Froissart sentence examples

froissart
  • Jean Froissart >>

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  • Froissart relates that he was burned to death through his bedclothes catching fire; Secousse says that he died in peace with many signs of contrition; another story says he died of leprosy; and a popular legend tells how he expired by a divine judgment through the burning of the clothes steeped in sulphur and spirits in which he had been wrapped as a cure for a loathsome disease caused by his debauchery.

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  • See Jean Froissart, Chroniques, edited by S.

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  • 1453), in his continuation of Froissart's chronicles.

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  • Nothing definite is known of him previous to the outbreak of the peasant revolt in 1381, but Froissart says he had served as a soldier in the French War, and a Kentishman in the retinue of Richard II.

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  • See also Thomas Walsingham, Chronicon Angliae (Rolls series, 1814); Froissart, Chronicles (edited by G.

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  • In popular story and ballad he is known as one of the heroes of Otterburn or Chevy Chase, which is the subject of one of the most stirring recitals of Froissart.

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  • The gravest doubts, however, exist as to the authenticity of this story; Fernao Lopes, the Portuguese Froissart, who is the great authority fcr the details of the death of Inez, with some of the actors in which he was acquainted, says nothing of the ghastly ceremony, though he tells at length the tale of the funeral honours that the king bestowed upon his wife.

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  • His court, described at length in Froissart's famous chronicle,.

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  • by Froissart and Waurin it is distinctly stated that the crown was arched in the form of a cross.

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  • The town was devastated in 1359 by the English, when, according to Froissart, no fewer than 900 mansions were burnt.

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  • John Froissart the chronicler died and was buried here.

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  • 36; Froissart, bk.

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  • 6 Froissart, Bk.

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  • The dates which have been selected vary from 1344 (given by Froissart, but almost certainly mistaken) to 1351.

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  • A couple of quotations from Froissart will illustrate the extent to which war had now become a mere business.

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  • How far Edward's solicitude was disinterested may be gauged from Froissart's parallel remark about the battle of Aljubarrota, where, as at Agincourt, the handful of victors were obliged by a sudden panic to slay their prisoners.

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  • Froissart is perhaps the source from which we may gather most of chivalry in its double aspect, good and bad.

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  • Adenes le Rois, Jean Froissart, Jean Lemaire des Belges and others - are included in the general history of French Literature.

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  • The chief original sources for John's life are Froissart, the maliciously hostile Chronicon Angliae (1328-1388), and the eulogistic Chronicle of Henry Knighton (both the latter in the Rolls Series).

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  • GEORGE LOCKHART (1673-1731), of Carnwath, Scottish writer and politician, was a member of a Lanarkshire family tracing descent from Sir Simon Locard (the name being originally territorial, de Loch Ard), who is said to have accompanied Sir James Douglas on his expedition to the East with the heart of Bruce, which relic, according to Froissart, Locard brought home from Spain when Douglas fell in battle against the Moors, and buried in Melrose Abbey; this incident was the origin of the "man's heart within a fetterlock" borne on the Lockhart shield, which in turn perhaps led to the altered spelling of the surname.

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  • - The chronicles of Jean le Bel, Adam Murimuth, Robert of Avesbury, Froissart and "Le Religieux de Saint Denis."

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  • The extremity of the peninsula is called Ras Mandia or Cape Africa - Africa being the name by which Mandia was designated by Froissart and other European historians during the middle ages and the Renaissance.

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  • JOINVILLE, JEAN, SIRE DE (1224-1319), was the second great writer of history in Old French, and in a manner occupies the interval between Villehardouin and Froissart.

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  • It does not, like Villehardouin, give us a picture of the temper and habits of a whole order or cast of men during a heroic period of human history; it falls far short of Froissart in vivid portraying of the picturesque and external aspects of social life; but it is a more personal book than either.

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  • The book in which this interesting story is told has had a literary history which less affects its matter than the vicissitudes to which Froissart has been subjected, but which is hardly less curious in its way.

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  • But, whereas there is no great difficulty (though much labour) in ascertaining the original and all subsequent texts of Froissart, the original text of Joinville was until recently unknown, and even now may be said to be in the state of a conjectural restoration.

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  • Froissart, Chroniques; Enguerrand de Monstrelet, Chroniques, covering the first half of the 15th century (Eng.

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  • Toward the close of the middle ages the vernacular literatures were adorned with Villani's and Froissart's chronicles.

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  • The Annals of Lu, enlarged by Tso K`iu-ming so as to embrace the history of the kingdom generally, are as full of life and interest as the pages of Froissart.

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  • There is a generally accepted story, based on the chronicles of Jehan le Bel and Froissart, that she summoned the English forces to meet the Scottish invasion of 1346, and harangued the troops before the battle of Neville's Cross.

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  • Philippa was the patron and friend of Froissart, who was her secretary from 1361 to 1366.

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  • In addition to the account given in his Chroniques, Froissart wrote a formal eulogy of her, which has been lost.

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  • Continuing the work of Froissart, Monstrelet wrote a Chronique, which extends to two books and covers the period between 1400 and 1444, when, according to another chronicler, Matthieu d'Escouchy, he ceased to write.

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  • His point of view is thus directly opposed to that of Froissart.

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  • See Froissart's Chronicles; Duc d'Aumale, Notes et documents relatifs a Jean, roi de France, eta sa captivite (1856); A.

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  • A large number of French and Flemish chronicles illustrate the history of the Hundred Years War, by far the most important being Froissart (best edition by Luce, though Lettenhoves is bigger).

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  • His son and heir-apparent, Maurice of Berkeley, was the hero of a misadventure recorded by Froissart, who tells how a young English knight, displaying his banner for the first time on the day of Poitiers, rode after a flying Picard squire, by whom he was grievously wounded and held to ransom.

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  • Froissart errs in describing this knight as Thomas, lord of Berkeley, for the covenant made in 1360 for the release of Maurice is still among the Berkeley muniments, the ransom being stated at 1080.

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  • See Jean Froissart, Chroniques, translated by T.

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  • 1483), and his grand-nephew was John, Lord Berners, the translator of Froissart.

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  • He then became associated with Henry of Lancaster, but did not return to England before 1399, and the account which Froissart gives telling how he was sent by the Londoners to urge Henry to come and assume the crown is thought to refer to his nephew and namesake, Thomas, earl of Arundel.

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  • This battle, sung by an unknown trouvere and retold with variations by Froissart, was an episode in the struggle for the succession to the duchy of Brittany between Charles of Blois, supported by the king of France, and John of Montfort, supported by the king of England.

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  • This defect appears most strongly in his treatment of Joan of Arc; and the attack on Agnes Sorel seems to have been dictated by the dauphin (afterwards Louis XI.), then a refugee in Burgundy, of whom he was afterwards to become a severe critic. He was not, however, misled, as his more picturesque predecessor Froissart had been, by feudal and chivalric tradition into misconception of the radical injustice of the English cause in France; and except in isolated instances where Burgundian interests were at stake, he did full justice to the patriotism of Frenchmen.

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  • Reminding us in some respects of the quaint medieval writers, Froissart and Philippe de Comines, he greatly excels them, at once in the beauty of his language and the art with which he has combined his heterogeneous materials into a single perfect harmonious whole.

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  • He was so much the king's factotum that Froissart (i.

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  • See the chronicles of Froissart, and of Pierre d'Orgemont (Grandes Chroniques de Saint Denis, Paris, vol.

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  • (See Le Poeme du combat des Trente, in the Pantheon litteraire; Froissart, Chroniques, ed.

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