How to use Frederick william in a sentence

frederick william
  • The death without direct heirs of Duke John William in 1609 led to serious complications in which almost all the states of Europe were concerned; however, by the treaty of Xanten in 1614, Cleves passed to the elector of Brandenburg, being afterwards incorporated with the electorate by the great elector, Frederick William.

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  • The incumbency of Trinity Chapel was held by the famous preacher Frederick William Robertson (1847-18J3).

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  • Bernard was succeeded in 1706 by his three sons, Ernest Louis, Frederick William and Anton Ulrich, but after 1746 the only survivor was the youngest, Anton Ulrich, who reigned alone from this date until his death in 1763.

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  • HiS Son, Frederick William Seward, was born in Auburn, New York, on the 8th of July 1830, graduated at Union College in 1849 and was admitted to the bar at Rochester, N.Y., in 185x.

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  • Reumont was the friend and adviser of Frederick William IV.

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  • The contrast between the new regime and the ancient tradition of the city was curiously illustrated in 1818 by a scene described in Metternich's Memoirs, when, before the opening of the congress, Francis I., emperor of Austria, regarded by all Germany as the successor of the Holy Roman emperors, knelt at the tomb of Charlemagne amid a worshipping crowd, while the Protestant Frederick William III.

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  • After his grandfather, George I., became king of Great Britain and Ireland in 1714, Frederick was known as duke of Gloucester and made a knight of the Garter, having previously been betrothed to Wilhelmina Sophia Dorothea (1709-1758), daughter of Frederick William I., king of Prussia, and sister of Frederick the Great.

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  • During this period of diplomatic work he acquired an exceptional knowledge of the affairs of Europe, and in particular of Germany, and displayed great tact and temper in dealing with the Swedish senate, with Queen Ulrica, with the king of Denmark and Frederick William I.

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  • He also wrote biographies of Frederick the Great and Frederick William IV.

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  • In the large market place is the statue of the Prussian king Frederick William I., erected in 1824, and there is a war memorial on the Friedrich Wilhelm Platz.

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  • In 1791 he married Frederica Wilhelmina, daughter of Frederick William II., king of Prussia, thus cementing very closely the relations between the houses of Orange-Nassau and Hohenzollern.

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  • The united diet which was opened on the 3rd of February 1847 was no more than a congregation of the diets instituted by Frederick William III.

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  • To Frederick William these came as a complete surprise, and, rudely awakened from his medieval dreamings, he even allowed himself to be carried away for a while by the popular tide.

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  • For Frederick William the position of leader of Germany now meant the employment of the military force of Prussia to crush the scattered elements of revolution that survived the collapse of the national movement.

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  • But Prussia was not ripe for a struggle with Austria, even had Frederick William found it in his conscience to turn his arms against his ancient ally, and the result was the humiliating convention of Olmtitz (November 29th, 1850), by which Prussia agreed to surrender her separatist plans and to restore the old constitution of the confederation.

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  • Yet Frederick William had so far profited by the lessons of 1848 that he consented to establish (1850) a national parliament, though with a restricted franchise and limited powers.

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  • In religious matters Frederick William was also largely swayed by his love for the ancient and picturesque.

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  • In 1844 he became an extraordinary professor at the university of Berlin, and in the same year was appointed tutor to Prince Frederick William (afterwards the Emperor Frederick III.) - a post which he held till 1850.

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  • Especially noteworthy, however, was the Denkschrift or Missive addressed by him to King Frederick William III.

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  • It was the hand of the author of that offensive Missive to Frederick William III., on the liberty of the press, that drafted the Carlsbad decrees; it was he who inspired the policy of repressing the freedom of the universities; and he noted in his diary as "a day more important than that of Leipzig" the session of the Vienna conference of 1819, in which it was decided to make the convocation of representative assemblies in the German states impossible, by enforcing the letter of Article XIII.

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  • In 1848 he was elected a member of the German parliament at Frankfort, where he associated himself with the right centre, supporting the proposal for a German empire under the supremacy of Prussia; and he was one of the deputation which offered the imperial crown to Frederick William IV.

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  • He was kept in prison till 1826, when Frederick William III., having recovered from an accident, pardoned those whom he considered to have wronged him most deeply.

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  • Such was the man whom Frederick William II., immediately after his accession, called to his counsels.

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  • In his zeal for orthodoxy, indeed, Frederick William outstripped his minister; he even blamed W6llner's "idleness and vanity" for the inevitable failure of the attempt to regulate opinion from above, and in 1794 deprived him of one of his secular offices in order that he might have more time "to devote himself to the things of God"; in edict after edict the king continued to the end of his reign to make regulations "in order to maintain in his states a true and active Christianity, as the path to genuine fear of God."

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  • The army was the very foundation of the Prussian state, a truth which both Frederick William I.

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  • A formal alliance was indeed signed on the 7th of February 1792, and Frederick William took part personally in the campaigns of 1792 and 1793.

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  • In Prussia the title has occasionally been bestowed by the king on general superintendents of the Lutheran church, as in 1829, when Frederick William III.

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  • On the 21st of June Warsaw was retaken by the Poles, and four days later Charles was obliged to purchase the assistance of Frederick William by the treaty of Marienburg.

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  • This school fell into decay under the regime of the kingdom of Westphalia, but was restored in 1817 by King Frederick William III.

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  • In consequence of the political troubles of 1848 Princes Frederick William of HohenzollernHechingen and Charles Anton of Hohenzollern-Sigmaringen resigned their principalities, and accordingly these fell to the king of Prussia, who took possession on the 12th of March 1850.

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  • Some remains of the old building may still be seen adjoining the present castle, which was built by King Frederick William IV.

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  • It is chiefly distinguished for its mathematical and philosophical studies, and possesses a famous observatory, established in 1811 by Frederick William Bessel, a library of about 240,000 volumes, a zoological museum, a botanical garden, laboratories and valuable mathematical and other scientific collections.

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  • In 1724 the three independent parts were united into a single town by Frederick William I.

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  • Less than a year after Princess Beatrice's birth the princess royal was married to Prince Frederick William of Prussia, afterwards the emperor Frederick.

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  • In 1648 it passed to Sweden, but in 1676 was retaken by Frederick William I.

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  • In Germany it had, for a while, been assumed by the Lutherans as against the Calvinists, and when in 1817 King Frederick William III.

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  • Augustus attempted to indemnify himself for his failure to obtain Livonia, his covenanted share of the Swedish plunder, by offering Frederick William of Prussia Courland, Polish Prussia and even part of Great Poland, provided that he were allowed a free hand in the disposal of the rest of the country.

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  • With the Prussian statesmen he had some success, but he could make no impression on Frederick William.

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  • By the treaty of Tilsit (July 9th, 1807) Frederick William had to surrender half his dominions, and what remained to him was exhausted by French exactions and liable at any moment to be crushed out of existence by some new whim of Napoleon.

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  • That during and after the settlement of 1815 Frederick William played a very secondary part in European affairs is explicable as well by his character as xI.

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  • But though reluctant to play the part of a constitutional king, Frederick William maintained to the full the traditional character of "first servant of the state."

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  • The revolutions of 1830 strengthened Frederick William in his reactionary tendencies; the question of the constitution was indefinitely shelved; and in 1831 Prussian troops concentrated on the frontier helped the task of the Russians in reducing the military rising in Poland.

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  • Yet, in spite of all, Frederick William was beloved by his subjects, who valued him for the simplicity of his manners, the goodness of his heart and the memories of the dark days after 1806.

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  • The correspondence (Briefwechsel) of King Frederick William III.

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  • It has a handsome marketplace with a statue of Frederick William III.; and there are extensive suburbs, of which the most important is Miinde.

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  • During the Thirty Years' War it was captured by the Swedes in 1631, passing by the treaty of Westphalia to the elector of Brandenburg, Frederick William I., who strengthened its fortifications.

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  • It was frequently involved in the conflict between the Hungarian king Matthias Corvinus and the emperor Frederick William III., and also during the Thirty Years' War.

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  • In 1793 Louise met at Frankfort the crown prince of Prussia, afterwards King Frederick William III., who was so fascinated by her beauty, and by the nobleness of her character, that he asked her to become his wife.

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  • The Louise Foundation (Luisenstift) for the education of girls was established in her honour, and in 1814 Frederick William III.

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  • His son and successor, George II., who founded the university of Göttingen in 1737, was on bad terms with his brother-in-law Frederick William I.

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  • Partly co-operative with James Thorne and at his death independently, the Church was favoured with the influence of Frederick William Bourne.

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  • The present establishment only dates from 1818, and owes its existence to King Frederick William III.

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  • Niebuhr is buried in the cemetery outside of the Sterntor, where a monument was placed to his memory by Frederick William IV.

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  • The controversy with Prussia about the education of children of whose parents but one was Roman Catholic led to the imprisonment of Droste-Vischering, archbishop of Cologne, and later of Dunin, archbishop of Gnesen-Posen; but the accession of the royal romanticist Frederick William IV.

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  • Availing himself of a testamentary union made in 1 537 between the duke of Liegnitz and the elector of Brandenburg, and of an attempt by the elector Frederick William to call it into force in spite of its annulment by Ferdinand I.

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  • In 1657 it was taken by storm by the Swedish general Wrangel, and in 1659, after the fortress had been dismantled, it was occupied by Frederick William of Brandenburg.

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  • In 1808 he was appointed tutor to the royal princes, in 1809 councillor of state in the department of religion, and in 1810 tutor of the crown prince (afterwards Frederick William IV.), on whose sensitive and dreamy nature he was to exercise a powerful but far from wholesome influence.

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  • His historical importance lies neither in his writings nor in his political activity, but in his personal influence at the Prussian court, and especially in its lasting effect on the character of Frederick William IV.

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  • But the Prussian alliance became hateful to her, and her later correspondence with Grimm overflows with contempt of his successor Frederick William II., who is always spoken of by her as "Brother Gu."

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  • The elector now retired to Hanau, appointed his son Frederick William regent, and took no further part in public affairs.

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  • After the breakdown of the Frankfort National Parliament, Frederick William joined the Prussian Northern Union, and deputies from Hesse-Cassel were sent to the Erfurt parliament.

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  • On the cession of the principality to Prussia in 1791 the order was transferred and King Frederick William raised it to that place in Prussian orders which it has since maintained.

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  • In 1840 the class for distinction for science and art, or peace class (Friedensklasse) was founded by Frederick William IV., for those " who have gained an illustrious name by wide recognition in the spheres of science and art."

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  • There are also for ladies the Order of Service, founded in 1814 by Frederick William III., in one class, but enlarged in 1850 and in 1865.

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  • There is a statue of Frederick William of Brandenburg.

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  • His second wife, Sophie Charlotte (1668-1705), sister of the English king George I., was the friend of Leibnitz and one of the most cultured princesses of the age; she bore him his only son, his successor, King Frederick William I.

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  • In refusing to agree to the offer of the imperial crown to Frederick William IV, Maximilian had the support of his parliament.

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  • At the end of the war, in 1678, by the peace of Nijmwegen, Louis took care that Frederick William should be deprived of the fruits of his victory, and Austria had to resign Freiburg im Breisgau to the French.

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  • The extravagance of Frederick drained the resources of his state, but this was amply atoned for by the rigid economy of Frederick William I., who not only paid off the debts accumulated by his father, but amassed an enormous treasure.

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  • With the aid of Russia Frederick William held out a while longer, but after Napoleons decisive victory at Friedland (June 14, 1807) the tsar came to terms with the French emperor, sacrificing the interests of his ally.

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  • Prussia, in spite of the promises of Frederick William in the hour of need, remained without a central constitution; all the more reason why the states of second rank should provide themselves with one.

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  • The reign began well, it is true, notably in the reversal of the narrow ecclesiastical policy of Frederick William III.

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  • When, on the evening of the 3oth, a mob surrounded the palace, clamouring for the king to give effect to this resolution, Frederick William lost patience, ordered General Wrangel to occupy Berlin with troops, and on the 2nd of November placed Count Brandenburg, a scion of the royal house and a Prussian of the old school, at the head of a new ministry.

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  • All Germany awaited with anxiety the reply of Frederick William.

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  • Although Frederick William had refused to become emperor, he was unwilling to miss altogether the opportunity afforded by the difficulties of Austria.

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  • On the 1st of January 1861 the standards of the new regiments were solemnly blessed; on the next day Frederick William IV.

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  • The emperor, who, as Bismarck said, intended to be his own chancellor, required Bismarck to draw .up a decree reversing a cabinet order of Frederick William IV., which gave the Prussian ministerpresident the right of being the sole means of communication between the other ministers and the king.

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  • The situation was somewhat similar to that which existed during the last years of Frederick William IV., when.

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  • If he persuaded Frederick William III.

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  • Soon afterwards at Memel he entered into a close alliance with Prussia, not as he boasted from motives of policy, but in the spirit of true chivalry, out of friendship for the young king Frederick William and his beautiful wife.

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  • He had been married, in 1793, without his wishes being consulted, to the beautiful and amiable Princess Maria Louisa of Baden (Elizabeth Feodorovna), a political match which, as he regretfully confessed to his friend Frederick William of Prussia, had proved the misfortune of both; and he consoled himself in the traditional manner.

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  • In 1830 the students struck a medal in his honour, and in 1831 he was decorated by an order from Frederick William III.

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  • The town has a statue of Frederick William I., the great elector of Brandenburg.

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  • He had early become an intimate friend of the crown prince (afterwards King Frederick William IV.), and the Prussian constitution of February 1847 was an attempt to realize the ideas put forward by him in his Gesprache aus der Gegenwart fiber Staat and Kirche, published under the pseudonym "Waldheim" in 1846.

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  • In November 1847 and March 1848 Radowitz was sent by King Frederick William to Vienna to attempt to arrange common action for the reconstruction of the German Confederation.

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  • In his capacity of president he appeared, on 3rd April 1849, in Berlin at the head of a deputation of the Frankfort parliament to announce to King Frederick William IV.

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  • Steubenville was platted as a town in 1797, immediately after the erection of Jefferson county, and was built on the site of Fort Steuben, erected in 1786-1787, and named in honour of Baron Frederick William von Steuben; it received a city charter in 1851, and its city limits.

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  • In the Lustgarten is a statue of Frederick William III., by Wolff; in the Tiergarten, Drake's marble monument to the same ruler; and in the mausoleum in the park in Charlottenburg he and his queen, Louisa, are sculptured in marble by Rauch.

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  • On the Kreuzberg a Gothic monument in bronze was erected by Frederick William III.

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  • It was as a weapon of war, as well as a nursery of learning, that Frederick William III.

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  • It was built in the reign of Frederick William III.

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  • It was not, however, until the time of King Frederick William I.

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  • Strauss resumed his literary activity by the publication of Der Romantiker auf dem Thron der Ciisaren, in which he drew a satirical parallel between Julian the Apostate and Frederick William IV.

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  • In 1692 he ' Besides Friedrich Heinrich, count von Seckendorf, separately noticed, other members of the family were Adolf Franz Karl (1742-1818), who was made a count by Frederick William III.

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  • In 1655 the elector Frederick William of Brandenburg founded here a Protestant university, which flourished until 1802.

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  • In 1841 he visited England, being commissioned by King Frederick William IV.

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  • The principal churches are the Nikolaikirche; the Church of the Holy Ghost, built in 1728; the garrison church, containing the remains of Frederick the Great and his father, Frederick William I.; and the Friedenskirche, or Church of Peace, erected by Frederick William IV.

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  • Immediately to the west is the park of Sans Souci, laid out by Frederick the Great, and largely extended by Frederick William IV.

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  • In 17 9 1 the last margrave of Anspach sold his principality to Frederick William II., king of Prussia; it was transferred by Napoleon to Bavaria in 1806, an act which was confirmed by the congress of Vienna in 1815.

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  • In August 1791 he had met Frederick William II.

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  • This famous institution, originally founded by the elector Charles Theodore in 1767, was reorganized by King Frederick William III.

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  • During the Hundred Days, Louis Napoleon, then a child of seven, witnessed the presentation of the eagles to 50,000 soldiers; but a few weeks later, before his departure for Rochefort, the defeated Napoleon embraced him for the last time, and his mother had to receive Frederick William III.

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  • In a second campaign he lestroyed at Jena both the army and the state of Frederick William III., who could not make up his mind between the Napoleonic treaty of SchOnbrunn and Russias counter-proposal at Potsdam (October 14, 1806).

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  • During the earlier part of the 19th century the poem was eagerly scanned by the enemies of the Hohenzollerns, some of whom believed that the race would end with King Frederick William III., the representative of the eleventh generation of the family.

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  • Afterwards he urged a good understanding with Napoleon, but his advice was met by the insuperable objection of King Frederick William IV.

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  • Although his harsh measures aroused some irritation, the count did something to rid the land of the Swedes and to mitigate its many evils; but its condition was still very deplorable when George William died at Konigsberg on the 1st of December 16 4 0, leaving an only son, Frederick William.

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  • Having returned to Brandenburg in 1643, Frederick William remained neutral during the concluding years of the Thirty Years' War, and set to work to organize an army and to effect financial reforms. About the same time diplomatic methods freed Cleves, Mark and Ravensberg from foreign troops, but the estates of these lands gained a temporary victory when the elector attacked their privileges.

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  • In 1650 Frederick William attacked his rival, but a variety of circumstances, among others a change of government in the Netherlands, and the resistance of the estates of Cleves, thwarted his plans, and he was compelled to listen to the mediating powers, and to acquiesce in the status quo.

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  • In imperial politics Frederick William supported the election of Ferdinand, son of the emperor Ferdinand III., as king of the Romans in 1653; but when the emperor failed to fulfil his promises, influenced by Waldeck, he acted in opposition to the imperial interests, and even formed a plan for a great alliance against the Habsburgs.

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  • Hastening from Franconia to defend the electorate, Frederick William gained a complete victory over a superior number of the enemy at Fehrbellin on the 28th of June 1675, a great and glorious day for the arms of Brandenburg.

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  • This feebleness on the part of his ally induced Frederick William to listen more readily to the overtures of Louis, and in 1679, and again in 1681, he bound himself to support the interests of France.

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  • The remarkable services of Frederick William to his country can best be judged by comparing its condition in 1640 with that in 1688.

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  • While thus winning for himself a position in the councils of Europe, Frederick William was not less active in strengthening the central authority within his own dominions.

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  • In matters of general administration Frederick William showed himself a prudent and careful ruler, and laid the foundation of the future greatness of Prussia in almost every department.

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  • The Government, probably influenced as much by hatred and fear of the French Revolution, of which Kant was supposed to be a partisan, as by love of orthodoxy, resented the act; and a secret cabinet order was received by him intimating the displeasure of the king, Frederick William II., and exacting a pledge not to lecture or write at all on religious subjects in future.

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  • In 1815 he was with the Allies in Paris, and in the following year set out on the grand tour, visiting Moscow and the western provinces of Russia, Berlin (where his engagement to Princess Charlotte Louise, daughter of Frederick William III., was arranged) and England, where his handsome presence and charming address created a profound impression.'

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  • Nicholas foresaw the troubles brewing, and warned Frederick William IV.

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  • Thus Nicholas, who refused to believe in the perfidy ascribed by Frederick William to Austria, 2 was the immediate cause of Prussia's humiliation at Olmiitz.

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  • James Lumley was charged with stealing a bundle of straw plait from the gig of Frederick William Bethel at Lavenham.

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  • The sons were George (afterwards King George III.), Edward Augustus, duke of York and Albany (1739-1767), William Henry, duke of Gloucester and Edinburgh (1743-1805), Henry Frederick, duke of Cumberland (1745-1790), and Frederick William (1750-1765); the daughters were Augusta (1737-1813), wife of Charles William Ferdinand,duke of Brunswick,and Caroline Matilda (1751-1775), wife of Christian VII., king of Denmark.

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  • In 1837 he became full professor at Berlin; in 1841 Frederick William IV., always ready to recognize intellectual eminence, appointed him Prussian historiographer.

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  • Prussia had paid a heavy price for the territories acquired at the expense of Poland in 1793 and 1795, and when, on the 16th of November 1797, Frederick William died, he left the state in bankruptcy and confusion, the army decayed and the monarchy discredited.

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  • Once committed to the Russian alliance, however, he became the faithful henchman of the emperor Alexander, whose fascinating personality exercised over him to the last a singular power, and began that influence of Russia at the court of Berlin which was to last till Frederick William IV.'s supposed Liberalism was to shatter the cordiality of the entente.

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  • His son and successor, George II., who founded the university of Göttingen in 1737, was on bad terms with his brother-in-law Frederick William I.

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  • As the Danes soon afterwards took possession of Schleswig again, thePrussians once more drove them back, but, in view of the threatening attitude of the powers, Frederick William summoned up courage to flout the opinion of the German parliament, and on the 26th of August, without the central government being consulted, an armistice of seven months was agreed upon at Malmoe.

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  • The dilemma was from the first so obvious that the parliament would have done well to have recognized at once that the only possible solution was that arrived at, after the withdrawal of the Austrian delegates, by the exclusion of Austria altogether and the offer of the crown of Germany to Frederick William of Prussia.

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  • In 1666 the great elector, Frederick William of Brandenburg, made with William, count palatine of Neuburg, a treaty of mutual succession to the duchies, providing that in case the male line of either house became extinct the other should inherit its lands.

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