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free-will

free-will

free-will Sentence Examples

  • Better than preying on the free will of humans.

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  • You've done a lot of interfering for someone who believes in free will.

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  • You have free will.

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  • "I don't get this whole free will thing," Katie complained when the cook returned.

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  • Didn.t realize I liked having some sort of free will.

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  • "And the Immortals have thousands," she said.  She swiped at a branch that snaked in front of her.  "Do demons have to pretend to respect a human's free will like Immortals do?"

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  • Xander was pissed by the time she returned, aware he'd never be able to track her down if she didn't come back of her own free will.

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  • times free will is rather a probandum.

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  • When we recollect the empiricist starting-point of science, it is curious to observe with what vehemence the average man of science now rejects free will.

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  • Thus libertarian free will has to disappear from their belief.

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  • It is a system of empiricism and materialism, remarkable only for teaching free will.

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  • Theism can take but little interest in this peculiar type of free will doctrine, or again in Epicurus's professed admission of the existence of gods - made of atoms: inhabiting the spaces between the worlds; Stoicism.

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  • Human survival is taught, but not ultimate immortality; and, as against Epicureanism, Stoicism on the whole tends to deny free will.

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  • He teaches free will and immortality; and the design and cosmological arguments are both traceable in him.

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  • From this theological entanglement the problem of free will did not escape for long centuries.

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  • The free will which Leibnitz teaches is not libertarian but determinist.

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  • You argue, for example, that you have no free will.

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  • Pantheism does not favour free will or immortality, and may move indefinitely near to materialism.

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  • His ascription to man of a unique faculty, free-will, forbade his conceiving our species as a link in a graduated series of organic developments.

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  • The fifth and last book takes up the question of man's free will and God's foreknowledge, and, by an exposition of the nature of God, attempts to show that these doctrines are not subversive of each other; and the conclusion is drawn that God remains a foreknowing spectator of all events, and the ever-present eternity of his vision agrees with the future quality of our actions, dispensing rewards to the good and punishments to the wicked.

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  • He reconciled free-will and necessity by representing the divine decree not as temporarily antecedent, but as immediately related to the action of the created will.

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  • From this difference as to the nature of free-will followed by necessary consequence a difference with the Thomists as to the operation of divine grace.

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  • Rickaby, Free Will and Four English Philosophers (1906); J.

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  • The suspected theses included such points as the following: that Christ descended ad inferos not in His real presence but quoad effectum; that no image or cross should receive latreia even in the sense allowed by Thomas; that it is more reasonable to regard Origen as saved than as damned; that it is not in a man's free will to believe or disbelieve an article of faith as he pleases.

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  • It thus stands in sharp contrast to the anthropology of Kant, which opposes human development conceived as the gradual manifestation of a growing faculty of rational free will to the operations of physical nature.

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  • It shows the influence of Arminian theology against Calvinism, which was vigorously upheld in the Quin-particular formula, put forward by the synod of Dort in 1619 to uphold the five points of Calvinism, after heated discussion, in which English delegates took part, of the problems of divine omniscience and human free-will.

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  • Before Him they all bow in worship and acknowledge that by Him were created all things and of His own free will were all created.

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  • With a few exceptions (Poland, Bosnia) it was through their free will that the Empire had come into being.

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  • He is at his weakest in defending free will against Luther, and indeed he can hardly he said to enter on the metaphysical question.

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  • Albertus is frequently mentioned by Dante, who made his doctrine of free-will the basis of his ethical system.

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  • When, owing to disputes between Icelandic and Norwegian merchants, Skuli thought of a military expedition to Iceland, Snorri promised to make the inhabitants submit to Haakon of their own free will.

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  • The champions of this reaction fought under the banner of St Augustine; and Baius' Augustinian predilections brought him into conflict with Rome on questions of grace, free-will and the like.

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  • Free-will Baptist Foreign Missionary Society in India.

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  • the denial of free-will (xv.

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  • 11-20 (on free-will); xxiv.

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  • 22 Jacob vows of his own free will to pay tithes, just as the Arabs used to vow the tithe of the increase of the flock (schol.

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  • For a long time the advocates of free-will, in their eagerness to preserve moral responsibility, went so far as to deny all motives as influencing moral action.

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  • For the history of the free-will controversy see the articles, Will, Predestination (for the theological problems), Ethics.

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  • As perhaps the first clear exposition and defence of the psychological doctrine of determinism, Hobbes's own two pieces must ever retain a classical importance in the history of the free-will controversy; while Bramhall's are still worth study as specimens of scholastic fence.

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  • Rickaby, Free Will and Four English Philosophers (1906), pp. 1 -72; J.

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  • The latter Mansel's psychology reduces to consciousness of our organism as extended; with the former is given consciousness of free will and moral obligation.

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  • His development is chiefly noteworthy in regard to these two leading points - the relation of the evangelium or doctrine of free grace (I) to free will and moral ability, and (2) to the law and poenitentia or the good works connected with repentance.

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  • It has been warned of the limitations and risks in use of the information, and despite such warnings, chooses of its own free will to continue to access or use the Contents.

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  • He had embraced the Motazilite doctrine about free will and predestination, and was in particular shocked at the opinion which had spread among the Moslem doctors that the Koran was the uncreated word of God.

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  • But the most effective protest against them was a movement which began when Michel de Bay, a professor at the Flemish university of Louvain, put forward certain theories on grace and free-will in the latter part of the 16th century.

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  • It is enough to say that two rival doctrines of grace and free-will were struggling for mastery in the Roman Church.

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  • The other laid the chief stress on free-will; it was known as Molinism from its inventor, the Jesuit Louis de Molina, and was in great favour with the society.

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  • The whole system of the Jesuits rested on a basis of free-will.

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  • Then he will really feel morally responsible if he leaves them undone, hence the necessity of free-will.

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  • the other hand, as Jansen pointed out, free-will tends to make the average man's estimate of his own powers into the supreme criterion of all that is good and right.

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  • Jansen accordingly denounced free-will as dishonouring to God, and destructive of the higher interests of morality.

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  • On the other hand, only preach to them a strong doctrine of free-will, and all these dangers vanished.

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  • Thus within the spiritual sphere free-will led up to Jesuit obedience.

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  • But in the secular world this paradox failed to obtain; there free-will was only too ready to come into conflict with the Church.

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  • Mangey): "All this company of the good and wise have of their own free will divested themselves of too copious wealth; nay, have spurned the things dear to the flesh.

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  • had sent certain capitulti concerning grace and free-will, drawn chiefly from the writings of Augustine and Prosper.

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  • This peculiar doctrine of grace and free-will was adopted by Amyraut, Cappel, Bochart, Daille and others of the more learned among the Reformed ministers, who dissented from Calvin's.

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  • Thus the Roman edition contains (of metrical works) exegetical discourses, hymns on the Nativity of Christ, 65 hymns against heretics, 85 on the Faith against sceptics, a discourse against the Jews, 85 funeral hymns, 4 on free-will, 76 exhortations to repentance, 12 hymns on paradise, and 12 on miscellaneous subjects.

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  • The first was in answer to the question "Whether man's free will can be proved from self-consciousness," proposed by the Norwegian Academy of Sciences at Drontheim.

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  • On June 27 and 28 and on July 1 and 3 Eck disputed with Carlstadt on the subjects of grace, free will and good works, ably defending the Roman Semipelagian standpoint.

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  • Collins was a pronounced necessitarian; Morgan regarded the denial of free will as tantamount to atheism.

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  • Pelagius maintained the free-will of man, and held that man's conduct, character, destiny are in his own hand.

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  • In the Church of Rome the Dominicans favoured Augustinianism, the Jesuits Semi-Pelagianism; the work of Molina on the agreement of free-will with the gifts of grace provoked a controversy, which the pope silenced without deciding; but which broke out again a generation later when Jansen tried to revive the decaying Augustinianism.

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  • Nor, in Molina's view, does his doctrine of free-will exclude predestination.

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  • The omniscient God, by means of His "scientia media" (the phrase is Molina's invention, though the idea is also to be found in his older contemporary Fonseca), or power of knowing future contingent events, foresees how we shall employ our own free-will and treat His proffered grace, and upon this foreknowledge He can found His predestinating decrees.

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  • His seven years' residence in the Low Countries brought him into close relations with modes of thought differing essentially from his own; and, though he was neither by temperament nor training inclined to be affected by the prevailing Augustinian doctrines of grace and free-will, the controversy into which he fell on these questions compelled him to define his theological principles more clearly.

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  • The aim of this treatise was to refute the doctrine of free-will, since he considered it the logical, as distinguished from the sentimental, ground of most of the Arminian objections to Calvinism.

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  • The essential thing was that a man should come to baptism of his own free will and not under compulsion or from hope of gain.

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  • Free-will is so, although it is preceded by deliberation and determination, i.e.

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  • A parliament had been called in November; it voted that all the charters given by the king at Mile End were null and void, no manumissions or grants of privileges could have been valid without the consent of the estates of the realm, and for their own parts they would never consent to such, of their own free will nor otherwise, even to save themselves from sudden death.

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  • It may be summed up in one word as the theology of free will.

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  • On the other hand, a shadow is cast upon the future by Origen's fear that incalculable free will may again depart from God.

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  • Harnack takes a different view of Origen; the certainty of ultimate salvation overbears free will with a sort of physical necessity.

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  • He may have left a vulnerable frontier in his earlier dealings with the same thorny problem of free will.

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  • Seven hundred Thespians accompanied Leonidas to Thermopylae and of their own free will shared his last stand and destruction.

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  • Distinctive Particulars of Christian Morality 821 Development of Opinion in Early Christi C. Modern Ethics - continued Page Association and Evolution 837 Free-will.

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  • At the same time it cannot be broadly said that Christianity took a decisive side in the metaphysical controversy on free-will and necessity; since, just as in Greek philosophy the need of maintaining freedom as the ground of responsibility clashes with the conviction that no one deliberately chooses his own harm, so in Christian ethics it clashes with the attribution of all true human virtue to supernatural grace, as well as with the belief in divine foreknowledge.

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  • The latter difficulty Thomas, like many of his predecessors, avoids by supposing a " co-operation " of free-will and grace, but the former he does not fully meet.

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  • He argues that men having no free will have really no desert; therefore the divine equity must ultimately distribute happiness in equal shares to all; therefore I must ultimately increase my own happiness most by conduct that adds most to the general fund which Providence administers.

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  • Before concluding this sketch of the development of English ethical thought from Hobbes to the thinkers of the 19th century, it will be well to notice briefly the views held by different moralists on the question of free-will, - so far, that is, as they have been put forward as ethically important.

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  • But in spite of the strong interest taken in the theological aspect of this question by the Protestant divines of the 17th century, it does not appear that English moralists from Hobbes to Hume laid any stress on the relation of free-will either to duty generally or to justice in particular.

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  • rather than ethical; Clarke's view being that the apparently arbitrary particularity in the constitution of the cosmos is really only explicable by reference to creative free-will.

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  • But since the reaction, led by Price and Reid, against the manner of philosophizing that had culminated in Hume, free-will has been generally maintained by the intuitional school to be an essential point of ethics; and, in fact, it is naturally connected with the judgment of good and ill desert which these writers give as an essential element in their analysis of the moral consciousness.

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  • In answer to this argument some necessarians have admitted that punishment can be legitimate only if it be beneficial to the person punished; others, again, have held that the lawful use of force is to restrain lawless force; but most of those who reject free-will defend punishment on the ground of its utility in deterring others from crime, as well as in correcting or restraining the criminal on whom it falls.

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  • Another important peculiarity of Kant's doctrine is his development of the connexion between duty and free-will.

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  • In Fichte's system the connexion of ethics and metaphysics is still more intimate; indeed, we may compare it in this respect to Platonism; as Plato blends the most fundamental notions of each of these studies in the one idea of good, so Fichte blends them in the one idea free-will.

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  • M`Taggart's Studies in Hegelian Cosmology, and his later work, Some Dogmas of Religion, contain interesting contributions to the theory of pleasure and of the problem of free will and determinism.

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  • In philosophy he devoted himself to ethics, and especially to the examination of the ultimate intuitive principles of conduct and the problem of free will.

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  • In fact, whilst in the Eastern Church the metaphysical ardour of the Greeks was spending itself in terrible combats in the oecumenical councils over the interpretation of the Nicene Creed, the clergy of Gaul, more simple and strict in their faith, abjured these theological logomachies; from the first they had preferred action to criticism and had taken no part in the great controversy on free-will raised by Pelagius.

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  • She scrubbed herself down, angry at the Immortals as a whole for tolerating a system that screwed over their mates and eliminated free will.

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  • I monitor and balance potential outcomes and free will.

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  • There's a difference between free will and having the deck stacked against you.  Humans need someone to protect them from these reckless Immortals, not to mention the demons.

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  • act upon is done entirely at your own free will.

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  • Why is it that people give up the doctrines of grace if they fall in with eloquent advocates of free will?

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  • Beatrice now extols free will as the greatest gift of God, most matched to Him, and most valued by Him.

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  • The problem of the compatibility of divine foreknowledge with human free will.

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  • Purpose is life's yellow highlighter, emphasizing fate and directing your free will.

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  • This may involve hypnotism, drugs, psychological pressure, blackmail or other inducements which undermine your free will.

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  • mechanistic worldview, would deny that human beings possess consciousness or free will.

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  • I had done that by the impulse of dire necessity, which I ought to have done at first of my own free will.

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  • preconscious free will.

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  • The Irenaean theodicy justifies evil as being soul making, while the Augustinian form puts evil down to the exercise of human free will.

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  • This overlooks any concept of free will or personal volition among users in gaging their level of intoxication.

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  • Born Free will continue to spread the message: wild animals belong in the wild animals belong in the wild.

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  • Few scientists, even those with a mechanistic worldview, would deny that human beings possess consciousness or free will.

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  • But that would only mislead us; free will and immortality are really predicates ascribed - on whatever grounds - to the soul; and it is natural that in theism the soul of man should be a topic second in importance only to God Himself.

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  • Sometimes it will be found that free will is asserted as an assured fact, as a datum, and so as a ground of inference to God.

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  • Next, from the certainty of duty we infer as our first moral postulate free will - " I can because I ought "; which, primarily at least, means " I know I can because I know I ought."

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  • In spite of some waverings towards what has lately been called " conditional immortality " (see Apologetics) the doctrine of " natural immortality " championed by Augustine became dominant in the church; an instalment of what was afterwards to be called Natural Theology; and a postulate or presupposition to-day - like free will - in Roman Catholic apologetics.

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  • In the volume on Empirical Psychology, Wolff discusses free will.

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  • Thus, for Lotze, free will is possible; the consequences of action proceed regularly a parte post, and there is no such chaos as the critics of Libertarianism have pretended it would involve.

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  • His theory of the development of free-will (the objective spirit), which takes its start from Kant's conception of history, with its three stages of legal right, morality as determined by motive and instinctive goodness (Sittlichkeit), might almost as well be expressed in terms of a thoroughly naturalistic doctrine of human development.

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  • The dissidence of dissent, however, filled him with uneasiness, and he abhorred Luther's denial of free will and his exaggerated notion of man's utter depravity; in short, he did nothing whatever to promote the Protestant revolt, except so far as his frank denunciation and his witty arraignment of clerical and monastic weaknesses and soulless ceremonial, especially in his Praise of Folly and Colloquies, contributed to bring the faults of the Church into strong relief, and in so far as his edition of the New Testament furnished a simple escape from innumerable theological complications.

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  • As to the use of reason beyond knowledge, Kant's position is that, in spite of its logical inability to transcend phenomena, reason in its pure, or a priori use, contains necessary a priori " ideals " (Ideen), and practical reason, in order to account for moral responsibility, frames postulates of the existence of things in themselves, or noumena, corresponding to these " ideals "; postulates of a real free-will to practise morality, of a real immortality of soul to perfect it, and of a real God to crown it with happiness.

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  • Its chief ideas are - (1) That, owing partly to the want of ability in historians, and partly to the complexity of social phenomena, extremely little had as yet been done towards discovering the principles which govern the character and destiny of nations, or, in other words, towards establishing a science of history; (2) That, while the theological dogma of predestination is a barren hypothesis beyond the province of knowledge, and the metaphysical dogma of free will rests on an erroneous belief in the infallibility of consciousness, it is proved by science, and especially by statistics, that human actions are governed by laws as fixed and regular as those which rule in the physical world; (3) That climate, soil, food, and the aspects of nature are the primary causes of intellectual progress, - the first three indirectly, through determining the accumulation and distribution of wealth, and the last by directly influencing the accumulation and distribution of thought, the imagination being stimulated and the understanding subdued when the phenomena of the external world are sublime and terrible, the understanding being emboldened and the imagination curbed when they are small and feeble; (4) That the great division between European and non-European civilization turns on the fact that in Europe man is stronger than nature, and that elsewhere nature is stronger than man, the consequence of which is that in Europe alone has man subdued nature to his service; (5) That the advance of European civilization is characterized by a continually diminishing influence of physical laws, and a continually increasing influence of mental laws; (6) That the mental laws which regulate the progress of society cannot be discovered by the metaphysical method, that is, by the introspective study of the individual mind, but only by such a comprehensive survey of facts as will enable us to eliminate disturbances, that is, by the method of averages; (7) That human progress has been due, not to moral agencies, which are stationary, and which balance one another in such a manner that their influence is unfelt over any long period, but to intellectual activity, which has been constantly varying and advancing: - "The actions of individuals are greatly affected by their moral feelings and passions; but these being antagonistic to the passions and feelings of other individuals, are balanced by them, so that their effect is, in the great average of human affairs, nowhere to be seen, and the total actions of mankind, considered as a whole, are left to be regulated by the total knowledge of which mankind is possessed"; (8) That individual efforts are insignificant in the great mass of human affairs, and that great men, although they exist, and must "at present" be looked upon as disturbing forces, are merely the creatures of the age to which they belong; (9) That religion, literature and government are, at the best, the products and not the causes of civilization; (10) That the progress of civilization varies directly as "scepticism," the disposition to doubt and to investigate, and inversely as "credulity" or "the protective spirit," a disposition to maintain, without examination, established beliefs and practices.

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  • If there be a single law governing the actions of men, free will cannot exist, for then man's will is subject to that law.

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  • Whatever presentation of the activity of many men or of an individual we may consider, we always regard it as the result partly of man's free will and partly of the law of inevitability.

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  • In history we find a very similar progress of conviction concerning the part played by free will in the general affairs of humanity.

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  • The farther back in history the object of our observation lies, the more doubtful does the free will of those concerned in the event become and the more manifest the law of inevitability.

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  • Thus our conception of free will and inevitability gradually diminishes or increases according to the greater or lesser connection with the external world, the greater or lesser remoteness of time, and the greater or lesser dependence on the causes in relation to which we contemplate a man's life.

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  • Man's free will differs from every other force in that man is directly conscious of it, but in the eyes of reason it in no way differs from any other force.

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  • And as the undefinable essence of the force moving the heavenly bodies, the undefinable essence of the forces of heat and electricity, or of chemical affinity, or of the vital force, forms the content of astronomy, physics, chemistry, botany, zoology, and so on, just in the same way does the force of free will form the content of history.

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  • But just as the subject of every science is the manifestation of this unknown essence of life while that essence itself can only be the subject of metaphysics, even the manifestation of the force of free will in human beings in space, in time, and in dependence on cause forms the subject of history, while free will itself is the subject of metaphysics.

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  • So also in history what is known to us we call laws of inevitability, what is unknown we call free will.

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  • The recognition of man's free will as something capable of influencing historical events, that is, as not subject to laws, is the same for history as the recognition of a free force moving the heavenly bodies would be for astronomy.

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  • From the standpoint from which the science of history now regards its subject on the path it now follows, seeking the causes of events in man's freewill, a scientific enunciation of those laws is impossible, for however man's free will may be restricted, as soon as we recognize it as a force not subject to law, the existence of law becomes impossible.

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  • Born Free will continue to spread the message: wild animals belong in the wild.

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  • Check with the camp you're interested in if your teen is not willing to go on his own free will.

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  • We are not living in a country where we do not have free will.

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  • Behaviorist theories, with their complete denial of free will in moral decision-making, are unattractive to many and require precise, dedicated, behavior modification techniques.

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  • What you get for free will vary from site to site.

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  • Rob Brezny's horoscope column, Free Will Astrology, is published on a weekly basis online and in more than 100 offline publications.

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  • Remember, the stars and planets may influence, but mortal man is a creature of free will and thought.

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  • Many believe this is because time is fluid, and the individual possesses free will to always change the outcome.

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  • It is not a state of unconsciousness in which a subject loses control of his or her own free will.

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  • The Sixes are instrumental in leading the Cylon civil war and returning free will to the Centurions.

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  • Creatures of Heaven, angels are depicted as obedient warriors with no free will.

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  • Angels are comparatively beautiful, but their lack of free will and compassion makes them alien indeed.

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  • LTK: In FlashForward, the overarching theme is fate versus free will.

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  • RS: You know, I think that the preponderance of physics related to the nature of time implies that we don't actually have much in the way of free will.

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  • Whether you're a first time eBay seller, or you're a high-volume PowerSeller, having access to high quality auction templates on eBay for free will allow you to create some of the most attractive product listings possible.

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