where you can pick one from column A, two from column B or some such assortment.
  • The menu specializes in do-it-yourself combinations, where you can pick one from column A, two from column B or some such assortment.
  • You can dine in or have your food delivered, or you can order ahead of time and pick it up from its drive-through window.
  • If you'd prefer to get your dinner to go, you can forgo the buffet and order from the takeout menu instead.38 Main St.
  • If you're hankering for a steak but don't want to miss out on the renowned seafood from local waters, Grilled Wild Sea Scallops can be added to any entrée.
  • Try the Manila Clams made from the locally harvested Samish Bay clams or any one of the fresh seafood selections.
  • Dirty Dan Harris' Steak and Seafood Between the thick-cut steaks and fresh seafood yielded from the nearby bay and ocean, Dirty Dan Harris' is an example of Bellingham dining at its best.
  • For the traveling foodie, Bellingham provides a variety of fine steakhouses from the traditional to the truly innovative.
  • For under $7 (as of 2009), you can enjoy specialties ranging from the familiar (kung pao chicken, Mongolian beef) to the less well-known (deep-cooked potato, diced fish with pickled pepper), all of these accompanied by soup and steamed or fried rice.
  • If you should find yourself starving in Seattle after a day of outdoor activities and you're craving Chinese, check out this list of top picks from the University of Washington's Chinese Student Association.
  • The restaurant operates Sunday through Thursday from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. and from 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. on Fridays and Saturdays.2424 Wilson Blvd.
  • The restaurant operates Sunday through Thursday from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. and from 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. on Fridays and Saturdays.2424 Wilson Blvd.
  • Explore the city as you savor the aroma of morning coffee from the local cafés and when exhausted, enjoy a sumptuous meal in an Indian restaurant.
  • The restaurants on Isle of Palms range from upscale establishments to beach-side bars, and you'll have your choice of fresh seafood and traditional Lowcountry favorites.
  • Fettucini alfredo stands out from the rest of the menu, with a homemade cheese and cream sauce topping fresh fettucini.
  • Pietro and Sons Italian Restaurant The family-owned Pietro and Sons Italian Restaurant has an enormous traditional Italian menu, ranging from simple pasta dishes to veal, chicken and seafood.
  • Formed in the late 1700s, Elmira is one of them many towns in the state that benefited from canal traffic.
  • Anmol Restaurant is open from Monday through Saturday from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. and Sunday from 11 a.m. to 9 p.m.
  • Anmol Restaurant is open from Monday through Saturday from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. and Sunday from 11 a.m. to 9 p.m.
  • Anmol Restaurant is open from Monday through Saturday from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. and Sunday from 11 a.m. to 9 p.m.
  • Milwaukee, WI 53202(414) 271-8200‎mayuramilwaukee.com Anmol Restaurant Anmol Restaurant makes Pakistani and Indian dishes with "100% zabiha halal meat." Vegetarians can choose from six entrees, including the classic brown lentil dish, Daal Chana.
  • Mayura Indian Restaurant serves a lunch buffet Monday through Friday from 11:30 a.m. to 3 p.m.; Saturday and Sunday from 11:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.
  • Mayura Indian Restaurant serves a lunch buffet Monday through Friday from 11:30 a.m. to 3 p.m.; Saturday and Sunday from 11:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.
  • Indulge in a dish from its Tandoori oven like the Chicken Shashlik or one of their many vegetarian entrées including Bhindi Masala.
  • Dinner is served Sunday to Thursday from 5 to 10:30 p.m.; Friday and Saturday from 5 to 10:30 p.m.
  • Dinner is served Sunday to Thursday from 5 to 10:30 p.m.; Friday and Saturday from 5 to 10:30 p.m.
  • Maharaja Restaurant is open for lunch seven days a week from 11:30 a.m. to 3 p.m.
  • See the North Point Lighthouse and take in the scenic lake view from Bradford Beach.
  • The dinner menu, accompanied by a decent wine list, includes everything from local seafood to prime steaks.
  • This is a family-friendly restaurant with everything on the lunch menu from the obligatory grilled cheese sandwich for the little ones to a local scallop taco for those craving truly local seafood.
  • You can choose from a more formal atmosphere or one that is casual and relaxed.
  • Manuel's serves Sunday brunch from 10 a.m. until 3 p.m.
  • Downtown and Arboretum locations are open Monday through Thursday from 11 a.m. until 10 p.m., Friday and Saturday from 11 a.m. until 11 p.m. and Sunday from 10 a.m. until 10 p.m.
  • Downtown and Arboretum locations are open Monday through Thursday from 11 a.m. until 10 p.m., Friday and Saturday from 11 a.m. until 11 p.m. and Sunday from 10 a.m. until 10 p.m.
  • Downtown and Arboretum locations are open Monday through Thursday from 11 a.m. until 10 p.m., Friday and Saturday from 11 a.m. until 11 p.m. and Sunday from 10 a.m. until 10 p.m.
  • Open from Sunday through Wednesday from 11:00 a.m. until 10:00 p.m. and Thursday through Saturday from 11:00 a.m. until 11:00 p.m., the restaurant serves brunch Saturdays and Sundays from 11 a.m. until 4 p.m.
  • Open from Sunday through Wednesday from 11:00 a.m. until 10:00 p.m. and Thursday through Saturday from 11:00 a.m. until 11:00 p.m., the restaurant serves brunch Saturdays and Sundays from 11 a.m. until 4 p.m.
  • Open from Sunday through Wednesday from 11:00 a.m. until 10:00 p.m. and Thursday through Saturday from 11:00 a.m. until 11:00 p.m., the restaurant serves brunch Saturdays and Sundays from 11 a.m. until 4 p.m.
  • Open from Sunday through Wednesday from 11:00 a.m. until 10:00 p.m. and Thursday through Saturday from 11:00 a.m. until 11:00 p.m., the restaurant serves brunch Saturdays and Sundays from 11 a.m. until 4 p.m.
  • Happy hour, with $5 draft beers and margaritas, is every day from 3 p.m. to 7 p.m.
  • The machaca con huevo, shredded dried beef with eggs, is typical of northern Mexico, and the carnitas, braised pork with a hint of orange flavor, are from Michoacan.
  • Paramus is also home to four golf courses, a bike path that runs from Ridgewood to Rochelle Park, and the Saddle River County Park, offering a number of options for recreation enthusiasts and adventure seekers.
  • The restaurant uses ingredients from local organic farmers, and imports cheese, olive oil and salami from Italy.
  • The restaurant uses ingredients from local organic farmers, and imports cheese, olive oil and salami from Italy.
  • Rochester NY 14623(585) 427-7420bazilrestaurant.com Tokyo Japanese Restaurant A teppanyaki-style restaurant, Tokyo Japanese Restaurant serves lunches and dinners from the hibachi or sushi bar.
  • Diners can choose from one of nine pastas, any of 10 sauces and add-on toppings including chicken, shrimp, sausage and different vegetables.
  • There are a handful of family-owned establishments offering a break from the chain food.
  • Gus' Steak House5698 State Highway 12Norwich, NY 13815-3201(607)336-4777gussteakhouse.com Canasawacta Country Club The private Canasawacta Country Club is open to the public for dinner seven days a week from April to September, as of November 2009.
  • Choose from entrees such as mussels marinière with garlic, white wine, and parsley, or tiger prawns with garlic, white wine, and a bisque Marseillaise.
  • This charming cafe/deli features classically French dishes using Chef William Rolle's family recipes from Lyon, France.
  • Whether coming in from a river rafting excursion, a run or ride along the American River Bike Trail, a fly-fishing expedition, or a stroll through Old Sacramento, the city's French food options will be sure to please the palate and relax the mind.
  • The college crowd from California State University, Sacramento gives the city a young, hip, and fresh vibe, while the politicians and power brokers at the state capitol provide the city with an air of importance.
  • The menu offers a variety of dishes ranging from seafood specialties to escargot.
  • Powered by the wind and sun, this restaurant offers homemade organic meals cooked with food from 15 local suppliers.
  • Caribbean Flavor opens Monday through Thursday from 11:30 a.m. to 8 p.m.; Friday and Saturday 11 a.m. to 9:30 p.m.
  • Jamaican James Jerk Pit opens Monday through Saturday from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m.; Sunday and Monday from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m.
  • Jamaican James Jerk Pit opens Monday through Saturday from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m.; Sunday and Monday from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m.
  • Real Jamaican Jerk an' Ting serves food Monday through Thursday from 11 a.m. to 9 p.m., Friday from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. and Saturday from 9:30 a.m. to 10 p.m.
  • Real Jamaican Jerk an' Ting serves food Monday through Thursday from 11 a.m. to 9 p.m., Friday from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. and Saturday from 9:30 a.m. to 10 p.m.
  • Real Jamaican Jerk an' Ting serves food Monday through Thursday from 11 a.m. to 9 p.m., Friday from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. and Saturday from 9:30 a.m. to 10 p.m.
  • Finally, after a day in Central Park, escape from New York City, drive through the Holland Tunnel and eat at a restaurant called Caribbean Flavor.
  • Tuscany Grill Restaurant 120 College Street Middletown, CT 06457(860) 346-7096tuscanygrill.com Eli Cannon's Tap Room This convivial New York-style pub attracts beer fans from across the state of Connecticut.
  • Choose from a diverse selection of tasty dishes, including southern-fried tofu and portobello burgers.
  • Home of Wesleyan University, Middletown caters to an upbeat, college crowd, so there are plenty of good taverns and bars to choose from.
  • Less than 9 miles from the center of Bernardsville sits the 127 acres of New Jersey's largest horticultural park, Frelinghuysen Arboretum.
  • Choose from one of 10 po-boy sandwiches or enjoy gumbo, red beans and rice, jambalaya and smoked sausage.
  • Choose from 14 specialty omelets, seven signature eggs benedicts and the egg and potato scramblers.
  • Choices range from salads, sandwiches and burgers to filet mignon, pasta and meatballs with Mia's renowned homemade sauce.
  • Alton's Family Restaurant Conveniently located five minutes from the Buffalo International Airport, Alton's is a "round-the-clock" diner established in 1982 by brothers Al and Milton Koutsandreas.
  • Entrees range from $15.95 for classics, such as spaghetti and meatballs and penne primavera to $30.95 for dishes including wasabi scallops and filet mignon.
  • Choose from a large selection of menu items, including hot and cold appetizers, pasta, steak and seafood.
  • Steamed or broiled lobster, depending on the weight, ranges from $22.50 to $39.50.
  • As of 2009, lunch entrees range from $6.50 to $15.75, and dinner entrees run from $19.00 to $39.95.
  • As of 2009, lunch entrees range from $6.50 to $15.75, and dinner entrees run from $19.00 to $39.95.
  • Take in the beautiful view of the harbor from the dining room, or select the catch of the day from their take-out fish market.
  • Take in the beautiful view of the harbor from the dining room, or select the catch of the day from their take-out fish market.
  • Guests can also order from the menu, which features a variety of chicken, seafood, lamb, and vegetarian specialties.
  • For lunch, you can choose from the mini-menu "Why French Women Don't Get Fat." And for dinner, the evening specials supplement the menu with traditional French dishes like Bouillabaise Seafood Stew and Steak Diane.
  • There are over 200 labels from around the world available.
  • La Fogata also has early dinner specials daily from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m.
  • In addition to their churrasco, they have a full entrée menu from which to choose, as well as inventive salads and sides.
  • Located on Waters Avenue in the Town and Country area of northwest Tampa, it is a quick drive from anywhere in the Bay area and family-owned and operated.
  • Their large selection of fish from around the world can include Tuna, Salmon, Rainbow Trout, Snapper, Chillean Sea Bass, and more, on any given night.
  • Deptford Township has exploded with activity in recent years with so many people moving from the city of Philadelphia, only 15 minutes away.
  • There is a nice cheese menu, which is organized by region, and great for pairing with many of the wines from the elaborate list.
  • All of the bread and pasta is homemade on the premises, and sausages and sauces are made from family recipes.
  • Italian is one of the popular cuisines in the city, with many top-notch Italian restaurants to choose from.
  • Vegans can choose from a variety of options, including chimichangas, burritos, fajitas and poblano relleno.
  • Vegan guests can choose from vegetarian burritos, tacos and appetizers.
  • The restaurant is open for both lunch and dinner and is conveniently located on Wadsworth Blvd. in Arvada, so you can stop by on your way either up to the mountains or coming back down from a day on the trails or slopes.
  • Colorado boasts a range of outdoor activities, ranging from skiing and snowshoeing to rafting, hiking, climbing and biking.
  • Arvada, CO is a convenient pit-stop for anyone heading up into the mountains from Denver.
  • The cooks buy their Dungeness crab from local San Francisco fishermen and offer an array of crab dishes, such as crab cakes and crab sandwiches.
  • Due Amici Italian Grill is open Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday 11 a.m. to 8:30 p.m.; Thursday, Friday and Saturday from 11:30 a.m. to 10 p.m.; and Sunday 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. with brunch from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
  • Due Amici Italian Grill is open Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday 11 a.m. to 8:30 p.m.; Thursday, Friday and Saturday from 11:30 a.m. to 10 p.m.; and Sunday 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. with brunch from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
  • Bacio Italian Cuisine serves dinner Sunday from 4 to 8 p.m.; Wednesday and Thursday 5 to 9 p.m.; and Friday and Saturday 5 to 10 p.m.
  • Palmyra Cove Nature Park is less than three miles from the center of town.
  • The Gin Mill serves lunch and dinner to hungry outdoor enthusiasts seven days a week, from 11 a.m. to 2 a.m.
  • Watch sports on flat-screen televisions and choose from 17 ice-cold beers on tap.
  • The restaurant serves breakfast, lunch and dinner every day from 7 a.m. to 10 p.m.
  • Dina's markets to a health-conscious clientele, with meals made to order from local ingredients whenever possible.
  • Mikado Japanese Cuisine opens Monday through Thursday from 11:30 a.m. to 10:30 p.m., Friday from 11:30 a.m. to 11 p.m., Saturday from 12:30 p.m. to 11 p.m. and Sunday from 12:30 p.m. to 10 p.m.2320 Marlton Pike 70 W.
  • Mikado Japanese Cuisine opens Monday through Thursday from 11:30 a.m. to 10:30 p.m., Friday from 11:30 a.m. to 11 p.m., Saturday from 12:30 p.m. to 11 p.m. and Sunday from 12:30 p.m. to 10 p.m.2320 Marlton Pike 70 W.
  • Mikado Japanese Cuisine opens Monday through Thursday from 11:30 a.m. to 10:30 p.m., Friday from 11:30 a.m. to 11 p.m., Saturday from 12:30 p.m. to 11 p.m. and Sunday from 12:30 p.m. to 10 p.m.2320 Marlton Pike 70 W.
  • Mikado Japanese Cuisine opens Monday through Thursday from 11:30 a.m. to 10:30 p.m., Friday from 11:30 a.m. to 11 p.m., Saturday from 12:30 p.m. to 11 p.m. and Sunday from 12:30 p.m. to 10 p.m.2320 Marlton Pike 70 W.
  • Expect all your favorite hand rolls, sushi and sashimi selections, priced from $2 to $10.
  • Norma's Mediterranean Restaurant opens Monday through Thursday from 11 a.m. to 9 p.m.; Friday and Saturday from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m.; and Sunday from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m.
  • Norma's Mediterranean Restaurant opens Monday through Thursday from 11 a.m. to 9 p.m.; Friday and Saturday from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m.; and Sunday from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m.
  • Norma's Mediterranean Restaurant opens Monday through Thursday from 11 a.m. to 9 p.m.; Friday and Saturday from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m.; and Sunday from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m.
  • Vegetarians can order from every section of the menu with ease.
  • Myung Ga Korean Restaurant opens Monday through Saturday from 10:30 a.m. to 10 p.m.404 Marlton Pike E.
  • Frank's Deli and Catering is open Monday through Friday from 6:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m., Saturday from 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Sunday from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m.
  • Frank's Deli and Catering is open Monday through Friday from 6:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m., Saturday from 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Sunday from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m.
  • Frank's Deli and Catering is open Monday through Friday from 6:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m., Saturday from 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Sunday from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m.
  • The Aristocrat Restaurant opens Monday through Saturday from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m.534 Union Ave.
  • Breakfast, lunch and dinner are served; menu items run from the mundane to unusual.
  • Dinner is served Tuesday and Wednesday from 4 to 10 p.m.; Thursday through Saturday from 4 to 11 p.m.; and Sunday from noon to 10 p.m.15 Cleveland St.
  • Dinner is served Tuesday and Wednesday from 4 to 10 p.m.; Thursday through Saturday from 4 to 11 p.m.; and Sunday from noon to 10 p.m.15 Cleveland St.
  • Dinner is served Tuesday and Wednesday from 4 to 10 p.m.; Thursday through Saturday from 4 to 11 p.m.; and Sunday from noon to 10 p.m.15 Cleveland St.
  • Solar do Minho serves lunch Tuesday through Saturday from noon to 4 p.m.
  • Mo's New York Grill opens Tuesday through Friday from 11:30 a.m. to 10 p.m., Saturday from noon to 10 p.m. and Sunday from noon to 9 p.m.14 Memorial Hwy.
  • Mo's New York Grill opens Tuesday through Friday from 11:30 a.m. to 10 p.m., Saturday from noon to 10 p.m. and Sunday from noon to 9 p.m.14 Memorial Hwy.
  • Mo's New York Grill opens Tuesday through Friday from 11:30 a.m. to 10 p.m., Saturday from noon to 10 p.m. and Sunday from noon to 9 p.m.14 Memorial Hwy.
  • Little Mexican Café is open daily from 10 a.m. to midnight.
  • Dinner is served Monday through Thursday and Sunday from 5 until 10 p.m.; Friday and Saturday from 5 to 10:30 p.m.30 Division St.
  • Dinner is served Monday through Thursday and Sunday from 5 until 10 p.m.; Friday and Saturday from 5 to 10:30 p.m.30 Division St.
  • Coromandel Cuisine of India serves lunch Monday through Friday from noon until 2:30 p.m.; Saturday and Sunday from noon until 3 p.m.
  • Coromandel Cuisine of India serves lunch Monday through Friday from noon until 2:30 p.m.; Saturday and Sunday from noon until 3 p.m.
  • Coromandel Cusine of India Coromandel Cuisine of India presents diners with a "unique blend of spices and diverse style of cooking from the different Indian states." It won the Connecticut Readers Choice award in 2007.
  • Along with their kung pao and moo shu dishes, it has many vegetable entrees to choose from. 45 Grand County Road #84Fraser, CO 80442(970) 726-5252skitownrestaurants.com/winter-park/restaurant.php?rid=230 Resources Play Winter Park
  • S. 40Winter Park, CO 80482 (970) 726-8955skitownrestaurants.com/winter-park/restaurant.php?rid=234 Pearl Dragon II Pearl Dragon II, located in Fraser, is a short drive from Winter Park.
  • Fraser, CO 80442(970) 726-9390skitownrestaurants.com/winter-park/restaurant.php?rid=240 Rudi's Deli Offering homemade breads, soups and chili along with breakfast burritos, paninis and value plates, it is open from 7:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily.
  • Vegetarians can choose from a wide range of options.
  • Winter Park, Colo., located along Highway 40, is one of the easier ski resorts to drive to from the Front Range and is usually frequented by weekend warriors trying to get as much snow time in before heading back to work on Monday.
  • The restaurant also features an extensive wine list with varietals from Italy as well as those from local vineyards.
  • The restaurant also features an extensive wine list with varietals from Italy as well as those from local vineyards.
  • The popular eatery also features live music and events from local Lewiston artists and has a catering option that can accommodate up to 100 people.432 Center St.
  • From traditional Italian and barbecue joints to Greek and American fare, dining in Lewiston is sure to satisfy everyone's tastes.
  • Right over the Connecticut River from New Hampshire, Brattleboro is known for a strong sense of community and civic involvement.
  • They serve lunch buffet Monday through Friday from 11:30 a.m. to 2:15 p.m. and from noon to 2:45 p.m. during weekends.796 Royal Saint George Dr.
  • They serve lunch buffet Monday through Friday from 11:30 a.m. to 2:15 p.m. and from noon to 2:45 p.m. during weekends.796 Royal Saint George Dr.
  • Relax with an authentic chilled Indian beer as you savor delicacies from their exhaustive menu.
  • Ste. 101 - 102Naperville, IL(630) 420-7565dakshinrestaurants.com Curry Leaf Curry Leaf's authenticity comes from its native owners, who strive to bring the very best in their food.
  • The best way to experience Indian food is to stop by for a lunch buffet served everyday from 11:30 a.m. to 3:00 p.m.
  • There is mozzarella cheese, but this cheese is smothered in sauerkraut and corned beef, and the final product tastes far more like a Reuben sandwich than it does anything you might order from Domino's.
  • One word of warning from travelers unfamiliar with the area--it's pretty hard to find, and GPS units don't tend to work too well in this mountainous region, so bring your map and compass.1 Main St.
  • This award-winning inn draws guests from all over the Baltimore-Washington metropolitan area, as does its restaurant.
  • It is open from 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. daily.518 Hennepin Ave.
  • From crab cakes to savory turkey meatloaf, the menu features both vegetarian and traditional offerings to appeal to appetites big and small.
  • Located just a few blocks from the Basilica of St.
  • Located just minutes from hiking trails that are used to explore one of the area's most popular natural destinations, Minnehaha Falls, Minneapolis combines outdoor adventure with big-city amenities.
  • Bacana Brazil Steakhouse16123 Chesterfield Parkway WestChesterfield, MO 63017(636) 532-6969www.bacanabrasil.com Andria's Steak House Eberwein Park is just down the road from Andria's Steak House.
  • Oishi also has a large menu of drinks ranging from soda to specialty beverages such as the "Zombie," "Fog Cutter," and "Midori Melondaide." After dinner you can cool off with some ice cream or enjoy a thick slice of cheesecake.
  • The restaurant has a menu that includes a number of specials to choose from.
  • Open from 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. except on weekends when they extend up to 12:30 a.m., Fratello's Pizzeria is a lovely and fun stopover for all food lovers.
  • Just nine miles from the town you can find Pratt At Munson-Williams-Proct Museum and Art Galleries.
  • The Utica Zoo is 8.8 miles from the town and the AMF Bowling Alleys just two miles farther are two local attractions around Frankfort.
  • Charlotte's Restaurant Specializing in Hudson Valley native foods, Charlotte's Restaurant is the place to eat for simple, delicious cuisine from only the finest ingredients.
  • Located just an hour and a half from New York City, Millbrook is a lovely place for a weekend getaway.
  • Menu prices range from the $6.95 for the "heavily loaded" salad bar to around $17.95 for the fisherman's platter that includes excellent choices of haddock, scallops, clam strips and shrimp.
  • Apple Betty Diner5350 East Seneca Street,Vernon, NY 13476(315) 829 4875 Squat and Gobble Squat & Gobble specializes in crepes, salads, soups, sandwiches, omelets, pasta, bagels and breakfast specials with prices ranging from $6 to $15.
  • Art Kirkland Center is an art gallery just 8 miles from Vernon.
  • The menu includes a myriad of authentic Italian dishes that range from an appetizer of baby eggplant to meat dishes that include veal piccata.
  • In addition to its natural wonders, there are a wide variety of eateries to choose from, for seafood and well beyond.
  • You may even get a personal greeting from the owner.
  • The restaurant is just under a mile away from the 2.1 mile Eastern Promenade Trail, which runs alongside the Atlantic Ocean and leads to the East End Beach.
  • It's away from the busy downtown, so navigating to the restaurant and parking won't be as difficult as the other restaurants.
  • Open daily from 6 AM to 2 PM, with extended hours for dinner service on Fridays.
  • Known for their hearty breakfasts and homemade soups, Caspers is exactly the environment one would expect from a local restaurant in an outdoor lover's paradise.
  • The restaurant also sponsors numerous food, wine and beer tasting events where guests can learn more about these beverages as well as enjoy a fixed-priced meal from the restaurant. 404 North Country RoadSt.
  • Additionally, the bistro features numerous wine and beer selections, including wine from Australia and California and German beers.
  • James numerous wine offerings from Australia, Italy, California, France, and vineyards from Long Island, to name a few.
  • James numerous wine offerings from Australia, Italy, California, France, and vineyards from Long Island, to name a few.
  • Start off your meal with smoked sirloin nachos, fried pickles or choose from steak soup, chili and eight signature salads.
  • Choose from prime rib, rib eye, porterhouse, center cut filet, T-bone and filet mignon, then add sautéed mushrooms, grilled onions, blue cheese butter or a pepper crust.
  • It also has a wonderful Sunday lunch fixed-price meal, with an option of with or without wine, that makes choosing from the otherwise large menu easier.
  • Harrison's features a raw bar with oysters and clams and seafood, including Maryland rockfish, right from the boat to the table.
  • You can work up an appetite riding a rented bike, roller-skating and skateboarding, best done from sunrise onward to get a chance at seeing dolphins inshore.
  • Guests can choose selections from an extensive wine list.
  • Mitchell's Steak House Mitchell's Steak House features an outdoor patio, where guests can enjoy the warm Ohio summer evenings while sampling a selection from the restaurant's extensive wine list.
  • The restaurant serves Sicilian inspired dishes made from organic, local, and seasonal ingredients, and also fine ingredients directly imported from Sicily.
  • The restaurant serves Sicilian inspired dishes made from organic, local, and seasonal ingredients, and also fine ingredients directly imported from Sicily.
  • All Purpose Pizza also offers home deliveries of the pizza, which you can order from the website. 2901 S Jackson St.
  • From within this selection, you will find several Italian restaurants ranging in price and cuisine.
  • Because of the size and diverse population of the neighborhood, Beacon Hill offers a tremendous variety of restaurants from which to choose.
  • Over 100 restaurants sit in the North End, providing many choices of Italian cuisine from different regions.
  • There are also Texas beers available from the bar.
  • S., is not an exception and has many vegan and vegetarian restaurants to choose from.
  • The saloon features nightly musical entertainment Wednesdays through Saturdays, ranging from top 40 hits to the best country songs.
  • Located on the ocean, Daddy Mac's has beautiful views from many tables, including on the outdoor dining deck.
  • Some of the highlights from the 2009 summer menu were the Clams Casino, the Gnocchi Napoli and Pasta e Fagioli.
  • Just a few blocks south from Hoehn's Lake is a small Indian restaurant called Indian Pastry House.
  • Located close to Wright Patterson Air Force Base, Fleming's serves the steaks, chops, and seafood anyone would expect from a fine steakhouse.
  • Open for dinner service seven days a week, Fleming's has received the Award of Excellence from Wine Spectator in both 2008 and 2009.
  • It is one mile from the Charles River, where outdoor adventurers can enjoy kayaking, sailing, canoeing, and running or biking along the footpath.
  • The Harborside Inn is located one block from the waterfront, which offers historical landmarks such as the Boston Tea Party ship, and seasonal outdoor concerts.
  • The hotel offers many types of rooms, from standard guestrooms to suites, with pillow-top mattresses and views of the Boston skyline or the charming North End.
  • Millennium Bostonian Hotel The Millennium Bostonian is centrally located, and is just steps away from Faneuil Hall, and Boston's historical Freedom Trail.
  • Choose from vegetables, paneer, chicken, fish, lamb or shrimp and add one of your favorite Indian sauces like tikka masala, saagwala, korma, curry or vindaloo accompanied with basmati rice pilaf.
  • Choose from several desserts including mango pudding and traditional Indian rice pudding.
  • Guests may choose the buffet or order from the menu for dinner service.
  • Great early bird specials are served from 4 to 6 p.m. daily and 1 to 4 p.m. on Sunday.
  • Half a dozen sausage varieties are available, from knockwurst to Nuernberger Rostbratwuerst'l, and a variety plate, Passauer Wurstplatte, for those who'd like to sample a number of different types.
  • The hours of operation for Bohemian Restaurant are: Tuesday through Thursday 5 p.m. to 10 p.m., Friday noon to 11 p.m., Saturday 5 p.m. to 11 p.m., and Sunday from 4 p.m. to 9 p.m.
  • Senorita's Mexican Restaurant is open from Monday through Thursday from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m.; Friday and Saturday from 11 a.m. to 11 p.m.; Sunday from 11 a.m. to 9 p.m.
  • Senorita's Mexican Restaurant is open from Monday through Thursday from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m.; Friday and Saturday from 11 a.m. to 11 p.m.; Sunday from 11 a.m. to 9 p.m.
  • Senorita's Mexican Restaurant is open from Monday through Thursday from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m.; Friday and Saturday from 11 a.m. to 11 p.m.; Sunday from 11 a.m. to 9 p.m.
  • Senorita's Mexican Restaurant is open from Monday through Thursday from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m.; Friday and Saturday from 11 a.m. to 11 p.m.; Sunday from 11 a.m. to 9 p.m.
  • Vegetarians have their own section on the menu, and can choose from special entrees including Tito's Spinach Burritos ($11.95).
  • Brookside Thai Restaurant is open from Sunday through Thursday from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m.; Friday and Saturday from 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. (closed Monday through Friday from 3 to 5 p.m.).
  • Brookside Thai Restaurant is open from Sunday through Thursday from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m.; Friday and Saturday from 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. (closed Monday through Friday from 3 to 5 p.m.).
  • Brookside Thai Restaurant is open from Sunday through Thursday from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m.; Friday and Saturday from 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. (closed Monday through Friday from 3 to 5 p.m.).
  • Brookside Thai Restaurant is open from Sunday through Thursday from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m.; Friday and Saturday from 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. (closed Monday through Friday from 3 to 5 p.m.).
  • Eagle Rock Reservation is less than 4 miles from the center of Bloomfield, and claims 408 acres of woodlands on the crown of Watchung's First Mountain.
  • Brunch is served with a complimentary glass of champagne, mimosa or bloody Mary, and as of 2009 prices range from $10 to $26.
  • Brunch is buffet style and available on Sundays from 10 am to 2 pm.
  • Azalea Located just one block from historic Independence Hall, Azalea is an ideal brunch spot for travelers who wish to make the most of their visit to Philadelphia.
  • There are four locations in Santa Barbara, but the State Street restaurant is just a couple of blocks from Vera Cruz Park.
  • Monday through Saturday, and Sunday from 11 a.m. until 8 p.m.
  • Emilio's is just down the block from Truth Aquatics, which placed sixth in Rodale's Scuba Diving magazine's readers' choice in the Top 100 Overall Best Diving Excursions.
  • You can lunch from a menu of exotic salads, sandwiches, and a handful of entrees for around $15 from 11:30 a.m. to 2 p.m.
  • You can lunch from a menu of exotic salads, sandwiches, and a handful of entrees for around $15 from 11:30 a.m. to 2 p.m.
  • Elements is just a mile from Ledbetter Beach and Park and less than two miles from the Santa Zoological Gardens.
  • Elements is just a mile from Ledbetter Beach and Park and less than two miles from the Santa Zoological Gardens.
  • Santa Barbara, CA 93101(805) 963-1293cafezaytoon.com Elements Restaurant and Bar Voted "Best Place to Be Seen" by the Santa Barbara News Press, this chic, upscale restaurant and bar offers Happy Hour every day from 4:30- p.m. to 6:30 p.m.
  • Lunch is served from 11:30 a.m. until 4 p.m. six days a week, and cost around $13; dinner starts at 4 p.m., is served until 9 p.m., and averages around $20 a person.
  • Café Zaytoon This restaurant receives high marks from restaurant reviewers, and customers alike.
  • Restaurant choices are seemingly endless in Santa Barbara, serving everything from international fare to the good old American cheeseburger.
  • Deli-King is open Tuesday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 8 p.m., Saturday and Sunday 8 a.m. to 8 p.m.
  • Large travel groups of 20 or more can order from their family menu.
  • Dinner is served Monday through Thursday from 4:30 p.m. to 10 p.m., Friday from 4:30 to 11 p.m., Saturday from noon to 11 p.m. and Sunday from noon to 9:30 p.m.
  • Dinner is served Monday through Thursday from 4:30 p.m. to 10 p.m., Friday from 4:30 to 11 p.m., Saturday from noon to 11 p.m. and Sunday from noon to 9:30 p.m.
  • Dinner is served Monday through Thursday from 4:30 p.m. to 10 p.m., Friday from 4:30 to 11 p.m., Saturday from noon to 11 p.m. and Sunday from noon to 9:30 p.m.
  • Dinner is served Monday through Thursday from 4:30 p.m. to 10 p.m., Friday from 4:30 to 11 p.m., Saturday from noon to 11 p.m. and Sunday from noon to 9:30 p.m.
  • Momotaro is open for lunch Monday through Friday from 11:30 a.m. to 3:00 p.m.
  • This beautiful area of Northern New Jersey offers outdoor enthusiasts a chance to get away from it all, and still be within 1 hour of New York City.
  • The restaurants in Clark, New Jersey are only 20 minutes away from Watchung Reservation, Lanape Park, and several golf courses including Shackamaxon, and Ash Brook.
  • For dinner, choose from filet mignon, porterhouse, strip steaks, rib-eye, prime rib and pork chops, as well as grilled chicken and fried, grilled or coconut shrimp.
  • Choose from 12 appetizers, including chili and buffalo wings.
  • Choose from appetizers, such as crabmeat stuffed mushrooms, lobster bisque, veal osso buco ravioli and seared ahi tuna.
  • Scarsdale Metro Restaurant likes to do big events, but will only serve food from a smaller catering menu.
  • A fish market is available three floors down from the restaurant, and sells all the fresh fish that Eastchester Fish Gourmet uses in its dishes.
  • Diners can either choose from a "raw bar" selection, which has uncooked dishes like shrimp cocktail, clams and oysters, or hot food menu with has a variety of seafood dishes.
  • All the meat and fish served in the restaurant is bought only from farms that adhere to strict humane and eco-friendly practices.
  • Racanelli's Pizza and Brew851 Central Park AvenueScarsdale, NY 10583(914) 472-1032scarsdale.racanellirestaurants.com/ Meritage Restaurant Meritage Restaurant in Scarsdale serves fine American cuisine made from locally-grown products.
  • It's rural and untouched natural scenery make it a prime location for many trying to get away from the big city.
  • Fire Stones is located about 12 minutes from the Vermont Institute of Natural Science Nature Center.
  • You can enjoy wood-fired dining in all its rustic elegance, feast from the rooftop deck, or call ahead for takeout.
  • Tanino Ristorante This restaurant's authenticity comes from its native Italian owner.
  • Lias menu offers a nice variety of lunch and dinner entrees that run the gamut from lasagnas and pastas to fish and chips and fried clams.
  • Modern Shelton offers a variety of activities, from fishing in the river to golfing at Brownson Country Club, as well as a variety of notable Italian restaurants.
  • Tucked in the shopping area of the prototypical New England town of Wilton, this is the locals' go-to restaurant for hearty breakfasts, club sandwiches, and dinner dishes ranging from stuffed seafood to Greek and Italian favorites.
  • A variety of dining choices are available ranging from seafood to bar food.
  • Stop by for Sunday brunch buffet from 10:30 a.m. to 2 p.m.
  • Monday through Thursday and from 4 p.m. to 10 p.m.
  • Willie's Taverne is open for lunch from 11:30 a.m. to 4 p.m.
  • Tuesday through Friday and dinner is served from 5 to 10 p.m.
  • Trattoria Mediterranea is open for lunch from 11:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.
  • Friday and Saturday; and from 4:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m.
  • Monday through Thursday; from 4:30 p.m. to 10:30 p.m.
  • Kiku Hibachi & Sushi is open for lunch from 11:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.
  • Outdoor enthusiasts, hungry from a day of activities, can relax and enjoy a delicious meal in any one of these fine Bedminster, New Jersey, restaurants.
  • Get pizza by the slice or a whole pie; small pizzas are $13 to $20 and the large size ranges from $15 to $22.50.
  • As of November 2009, appetizers range in price from $3.95 to $13.95, hero sandwiches from $6.95 to $9.50, pasta dishes from $9.95 to $23.95 and entrees from $11.95 to $19.95.
  • As of November 2009, appetizers range in price from $3.95 to $13.95, hero sandwiches from $6.95 to $9.50, pasta dishes from $9.95 to $23.95 and entrees from $11.95 to $19.95.
  • As of November 2009, appetizers range in price from $3.95 to $13.95, hero sandwiches from $6.95 to $9.50, pasta dishes from $9.95 to $23.95 and entrees from $11.95 to $19.95.
  • As of November 2009, appetizers range in price from $3.95 to $13.95, hero sandwiches from $6.95 to $9.50, pasta dishes from $9.95 to $23.95 and entrees from $11.95 to $19.95.
  • First courses range in price from $9 to $16 and main courses run from $26 to $30.
  • First courses range in price from $9 to $16 and main courses run from $26 to $30.
  • The Outback Steakhouse was awarded "Best Steak" from the Zagat survey of national restaurant chains.
  • In 2007, the restaurant won Grand Prize for its steaks from the Idaho Beef Council.
  • The Inn is styled as an old schooner, with water views available from the indoor dining area.
  • Dinner is served Monday through Wednesday from 3 to 9 p.m., Thursday from 3 to 10 p.m., Friday from 3 to 11 p.m., Saturday 4 to 11 p.m. and Sunday 4 p.m. to 9 p.m.
  • Dinner is served Monday through Wednesday from 3 to 9 p.m., Thursday from 3 to 10 p.m., Friday from 3 to 11 p.m., Saturday 4 to 11 p.m. and Sunday 4 p.m. to 9 p.m.
  • Dinner is served Monday through Wednesday from 3 to 9 p.m., Thursday from 3 to 10 p.m., Friday from 3 to 11 p.m., Saturday 4 to 11 p.m. and Sunday 4 p.m. to 9 p.m.
  • The Laughing Cat serves a lunch buffet every weekday from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.
  • La Tarraza is open for lunch Tuesday through Friday at 11:30 a.m. and they serve dinner Tuesday through Saturday from 5:30 p.m.
  • Historic Ybor City and Tampa's booming SoHo district have a bounty of restaurants to choose from.
  • The Lobster Roll is just 5 miles from Wildwood State Park.
  • With menu staples such as grilled diver scallops and braised beef bourguignon and presided over by Executive Chef Albert DeAngelis, Mediterrano received a "very good" rating from the "New York Times".
  • Mediterraneo Since opening in 1995, Mediterraneo has delighted patrons with their cuisine that incorporates culinary influences from Greece, Italy, the Middle East, Morocco, North Africa and Southern France.
  • Located 37 minutes by train from Manhattan, Greenwich, Connecticut was ranked as the 12th best place to live in the United States by "Money Magazine" in 2005.
  • Alaska Pete's Roadhouse Grille and Moondog SaloonRoute 209 NorthMarshall's Creek, PA 18335(570) 223-8575alaskapetes.com La Vina Restaurant Reeders Just five minutes from Tannersville is La Vina.
  • Smuggler's CoveRoute 611Tannersville, PA 18372(570) 629-2277smugglerscove.net Alaska Pete's Roadhouse Grille and Moondog Saloon Also accessible to Route I-80, but about 15 minutes from Tannersville is Alaska Pete's Roadhouse Grille and Moondog Saloon.
  • Taz Tandoor1953 Deer Park AveDeer Park, NY (631) 243-3989taj-tandoorrestaurant.com The Curry Club The Curry Club specialized in curries from all over India.
  • Their breads are superb, particularly the onion naan, which is stuffed with onions and served directly from the tandoor oven.
  • From classic General Tso's Chicken to Shrimp Fried Rice, this place has all you need.
  • Oriental Star has over 40 items on the buffet at any given time, giving everyone in your party plenty to choose from.
  • Along with a variety of pizzas and toppings to choose from, Honest John's also makes a variety of sub sandwiches and hot wings.
  • Serving dishes like mac and cheese, escargot and a falafel burger, you can expect a variety of choices from Forte's eclectic menu.
  • Macduff's Restaurant317 Pine StreetJamestown, NY 14701(716) 664-9414 http://www.macduffsrestaurant.com/ Forte Forte serves very worldly cuisine, with dishes from a variety of places.
  • El Corral Restaurant2201 E River RdTucson, AZ 85710520-299-6092www.elcorraltucson.com Claim Jumper Visitors from the East Coast may not have had the experience of Claim Jumper, but it should be visited on any trip to the West.
  • From prime rib to filet mignon, El Corral adds a special Southwestern touch to their meals with sides that include Tamale Pie or Ranch Beans.
  • Featuring ribeyes, porterhouse, filet Mignon and prime rib, as well as some of the finest seafood from all around, McMahon's brings the finest dining in a delectable atmosphere.
  • The restaurant allows customers to personally select their cut of meat from a display case before each steak is grilled to perfection on a charcoal grills.
  • Brunch is served from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Sundays.
  • Omaha, NE 68130 (402) 330-0440omaha.grisantis.net/ordereze/default.aspx Granite City Take advantage of the unlimited Sunday brunch, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., at Granite City.
  • From an omelet bar, eggs Benedict bar and pasta bar to a fresh waffle bar, it has everything you'll need to carb load after a week of hiking.
  • Come hungry and give yourself plenty of time to nosh at Grisanti's Sunday brunch from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
  • If that's not what you're looking for, then you'll have Greek, Mexican or Chinese food places to choose from.
  • Choose from a hot dog vendor that offers 13 types of hot dogs to sandwich delis and pizza places.
  • Enjoy the outdoor patio during the warmer months, or try the Billy Goat Tavern, famous from the "Cheezborger" skit with actor John Belushi on "Saturday Night Live." Food Court The food court at Navy Pier offers selections for any food craving.
  • Harry Caray's Tavern, named after the famous Chicago Cubs broadcaster, offers selections for the whole family from steaks, salads, paninis, pasta, pizzas and even a burger bar.
  • Another way to enjoy the Chicago skyline is from one of Chicago's dining cruises.
  • Fine Dining & Dinner Cruises Enjoy views of the Chicago skyline from the Phil Stefani Signature Restaurant called the Riva.
  • From fine dining restaurants to a food court with McDonalds, Starbuck's and Ben & Jerry's ice cream, Navy Pier offers a full range of restaurant options.
  • Located on beautiful Lake Michigan, Chicago's Navy Pier includes a 15-story Ferris wheel, IMAX theater, children's museum, dinner cruise boats, Shakespearean theater and a stage to enjoy entertainment from music to dance to theater.
  • So while you are there, try out an exclusive beer from its taps.
  • This Belgian restaurant offers 150 types of extensive beer from Belgium and other countries all over the world.
  • Eulogy Belgian Tavern Eulogy Belgian Tavern makes the three-block walk from Independence Hall toward the riverfront worth it.
  • Cannon Beach, OR 97110(503) 436-9130 ecolaseafoods.com Fultano's Pizza A kid-friendly dining experience, Fultano's Pizza is just a short walk from the beach and offers a tasty selection of pastas, pizza and sub sandwiches.
  • Serving all kinds of locally caught seafood, Ecola allows guests to either sit down and eat or order take-out fresh fish, lobster, clams and more from their market.
  • Withs its open outdoor patio, the Driftwood is a perfect stop for those still dusty from exploring the nearby beach or trails.
  • Driftwood Inn Restaurant and Lounge Just steps from the beach, the Driftwood is a great choice for diners looking for a cozy hometown restaurant.
  • Choose from a five-course tasting menu that is paired with wine or order off the menu, which has several choices of California cuisine with a French flair.
  • It also boasts an impressive wine list and received an Award of Excellence in 2007 from the Wine Spectator.
  • For the early birds, there is a nightly sunset special from 3 p.m. to 5:45 p.m.
  • The restaurant has seafood delivered daily from San Diego.
  • Bellevue, Washington, has many Indian restaurants from which to choose.
  • Lunch sandwiches and salads generally range from $7 to $9; dinner entrees from $12 to $18.
  • Lunch sandwiches and salads generally range from $7 to $9; dinner entrees from $12 to $18.
  • The smaller dinner menu offers more traditional choices, from stuffed shells to crab cakes.
  • From the Roast Duck with figs to Coq Au Vin Rouge to an inspired wine list, this menu caters to deep lovers of French food.
  • Ranging from Innsbrook to the Fan to the downtown area, Richmond's French restaurants should satisfy the palate of any French cuisine lover.
  • The hotel also features a full bar, with the option to choose from popular beers and wines from upstate New York.
  • The hotel also features a full bar, with the option to choose from popular beers and wines from upstate New York.
  • This contemporary, seasonal dining establishment is open from mid-June to mid-September.
  • This seasonal restaurant is open from mid-June until September.
  • Open for lunch and dinner service Tuesday through Sunday, with special breakfast service on Saturday and Sunday from 8 AM until 12 noon.
  • Be on the lookout for their "Early Supper" specials, available Tuesday through Sunday from 11:30 AM until 4:00 PM, or try one of their many daily blackboard specials.
  • VinceAnna's Italian-American Restaurant Open Tuesday through Sunday from 4:00 PM to 9:00 PM, VinceAnna's has served traditional Italian favorites to the Greenville area since opening in 1945.
  • Murphy's Place211 N W Center Street,Mount Olive, NC 28365(919) 658-5770myspace.com/mountoliveshangout Ethnic Haunts Nino's Italian Restaurant The food consistently gets high marks from locals, and visitors alike.
  • Despite the name, pizza isn't the only thing on the menu here -- diners can also choose from sandwiches and subs, fresh lasagna, burgers, or simply go for the all-you-can-eat salad bar.
  • The extensive menu features American cuisine and guests have their choice of rooms to dine in, from an old-fashioned diner with booths and a counter, to a marble terrace, sun-drenched garden room, or a warm tavern, to name just a few.
  • The Chesterfield Inn features an eclectic menu ranging from Creole to pasta, ribs, and a colossal 16 ounce beef burger.
  • Enjoy sushi or izagaya dishes at prices ranging from $5-$10.
  • Breakfast is served from 8 a.m. until 3 p.m. daily, however a few breakfast menu items are available all day.
  • The menu changes quarterly and focuses on food from coastal regions worldwide.
  • The restaurant is located only two miles from the Shiloh Trail, and is open for lunch, and dinner, seven days a week.
  • Memphis, TN 38103(901) 521-9798 neelysbbq.com Cozy Corner Restaurant Cozy Corner is open Tuesday through Saturday for lunch only, and it is less than a 15 minute drive from the popular put-in at Memphis Harbor.
  • Boaters exiting the Wolf River at the Walnut Grove take-out are a short 15 minute drive from the Neely's West Memphis location.
  • Corky's is less than a 20 minute drive from the put-in for the 11 mile canoe float on the Ghost River.
  • Diners are encouraged to "mix and match" from the many varieties of fish, chicken, and steak on the menu, which includes lobster tail, filet mignon, and Sumo Man which is filet mignon, chicken, and lobster tail.
  • The menu is based on two staple foods from the rural Isan province Thailand: larb and green papaya salad.
  • The wine list draws on solid favorites from California and Italy.
  • It's hard to go wrong with this menu, which features solid performances from the heavy hitters in every Italian food group.
  • Pearl River, New York is located just 20 minutes from the New York metropolitan area.
  • Its alcohol selection includes light and dark beers from its own brewery, plus imported German beers including Beck's, St.
  • III Forks' wine cellar holds over 5,000 bottles of wine from around the world.
  • Cedar Hill State Park, 10 minutes from Dallas, offers camping, boating, fishing and mountain biking.
  • The friendly pub, just a few blocks from the Susquehanna River, has a menu with many traditional German favorites, including Bavarian goulash, various sausages and the house specialty, Mad Gerdes chicken sandwich.
  • The "Dutch" in the nickname actually derives from Deutsch, or German, the language spoken by many early residents.
  • Mishawaka, IN 46545(574) 247-4000comfortinn.com/hotel-mishawaka-indiana-IN199 Country Inn & Suites The Country Inn & Suites is located on the north side of Mishawaka, about 4 miles from downtown and close to the University of Notre Dame.
  • It's close to state parks including O'Brien and Potato Creek, and is about a one-hour drive from Lake Michigan.
  • Chicago, IL 60605(312) 662-1082 Restaurants Near University of Illinois at Chicago Have a breakfast or lunch fruit smoothie from Jamba Juice.
  • Take a walk from the Natural History Museum or Shedd Aquarium and continue your cultural experience by eating at Utopia International Caribbean Cuisine.
  • After a workout at Fitness Formula Club, walk one block east and south for Mexican food from Zapatista.
  • Enjoy sushi and other Japanese fare from Oysy after viewing Buckingham Fountain.
  • After a workout at XSport Fitness, walk a few feet north and enjoy Chicago-style deep-dish pizza from Lou Malnati's Pizzeria.
  • Just minutes from the lakefront, South Loop has an array of restaurants, including breakfast, pizza, Thai, fried chicken and American fare.
  • Because of its year-round warm weather, Tampa offers residents and visitors many opportunities for outdoor recreation, from swimming to golfing and hiking.
  • For your entree, the menu always includes a beef, chicken, pork, fish, and pasta dish to choose from.
  • Non-guests should call for a reservation to attend the three-course dinner served from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.
  • Some past favorites dishes from diners have been the seared scallops appetizer and the browned butter trout.
  • Open for dinner Tuesday through Saturday from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m., even the wine here comes from organic vineyards.
  • Open for dinner Tuesday through Saturday from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m., even the wine here comes from organic vineyards.
  • Open for dinner Monday to Saturday from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m., Cafe Michel is an ideal dining spot in Lexington.
  • It is far from a stuffy environment despite its position as Lexington's favorite special occasion eatery.
  • After a full day of adventures, relax with a bottle of wine from the extensive wine list.
  • Favorite items from the menu include New Zealand char-grilled elk, filet mignon served with roasted shallots, and seared Ahi tuna with a side of pineapple rice.
  • Save room for dessert--choose from a variety of homemade tortes, cheesecakes, and apple or cherry strudel.
  • Boyce Mayview Park is located less than 5 miles from Barley's & Hop's.
  • Event participants choose from two courses in the Southside area.
  • Allegheny Commons Park is a short walk from Max's.
  • Ipanema Brazailian Grill The Ipanema Brazailian Grill in Framingham, Massachusetts, is located mere feet from the Framingham Center commuter rail stop.
  • Instead, we can think of it as many cuisines that all exist simultaneously--from fish to beef to rice and beans, from root vegetables to tropical fruit.
  • A mix of the native Indian cuisine, the African influence from Brazil's more than 300-year period of slavery, and the huge number of European and Asian immigrants in the early 1900s, it is impossible to pin down a strict definition of Brazilian food.
  • The restaurant is open from 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. on Sunday, 11 a.m. to 9 p.m.
  • Austin, TX 78701(512) 457-1500 flemingssteakhouse.com Saltgrass Steak House Also a quick drive from Mayfield Park is the Saltgrass Steak House near the Arboretum in Austin.
  • Fleming's Prime Steakhouse Just a 10-minute drive from Mayfield Park, Fleming's Prime Steakhouse prides itself on a stylish and contemporary restaurant style, and a great selection of southwest and American-style foods.
  • Austin has no shortage of steakhouses, but a few choices stand apart from the rest.
  • The Alcoa location is just minutes from Alcoa's Central Park, making it an easy stop after working up an appetite biking the Maryville-Alcoa Greenway.
  • Hot Rod's is less than half a mile from Alcoa's Bicentennial Park, making it an ideal stop for a bite to eat after a day of freshwater fishing or bird-watching.
  • But get there early--the "6 under $6" menu is only available from 11:00 am to 4:00 pm.
  • From fried grouper to top sirloin steak, the menu has something for nearly everyone.
  • Alcoa, Tennessee, is located just a half-hour's drive from the Great Smoky Mountains National Park, where over 800 miles of trails welcome hikers for an afternoon's casual stroll and picnic, a day's trek, or an overnight camping trip.
  • Start off with a small plate like the lamb burger made with lamb from a local farm or the fried oysters with house made tartar sauce.
  • They source ingredients from as close as possible to minimize impact on the environment.
  • Kisco--a town in New York's Westchester County, around an hour's drive from New York City--features a wide array of New York's natural wonders.
  • Oswegatchie Coffee Company is open weekdays from 6 a.m. to 2 p.m. and Saturdays from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. (closed on Sundays).
  • Oswegatchie Coffee Company is open weekdays from 6 a.m. to 2 p.m. and Saturdays from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. (closed on Sundays).
  • Oswegatchie is a Native American word you may recognize from the Oswegatchie Hills Nature Preserve.
  • Open every day from 6 a.m., the Circle Inn is conveniently located at the foothills of the Adirondack Mountains, and they have RV parking.
  • Not only does the Oswegatchie River run right through town, from this central location you are only an hour and a half from Lake Ontario and 30 minutes from Wolf Lake State Forest, Fire Fall State Forest and Trout Lake State Forest.
  • Not only does the Oswegatchie River run right through town, from this central location you are only an hour and a half from Lake Ontario and 30 minutes from Wolf Lake State Forest, Fire Fall State Forest and Trout Lake State Forest.
  • Not only does the Oswegatchie River run right through town, from this central location you are only an hour and a half from Lake Ontario and 30 minutes from Wolf Lake State Forest, Fire Fall State Forest and Trout Lake State Forest.
  • Only dinner is served at the Akron location, located 10 minutes from downtown.
  • Choose from beef, veal, pork, chicken, salmon, tuna, lobster and crab.
  • Located minutes from downtown Akron, Fleming's serves aged prime steaks broiled at 1,600 degrees.
  • Flemings Prime Steakhouse and Wine Bar Fleming's received runner-up for Best Steakhouse in 2008 from the Akron Beacon Journal, Akron Life & Leisure Magazine.
  • For the main course choose from the lobster risotto with a sherry cream sauce or the braised duck leg in a flavorful broth with fennel and tomatoes.
  • La Loggia is open from 11 a.m. until 9 p.m., Monday through Thursday, and Fridays 11 a.m. to 11 p.m.
  • Miami, Florida 33140(305) 538-4400cafeavanti.com La Loggia Ristorante In downtown Miami, right across the street from the Dade County Courthouse, you can find La Loggia Italian restaurant.
  • Saturday's hours are 4:40 to 11 p.m., and the establishment is open Sundays from 4:40 to 10 p.m.
  • Café Avanti is open for lunch Monday through Friday, 11:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m., and dinner is served from 4:30 to 10 p.m.
  • You can buy gourmet deli items like antipasto, Italian groceries and wine from the market.
  • In addition, Miami has an abundance of yoga classes to choose from, and drop-ins are always welcome.
  • Just a 15-minute drive from Land Between the Lakes, Knoth's and aits pulled pork get rave reviews.
  • Open for breakfast and lunch from mid-February through December, this casual restaurant is a local favorite.
  • Patti's is just a 5-minute ride from Lake Barkley.
  • Menu items range from burgers and salads to steaks and chops.
  • There are specialty pizzas such as one with A-1 sauce as well as traditional pizzas ranging in price from $8.49-10.99 for small, $9.49-11.99 for a medium and $10.59-17.99 for a large (as of November 2009).
  • Prices are reasonable, with most dishes ranging from $9 to $15.
  • Marshall Farms Corner Deli Take a break from hiking and swimming at Lake Anna for a short drive to this country store, deli and wine shop.
  • Known for its vineyards, historic sites and fine restaurants, Orange County is an easy drive from Washington, D.
  • It is open from 11 a.m. to midnight Sunday through Thursday and from 11 a.m. to 2 a.m.
  • It is open from 11 a.m. to midnight Sunday through Thursday and from 11 a.m. to 2 a.m.
  • Wheatless In Seattle Start the day right with a baked-on-site scone or made-to-order omelette from Wheatless In Seattle, a totally wheat-free and gluten-free bakery in the city's friendly Greenwood neighborhood.
  • From organic bakeries that focus on sustainability to traditional Asian-oriented cuisine with a Pacific Northwest flair, the diverse Seattle restaurant scene offers plenty of options to satisfy the gluten-free and wheat-free diner.
  • Maybe you can try the stuffed jalapeno diablos, el tesoro mussels or sesame crusted tuna loin from the dinner menu.
  • Many companies and people host their events from birthdays, anniversaries, corporate parties and weddings.
  • American cuisine is prepared from local seafood and produce.
  • Over 300 fine wines from around the world are available at Geja's---fifty of which are offered by the glass.
  • For entertainment, expect to find Mexican soaps that are dubbed in Russian from the overhead TV.
  • Aside from its kebabs, house specials include garlicky fries, and other kosher treats.
  • Aside from the wine list, patrons especially love the selection of cheeses, small plates and other flavorful cuisines.
  • The menu is expansive with numerous seafood main entrees as well as a large sushi and sashimi bar, offering patrons an eclectic mix of options to choose from.
  • The menu ranges from Country Meatloaf to Porcini Dusted Sea Scallops to a dry-rubbed rack of suckling pig.
  • Start with the summer spring rolls with shrimp and beef or the signature pho soup, made with local ingredients and herbs from the owner's garden.
  • With the usual Italian favorites like calamari, baked clams, chicken and veal dishes, the Blue Fountain relies on outstanding service and quality of food to set it apart from other restaurants.
  • The salads here are fresh, and the soups are made from scratch.
  • Morton's steaks are prime-aged, Midwest grain-fed beef that is shipped from Chicago.
  • From signature lamb chops and juicy prime rib, to successful starters such as lump crab cakes and lobster tempura, Fleming's will make the pickiest of steak lovers happy.
  • You can eat in or take out items ranging from traditional pies like Neopolitan and Sicilian to calzones, chicken dishes, baked ziti, chicken wings and salads.
  • Diners are allowed to bring a bottle of wine or beer from home to enjoy with their dinner.
  • Oceanside Seafood Many people like to enjoy seafood when visiting the beach, and Oceanside Seafood is just a few blocks away from the beach in Avalon.
  • Experienced chefs, directly from China, prepare authentic Hunan, Szechuan and Mandarin food.
  • Thousands of Southern California restaurants boast of cutting-edge cuisine and a memorable culinary experience, but if you come to California to see the views from a peak, you might be yearning for meal with a view of the Pacific Ocean.
  • The menu also features a unique wine list, including varietals from California, Chile, Italy, and Argentina.
  • The menu is quite impressive with authentic Mexican offerings of soups, appetizers, and main dishes including specials from the grill.
  • The atmosphere is relaxed and warm, providing a comfortable Mediterranean environment where guests dine on dishes made from seasonal and local ingredients.
  • The menu also has numerous salads for diners to choose from if they are looking for a lighter meal.
  • No matter what you're craving, you'll find something to please every palette. 2 Vine 2 Vine features food straight from nature.
  • This Hohokus restaurant is open until 10:30 p.m. on Fridays and Saturdays, so if you are late coming back from the trail, they will be ready to serve you.
  • This Hohokus restaurant serves the freshest locally grown produce and meats from the surrounding area.
  • Choose from a bountiful assortment of classic Italian salads, pizzas, pastas, sauces, proteins, desserts and wine.
  • That said, the atmosphere is very "country inn" and the clientele is mixed from the upper-class to poor college students there for a special dinner.
  • Aside from these, the restaurant also serves a wide variety of Italian dishes.
  • Lunch specials are also available from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.1010 Trinity Cl.
  • Guests can choose from Salad & Soups, Veal, Poultry & Pasta, Steak & Sirloins, Homemade desserts, and Spaghetti & Cheeseburgers for children.
  • Wimpy's Inn805 Ford StreetOgdensburg, NY 13669(315)394-1519 Jreck Subs Jreck Subs Company started in 1967, from a converted school bus that was parked outside the U.
  • Big Cheese Pizza701 Canton StreetOgdensburg, NY 13669(315) 393-9101bigcheesepizzany.com Wimpy's Inn Wimpy's Inn derived its name from the hamburger-eating character in Popeye cartoons.
  • Grab some subs from Jreck Subs if you're on the go.
  • Check out the all time favorite pizza from Big Cheese Pizza and Hamburger from Wimpy's Inn.
  • Check out the all time favorite pizza from Big Cheese Pizza and Hamburger from Wimpy's Inn.
  • Located in the shopping center by Walmart a few miles away from campus, this local favorite offers an extensive menu.
  • From its massive forests to its southern coastline, the Magnolia state offers hunting, fishing, cycling and plenty of sun.
  • It doesn't get much deeper south than Mississippi, a haven for barbecue, fried chicken and fresh seafood from the coast.
  • Patrons can also enjoy selections from the extensive wine list.
  • Customers also can choose from a variety of burgers, buffalo wings and salads.
  • Ocala is also popular because it is less than two hours from several beaches along the Atlantic Ocean and the Gulf of Mexico.
  • They also host a Happy Hour from 2:30 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. nightly and a Sunday brunch from 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m.
  • They also host a Happy Hour from 2:30 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. nightly and a Sunday brunch from 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m.
  • Exotic side dishes range from truffle oil creamed corn to black forbidden rice.
  • In addition to varied and fresh seafood, dinner entrees include a range of USDA approved corn-fed beef from a petit filet mignon to a massive porterhouse accompanied with your choice of special sauce.
  • In addition, Café Vermilionville features a kid's menu, holiday menus for Thanksgiving and Easter, and a huge outdoor dining area, where patrons can enjoy their meals from a covered balcony or under a tent situated on beautiful cobblestone.
  • When you wind down from your day of adventure, check out one of the amazing Cajun restaurants in town.
  • From bison burgers to "Ken's Favorite"--bleu cheese, bacon, lettuce, tomatoes, pickles and mayo--there is no lack of meat in this hot spot.
  • Aside from a long list of wraps, paninis, salads and ciabatta sandwiches, the café treats diners to daily baked goods like loaf cakes, croissants and scones.
  • Aside from standard Greek dishes--souvlaki and Pastichio, After Athens serves delectable grilled pork chops and a special crab meat-stuffed filo dough called the Portabello After Athens.17 Park Ave.
  • Meals range from $16-$25, and the cafe is open 11:30 a.m.-11 p.m. daily.222 E.
  • Meal prices are on the higher end of the spectrum, ranging from $15-$25.443 Lexington Ave.
  • Prices range from $5-$9, as of November 2009, and accepts major credit cards.125 E.
  • Add a side of rice or noodles and choose from chicken, steak, salmon, unagi or shrimp tempura to accompany your rice or noodle bowls.
  • You can enjoy seafood specials ranging from scallop to octopus at the Roe.
  • Choose from sushi options like squid, tuna, salmon, sea urchin and many more.
  • Family-owned and operated, Fifty Coins took its name from a race horse once owned by the family.
  • Redding Roadhouse You might not know what to expect from Redding Roadhouse.
  • With a long commitment to preserving open space, Redding, Connecticut has preserved nearly 4,000 acres of land from development.
  • With 21 domestic, important, and microbrew beers from which to choose, Paddy's is the happening place on weekend nights.
  • Club 577465 Seneca Road NHornell, NY 14843(607) 324-1298 club57.com Paddy's Pub and Grill Paddy's Pub and Grill (formerly Grady's Grill) is popular with both locals and students from neighboring Alfred, New York.
  • Club 57 Club 57 is a favorite restaurant of Hornell locals, and offers a wide variety of foods, from fried pub grub to delicious grilled steaks.
  • On Friday and Saturday nights, Patz on the River plays host to a live band from the area and guests are encouraged to dance the night away.
  • The choice of entrees ranges from seafood to pasta, but they also have burgers, steaks and chicken to satisfy guest's needs.
  • For those guests who are worn out from their action-packed day, Vona's will even deliver.
  • Guests can dine on a wide array of meals that range from pasta dishes to steak.
  • Sit outside under the palm trees from May through October.
  • Less than two miles from the open-air Laumeier Sculpture Park, Graham's Grill is an easy-going, family place.
  • All the food is made from scratch and the portions are large.
  • Central Texas ExpresswayKilleen, TX 76543(254) 699-5500www.txlc.com Texas Roadhouse Grab a steak from this popular chain restaurant where you are encouraged to eat peanuts and throw the shells on the floor.
  • Patrons can choose from six meats or a vegetarian option.
  • All of Costa Vida's restaurants offer a quick, counter service meal with food that is prepared from scratch each day for maximum freshness.
  • Aside from its fantastic recreational opportunities, such as deep sea fishing, golfing and windsurfing, South Portland also offers some excellent Mexican cuisine.
  • If you do go, be sure and sample something from their selection of specialty dosai.
  • Aside from an excellent selection of standard Indian fare, Karavalli also has Indo-Chinese dishes, vegan options and a healthy selection of seafood.
  • The team of specialist chefs hail from no less than six different Indian provinces.
  • Ted Collins bought the property from the Schoen family in 1967, and eventually converted it into a commercial center.
  • Aside from traditional crepes rolls, Simply Crepes serves an eat-all-you-can buffet with 20 food selections, plus a mouth-watering oatmeal crème brulee bar.
  • Aside from food, you can also buy unique gifts at Regalia Fine Gifts just behind Hicks & McCarthy's.
  • The commercial center also has historical restaurants open from morning until night.
  • The restaurant boasts Mediterranean-inspired décor and is just a few blocks from the Tampa Theater and the Tampa Bay Performing Arts Center.
  • Howard AvenueTampa, FL 33606(813) 258-0393 Spain Restaurant and Toma Bar Located in the heart of downtown Tampa, Spain Restaurant and Toma Bar serves up a variety of seafood-heavy tapas from traditional recipes native to the Galicia area of Spain.
  • Many of the ingredients used at Ceviche are imported from Spain to ensure diners a truly authentic experience.
  • There are over 100 different tapas on the menu, both hot and cold, made from the traditional recipes of Catalan and northern Spain.
  • Tampa is also only 70 miles from the Green Swamp, where a bed of raised limestone brings the groundwater to the surface, resulting in a huge wetland in the middle of central Florida.
  • Sunday through Thursday, catch the early dinner from 5-6 p.m. and choose from best-selling dishes at special prices.
  • Sunday through Thursday, catch the early dinner from 5-6 p.m. and choose from best-selling dishes at special prices.
  • Happy hour is from 5-6 p.m. and from 9 p.m. to closing with discounts on drinks and some menu items.
  • Happy hour is from 5-6 p.m. and from 9 p.m. to closing with discounts on drinks and some menu items.
  • Prices are mid-range with lunch from $7.50 to $16.50, $9.50 to $21.50 for most entrees, and $3 to $10.50 for individual sushi rolls.
  • Thursday nights are Ladies Night from 6-9 p.m. with drink and sushi specials.
  • By 1740, settlers from Pennsylvania and other parts of Virginia began farming the land located west of the Blue Ridge Mountains, the great valley between Maryland and Tennessee.
  • The menu is an ever-changing variety of cuisines and cooking styles from around the world.
  • As the perfect accompaniment to your meal, choose a bottle of wine from the extensive international wine list.
  • The bistro is opened Tuesdays through Saturdays from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m.
  • Sunday is a day for family and savings, as all families get 10 percent off meals from 11:30 a.m. to 4 p.m.
  • Those who come to enjoy more than just a drink can choose from a menu of steaks, pizza and pasta, hamburgers, ribs, chicken and seafood.
  • After some sight-seeing and traveling, there are distinctive restaurants to choose from in Deep River, Connecticut.
  • The atmosphere is relaxed and fun, and prices range from $7 to $20, as of 2009.
  • Smokin' Moe's is open seven days a week from 11 a.m. to 9 p.m.
  • Open seven days a week, 365 days a year, Deno's serves food from 11:30 a.m. to 10 p.m., with the bar open "until it closes" at 2 a.m. or earlier.
  • Winter Park offers year-round activities, from skiing, rafting and hiking to hot air balloon rides.
  • With many local restaurants ranging from fine dining to inexpensive eateries, there's something for everyone.
  • Located one hour from Rocky Mountain National Park, the city is in an excellent location for those wishing to sightsee or nature watch.
  • In addition to a four-page wine list, diners can opt for resh oysters, tuna shooters, mussels, prawns, Florida stone-crab claws or Alaskan king crabs from the raw bar, or choose from a selection of fresh pastas and savory flatbreads.
  • In addition to a four-page wine list, diners can opt for resh oysters, tuna shooters, mussels, prawns, Florida stone-crab claws or Alaskan king crabs from the raw bar, or choose from a selection of fresh pastas and savory flatbreads.
  • Steaks range from an 8-ounce filet to an 18-ounce prime rib, each seasoned with salt and pepper and served with a pat of butter and a lemon wedge.
  • Although prices appear steep, each entree includes French onion soup au gratin, house salad, baked potato, onion rings and organic vegetables from Bern's farm.
  • Local dining options reflect this diversity, ranging from standard chain fare to historical taverns that bring out the region's unique identity.
  • Syracuse, NY 13219-1958(315) 487-5864nesticostoo.com Gino's Steaks Gino's Steaks borrows its name and menu from the Philadelphia landmark Geno's Steaks.
  • Syracuse, NY 13219-1354(315) 488-9322tullysgoodtimes.com Nestico's Too‎ Another family-owned restaurant, Nestico's Too borrows its name from its sister restaurant in north Syracuse.
  • The area separates the city of Syracuse from the Camillus area.
  • And the venue is just steps from Great Patchogue Lake, a popular fishing destination. (Please see website and ref. 2)Brick House Brewery & Restaurant67 W.
  • While you can also order sandwiches, rack of lamb, or steaks from the American menu, take a peek at the traditional menu featuring sausage rolls, shepherd's pie, pasties, or bangers and mash.
  • Rated "Favorite Overall Restaurant" in the 2008 Mad Diner Awards, The Old Fashioned was founded in 2005 to highlight great Wisconsin food from small, local Wisconsin producers.
  • Steaks are offered in a variety of sizes and cuts, from an 8-ounce filet mignon to a 20-ounce bone-in ribeye.
  • In 2006 Carnevor won "Best New Restaurant" from OnMilwaukee.com, the Shepherd Express and Dennis Ghetto's section from the Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel.
  • In 2006 Carnevor won "Best New Restaurant" from OnMilwaukee.com, the Shepherd Express and Dennis Ghetto's section from the Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel.
  • The specialty here is salt cod and foods from northern Portugal.
  • Handlebars is closed from November until April each year.
  • Handlebars Restaurant and Saloon The theme and decor for Handlebars is from the late 1800s, and the staff is dressed in period garb to help complete the experience of a mining town during the gold rush era.
  • Lakewood, Colorado 80227 (303) 985-9696 Hampton Inn Denver West Federal Center The Hampton Inn Denver West Federal Center is just minutes away from many outdoor activities.
  • Lakewood, Colorado 80227(303) 980-9200 Sheraton Denver West Hotel The Sheraton Denver West Hotel is a contemporary accommodation that is just across from the Denver Federal Center.
  • For dessert choose from 21 different kinds of cake like the apple strudel and the German fruit torte.5238 E.
  • From German sausage to great brews and desserts, these hidden dining establishments are perfect for the adventurous foodie looking to go off the beaten path.
  • For those looking for a taste of Germany in Germantown, there's plenty of delicious options to choose from in the area.
  • Prices in 2009 range from about $19 and $34.213 Main StreetMount Kisco, NY 10549(914) 666.4448fishcellar.com/menufc.html
  • Prices in 2009 range from about $12 to $28. 360 North Bedford RoadMount Kisco, NY 10549 (914) 666.7711tuscanoven.com/ The Fish Cellar The Fish Cellar has been in Mount Kisco since 1999.
  • Prices in 2009 range from about $11.95 to $28.95. 222 E.
  • Prices in 2009 range from $19 to $30. 510 Lexington Ave.
  • Prices in 2009 range from about $15 to $28. 251 Lexington Ave.
  • The Flying Pig on Lexington The Flying Pig on Lexington first opened in 2000 and uses farm-fresh foods, mostly from the Hudson Valley.
  • Mount Kisko is right on Route 117, the Saw Mill River Parkway, making it easy to get to and from all the outdoor places in Westchester County.
  • Choose from appetizers, pastas, chicken and steak, plus seafood with nightly changing specials.
  • Restaurants range from casual to fine dining, each providing a memorable dining experience.
  • Deeter's is open for lunch from 11 a.m. until 2 p.m.
  • The restaurant is open for lunch Monday through Friday from 11:30 a.m. until 2:30 p.m.
  • Big plates of food with homemade sauces and natural ingredients make this restaurant ideal for those who want to stay away from fast food.
  • Dallas offers an abundance of premier steakhouses serving everything from Kobe beef to Prime USDA choice.
  • From food to spirits and live entertainment, you can truly get a taste of the Irish culture by paying a visit to Wauwatosa's Irish dining establishments.
  • Select a beverage to wet your palate from soda, sparkling wine, red wine, white wine or a cocktail. 920 Second Ave.
  • If you're feeling creative, customize your own panini from their selection of 20 cheeses and 11 meats.
  • You may choose from interesting paninis such as the smoked yellowtail or the Sur'prese--prosciutto, mozarella and blueberry jam.
  • San Diego, California, is truly an international city with restaurants offering cuisines from all over the world.
  • Karavalli Regional Cuisine of India Karavalli Regional Cuisine of India serves dishes from all of the regions of India.
  • Just minutes from the airport, the Doubletree is conveniently located for exploring the surrounding area and ideal for walking or biking around Rosemont.
  • The location of the hotel makes it a convenient walk to shopping and dining, and it is within reasonable distance from O'Hare and all that Chicago has to offer.
  • If you are visiting the area, staying at one of the many hotels in Rosemont will offer you close proximity to O'Hare International Airport as well as a slight drive from Chicago and Lake Michigan.
  • Located just minutes away from Chicago, the city of Rosemont features swimming pools, biking and walking trails, and fishing locations to pass the time away.
  • Whether you hike around the Arapaho National Forest or plan on going skiing and tubing during the winter, Fraser is the ideal escape from city stress.
  • The menu also includes grilled salmon, halibut, pork and rack of lamb and has a variety of beverages from espressos and lattes to ice tea, soda, cocktails, beer and a large selection of wines and spirits.
  • The steakhouse also includes a large assortment of steaks from rib eye to prime rib and New York to filet minon.
  • When you are ready for dinner, Mackey's features many menu items with an Irish flair from appetizers to entrees, desserts, soups, salads and more.
  • If you're looking for a place to eat steak in Oregon, you have plenty to choose from.
  • The restaurant sources its ingredients from local farms and bakes its desserts and bread in house.
  • The menu consists of American cuisine offering various dishes that range from a burger and fries to grilled swordfish.
  • The antique lanterns that hang from the ceiling give the establishment the feel of times past.
  • Angelina's Ristorante Located on Lake Avenue, diners at Angelina's Ristorante can indulge in wine from around the world while enjoying the authentic Italian cuisine.
  • Located in northeast Portland in the Concordia neighborhood, Beast is a few blocks from the Alberta park.
  • Portland, OR 97214(503) 546-8796www.lepigeon.com Beast Beast may look plain from the outside, but don't be deceived.
  • Dinners are priced from $15 to $20 not including drink or gratuity.
  • Cowboy's offers friendly service and a fun atmosphere and is open from 11 a.m. to 9 p.m.
  • The restaurant is open from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. and 4 to 9:30 p.m., Monday through Thursday, and Friday, Saturday, and Sunday from 11 a.m. to 9 p.m.
  • The restaurant is open from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. and 4 to 9:30 p.m., Monday through Thursday, and Friday, Saturday, and Sunday from 11 a.m. to 9 p.m.
  • Dinners range in price from $20 to $35 not including drinks or gratuity.
  • Bar area opens at 4 p.m. daily, while restaurant hours are from 5 to 9:30 p.m., Monday through Thursday and from 5 to 10:30 p.m. on Friday and Saturday.
  • Bar area opens at 4 p.m. daily, while restaurant hours are from 5 to 9:30 p.m., Monday through Thursday and from 5 to 10:30 p.m. on Friday and Saturday.
  • Ben's offers a huge variety of wines from its wine list.
  • Whether attending Riverfest in April, observing nature at Oxbox Meadows, or enjoying a tour of the National Infantry Museum, you can refuel and recharge with a hearty steak dinner from the finest establishments in the Chattahoochee River valley area.
  • Morton's Steakhouse The Louisville branch of this acclaimed boutique chain serves up USDA prime aged beef shipped in fresh daily from Chicago.
  • From nationally renowned chains to cherished local establishments, Derby City steaks don't disappoint.
  • Prices for the restaurant range from $15 - 30 a person.
  • The menu includes a great variety of foods from Egg Jardinière for breakfast to Creole Egg Salad Sandwich for lunch.
  • This restaurant has a huge menu with everything on it from soups and salads to BBQ ribs and meatloaf. 602 Main St.
  • Oceans 11 is less than 1 mile away from the Anne Kolb Nature Center, which features guided kayaking tours through the area's mangrove forests.
  • This restaurant is located less than 2 miles away from the popular nature trails at Seminole Park.
  • Giorgio's is also a few blocks south from the nature walk at John U.
  • Guests can also order cocktails from the full bar.
  • Japanese appetizers feature beef, pot stickers, fish and edamame among many other choices, and entrees vary from chicken, salmon or beef teriyaki, spicy udon or miso soup with a side of vegetables, as well as vegetarian sushi dinners.
  • Aside from the extensive sushi selection, Japango offers traditional and contemporary Japanese cuisine to residents and visitors alike.
  • You can select your preferred wine from a wine list of at least 200 wines.
  • PF Chang's China Bistro125 Westchester Avenue Space D315White Plains, NY 10601(914) 997-6100pfchangs.com Morton's The Steakhouse Morton's The Steakhouse is located in the Fortunoff Building, across from The Westchester, a local shopping center.
  • Guests have a wide variety of food from which to choose, including hibachi steak, filet mignon, herb crusted salmon, shrimp scampi and grilled pork chops.
  • Manitou Springs, Colorado 80829(719) 685-3755 Paravicini's Italian Located just three miles down the road from downtown Manitou Springs is Paravicini's Italian Bistro.
  • Secluded wooded campgrounds offer a peaceful escape from the city, as well as dozens of hiking and biking trails near the historic town.
  • Aside from the abundance of shopping, dining and scenic locations, those who visit Manitou Springs have plenty to do outdoors.
  • The area is well-known for its many mineral springs, which are supplied with water from melted snow off of Pike's Peak.
  • Aside from the many varieties of meat, it also features a large salad bar.
  • Although lunch entrees range from $9 to $12, dinner prices rise slightly from $10 to $15.
  • Although lunch entrees range from $9 to $12, dinner prices rise slightly from $10 to $15.
  • The selections of sushi range in price from $3.50 to $12 per roll, as of 2009.
  • Traditional meat, pad thai, and curry dishes are offered, with entrees ranging from $9 to $15, as of 2009.
  • Prices for entrees range from $17 to $34, as of 2009.
  • You can find Thai food at all price points made authentically from award-winning chefs everywhere in the city.
  • Located just five minutes from Downtown, this steak restaurant has been serving tourists and residents since 1893.
  • Entrees range from $16-$24. farmerbrown25 Mason StSan Francisco, CA 94102(415) 409-3276 www.farmerbrownsf.com Café Gratitude This restaurant boasts an all-raw vegan menu, using locally grown, organic ingredients.
  • Tataki This Pacific Heights restaurant is built on the belief that to continue to enjoy the art of sushi, we must support the environment from which it comes from.
  • Tataki This Pacific Heights restaurant is built on the belief that to continue to enjoy the art of sushi, we must support the environment from which it comes from.
  • San Francisco is known for its variety of outdoor activities, from spending a day exploring Golden Gate Park, to hiking in the Marin Headlands across the bay.
  • The restaurant is relatively inexpensive, with prices in 2009 ranging from around $10 to $20 for dinner entrees.
  • Open Mondays through Saturdays from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. and Sundays from noon to 5 p.m.
  • Open Mondays through Saturdays from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. and Sundays from noon to 5 p.m.
  • Fresh, authentic Italian bread is delivered from the Bronx each day.
  • Pronto! offers New Haven style pizzas, imported pastas, gelatos, and sorbetos from Italy.
  • On Sundays, Skipper's Dock features a Dixieland Jazz Brunch from 2p.m. to 6 p.m.
  • Seafood dishes range from $17 to $25, and "Turf" dishes run $15 to $21.
  • Breakfast and lunch prices are under $10, and a three-course dinner ranges from $20 to $30.
  • Stonington's restaurants are just a short drive from the local beaches, campsites, and other outdoor activity venues.
  • It's also only about four blocks from Jefferson Park, convenient for an evening stroll before or after your meal.
  • Just two blocks from the Main Street train station, this is a convenient place to eat.
  • Cafe Gutenberg has a good selection of brats to choose from and genuine German coffee.
  • It is very close to I-95 and just a few blocks away from Jefferson Park.
  • They specialize in kebabs of all times, from chicken to fish.
  • The food is hearty Italian hailing from the south of Italy.
  • The Westbury Music Fair presents live shows ranging from theater to bands, and singers.
  • The menu offers options for every taste and budget, ranging from diner-delicious hearty breakfasts to well-appointed steak, pasta dishes, and seafood platters.
  • The average price for any menu item is about $7 with daily dinner specials costing about $14. 7918 WI-42Egg Harbor, WI 54209(920) 868-3342villagecafe-doorcounty.com Log Den The Log Den sits back in the woods away from the road.
  • During the fall and winter months, the restaurant is open from 8am to 2pm daily.
  • The average price for a breakfast is about $7 and you can choose from pancakes, fresh fruits and eggs.
  • Select from steak, seafood, chicken or enjoy freshly prepared sushi.
  • There's no shortage of good steak restaurants in Western North Carolina, from single operations to restaurants that are part of a chain, these steak houses pride themselves on quality food, good service, and happy customers.
  • The large portions served are sure to accommodate even those with hearty appetites, as all meals are served with bread and side items that are made from scratch.
  • The desserts are homemade daily from scratch, making it hard to resist the the caramel apple pecan pie or a brownie super sundae.
  • Diners can choose from dry-aged steaks, wet-aged steaks and Texas Akaushi Kobe Beef and choose the type and size of their steak.
  • Ferris Steakhouse is closed on Sunday, but you can visit them for dinner from 5 p.m. to 10 p.m., Monday through Friday.
  • D'Angelo's Ristorante Italiano is open for lunch Monday through Friday and dinner from Monday through Saturday and stays open till 2 in the morning on Saturday night.
  • Philadelphia, PA(215) 923-8208‎portofino1227walnut.com Sotto Varalli Sotto Varalli is a two-story Italian restaurant on Broad Street, otherwise known as the "Avenue of the Arts" and is directly across the street from the Academy of Music.
  • Portofino Portofino is a classic Philadelphia Italian restaurant that has been serving up the real goods from its theater district location for more than 35 years.
  • The Black Forest menu features a lot of wild game, from elk to snow goose.
  • Genesee Town Café25948 Genesee Trail RoadGolden, CO 80401(303) 526-2483 Black Forest Restaurant The Black Forest Restaurant is a short drive from Golden in the mountain community of Nederland.
  • The brewery was founded in 1873 by Adolph Coors, an immigrant from Wuppertal, Germany.
  • Many entrees are under $10, but the steaks run from $17.95 to $31.95.
  • And when you've worked up an appetite for steak, Madison offers a variety of steak restaurants to choose from.
  • No matter what time of year, there's an outdoor activity to be found, from biking and hiking, fishing and sailing, and cross-country skiing, sledding and ice skating.
  • Pho Basil177 Massachusetts AveBoston, MA 02115(617) 262-5377 Brown Sugar Café The name may be deceiving, but this restaurant is far from a café.
  • Boston is a city that is abundant with outdoors activities: from the Emerald Necklace, a string of city parks, to the Charles River, there is something for every outdoor enthusiast.
  • Anthony & George's7505 Staples Mill Road Richmond, Virginia 23228 Tel: 804-266-4182anthonyandgeorges.com/ Morton's The Steakhouse Not far from the aforementioned Tobacco Company, Morton's is part of a national chain of fine dining steakhouses.
  • From the Delmonico steaks to the filet mignon, reasonable prices define the menu here.
  • The restaurant takes its name from its location inside an old tobacco warehouse, and its four stories of dining are connected by an antique exposed elevator.
  • From upscale chain brands to locally owned favorites, Virginia's capital city is home to a range of quality steakhouses.
  • It is said that Frank Pepe, of Pepe's Pizzeria Napolitana, invented the clam pizza as a way to use the abundant supply of clams from New Haven's local fisherman.
  • Specialties are the French toast made from challah bread and the onion rings.
  • Singletons 150 Hicksville RoadBethpage, New York 11714(516) 731-7065 The Embassy Diner A quintessential Long Island diner offering everything from a large oversized menu.
  • The atmosphere is clubby but friendly, with a large, dark wooden bar separated from the dining room.
  • Singeltons The menu is large and diversified, offering everything from burgers to steaks to pasta.
  • The menu is pub-style comfort food from burgers to pot pies.
  • Considered part of Pleasure Island, Carolina Beach is located mere minutes from Wilmington, and Wrightsville Beach.
  • Choices range from a sirloin dip to the bacon-wrapped sirloin to filet mignon to a 20oz.
  • Today, a promenade enables jogging, walking and bicycling along the West Side Greenway, which starts from Battery Park and continues north beyond the George Washington Bridge.
  • Choose broccoli or eggplant with garlic sauce and rice from the special lunch menu or the diet special, American Buddhist Delight with broccoli, snow peas, string beans, baby corn, mushrooms, carrots, tofu and zucchini.
  • Offering a blend of ethnic and cultural cuisines, Bentara serves dishes of Chinese and Indian food along side inspirations from Dutch, Portugese and English cultures to produce a pan-Asian culinary fusion.
  • Along with wealthy and prominent residents, Bernardsville boasts several amazing eating establishments, all of which offer tempting treats, ranging from American fare to delicious international cuisine.
  • Boston, MA 02109(617) 742-2286irishconnection.com/blackrose.html Kinsale Pub and Restaurant Just across from City Hall is Kinsale, offering an extensive list of brews and affordable menu.
  • There is a heavy Irish influence still present here since immigration began in the mid-1800s, with waves seeking refuge from the famine in Ireland, most notably the Irish pubs.
  • This chic Catalan eatery serves fine tapas and paellas made from only the finest and freshest ingredients.
  • The menu offers a range of home-cooked meals, from hearty soups to stacked sandwiches to sizzling steaks.
  • While it is known for providing delicious entrees from the Atlantic, it is not limited by such.
  • Baldwinsville is known for its scenic natural beauty, and boasts a wide range of eateries, from traditional diners to posh seafood restaurants.
  • In 1956, Jack Parr hosted an episode of "The Tonight Show" from the dining room.
  • The in-house decor, like the chandeliers fashioned from old postcard racks and the vintage old grinders littered everywhere, add to the rustic aura of the restaurant.
  • Its vegetarian dishes include cuisines from all around the world, like the Vietnamese yellow curry with cashew jasmine rice, and the Italian thin crust pizza with three different types of mushrooms.
  • The restaurant also has spectacular views, as diners can see the Golden Gate Bridge and the San Francisco Marina from out of the floor-to-ceiling windows.
  • All of Green's dishes feature ingredients grown directly from the Zen Center's famous Green Gulch farm.
  • An intimate jazz club featuring live music almost every night, Blues Alley has hosted musicians from all around the globe for over 40 years.
  • C. and just minutes away from the heart of Bethesda lies Blues Alley.
  • Located in the heart of Bethesda, and only steps away from the Capital Crescent Trail, the Louisiana Kitchen & Bayou Bar is sure to tantalize the taste buds.
  • Open seven days a week (hours vary) and offering beautiful indoor and outdoor dining spaces, the Louisiana Kitchen & Bayou Bar features fresh seafood, locally grown vegetables, savory sauces and cornbread made from scratch.
  • The chef can spice your entree to your preference from mild to vary spicy.
  • From its signature "meat parade" to the Latin dance music, dining at a Brazilian restaurant is an unforgettable experience.
  • Whether you're just returning from a Brazilian hiking adventure, or you simply want to enjoy the traditional Brazilian feast, you're in luck.
  • Philadelphia, PA 19103(215) 557-0108 Ethio Cafe and Carryout Although uninviting from the outside, Ethio Cafe and Carryout features home-style Ethiopian cuisine in a warm atmosphere.
  • Serving breakfast, lunch and dinner, Kaffa is a great neighborhood hangout for diners from students to families.
  • Patrons who order the rodizio-style meats may also choose side dishes from the buffet.
  • Patrons start the meal at the side and salad bar and then can chose from an all-you-can-eat selection of 12 skewered meats brought to their tables.
  • Brazilian steakhouses serve cuts of meat cooked over charcoal, and there are several for travelers to choose from.
  • Taking a break from any activity should certainly include a journey into one of Pennsylvania's larger cities for a protein-packed meal.
  • The food is served on delightful, genuine antique china from Galway, Ireland.
  • Menu items range from comfort food such as homemade meatloaf with parmesan mashed potatoes and haricot verts to more epicurean selections such as roasted pumpkin and saffron infused risotto. 500 W.
  • As you and your date dine on exotic fare, you can take time out from staring deep into one another's eyes to enjoy the gorgeous Hill Country scenery.
  • Moghul Palace Located in the heart of the city, you can still get the feel of being away from it all, in this cozy spot featuring great food.
  • There are a several exquisite restaurants to choose from: Mediterranean Cuisine with views of the sea, 24 hour room service, and a Queens Room is reserved for those who love fine teas and pastries.
  • Sail away on the the Queen Mary 2 for a 10 Night Cruise to the Caribbean departing from the port of New York and sailing to:St.
  • While on the Norwegian Gem you will have a variety of 12 restaurants to choose from, with 11 lounges and bars, where you can relax and enjoy your company with cocktails.
  • Sail away on the Norwegian Gem for a 7 Night Cruise of the Bahamas, departing from the port of New York, and heading to the following Ports: Port Canaveral, Florida, Great Stirrup Cay, and Bahamas,Nassau.
  • AAA Club Cruises from New York has so many wonderful cruises to choose from, each trip comes with it's own unique vacation.
  • AAA Club Cruises from New York has so many wonderful cruises to choose from, each trip comes with it's own unique vacation.
  • Gauchos is located about five minutes from the airport, and just 10 minutes from Providence.
  • Gauchos is located about five minutes from the airport, and just 10 minutes from Providence.
  • There are several options in the area from which to choose.
  • Gather with friends for drinks, and signature martinis at the "O" Bar before ordering from the eclectic dining menu.
  • Order from the extensive wine menu and enjoy tapas such as chorizo with sweet, and sour figs, roasted garlic bulbs, crispy calamari, steamed clams or herbed goat cheese, and mushrooms.
  • Clifton Park, New York 12065(518) 688-1548zaika-anindianrestaurant.com Harbor House Harbor House features homemade fish fry and items from the grill.
  • It is located right off I-87, the New York State Thruway and a short drive from Adirondack State Park and Lake George.
  • Casa Nova Ristorante features a number of dishes that are inspired from Southern Italy.
  • The restaurant makes all of the meat products from scratch, using traditional German recipes.
  • Aside from easy beach access, there are a number of outdoor activities in the area, ranging from horseback riding to hiking in the New Jersey Forest.
  • Aside from easy beach access, there are a number of outdoor activities in the area, ranging from horseback riding to hiking in the New Jersey Forest.
  • Salads and soups are also served and the dessert menu offers everything from crepes to cheesecake.
  • Southfield, MI 48034(248) 356-6600baccoristorante.com Cinco Lagos Serving authentic Mexican and Latin cuisine, Cinco Lagos features house-made salsas and many tequila drinks to choose from.
  • West Bloomfield, MI 48322(248) 661-4466thelark.com Bacco Ristorante Serving Italian cuisine since 2002, Bacco Ristorante featured ingredients from Italy imported daily.
  • If you're hungry, order the classic El Gaucho steakhouse fare or have great food from the bar menu.
  • El Gaucho's cigar selection runs from $17 to $48, and as with everything here, the selections are stunning and the service is first rate.
  • If you're hungry, you can send for sustenance from the Bagdad Theater Café next door.
  • Kells opens early on the weekends so you can enjoy all your favorite sports, and great food is always available from the pub menu.
  • Prices in 2009 ranged from about $21.95 to $65.95.
  • Prices in 2009 ranged from about $14.95 to $25.95.
  • Prices in 2009 ranged from about $14.95 to $32.95.
  • Columbus, OH 43206(614) 444-7204theoldmohawk.com/ Cameron's American Bistro Cameron's American Bistro is a modern restaurant that features dishes from other parts of the country.
  • As of 2009, entree prices ranged from $7 to seafood market value.
  • The restaurant and fish market is open daily from 11 a.m. until 9 p.m. in the winter, and until 10 p.m. in the summer.
  • Conway, NH 03818 (603) 447-5050 cafenoche.net Banners Restaurant Located minutes from tax-free shopping in Mount Washington Valley, Banners Restaurant has served Conway since 1987.
  • Cafe Noche was voted "Best of New Hampshire" three consecutive years staring in 2005, and is open seven days a week, serving lunch from 11:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., and dinner until 9 p.m.
  • There is also a wide range of mouth-watering appetizers and vegetarian dishes as well as several tasty braised dishes to choose from.
  • You can order anything from Teriyaki Beef and roast pork, to chicken and fresh fish.
  • You can choose from anything from classic american food, to seafood, to asian cuisine.
  • You can choose from anything from classic american food, to seafood, to asian cuisine.
  • Full of parks, trails and golf courses, Bayside is popular especially for Manhattanites who want to get away from the buzz of the city.
  • Check-in is from 3 to 6 p.m but arranging for another time is possible.
  • The Big Blue House is a short stroll or bike ride from Tucson's cultural, restaurant and retail district on Fourth Avenue, and the University of Arizona is only eight blocks away.
  • Extended StayAmerica Tucson As basic as it is affordable, the ExtendedStay America Tucson provides clean rooms with full kitchen facilities and an on-site laundry--just what you need for a home away from home.
  • The dining room, with its rich paneled walls, leaded windows, and leather seats, is a scene from the Gilded Age.
  • From Japanese to American, and Italian to home cooked Hawiian, Kaua'i's restaraunts feature a wide variety of cuisines.
  • Aside from offering beautiful scenery and exciting activities, this island is also home to a lot of appetizing restaurants.
  • There are hundreds of dishes to choose from including beef chow mein, moo goo gai pan, general tso's chicken, sweet & sour chicken and wor shu duck.
  • For lunch, pick from southwest chicken salad, baked cod sandwiches, half-pound burgers and more.
  • Choose from dinner specialties including filet mignon, prime rib, surf & turf or chicken pomodoro.
  • Nature lovers can take advantage of the nearly 100 miles of trails embarking from the Chateau Lakes reservoirs, as well as fishing.
  • With an impressive wine list that lists wines from countries all over the world, Cave Vin is an idyllic restaurant for a date night after a day of boating and hiking.
  • This dimly lit restaurant serves everything you would see being served in Paris: from plump escargot steak tartare, to ravioli printemps and pan roasted halibut.
  • From basil pesto and roma tomate, to red potate with spinach Gorgonzola pizza, or try some of the jumbo scallops.
  • Since the menu ranges from Southwestern style, to European and Asian, it won't be difficult to pick the right meal.
  • From fried green tomatoes to shrimp and grits, local ingredients are used whenever possible.
  • Located away from downtown Charleston, it has less of a tourist clientele than other Charleston restaurants.
  • Cannon Beach, Oregon 97102(503) 436-1111moschowder.com Pizza a'fetta Pizza a'fetta is also situated near Ecola State Park and offers a nice change of pace from the area's mostly seafood oriented restaurants.
  • SpruceCannon Beach, Oregon 97110(503) 436-9130 ecolaseafoods.com Mo's Chowder Mo's Chowder is less than a 15-minute drive from the Tillamook Head Trail‎.
  • As its name implies, Ecola Seafoods specializes in the fresh catch hauled in daily from the nearby waters.
  • Ecola Seafoods Restaurant and Market Ecola Seafoods is located less than three miles from the Ecola State Park Trail.
  • Offering the most authentic experience, you will be rubbing elbows with everyone from true Greek Chicagoans, locals, as well as tourists who have heard the buzz about this place and their menu.
  • With over 20 appetizers under $10, including traditional dolmades, grilled octopus and delicious spinach cheese pies as well as nearly 60 entrees under $20 varying from fresh bakalo (codfish) to lamb shishkabobs, the menus are packed with fantastic deals.
  • Importing much of the ingredients-oils, cheeses, seafood, herbs and even wine straight from Greece, dining here is like taking a vacation from your vacation.
  • Importing much of the ingredients-oils, cheeses, seafood, herbs and even wine straight from Greece, dining here is like taking a vacation from your vacation.
  • Greek Islands Restaurant From the moment you step into Greek Islands, you are treated not as a customer but as family.
  • With a menu ranging from a pan-seared mahi mahi to a slow-grilled Kobe beef steak, as well as a wine list to easily pair both, Aroma is a must for dinner.
  • Breakfast is served all day, and the restaurant is open from 6 a.m. to 8 p.m. daily.136 1/2 Main St.
  • From casual fare to sophisticated multi-course meals, Bellport's restaurants will make the meal memorable and enjoyable.
  • The cafeteria-style dining is laid-back and offers plenty of different cuisines from which to choose.
  • Specialties and favorites include the meter-long bratwurst, beer from a boot and hearty platters.
  • Perched high in one of the Time Warner Center's towers, guests can reap the rewards of Chef Michael Lomanaco's kitchen and wine list while gaping with awe at Central Park from on high.
  • Served weekly from 9:30 a.m. to 2 p.m., the all-you-can-eat brunch buffet features dishes like roasted wild salmon, prawns, shellfish and Dungeness crab.
  • Cafe Campagne Located in the landmark Pike Place Marketplace, the Parisian-styled Cafe Campagne has won numerous awards from local media.
  • Dinner is served from an open kitchen where you can watch your meal preparation.
  • Catch has garnered awards and acclaim for its cuisine from Zagat Survey, Conde Nast Traveler, Wine Spectator and Boston magazines since 2005.
  • Neptune opens every day at 11:30 a.m. and features daily specials that range from lobster spaghettini to fish tacos.
  • Located in the city's North End, the menu includes classic New England clam chowder, pan-seared red snapper and a range of fresh offerings from the sea.
  • From Thai style BBQ to the stimulus package that pays back $1.00 in Mai Thai money for every $10 you spend, this restaurant is an excellent choice all around for a delicious Thai meal.
  • Specials are served with soup and spring roll from Monday until Wednesday, and with salad and spring roll on Thursday and Friday.
  • There are several nightclubs to choose from, each with a different style to set it apart.
  • You can grab a good read from Left Bank Books at Pike Place and settle in for the long lunch line at Tat's that is well worth the wait.
  • After lunch, take a 10-minute stroll from historic Volunteer Park, home of the Seattle Asian Art Museum.
  • All proceeds from Farestart's lunch and Thursday night meals go directly to the Farestart program, so you can fill your stomach while helping others fill theirs.700 Virginia St.
  • Located on Puget Sound, with ferry connections to islands and just hours from beautiful national forests and parks, Seattle offers the best of urban living and outdoor exploration.
  • Guests can choose from an extensive grill menu, sandwich list or vegetarian options.
  • Basil features a standard Thai menu of curries, noodles and rice, and Pad Thai, alongside appetizers, soups and salads, all made from the finest available ingredients.
  • Hank's downtown Charleston location is only a half mile from Marion square, a six and a half acre park, and a half mile from Charleston Bicycle Company, which offers a full line of bicycles for sale, as well as bike repair and running and cycling apparel.
  • Hank's downtown Charleston location is only a half mile from Marion square, a six and a half acre park, and a half mile from Charleston Bicycle Company, which offers a full line of bicycles for sale, as well as bike repair and running and cycling apparel.
  • All of this retaurant's menu items are made from scratch and the flavors will make it a lifetime experience.
  • Made from homemade dough, Wisconsin cheese and a chunky sauce on top, the thick pizzas here can fill even the most voracious appetite.
  • Demetrios' creates their own special blend of mozzarella and cheddar cheese to cover pizzas ranging from the 8-inch personal mini to the 17-inch large family pizza.
  • The gluten-free menu includes everything from soups and appetizers like Foccacia bread served with roasted garlic butter to pizza to gourmet dinners and deserts.
  • Another popular outdoor spot, the Chattahoochee Trail is perfect for hiking, biking and running along the banks of the Chattahoochee River, which runs from the Appalachian Mountains in northeast Georgia to the suburbs of Atlanta.
  • Louis, there are many restaurants that provide everything from steaks to seafood, French cuisine, lamb chops and a nice selection of wines.
  • Rare coffees are available from the Big Island, Maui, Oahu, Kauai and Molokai.
  • More than 5,000 different wines are available to choose from, and all steaks served at Capital Grille are dry aged.
  • Shula's Steak House Named after the famous football coach Don Shula, Shula's Steak House restaurant has received rave reviews from a number of different magazines and websites since 1991.
  • From pub-like joints with spurs on the walls and fries on the grill to first-class suit-and-tie arrangements, steakhouses come in all styles and types.
  • This restaurant also carries a hefty "price of admission," as Charlie Trotter says, ranging from $135 per person for the vegetable menu to $225 for the full 14-course experience.
  • Though dishes range in price from $145 to $225 per person as of 2009, the small-sized, creative offerings are presented with unmatched elegance and beauty.
  • There is something for everyone in this city, ranging from the free zoo parks to theater and opera events and nightlife.
  • Kids can order quesadillas and burritos from their own children's menu.
  • Take a break from the diet tonight and indulge in the Molten Center Chocolate Cake with Hazelnut Gelato.
  • Mia's Restaurant is open Sunday through Thursday from 10 a.m. to 3 a.m., Friday and Saturday from 10 a.m. to 4 a.m.
  • Mia's Restaurant is open Sunday through Thursday from 10 a.m. to 3 a.m., Friday and Saturday from 10 a.m. to 4 a.m.
  • Mo Mong Vietnamese Restaurant is open Monday through Thursday from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m., Friday and Saturday from 11 a.m. to 11 p.m.
  • Mo Mong Vietnamese Restaurant is open Monday through Thursday from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m., Friday and Saturday from 11 a.m. to 11 p.m.
  • Le Viet Restaurant & Bar is open Sunday through Thursday from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m., Friday and Saturday from 11 a.m. to 11 p.m.
  • Le Viet Restaurant & Bar is open Sunday through Thursday from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m., Friday and Saturday from 11 a.m. to 11 p.m.
  • Dinner specials created for two to 10 guest come with everything from appetizer to dessert.
  • Le Viet Restaurant is famous for genuine Vietnamese dishes like pan-seared noodles and hot pots created from fresh produce, herbs and just enough seasonings.
  • It has received a five-star rating from the Mobil Travel Guide for six years.
  • Performances run from January 19 through January 24, 2010 at the Palace Theater.
  • Performances run from January 12 to 17 2010 at the Palace Theater.
  • Performances run from October 27 through November 1, 2009 at the Ohio Theater.
  • Brooks tells the tale of Doctor Frankenstein's notorious feat of creating life from death.
  • Chicago, Illinois(312) 266-8999 gibsonssteakhouse.com Italian Style Steakhouses Harry Cary's Italian Steakhouse is a different type of steakhouse from the traditional.
  • It is an upscale restaurant with an assortment of gourmet entrees from steak to fish, great desserts and drinks.
  • The meats on the menu are from Creekstone Farm in Kentucky where the meat is aged on the premises in a salt tiled aging room.
  • Chicago has a number of different types of steak restaurants from traditional to Italian style.
  • New York, New York 10013(212) 226-9400 salaambombay.com Mint Fine Unwind from the day with Mint Fine's waterfall, beautiful hanging lights and peaceful music.
  • In a city that never sleeps, with a melting pot of every culture in the world, it is easy to find food from around the planet.
  • The owner is a native of Mexico and specializes in dishes from all regions of Mexico.
  • Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19017 (215) 928-9800 elvezrestaurant.comLolita: is a BYOB cash-only fine dining establishment with plenty of vegetarian options to choose from that are made from local ingredients.
  • Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19017 (215) 928-9800 elvezrestaurant.comLolita: is a BYOB cash-only fine dining establishment with plenty of vegetarian options to choose from that are made from local ingredients.
  • Gourmet Magazine praises Koi Palace as "an extremely fine Hong Kong-style seafood house." Dishes range from traditional to innovative.
  • The Slanted Door also serves a range of hand-picked Chinese teas from two San Francisco tea purveyors.
  • The wine list is a delight that complements the menu beautifully, ranging from Austrian Grüner Veltliners and Alsatian Gewurtztraminers to Belgian ales and German wheat beers.
  • Known for its martini bar and Sunday Champagne Brunch, the menu ranges from American style to Pan Asian flavors.
  • San Francisco, California 94133(415) 421-1429 Top of the Mark Take a good look at the panoramic views of San Francisco from the sky lounge high atop the Mark Hopkins Hotel on the crown of Nob Hill.
  • Enjoy the ambiance and quality as you savor the signature crab dishes, meat and fish from the charcoal broiler.
  • Enjoy drinks from the full bar or a glass of wine from the large wine list while you cozy up to your date.
  • Enjoy drinks from the full bar or a glass of wine from the large wine list while you cozy up to your date.
  • Trinacria Chef Eugenio Aliotta is brings true Sicilian flavor from his hometown across the Atlantic.
  • People from all over America visit Williamsburg for a taste of our country's history.
  • Choose from the grill menu or the fish market menu when you arrive for lunch or dinner.
  • Chicago has many fine restaurants, but a few stand out from the rest.
  • According to Frank Mancino in the New York Times, "It's like they dug up my grandma and she made the pie." The pizza is classic Neapolitan style, with ingredients imported from Italy.
  • Take a walking tour of Little Italy, visit South Street Seaport's famous fish market or take a bike ride from Riverside Park to the Chelsea Piers Sports complex.
  • From 2006 to 2009, this locally owned institution has been voted Best of Memphis for steak by Memphis Magazine readers.
  • The restaurant serves dinner nightly from 5:00 p.m. until 10:00 p.m., with special Friday Night Wine Dinner and Sunday Dinner menus.
  • Choose from one of five flavored broths and a huge buffet selection of beef, chicken, fish, tofu and vegetables.
  • Not only does Jimmy's offer a menu with everything from sandwiches and pasta to quesadillas, it has different lunch specials every week.
  • For those in your party who haven't developed a taste for sushi, however, Wasabi Bistro also offers a wide variety of other unique Japanese dishes to choose from.
  • From Italian to Asian cuisine, to amazing seafood and succulent steaks, Seattle features at least a little of every type of culinary creation.
  • Make a reservation to ensure a table during busiest times, and peruse the wine list featuring hundreds of wines priced from $20 to $1000 per bottle.
  • Downtown Indianapolis, having experienced a revitalization throughout the 1990s, now bustles with activity every day of the week and hosts culinary specialties from all over the world.
  • The menu ranges from made-to-order omelettes to Spanish tapas, and includes their own special granola recipe.
  • Sunday brunch is served from 9:00 a.m. until the kitchen closes at 2:30 p.m.
  • Brunch is served from 8:00 a.m. until 3:00 p.m. on weekends and holidays.
  • Soups, salads and sandwiches are made from fresh, seasonal ingredients from local farmers.
  • Soups, salads and sandwiches are made from fresh, seasonal ingredients from local farmers.
  • Take a break from your Calgary activities on Sunday to nourish your body and spirit with a hearty brunch.
  • Average prices in 2009 range from about $18 to $32.
  • Average prices in 2009 range from about $19.95 to $32.95.
  • The ceiling is where the eatery's name comes from; it looks like the inside of a canoe.
  • From the sweet potato casserole to the fried catfish and cornbread, the taste buds go crazy when eating the delicious meals prepared at this restaurant.
  • Fogo de Chao offers a dining experience that is unique among restaurants; at the beginning of every meal you visit a gourmet salad and side bar and choose from vegetables, cheeses, meats and traditional Brazilian side dishes.
  • Best Brazilian Fogo de Chao was rated one of America's best restaurants by Zagat survey and has won awards from Atlanta Magazine, the Dallas Observer and the Miami New Times.
  • However, what really sets Bone's Restaurant apart from other restaurants is its vast wine menu; with more than 1,000 bottles to choose from, it is a sommelier's favorite place to visit outside of a winery.
  • However, what really sets Bone's Restaurant apart from other restaurants is its vast wine menu; with more than 1,000 bottles to choose from, it is a sommelier's favorite place to visit outside of a winery.
  • Best Steakhouse Bone's Restaurant was named "the best steak house in the southeast," by The New York Times and has received rave reviews from GQ, Gourmet magazine and Atlanta Magazine.
  • The best thing about food in Atlanta is that it is so diverse, from down-home Southern cooking to traditional Italian and gourmet; there is a restaurant to fit everyone's palate.
  • Landis Ludlam Island was uninhabited for nearly 200 years, with visitors from the mainland using it for fishing, hunting and water recreation.
  • He stocked it with sheep and cattle brought from the mainland.
  • It started as a meeting place for the Leni Lanape tribes who came from the mainland to collect shells and fish.
  • Choose from either low-country fare or traditional, fried seafood dishes.
  • Choose from ribs, pork or chicken wings made in one of five Sticky Fingers original barbecue sauces.
  • Charleston, South Carolina, offers a broad variety of appetite-quenching choices from a warehouse of fish to a quaint, five-star restaurant with an intimate-cottage feel.
  • The atmosphere is amplified by the aroma of freshly made seafood emanating from the kitchen.
  • The city's proximity to the Atlantic Ocean means that there are a wealth of seafood restaurants to choose from, with some of the best listed below.
  • Seafood entrees range from grilled mahi mahi with wasabi sauce to linguine with shrimp, clams and a black bean sauce.
  • Sandwiches range from portobello mushroom to chopped salmon steak.
  • Average prices in 2009 range from about $8.99 to $17.99.
  • Average prices in 2009 range from about $11.75 to $13.95.
  • Average prices in 2009 range from about $14.00 to $37.00.
  • Mother Anna's211 Hanover St, Boston, Massachusetts 02113(617) 523-8496motherannas.com/ DaVinci DaVinci has gotten rave reviews from the Boston Globe, Zagnuts, the Boston Courant , the Boston Herald and others.
  • Average prices in 2009 range from about $15.00 to $25.00.
  • Average prices in 2009 range from about $11.95 to $25.95.
  • Average prices for lunch in 2009 range from about $2.95 to $7.25.
  • Average prices for breakfast in 2009 range from about $5.75 to $7.25.
  • Prices in 2009 average from about $ 9.95 to $25.95.
  • Average prices in 2009 range from about $17 to $31 for main dishes.
  • From May to September, they offer dining a the Dockside Grill, right by the beach.
  • Vegetarian specialties range from fresh vegetable curry to mixed veggies cooked with cream and nuts.
  • As of 2007, the suit was settled and besides the location change from Reading Terminal Market to the Bellvue Hotel, neither restaurant was visibly affected.
  • To keep up with Pat's, Geno's is also open 24 hours a day, and loyal customers of each restaurant keep up the rivalry by yelling at each other from opposite sides of the street.
  • Despite the obvious rivalry created due to Pat's and Geno's being across the street from one another, each restaurant makes its cheesesteak a little differently.
  • Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19147(215) 468-1546patskingofsteaks.com Geno's Steaks In 1966, Joe Vento's Geno's Steaks opened directly across the street from Pat's King of Steaks.
  • Pat's King of Steaks Pat's King of Steaks was opened by brothers Pat and Harry Oliveri in 1933, although they opened the stand as a hot dog vendor from 1930 to 1933.
  • Open from Memorial Day to Labor Day, the park is packed with wild water rides including the Master Blaster, Speed Slides and Lost Falls.
  • If you fly commercially, the closest large airport is Bangor International, which is located approximately 50 miles from Bar Harbor.
  • Tzatziki is made from a thick yogurt, shredded cucumber, garlic, fresh dill, olive oil and salt.
  • Tyrokafteri is a spicy cheese dip made from the seeds of a local pepper, the kafteri, a soft cheese such as feta or anthotiro, olive oil and garlic.
  • These snacks derive from the custom of spending hours socializing in a taverna, and vary widely by region.
  • Travelers can experience a slice of Southern life from some of the best five-star dining restaurants in the South, from French and Asian to petit filet mignon and 20-oz.
  • Travelers can experience a slice of Southern life from some of the best five-star dining restaurants in the South, from French and Asian to petit filet mignon and 20-oz.
  • Aside from their seafood and lobster dishes, Smith & Wollensky offer guests 10 oz.
  • They have also been the recipients of local and national awards, including The Wine Spectator's "Grand Award of Excellence" and "Award of Excellence" from the Distinguished Restaurants of North America.
  • Worth Rib eye, Dallas Filet, New York Strip and USDA Choice Sirloin, all ranging in size from six to 16 oz.
  • It made Fodor's Choice in 2009, and has won eight excellence awards from Wine Spectator magazine.
  • Biba This authentic Italian eatery has earned high praise from both Gourmet and Travel and Leisure magazines.
  • There have even had rave reviews from Planet Weekly.
  • Aside from its cultural side with museums, art galleries and Busch Gardens, there are plenty of shops to visit.
  • Suzette's earns high marks from customers for delicious dishes and excellent variety.
  • Starting from a mobile crepe stand, the eponymous Suzette founded her sit-down restaurant in 2000, and has expanded to a larger, but still cozy, establishment since.
  • Enjoy a rare wine from the 24,000-bottle wine cellar.
  • The restaurant is located in Boston's North End in a 17th-century row house a few door down from Paul Revere's house.
  • Entrees are a blend of Italian and French cuisine, ranging from stuffed ravioli to halibut and duck.
  • Patrons can ride a carriage from the splendid main lobby of the Grand Hotel to Bobby's seven nights a week.
  • Serving up casual cuisine and selections from the hotel's award-winning wine list, the bar features one of the oldest duckpin bowling alleys in the United States.
  • City Park Grill Located in Petoskey, Mich., the historic City Park Grill sits just minutes from Lake Michigan.
  • The restaurant is the only one in the city offering various Chesapeake Bay oysters from Virginia's Rappahannock River.
  • The cozy and comfortable atmosphere serves as the perfect venue for patrons seeking a place to relax and dine in the heated patio or indoors while nightly live jazz tunes emanate from the piano.
  • Wine aficionados have ample options from the European or domestic selection to complement the French-inspired cuisine.
  • The city boasts restaurants of every venue, from dressy to casual.
  • There are fishing excursions from the marina, while other outdoor enthusiasts can take a walk or a run on the beaches of Cape May a short distance away.
  • Most diners have a view of the harbor and can watch the fishing and pleasure boats while they enjoy the catch of the day or a meal from the raw bar.
  • The Lobster House Fisherman's Wharf in Cape May, New Jersey, is home to the Lobster House, where all seafood served in the restaurant is brought in daily from the business's own fishing boats.
  • Close to many of these activities are a number of restaurants offering everything from comfortable pub food after a ski run to fine dining at a four-star restaurant overlooking the Manhattan skyline.
  • From an outdoor enthusiast's perspective, the small state of New Jersey has it all---mountain hiking, skiing and snowboard trails, lake and ocean fishing, and biking paths through forests and cities alike.
  • It offers diners a large menu selection, which features everything from chicken wings to fried fish and 20 types of beer on tap.
  • Breakfast/brunch is served Saturday and Sunday from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.; dinner is served Tuesday through Sunday from 5:30 p.m. to 11 p.m.
  • Breakfast/brunch is served Saturday and Sunday from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.; dinner is served Tuesday through Sunday from 5:30 p.m. to 11 p.m.
  • Duo serves weekend brunch on Saturday and Sunday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
  • Monday through Saturday and from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. on Sunday.
  • The restaurant is open seven days a week for dinner, from 5 p.m. to 10 p.m.
  • The market features eateries from around the world, souvenir vendors and street performers in a colonial-style setting.
  • The following 10 attractions are culled from a number of the top travel guide listings.
  • From healthy fare to close proximity to the beach, there is no shortage of options for the outdoor enthusiast with the appetite for Chinese food.
  • Stamford, CT 06901(203) 348-8000www.marketstamford.com Brasitas Indulge in Latin American dishes accompanied by juice made from 100 percent natural fruit pulp, including mango, pineapple, guava, raspberry and passion fruit.
  • Market is open for lunch Monday through Friday from 11 a.m. until 3:30 p.m.
  • Choose from a café style luncheon, ethnic food or an upscale dining experience.
  • Average prices in 2009 range from about $17.95 to $21.95Chabucás Steaks & Rotisserie316 W.
  • Average prices in 2009 range from about $16 to $95.
  • Average prices in 2009 range from about $25 to $39.
  • Average prices in 2009 range from about $22 to $45.
  • Average prices in 2009 range from about $17.95 to $40.95.
  • Average prices in 2009 range from about $8.99 to $15.99.
  • Average prices in 2009 range from about $10 to $42.
  • Average prices in 2009 range from about $19.50 to $36.
  • Average prices in 2009 range from about $22 to $68.
  • Dallas Chamberlain's Steak and Chop House has been open since 1993 and has a four-star rating from the Dallas Morning News and was named one of the best restaurants in 2008 by D Magazine.
  • With everything made from scratch, Tupelo Junction serves classic dishes from the deep South with a California flair.
  • With everything made from scratch, Tupelo Junction serves classic dishes from the deep South with a California flair.
  • Choose from the spicy Kung Pao chicken or succulent jasmine tea smoked duck among other Chinese classics.
  • Santa Barbara, CA 93101(805) 730-1160bouchonsantabarbara.com The Stonehouse The famous San Ysidro Ranch's The Stonehouse offers gourmet dishes made with regional ingredients and produce grown from its on-site garden.
  • Be sure to take a peek inside the private dining area--the entire ceiling is made from wine corks, of course.
  • An excellent wine list featuring wines from the Santa Barbara area also awaits you at Bouchon.
  • All the favorites are on the menu and guests can choose from a long wine list or request that the chef pick a wine to enhance the meal.
  • The menu has a variety of dishes that includes fresh scallops, duck breast and lobster from Maine.
  • Choose from the Prix-Fixe menu or the Collection menu.
  • That oddity didn't stop the "Dallas Observer" from naming it the "Best Italian Restaurant in Dallas" for 2008 and 2009.
  • With over 5,000 wines to choose from and private dining rooms available, The Capital Grille is open for lunch and dinner, with fresh desserts, including ice cream made in-house.
  • Of course, there are Texas steakhouses, and ethnic infusions of Mexican, Indian and Southern-Cajun to choose from, but for health-conscious travelers, the top restaurants in Dallas specialize in local food.
  • Dallas diners have a wide variety of restaurants to choose from.
  • It derives its name from the nearby bridge, the site of three suicides over the years.
  • It is set a little back from the Chesapeake Bay, but it is still close to the water as it sits alongside the Choptank River.
  • The restaurant is situated on the waterfront of the Kent Narrows, just down the road from the Bay Bridge.
  • The restaurant is located directly across from the Hoboken PATH station.
  • From the Guinness BBQ burger to the Emigrant's Corned Beef and Cabbage, both lunch and dinner is an international experience.
  • Ri Ra Atlantic City Built from the remains of real Irish pubs, the Ri Ra Atlantic City offers diners traditional Irish cuisine as well as American dishes with an added Irish flare.
  • Travelers often make day trips to New Jersey from New York City, and while there they dine on some of New Jersey's finest foods.
  • From its Miss Mikuni Pageant to its Halloween extravaganzas, from its Iron Chef competitions to the restaurant's Golf Classics, Mikuni Japanese Restaurant and Sushi Bar certainly transcends its already extensive menu.
  • From its Miss Mikuni Pageant to its Halloween extravaganzas, from its Iron Chef competitions to the restaurant's Golf Classics, Mikuni Japanese Restaurant and Sushi Bar certainly transcends its already extensive menu.
  • From its nearby state parks---like Stone Lake and Delta Meadows---to larger national parks just a short drive away---like Tahoe National Forest, Yosemite and El Dorado National Forest---the city has much to offer the nature enthusiast.
  • With a simple yet appetizing menu, guests of Simply Fish can order anything from the broiled jumbo sea scallops known as "scallops casino" to curry-spiced peel-and-eat shrimp served with a yogurt chutney and cucumber sauce.
  • Getting There A high-speed ferry from Nova Scotia carries passengers to Bar Harbor in 2 1/2 hours.
  • Accommodations A variety of accommodations are available, from rustic campsites to plush suites overlooking the ocean.
  • Lunch is a "choose one from column A, column B and column C" style menu, with the dinner menu being a la carte with nightly specials.4883 MacArthur Blvd.
  • C. 20001(202) 737-0400johnnyshalfshell.net Black Salt Black Salt's location qualifies it as almost being a neighborhood secret--it is situated far from where any tourist would venture in the Foxhall area.
  • C. 20006(202) 296-7700kinkead.com Johnny's Half Shell Johnny's Half Shell is located around the corner from Union Station, making it a good stop for those who are finishing up their day of seeing the sights near the U.
  • C. by Zagat's survey every year from 2000 to 2007.
  • Kinkead's This restaurant is located near George Washington University and is about four blocks up the street from the White House.
  • Entrees from the dinner menu were between $22 and $36 in 2009.
  • Savannah, GA 31401(912) 234-6686 Olde Pink House Living up to its name, Olde Pink House is indeed in a bright pink house dating from 1771.
  • Its crab cakes won a 2001 Best Menu Item award, and its shrimp, greens and grits earned a 2004 Best Entree award from Southern Living magazine.
  • Located in a brick building dating from 1902, the restaurant sits in the midst of Savannah's charming historic district.
  • Belford's Belford's received a four-and-a-half star rating from the New York Times.
  • The restaurant has consistently earned four- and five-star ratings from such food industry publications as Zagat and Hospitality of Science.
  • With its sophisticated yet comfortable lounge setting, Blue 13 offers a variety of diverse "rock and roll chic" entrees, from pork chops to seafood.
  • Not far from the Boston Lenox, you'll find some of the most exciting activities and fascinating places to see while staying in Boston.
  • The rooms are outfitted in rich colors with comfy armchairs and furnishings from the colonial era.
  • This comfortable, moderately priced hotel was created in 1997 from an abandoned warehouse.
  • Alexandria, Virginia‎ 22314(703) 683-6313‎laportas.net Geranio This restaurant sits one block from Old Town's major intersection of King Street and the George Washington Parkway.
  • The restaurant has a good wine list, including selections both from Virginia and around the world, but take care to mind the prices--there was not a single bottle of red priced below $35.
  • The core of the Firehouse's menu are steaks cut from beef raised on area farms.
  • Restaurant Eve Set in a converted historic warehouse in Old Town, this restaurant received four stars (the top rating) from the Washington Post, and its Irish chef was rated as one of the Top 50 new chefs by Food and Wine magazine in 2008.
  • C., and up the road from George Washington's estate at Mount Vernon, the town dates back to colonial times.
  • Choose from pasta, seafood, Asian wok food and specialty salads.
  • It is also a short drive from rural New Jersey forests, the Delaware and Hudson Rivers, and the Atlantic Ocean.
  • The menu ranges from expertly grilled steaks to hearty burgers, with a more than ample selection of appetizers and finger foods.
  • A vital and busy vacation town from the 1920s through the '50s, the age of jet travel and the development of beach resorts in Florida and the south took away much of Asbury Park's tourist trade.
  • It is not strictly Chinese, serving a varied combination of Asian cuisine from China, Japan, Thailand and India.
  • BroadwayHicksville, NY 11801(516) 939-6618‎westeastbistro.com Copper Wok New York Located just blocks from the major intersection of East Barclay Street and East Broadway, this restaurant is a favorite among locals.
  • It is found just 29 miles east from Manhattan Island, an approximate 45-minute drive from the bustling streets of Times Square.
  • It is found just 29 miles east from Manhattan Island, an approximate 45-minute drive from the bustling streets of Times Square.
  • After enjoying clams or shrimp from the buffet, you can choose a slice of pecan pie or a lemon turnover.
  • This restaurant offers an unlimited buffet Mondays through Thursdays from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. to accommodate seafood lovers.
  • These restaurants satisfy your hunger while allowing you to enjoy seafood dishes from around the world.
  • Ohio holds hiking trails, campgrounds and ski hills traversed by travelers from around the world.
  • Evans Notch The White Mountain National Forest stretches into Maine (from nearby New Hampshire) to include the Evans Notch region of Maine.
  • With a lively arts district, a minor league hockey team and an active waterfront, this city draws many visitors from all over the country.
  • Feel free to indulge, because the restaurant has a free limousine and shuttle service that goes to and from hotels in the area.
  • Choose from entrees such as omelets, vegetable crepes or eggs prepared to your liking.
  • The restaurant has a raw bar, with oysters and clams from the area.
  • Thali Regional Cuisine of India If you're looking for non-traditional food or a break from the ordinary, then Thali Regional Cuisine of India is a great choice for Christmas dinner.
  • Food for overnights includes meal service from the crew's mess.
  • Visitors can cater rations from the ship (boxed lunch meals) or enjoy the barbecue with fruit, vegetables, dessert and an array of meats.
  • The Funplex cafe at each location offers appetizers, hot Italian food from pizza to stomboli and calzone, burgers, chicken nuggets, salads, hot sandwiches, soup, snacks and dessert.
  • Somerset, NJ 08873 (732) 220-0051http://www.poojacuisine.com/ Neptune City Come inside from hours spent beachcombing and swimming to this Jersey Shore landmark, which offers takeout, fine food and drinks at the well-stocked bar.
  • There are many menu highlights to choose from as you chow down with lovely mountains off in the distance.
  • Honolulu, HI 96815(808) 922-2268dukeswaikiki.com La Mer Enjoy the spectacular view of Diamond Head in the distance while you enjoy exquisite French cuisine about as far away from Paris as possible.
  • They're only open from 6 to 9 p.m. and reservations are suggested for groups of four or more.
  • Their menu specifies which items are vegan and which are gluten free and all their seafood is fresh, brought in daily from the waters around the island.
  • These Kauai seafood restaurants bring in fresh fish from local waters and prepare them the same day, for an unforgettable dining experience.
  • The restaurant also has a market menu where all dishes are made with fresh ingredients purchased from local farmer's markets.
  • Garozzo's Ristorante526 Harrison StreetKansas City, MO 64106-1262(816) 221-2455 Cupini's Cupini's is a favorite for locals in Kansas City because all of the sauces are made from scratch daily, as are all the pastas.
  • The menu offers an array of choices from BBQ oysters and alligator sausage to enormous shrimp po'boy sandwiches and the specialty, blackened redfish.
  • The restaurant is open daily for lunch before closing from 3-5 p.m. so it can reopen for dinner.
  • Today, there are still several popular German restaurants to choose from.
  • Sides are available and prices range from $4 to $9.
  • Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53203(414) 276-4844historicturner.com/ Tutto Restaurant Bar Tutto is an upscale sports lounge located minutes from Bradley Center.
  • Opened in 1988, the center attracts tourists and visitors from around the country and the world.
  • From the moment you enter the restaurant you are sucked in by an ambiance reminiscent of a rustic old boathouse, making it clear that you are in for an authentic seafood experience.
  • With fish so fresh that it essentially goes from boat to plate, there's no guessing why this cuisine is so popular in the area.
  • Aside from its rich history, Williamsburg is also rich with culinary delights.
  • From breakfast to dinner, soup to pizza, and American to Thai cuisine, there is something to please every visitor.
  • The individual must carry the license while in the process of fishing and produce it upon demand from a conservation officer.
  • The commuter trains run from either North Station or South Station to the outlying suburbs and small towns such as Plymouth and Gloucester.
  • Explore the Charles River This slow-moving, meandering river separates Boston from Cambridge, but there is no reason that you can't explore both sides of the river.
  • There is also along the trail, on Boston's North Side, a delightful Italian neighborhood that offers a wide choice of restaurants and cafes, where you can take a break from the walk.
  • Two of the islands have ferry service from the Boston waterfront at Long Wharf North at Christopher Columbus Park; it runs from early May until Columbus Day.
  • Two of the islands have ferry service from the Boston waterfront at Long Wharf North at Christopher Columbus Park; it runs from early May until Columbus Day.
  • Spencer's menu spans a variety Pacific Rim and American favorites, from sauteed crab cakes made from savory Maryland crabmeat to Dijon-coated New Zealand rack of lamb.
  • Spencer's menu spans a variety Pacific Rim and American favorites, from sauteed crab cakes made from savory Maryland crabmeat to Dijon-coated New Zealand rack of lamb.
  • From buttermilk-fried chicken with root beer barbecue to a mustard-crusted lamb rack, you can top off any meal with one of the Falls 35 signature martinis.
  • Melvyn's also boasts two world-class wine cellars with premium vintages from around the world.
  • Melvyn's Restaurant Located within the historical Ingleside Inn in downtown Palm Springs, Melvyn's Restaurant has received numerous "Best of the Valley Awards" from the Desert Sun.
  • Open from May to early October, weather permitting, Five Islands Lobster Company serves fresh lobster, brought in twice daily from boats you can see from your picnic table on the dock.
  • Open from May to early October, weather permitting, Five Islands Lobster Company serves fresh lobster, brought in twice daily from boats you can see from your picnic table on the dock.
  • Open from May to early October, weather permitting, Five Islands Lobster Company serves fresh lobster, brought in twice daily from boats you can see from your picnic table on the dock.
  • Five Island Lobster Company Listed in the first place of Travel & Leisure's 10 Best Lobster Shacks in Maine, the Five Island Lobster Company features a 360-degree view from Georgetown Island, in the Five Islands Fishing Wharf.
  • From gourmet lobster dishes to the traditional coastal lobster shacks, visitors to Maine can enjoy the best lobster year round.
  • The restaurant is located in a large shopping plaza, so you can take a break from shopping or window-browsing and stop in for a nice bite to eat.
  • Fuji Sushi Buffet Although it takes its name from an island in the South Pacific, Fuji Sushi Buffet offers traditional Japanese sushi, as well as staff made creations (which can vary from visit to visit).
  • Fuji Sushi Buffet Although it takes its name from an island in the South Pacific, Fuji Sushi Buffet offers traditional Japanese sushi, as well as staff made creations (which can vary from visit to visit).
  • Select from dozens of types of sushi, or pick a combo or box meal such as a bento box.
  • Patrons select what they want from an expansive menu before a personal chef prepares the food at your table.
  • On the restaurant's walls are numerous awards backing up this claim, including awards from Northern Virginia Living magazine.
  • Though Virginia's capital city of Richmond is more than 9,000 miles from Tokyo, sushi lovers will find the Japanese delicacy throughout the northern half of the state.
  • The restaurant of the Gratz Park Inn, the chef uses apples from the trees in the backyard to include in the salads.
  • From seafood to southern fare, you can find a great catch, steak or salad at the restaurants included below while getting a feel for the city.
  • Selections from the garden are used in the dishes served at the lodge's restaurant.
  • Sea lions and other wildlife may be seen from the inn's patio or the beach.
  • Tips & Warnings   AAA guarantees that it has eliminated sub-standard properties from its listings, so you will be able to book with confidence.
  • Hotels are rated from 1 Diamond (budget travel) to 5 Diamonds (luxury travel) but all rated hotels must meet basic requirements for cleanliness, safety and comfort.
  • The exact spot where 189 fighters gave up their lives to defend Texas from Mexican invasion can today be seen and experienced firsthand by visitors to the historic plaza.
  • From the chain's multiple snack wraps, including a low-calorie grilled chicken option--to its salads, french fry-free and soda-free Happy Meals and chicken sandwiches, McDonald's is certainly a viable option for eating out and eating healthy.
  • Combining so many of the places where the story of America's independence from Britain began with colorful ethnic flavor, fine culture and a strong baseball tradition, the city has plenty to offer visitors in terms of outdoor sightseeing.
  • Dallas has thousands of restaurants, offering any kind of dining experience you could desire, from ethnic hole-in-the-wall to trendy see-and-be-seen foodie hot-spots.
  • It is the site of the annual Texas State Fair, which runs from late September through late October.
  • The Dallas World Aquarium is not to be missed; i includes dazzling indoor and outdoor displays of creatures from around the world.
  • The Dallas Museum of Art features art from around the world, from ancient to modern times.
  • The Dallas Museum of Art features art from around the world, from ancient to modern times.
  • Its rich history -- from New Spain territorial days to the present -- contributes to a vibrant multicultural scene, reflected in fine art, cuisine, music and more.
  • But where they really shine is their wine list, which includes a decent selection of vinho tinto (red wine) from Portugal.
  • They also have the good rodizio experience one would expect from a Brazilian steakhouse, and a full salad bar with many traditional sides.
  • As a chain, the restaurant has received awards from the Wine Spectator every year from 2002 to 2009.
  • As a chain, the restaurant has received awards from the Wine Spectator every year from 2002 to 2009.
  • If you happen to be taking a boat ride leaving from Aloha Tower Pier, consider going a little out of your way to this local gem.
  • You can find local Hawaiian restaurants all over Honolulu; in fact, many restaurants are are just a short walk or drive from local beach parks.
  • Vegetarian and vegan options will cut out much of the animal fat and cholesterol from your dinner.
  • Fine Dining Ask for the vegetarian, vegan, low glycemic or gluten free selections from the menu if they are not already highlighted.
  • Select several sides or à la carte items in order to build a meal from the healthier choices on the menu.
  • Request extra additions or substitutions to make a meal from the dish and to tailor it to fit any dietary needs.
  • This choice allows people to dine without the waste and added paper products used in bagging and wrapping items to go from a restaurant.
  • Executive Chef Shige Fujimoto's restaurant specializes in multiple course dinners, from light appetizers through tasting trays to delectable desserts, but you can order ala crate if you want to keep things simple or keep your costs lower.
  • The preparation for your meal begins when you place your reservation, as everything, from the soy sauce to the salt, is prepared in house, and special ingredients are flown in from Japan.
  • The preparation for your meal begins when you place your reservation, as everything, from the soy sauce to the salt, is prepared in house, and special ingredients are flown in from Japan.
  • A. offers a wide variety of sushi restaurants to choose from.
  • Los Angeles is a popular destination for travelers from all over the world.
  • Aladdin also serves a variety of wood-fired Middle Eastern-themed pizzas made from the freshest ingredients and traditional appetizers including hummus and feta-bathan-jan.
  • From lamb schwerma to vegetarian bryrani, patrons are sure to find a dish that will delight their palate and appease their appetite.
  • From surfing in the Pacific Ocean to taking a sunset job along the panoramic cliffs of Torrey Pines, living a healthy lifestyle is just a part of everyday life in San Diego.
  • Naan is made from white flour and rubbed with butter, but roti is typically whole wheat and served in smaller portions.
  • Seared scallops and lamb loin from Colorado are served at the restaurant, as are French desserts such as chocolate mousse.
  • San Francisco hosts dozens of events every year that bring outdoor enthusiasts from around the world, including tennis, golf and cycling events.
  • The shells turn from a dark burgundy to a bright red when cooked.
  • Prices at Du Vin are reasonable, starting at less than $5 during Happy Hour (from 4 to 6 p.m.) to around $20 for a dinner entrée.
  • Prices at La Mer can range from $90 to around $150 per person.
  • Instead, you select two to four courses (plus dessert) from the items you prefer.
  • The dress code for Chef Mavro is "dressy casual," according to the Honolulu Dining Guide, so it's likely you'll want to stop by your hotel on the way from the beach before going to eat.
  • The menu is set, ranging from three to six courses and priced from $60 to well over $100 a head.
  • The menu is set, ranging from three to six courses and priced from $60 to well over $100 a head.
  • Chef Mavro Chef Mavro is a restaurant run by chef and owner George Mavrothalassitis, originally from Marseille.
  • If you are having trouble making a decision about where to eat, consider taking a rest day from the mountains and enjoy a behind the scenes tour of Denver's top restaurants.
  • At nearby Dinosaur Ridge, you can explore dinosaur bones and footprints from the Jurassic period.
  • Buckhorn Exchange1000 Osage StreetDenver, CO 80204 (303) 534-9505 Red Rocks Grill Red Rocks is a 20-minute drive from downtown Denver.
  • The restaurant gets its name from the Buckhorn Lodge, which housed the workers on the Rio Grande Railroad.
  • Experience the soft chew of the delicious whole grain farro tossed with a hint of lemon zest and olive oil, or substitute the nutty seeds of quinoa--a grain-like crop from the Andes--for bulgur in the classic tabbouleh recipe.
  • Choose wines from the local California wine country as well as Italian vintages to complement your meal.
  • Calistoga, CA 94515 (707) 942-1220flatirongrill.com Ca'Bianca Italian Restaurant in Sonoma Valley Visit Ca'Bianca for a weekday lunch from 11 a.m. until 2:30 p.m., or for dinner starting at 5 p.m. seven days a week.
  • With different bands every single night, you can expect to experience anything from jazz to latin performances.
  • The southern copperhead, another poisonous snake that is infrequently encountered in the Louisiana lowlands, has a big head that is distinct from the body, and a blunt snout.
  • In addition to the assistance from the renters, the money finally gave her an income of her own, and the token independence that went with it.
  • In the kitchen she removed two mugs from the holder and reached for the coffee pot.
  • It came from us.
  • Later, she lay in bed, tucked warmly under the covers as his boots clicked away from her on the hardwood floor - down the hall and into the den.
  • Waking from her stupor, she blew him a kiss.
  • I can't imagine what he was thinking to hide a thing like that from you.
  • The coop was a comfortable 48°F - warm enough to keep the eggs from freezing, but cold enough that the chickens didn't get shocked by the temperature change when they went out of the coop.
  • He came up behind her and took the coffee cup from her hands, sitting it on the table.
  • Maybe she would have if she hadn't been shoving it from her mind.
  • Of course, if you prefer, we can wait until you come home from work and make it a fun family event.
  • Aside from packing, there was also decorating to be done.
  • Alex said from the doorway.
  • The fact that there was nothing to protect her from was irrelevant.
  • Removing his hands from the wall, he placed them on her shoulders, pulling her closer.
  • This child, who is from the crust of the earth, like yourself, called you a Wizard.
  • "He will sprout very soon," said the Prince, "and grow into a large bush, from which we shall in time be able to pick several very good sorcerers."
  • Then he looked up to find the nest from which they had fallen.
  • From that vantage point, if you had tried to look fifty years ahead to what the world would be like in the year 2500 BC, you would have expected very little change.
  • First, in the magnitude of what it claims, and second, in the degree to which it differs from what pessimists predict.
  • Why is it only described as a mechanical device divorced from any purpose?
  • Whether things in the future stay the same as they are today or change from what they are today, both are understood in terms of the current reality.
  • The little porch was hidden from view by a screen of yellow roses and Southern smilax.
  • I do not remember when I first realized that I was different from other people; but I knew it before my teacher came to me.
  • He felt that his words, apart from what meaning they conveyed, were less audible than the sound of his opponent's voice.
  • The Emperor ceased speaking, the crowd began pressing round him, and rapturous exclamations were heard from all sides.
  • There were sparks between them from the start.
  • From the next stall, Dawn answered.
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