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fox

fox

fox Sentence Examples

  • For a moment he gazed down at her, his expression much like the trapped fox in the hen house.

  • Now some really big names tell me to back off but it's my hen house where all you fox are playing.

  • The way he had rescued her from the dogs, and from the fox in the chicken house - yes, there were a lot of wonderful memories on this farm.

  • Gladys, bedecked in an orange caftan and a fox fur jacket, smiled a knowing smile to Cynthia and was gone.

  • It took an instant for her eyes to adjust to the dim coop interior, and then she found herself staring into the desperate eyes of a red fox.

  • Carmen pulled the coop door shut and the fox snarled around the hen, backing deeper into the corner.

  • Her knees hit the floor with a grinding jolt, and the fox seized the opportunity.

  • Furious at the loss, the fox made a snarling lunge at Carmen.

  • In an instant he entered the coop and pushed Carmen back, putting himself between her and the fox.

  • Waving his hands, he yelled and the fox darted out the coop door - without the hen.

  • I was expecting to find a skunk, and when I saw it was only a fox, I thought ...

  • I bet that fox thought this old hen was more than he bargained for.

  • The fox is gone.

  • If you felt that way, why didn't you let the fox have it?

  • And whom was she stabbing in the back - the chicken, the fox or Alex?

  • I threw the hen into the woods, so the fox will probably get it anyway.

  • The fox was already in your chicken house.

  • Well, you didn't have to give the chicken to the fox.

  • If the fox gets fat on my hens, it's no skin off your nose.

  • The scene was total chaos, with goats dashing every which way around the field, trying to avoid the squawking chickens and the fox.

  • A red fox was stocking a cottontail.

  • As she watched, the fox lunged for the rabbit.

  • I fell head over heals with the little goat lady who had the courage to get right up into my face and give me what-for about a hen I threw to the fox.

  • Fox's India Bill led to the downfall of the Coalition ministry in 1783.

  • The fox, of which several species exist, probably never ventured far into the plain, for it afforded him no shelter.

  • Pumas, jaguars and one or two species of wild cat are numerous, as also the Argentine wolf and two or three species of fox.

  • The chestnut covers considerable areas in Prigord, Limousin and Beam; resinotis trees (firs, pines, larches, &c.) form fine forests in the Vosges and The indigenous fauna include the bear, now very rare but still found in the Alps and Pyrenees, the wolf, harbouring chiefly in the Cvennes and Vosges, but in continually decreasing areas; the fox, marten, badger, weasel, otter, the beaver in the extreme south of the Rhne valley, and in the Alps the marmot; the red deer and roe deer are preserved in many of the forests, and the wild boar is found in several districts; the chamois and wild goat survive in the Pyrenees and Alps.

  • the flying fox; the python, the cobra, and many other varieties of snake, including the hamadryad; the alligator, the otter and the gavial, as well as countless kinds of squirrel, rat, &c., are found throughout the jungles of the peninsula in great numbers.

  • In an interview in 1654 the sincerity and enthusiasm of George Fox had greatly moved Cromwell and had convinced him of their freedom from dangerous political schemes.

  • He ordered Fox's liberation, and in November 1657 issued a general order directing that Quakers should be treated with leniency, and be discharged from confinement.

  • On the 10th of August George Fox met him riding at the head of his guards in the park at Hampton Court, but declared "he looked like a dead man."

  • The king (Henry VIII.) happened at the time to be visiting in the immediate neighbourhood, and two of his chief counsellors, Gardiner, secretary of state, afterwards bishop of Winchester, and Edward Fox, the lord high almoner, afterwards bishop of Hereford, were lodged at Cressy's house.

  • When the treatise was finished Cranmer was called upon to defend its argument before the universities of Oxford and Cambridge, which he visited, accompanied by Fox and Gardiner.

  • Rosenberg (1909) adduces evidence fox the existence of chromosomes or prochromosomes in resting nuclei in a large number of plants, but most observers consider that the chromosomes during the resting stage become completely resolved into a nuclear network in which no trace of the original chromosomes can be seen.

  • When the midsummer vacation arrived, he was preparing to set out with his family to Fox How in Westmoreland, where he had purchased some property and built a house.

  • Berachiah, 2 the compiler of the "Fox Fables" (which have much in common with the "Ysopet" of Marie de France), is generally thought to have lived in Provence in the 13th century, but according to others in England in the 12th century.

  • The tapir, fox, deer, wild cat, wild dog, carpincho or water hog and a few small rodents nearly complete the list of quadrupeds.

  • Fox (1835) and again by W.

  • B): "Fools, you are treading in the footsteps of the fox; can you not read the hidden meaning of these charming words ?"

  • Still, the reindeer frequents it for its lichens, and on the drier slopes of the moraine deposits there occur four species of lemming, hunted by the Arctic fox (Vulpes lagopus).

  • The hare is increasing rapidly, as well as the fox.

  • Fox and their two daughters, at Hydesville (Wayne county), New York, were much disturbed by unexplained knockings.

  • An investigation into the matter was thought to show that none of the Fox family was concerned in producing the rappings; but the evidence that they were not concerned is insufficient, although similar noises had been noticed occasionally in the house before they lived there.

  • The presence of certain "mediums" was required to form the link between the worlds of the living and of the dead, and Kate Fox and her sister were the first mediums. Spiritualists do not as yet claim to know what special qualities in mediums enable spirits thus to make use of them.

  • For instance, it is not very uncommon to find persons who can make loud sounds by partially dislocating and restoring the toe, knee, or other joints, and some experiments made with the Fox girls in 1851 supported the view that they made raps by this method.

  • It is singular that such closely allied species as the domestic dog and the Arctic fox are among the favourite prey of wolves, and, as is well known, children and even full-grown people are not infrequently the objects of their attack when pressed by hunger.

  • A note of Fox, however, on the margin of a copy of The Decline and Fall records a very distinct remembrance of the historian's previous vituperation of the ministry; within a fortnight of the date of his acceptance of office, he is there alleged to have said that " there was no salvation for this country until six heads of the principal persons in administration were laid upon the table."

  • and Mme Necker; Mr Fox also gave him two welcome " days of free and private society " in 1788.

  • Among the mammals are the opossum, raccoon, star-nosed mole (Condylura cristata), grey fox and fox squirrel.

  • The religiosity of the Quakers, with their doctrines of the " inner light " and the influence of, the Spirit, has decided affinities with mysticism; and the autobiography of George Fox (1624-1691), the founder of the sect, proceeds throughout on the assumption of supernatural guidance.

  • Much information about Conway will also be found in the biographies of his leading contemporaries, Rockingham, Shelburne, Chatham, Pitt and Fox.

  • OTTAWA, a city and the county-seat of La Salle county, Illinois, U.S.A., on the Illinois river, at the mouth of the Fox, about 84 m.

  • The mouth of the Fox was early visited by French explorers, and Father Hennepin is said to have discovered here in 1680 the first deposit of coal found in America.

  • It was rather parliamentary oratory in which he excelled, and his true compeers are rather Burke and Fox than any French speakers.

  • The young king took little pains with the government, and the control of affairs was shared between the clerical and peace party led by Richard Fox and Archbishop Warham, and the secular and war party led by Surrey.

  • and won the battle of Marignano, Wolsey took the lead in assisting the emperor Maximilian to oppose him; and this revival of warlike designs was resented by Fox and Warham, who retired from the government, leaving Wolsey supreme.

  • The more important of the carnivores which haunt the forests, valleys and mountain slopes are the bear (Ursus arctos), wolf, lynx, wild cat and fox (Vulpes melanotus).

  • Henceforth Bentham was a frequent guest at Bowood, where he saw the best society and where he met Miss Caroline Fox (daughter of the second Lord Holland), to whom he afterwards made a proposal of marriage.

  • Many of Mill's letters are published in Mrs Grote's life of her husband, in Duncan's Life of Herbert Spencer, in the Memories of Caroline Fox, and in Kingsley's letters.

  • Bain, John Stuart Mill, a Personal Criticism (1882); Fox Bourne, Life of J.

  • Fox, Napoleon Bonaparte and the Siege of Toulon (Washington, 1902); H.

  • Between his first and second arctic voyages he made the acquaintance of the Fox family, the spiritualists.

  • Kane and Margaret Fox (New York, 1866); "Discoveries of Dr Kane," in Jour.

  • He it was who was called a "fox" by Christ (Luke xiii.

  • No notable rivers flow into Lake Michigan, the largest being the Big Manistee and Muskegon on the east shore, and on the west shore the Menominee and the Fox, both of which empty into Green Bay, the most important arm of the lake.

  • It is also prepared by digesting precipitated mercuric sulphide with an alkaline sulphide fox some hours; it is said that Chinese vermilion owes its superiority to being made in this way.

  • Rough-Coated Fox Terrier.

  • (c) Dogs which find and also kill their game - the bloodhound, the foxhound, the harrier, the beagle, the otterhound, the fox terrier and the truffle dog.

  • The enormous sum of i 50o has been paid for a collie, and 000 guineas for a bulldog, both show dogs pure and simple; while L50o is no uncommon price for a fox terrier.

  • Most of the leading breeds have clubs or societies, which have been founded by admirers with a view to furthering the interests of their favourites; and such combinations as the Bulldog Club (incorporated), the London Bulldog Society, the British Bulldog Club, the Fox Terrier Club, the Association of Bloodhound Breeders - under whose management the first man-hunting trials were held, - the Bloodhound Hunt Club, the Collie Club, the Dachshund Club, the Dandie Dinmont Terrier Club, the English Setter Club, the Gamekeepers' Association of the United Kingdom, the International Gun Dog League, the Irish Terrier Club, the Irish Wolfhound Club, the St Bernard Club, the National Terrier Club, the Pomeranian Club, the Spaniel Club, the Scottish Terrier Club and the Toy Bulldog Club have done good work in keeping the claims of the breeds they represent before the dogowning public and encouraging the breeding of dogs to type.

  • FOX Hound.

  • The history of Quakerism in England may be divided into three periods: - (1) from the first preaching of George Fox in 1647 to the Toleration Act 1689; (2) from 1689 to the evangelical movement in 18 35; (3) from 1835 to the present time.

  • - George Fox (1624-1691), the son of a weaver of Drayton-in-the-Clay (now called Fenny Drayton) in Leicestershire, was the founder of the Society.

  • In 1652 a number of people in Westmorland and north Lancashire who had separated from the common national worship,' came under the influence of Fox, and it was this community (if it can be so called) at Preston Patrick which formed the nucleus of the Quaker church.

  • Fox and his fellow-preachers spoke whenever opportunity offered, - sometimes in churches(declining, for the most part, to occupy the pulpit), sometimes in barns, sometimes at market crosses.

  • It is these, and not the clergy of the Church of England, who are continually referred to by George Fox as " priests."

  • There is evidence to show that the arrangement for this " publishing of Truth" rested mainly with Fox, and that the expenses of it and of the foreign missions were borne out of a common fund.

  • Margaret Fell (1614-1702), wife of Thomas Fell (1598-1658), vice-chancellor of the duchy of Lancaster, and afterwards of George Fox, opened her house, Swarthmore Hall near Ulverston, to these preachers and probably contributed largely to this fund.

  • Such teaching necessarily brought Fox and his friends into conflict with all the religious bodies of England, and they were continually engaged in strife with the Presbyterians, Independents, Baptists, Episcopalians and the wilder sectaries, such as the Ranters and the Muggletonians.

  • The case of James Nayler (1617?-1660), who, in spite of Fox's grave warning, allowed Messianic homage to be paid to him, is the best known of these instances; they are to be explained partly by mental disturbance, resulting from the undue prominence of a single idea, and partly by the general religious excitement of the time and the rudeness of manners prevailing in the classes of society from which many of these individuals came.

  • Fox and others travelled in America.

  • at Adrianople; Alexander Parker (1628-1689) went to Africa; others made their way to Rome; two women were imprisoned by the Inquisition at Malta; two men passed into Austria and Hungary; and William Penn, George Fox and several others preached in Holland and Germany.

  • The beginning of this appears to be due to William Dewsbury (1621-1688) and George Fox; it was not until 1666 that a complete system of church organization George Fox.

  • John Wilkinson and John Story of Westmorland, together with William Rogers of Bristol, raised a party against Fox concerning the management of the affairs of the society, regarding with suspicion any fixed arrangement for meetings for conducting church business, and in fact hardly finding a place for such meetings at all.

  • Several imprisonments, including that of George Fox at Derby in 1650-1651, were brought about under the Blasphemy Act of 1650, which inflicted penalties on any one who asserted himself to be very God or equal with God, a charge to which the Friends were peculiarly liable owing to their doctrine of perfection.

  • While not unaware that with this, as with all moral questions, there may be a certain borderland of practical difficulty, Friends endeavour to bring all things to the test of the Realities which, though not seen, are eternal, and to hold up the ideal, set forth by George Fox, of living in the.

  • As early as 1660 George Fox was considering the question of buying land from the Indians.

  • As early as 1671 George Fox when in Barbados counselled kind treatment of slaves and ultimate liberation of them.

  • In 1666 Fox established Monthly Meetings; in 1727 elders were first appointed; in 1752 overseers were added; and in 1737 the right of children of Quakers to be considered as members was fully recognized.

  • - The writings of the early Friends are very numerous: the most noteworthy are the Journals of George Fox and of Thomas Ellwood, both autobiographies, the Apology and other works of Robert Barclay, and the works of Penn and Penington.

  • See also works mentioned at the close of sections on Adult Schools and on Quakerism in America, Scotland and Ireland, and elsewhere in this article; also Fox, George.

  • by Richard Holmes, 1882); Benjamin Boothroyd, The History of the Ancient Borough of Pontefract (1807); George Fox, The History of Pontefract (1827).

  • The coyote or small wolf, here and there the grey wolf, the fox and the mountain lion (panther) occur.

  • The first persons in England who took united practical action against the slave trade were the Quakers, following the expression of sentiment which had emanated so early as 1671 from their founder George Fox.

  • But in 1806, Lord Grenville and Fox having come into power, a bill was passed in both Houses to put an end to the British slave trade for foreign supply, and to forbid the importation of slaves into the colonies won by the British arms in the course of the war.

  • On the 10th of June of the same year Fox brought forward a resolution " that effectual measures should be taken for the abolition of the African slave trade in such a manner and at such a period as should be deemed advisable," which was carried by a large majority.

  • To meet the cost of this Captain Fox suggested that each member should give a penny per week.

  • Fox, identified San Salvador, on seemingly good grounds, with Samana (Atwood Cay), which lies about midway between Watling and Mariguana.

  • Valuable fur is obtained from the white and blue fox, the skin of the eider-duck and the polar bear.

  • The chief articles of export (together with those that have lapsed) have been already indicated; but they may be summarized as including seal-oil, seal, fox, bird and bear skins, fish products and eiderdown, with some quantity of worked skins.

  • The reindeer, arctic fox (Canis lagopus), hare, wolf, lemming (Myodes obensis), collar lemming (Cuniculus torquatus) and two species of voles (Arvicolae) are the most common on land.

  • The bear, badger, wolverine, polecat, ermine, common weasel, otter, wolf, fox, lynx, mole, hedgehog, common shrew, water-shrew and lesser shrew (Sorex vulgaris, S.

  • This may be so extended as to include a discourse in favour of pure morality, though, even in that case, the morals are founded on Christian doctrine, and even the sermon which the fox preaches in La Fontaine's Fables is a parody of a Christian discourse.

  • In the fable of Reynard the Fox the name of the hare is Coart, Kywart, Cuwaert or other variants.

  • The v, for f, is common in southern English pronunciation; vox, for fox, is found in the Ancren Riwle, c. 1230.

  • From the Scandinavian peninsula and the British Islands the range of the fox extends eastwards across Europe and central and northern Asia to Japan, while to the south it embraces northern Africa and Arabia, Persia, Baluchistan, and the northwestern districts of India and the Himalaya.

  • On the North American side of the Atlantic the fox reappears.

  • From this there is a more or less nearly complete gradation on the one hand to palecoloured forms like the white-footed fox (V.

  • India and Arabia, and on the other to the silver or black fox (V.

  • wadelli, the North American red or cross fox as V.

  • The cunning and stratagem of the fox have been proverbial for many ages, and he has figured as a central character in fables from the earliest times, as in Aesop, down to "Uncle Remus," most notably as Reynard (Raginohardus, strong in counsel) in the great medieval beast-epic "Reynard the Fox" (q.v.).

  • Rabbits, hares, domesticated poultry, game-birds, and, when these run short, rats, mice and even insects, form the chief diet of the fox.

  • When living near the coast foxes will, however, visit the shore at low water in search of crabs and whelks; and the old story of the fox and the grapes seems to be founded upon a partiality on the part of the creature for that fruit.

  • Flesh that has become tainted appears to be specially acceptable; but it is a curious fact that on no account will a fox eat any kind of bird of prey.

  • When suddenly confronted in a situation where immediate escape is impossible, the fox, like the wolf, will not hesitate to resort to the death-feigning instinct.

  • Silver fox is one of the most valuable of all furs, as much as £480 having been given for an unusually fine pair of skins in 1902.

  • Ile corsac fox (V.

  • corsac), ranging from southern Russia and the Caspian provinces across Asia to Amurland, may be regarded as a northern representative of the Indian species; while the pale fox (V.

  • Passing from South Africa to the north polar regions of both the Old and the New World, inclusive of Iceland, we enter the domain of the Arctic fox (V.

  • In a second phase of the species, the colour, which often displays a slaty hue (whence the name of blue fox), remains more or less the same throughout the year, the winter coat being, however, recognizable by the great length of the fur.

  • Many at least of the "blue fox" skins of the furtrade are white skins dyed.

  • The so-called foxes of South America, such as the crab-eating fox (C. thous), Azara's fox (C. azarae), and the colpeo (C. magellanicus), are aberrant members of the typical genus Canis.

  • On the other hand, the long-eared fox or Delalande's fox (Otocyon megalotis) of south and east Africa represents a totally distinct genus.

  • In a temperate and learned speech, based on Fox's declaration against constitution-mongering, he supported both the enfranchising and the disfranchising clauses, and easily disposed of the cries of "corporation robbery," "nabob representation," "opening for young men of talent," &c. The following year (1832) found Campbell solicitor-general, a knight and member for Dudley, which he represented till 1834.

  • Between 1782 and 1790 Tooke gave his support to Pitt, and in the election for Westminster, in 1784, threw all his energies into opposition to Fox.

  • With Fox he was never on terms of friendship, and Samuel Rogers, in his Table Talk, asserts that their antipathy was so pronounced that at a dinner party given by a prominent Whig not the slightest notice was taken by Fox of the presence of Horne Tooke.

  • Fox) in his celebrated pamphlet of Two Pair of Portraits.

  • At the general election of 1790 he came forward as a candidate for that distinguished constituency, in opposition to Fox and Lord Hood, but was defeated; and, at a second trial in 1796, he was again at the bottom of the poll.

  • Chiswick House, a seat of the duke of Devonshire, is surrounded by beautiful grounds; here died Fox (1806) and Canning (1827).

  • Mag., November 1832); Fox Talbot (Phil.Mag., June 1833).

  • Other animals fairly numerous are the spotted hyena, long-eared fox, jackal, aard wolf, red lynx, wild cat, wild dog and wart hog.

  • Fox, with R.

  • She had three children by Lord Edward Fitzgerald: Edward Fox (1794-1863); Pamela, afterwards wife of General Sir Guy Campbell; and Lucy Louisa, who married Captain Lyon, R.N.

  • It is the burial-place of Fox the martyrologist and Milton the poet, and contains some fine wood-carving by Grinling Gibbons.

  • Pitt was buried on the 22nd of February, and Fox on the 10th of October, both in Westminster Abbey.

  • Menou sent him away from Egypt, and on his passage he was captured by an English cruiser and taken to London, where he had a good reception among the Whigs and was well received by Fox.

  • Apart from some southern dialect forms which have found their way into the literary language, as vat (for fat or wine fat which still survives in the English Bible) and vixen the feminine of fox, all the words in English which begin with V are of foreign, and most of Latin origin.

  • Creevey was a Whig and a follower of Fox, and his active intellect and social qualities procured him a considerable intimacy with the leaders of this political circle.

  • Fox in his temporary secession.

  • There are deer, called taruco (Cervus antisensis); the viscacha, a large rodent; a species of fox called atoc; and the puma (Felts concolor) and ucumari or black bear with a white muzzle, when driven by hunger, wander into the loftier regions.

  • Tradition centres rather upon the fox (kitsune) and the badger (mujina), which are credited with supernatural powers, the former being worshipped as the messenger of the harvest god, while the latter is regarded as a mischievous rollicker.

  • Fox made entirely literary and political.

  • CHARLES JAMES FOX (1749-1806), British statesman and orator, was the third son of Henry Fox, 1st Lord Holland, and his wife, Lady Caroline Lennox, eldest daughter of Charles Lennox, 2nd duke of Richmond.

  • Fox's youth was disorderly, but it was never indolent.

  • The affection of Charles Fox for his father was unbounded, but the passion for gambling which had been instilled in him as a boy proved the ruin of the family fortune.

  • In the ardour of his passion Fox took his losses and their consequences with an attractive gaiety.

  • But Fox's character was incompatible with ministerial service under King George III.

  • And Fox was too independent to please a master who expected obedience.

  • The speech is unfortunately lost, but Gibbon, who heard it, told his friend Holroyd (afterwards Earl of Sheffield) that Fox, "taking the vast compass of the question before us, discovered powers for regular debate which neither his friends hoped nor his enemies dreaded."

  • Lord John Russell (afterwards Earl Russell), his friendly biographer, has to confess that Fox might have joined in the confession of Mirabeau: "The public cause suffers for the immoralities of my youth."

  • Horace Walpole has drawn a picture of him at that time which Lord Holland, Fox's beloved and admiring nephew, speaking from his early recollections of his uncle, confesses has "some justification."

  • "Fox lodged in St James's Street, and as soon as he rose, which was very late, had a levee of his followers and of the gaming club at Brooks's - all his disciples.

  • a manly and generous nature was well known to the personal friends of Fox, and is now universally allowed.

  • But by the bulk of his contemporaries, who could not fail to see the weaknesses he ostentatiously displayed, Fox was, not unnaturally, suspected as being immoral and untrustworthy.

  • Nor ought any critical admirer of Fox to deny that George III.

  • Fox made many mistakes, due in some cases to vehemence of temperament, and in others only to be ascribed to want of sagacity.

  • But if Fox learnt much from Burke he learnt with originality.

  • Fox acquired the conviction that, if the House was to be made an efficient instrument for restraining the interference of the king and for securing good government, it must cease to be filled to a very large extent by the nominees of boroughmongers and the treasury.

  • On the 29th of November 1779 Fox was wounded in a duel with Mr William Adam, a supporter of Lord North's whom he had savagely denounced.

  • When the disasters of the American war had at last made a change of ministry necessary, and the king applied to the Whigs, through the intermediary of Lord Shelburne, Fox made a very serious mistake in persuading the marquess of Rockingham not to insist on dealing directly with the sovereign.

  • The result was the formation of a cabinet belonging, in Fox's own words, partly to the king and partly to the country - that is to say, partly of Whigs who wished to restrain the king, and partly of the king's friends, represented by Lord Shelburne, whose real function was to baffle the Whigs.

  • Dissensions began from the first, and were peculiarly acute between Shelburne and Fox, the two secretaries of state.

  • All foreign affairs were entrusted to Fox.

  • He also persuaded his colleagues to grant some rather scandalous pensions, and Fox's acquiescence in this abuse after his recent agitation against Lord North's waste did him injury.

  • On the 2nd of April he was constrained to submit to the formation of a new ministry, in which the duke of Portland was prime minister and Fox and North were secretaries of state.

  • The coalition, and Fox in particular, were assailed in a torrent of most telling invective and caricature.

  • Fox now went into opposition again.

  • When parliament was dissolved at the end of the session of 1784, the country showed its sentiments by unseating 180 of the followers of Fox and North.

  • Immense harm was done to both by the publication of a book called The Beauties of Fox, North and Burke, a compilation of their abuse of one another in recent years.

  • Fox himself was elected for Westminster with fewer votes than Admiral Lord Hood, but with a majority over the ministerial candidate, Sir Cecil Wray.

  • The election was marked by an amazing outflow of caricatures and squibs, by weeks of rioting in which Lord Hood's sailors fought pitched battles in St James's Street with Fox's hackney coachmen, and by the intrepid canvassing of Whig ladies.

  • The high bailiff refused to make a return, and the confirmation of Fox's election was delayed by the somewhat mean action of the ministry.

  • But as Fox on this occasion aided the vested interests of some English manufacturers he secured a certain revival of popularity.

  • Fox supported the claim of the prince of Wales to the regency as a right, a doctrine which provoked Pitt into declaring that he would "unwhig the gentleman for the rest of his life."

  • The French Revolution affected Fox profoundly.

  • It should be noted that the scene with Burke took place in the course of the debate on the Quebec Bill, in which Fox displayed real statesmanship by criticizing the division of Upper from Lower Canada, and other provisions of the bill, which in the end proved so injurious as to be unworkable.

  • Fox's time at St Anne's was largely spent in gardening, in the enjoyment of the country, and in correspondence on literary subjects with his nephew, the 3rd Lord Holland, and with Gilbert Wakefield, the editor of Euripides.

  • The fall of Pitt's first ministry and the formation of the Addington cabinet, the peace of'Amiens, and the establishment of Napoleon as first consul with all the powers of a military despot, seemed to offer Fox a chance of resuming power in public life.

  • It gives an attractive picture of Fox's good-humour, and of his enjoyment of the "species of minor comedy which is constantly exhibited in common life."

  • Fox was not favourably impressed by Napoleon.

  • The death of Pitt left Fox so manifestly the foremost man in public life that the king could no longer hope to exclude him from office.

  • The formation of a ministry was entrusted by the king to Lord Grenville, but when he named Fox as his proposed secretary of state for foreign affairs George III.

  • A long period of office might now have appeared to lie before Fox, but his health was undermined.

  • In domestic politics Fox had no time to do more than insist on the abolition of the slave trade.

  • When a French adventurer calling himself Guillet de la Gevrilliere, whom Fox at first "did the honour to take for a spy," came to him with a scheme for the murder of Napoleon, he sent a warning on the 10th of February to Talleyrand.

  • But Fox was soon convinced that the French ministers were playing a false game.

  • The later stages of the negotiation were not directed by Fox, but by colleagues who took over his work at the foreign office when his health began to fail in the summer of 1806.

  • Fox is buried in Westminster Abbey by the side of Pitt.

  • The striking personal appearance of Fox has been rendered very familiar by portraits and by innumerable caricatures.

  • The latter were no doubt deliberately exaggerated, and yet a comparison between the head of Fox in Sayer's plate "Carlo Khan's triumphal entry into Leadenhall," and in Abbot's portrait, shows that the caricaturist did not depart from the original.

  • Fox was twice painted by Sir Joshua Reynolds, once when young in a group with Lady Sarah Bunbury and Lady Susan Strangeways, and once at full length.

  • The materials for a life of Fox were first collected by his nephew, Lord Holland, and were then revised and rearranged by Mr Allen and Lord John Russell.

  • Fox (London, 1853-1857).

  • Fox (London, 1859-1866); Sir G.

  • Fox (London.

  • 1880) brings new evidence; Charles James Fox, a Political Study, by J.

  • Edward Fox >>

  • When Fox seceded from the House of Commons, Tierney became a prominent opponent of Pitt's policy.

  • On the death of Fox he joined (1806) the Grenville ministry as president of the board of control, with a seat in the cabinet, and thus brought himself once more into line with the Whigs.

  • The above figure is coloured black as befits a funerary and nocturnal animal: it is more attenuated than even a greyhound, but it has the bushy tail of the fox or the jackal.

  • Probably these were the original genii of the necropolis, and in fact the same lean animal figured passant is s;b " jackal" or "fox."

  • Bears are no longer numerous; the panther and the ounce are met with; the wild hog, hyaena, wolf and fox are by no means rare; jackals and gazelles are very common.

  • It is also more robust in form than the others, its general aspect being more that of a fox than a weasel; in fact its usual name among the American hunters is "black fox."

  • Amphitryon accordingly took the field against the Taphians, accompanied by Creon, who had agreed to assist him on condition that he slew the Teumessian fox which had been sent by Dionysus to ravage the country.

  • and Charles Fox, and the second in 1914.

  • Fox, Kingsbridge Estuary (Kingsbridge, 1864) .

  • In 1857 the new scholarship was put to a famous test, in which the challenge thrown down by Sir George Cornewall Lewis and Ernest Renan was met by Rawlinson, Hincks, Oppert and Fox Talbot in a conclusive manner.

  • Fox, of the Central Laboratory of the International Council at Christiania, has investigated the relation of the atmospheric gases to sea-water by very exact experimental methods and arrived at the following expressions for the absorption of oxygen and nitrogen by sea-water of different degrees of concentration.

  • In 1756, immediately on his leaving school, he was appointed to a junior clerkship in the secretary of state's office by Henry Fox (afterwards Lord Holland), with whose family Dr Francis was at that time on intimate terms; and this post he retained under the succeeding administration.

  • In 1783 Fox produced his India Bill, which led to the overthrow of the coalition government.

  • There are important Frankliniana, about 13,000 papers, in the possession of the American Philosophical Society, to which they were conveyed by the son of Temple Franklin's executor, George Fox.

  • Other papers which had been left to Fox lay for years in barrels in a stable garret; they were finally cleared out, their owner, Mary Fox, intending to send them to a paper mill.

  • A parliamentary majority was now secured for the minister's policy by bribery and threats, and with the aid of Henry Fox, who deserted his party to become leader of the Commons.

  • There are many insectivorous birds; among the song birds are the hermit thrush, the wood thrush, the Wilson's thrush, the brown thrasher, the bobolink, the catbird, the oven bird, the house wren, the song sparrow, the fox sparrow, the vesper sparrow, the white-throated sparrow (Peabody bird), the goldfinch and the robin.

  • The porcupine is common, but the Canada pine marten or American sable, fisher, and red fox are rare, and the black bear and grey wolf are found only in small numbers.

  • The parish church, rebuilt in 1808, contains a tablet to Charles James Fox, who resided at St Anne's Hill in the vicinity, and another to Lawrence Tomson, a translator of the New Testament in the 17th century.

  • Yet it was at this moment that a political financier, Sir Julius Vogel, at that moment colonial treasurer in the ministry of Sir William Fox, audaciously proposed that the central government should borrow ten millions, make roads and railways, buy land from the natives and import British immigrants.

  • Sir William Fox, The War in New Zealand (London, 1866) is the best account of any portion of the native wars.

  • Caxton in 1481 has "lapwynches" (Reynard the Fox, cap. 27).

  • The city is a railway centre of some importance, and is served by the Chicago, Milwaukee & St Paul, the Minneapolis, St Paul & Sault St Marie, and the Chicago & NorthWestern railways, by interurban electric lines, and by steamboat lines connecting through the Fox river with vessels on the Great Lakes.

  • Of animals still found may be mentioned baboons and monkeys, the leopard, red lynx (Felis caracal), spotted hyena, aard wolf, wild cat, long-eared fox, jackals of various kinds, the dassie or rock rabbit, the scaly anteater, the ant bear (aardvaark), the mongoose and the spring haas, a rodent of the jerboa family.

  • In 1850 the Fox Sisters, on his wife's invitation, spent several weeks in his house.

  • Reindeer, followed by wolves, come also every year to the islands; the polar fox and polar bear, both feeding on the lemmings, are numerous.

  • The Victoria Falls bridge over the Zambezi, designed by Sir Douglas Fox, and completed in 1905, is a combination of girder and arch having a total length of 650 ft.

  • Abt Vogler, however, makes reservations in his praise, condemning his philosophical principles as too much in sympathy with those of Fox, which had already been expressed by P. Vallotti.

  • The surface is broken by many clusters of small hills, such as the Fox Ridge in the central part of the state and the Cave Hills in the north-west, and in the vicinity of streams it is much cut up by deep ravines.

  • Milwaukee-Downer College (for girls), in the north-east part of the city was established in 1895 by a consolidation of Milwaukee College for girls, and Downer College, formerly at Fox Lake.

  • Doubtless the coureurs du bois who at this time began to frequent the Wisconsin forests, touched at the bay many times within the succeeding years as the place was known to be a favourite rendezvous of the Fox (or Outagamie) Indians.

  • In1699-1700Father St Cosme, a Recollet friar, was here, finding bands of Mascoutens, Fox, Winnebago and Potawatomi.

  • Later lives state that the saint was also called Crimthann (fox), and Reeves suggests that he may have had two names, the one baptismal, the other secular.

  • KAUKAUNA, a city of Outagamie county, Wisconsin, U.S.A., on the Fox river 7 m.

  • Kaukauna is served by the Chicago & North-Western railway (which has car-shops here), by inter-urban electric railway lines connecting with other cities in the Fox river, valley, and by river steamboats.

  • Dams on the Fox River furnish a good water-power.

  • After the short ministry of Shelburne, succeeding the death of Rockingham, the duke of Portland was selected by Fox and North as a "convenient cipher" to become the head of the coalition ministry, to the formation of which the king was with great reluctance compelled to give his assent.

  • The rugged east section of the state, a part of Appalachian America, is inhabited by a people of marked characteristics, portrayed in the fiction of Miss Murfree (" Charles Egbert Craddock ") and John Fox, Jr. They are nearly all of British - English and Scotch-Irish - descent, with a trace of Huguenot.

  • There is a tradition that on one occasion the abbot of Beverley, anxious to investigate the case for himself, visited Mother Shipton's cottage disguised, and that no sooner had he knocked than the old woman called out "Come in, Mr Abbot, for you are not so much disguised but the fox may be seen through the sheep's skin."

  • section of the state was originally a favourite hunting-ground of the Indians, for here in abundance were the moose, caribou, deer, wolf, bear, lynx, otter, beaver, fox, sable, mink, musk-rat, porcupine, wood-chuck, ruffed grouse and pigeon.

  • Fox Talbot about 1840, but does not seem to have become generally known.

  • The Roman Catholic Church has charge of a number of special charities, some of them educational and some fox the relief of suffering.

  • DE PERE, a city of Brown county, Wisconsin, U.S.A., on both sides of the Fox river, 6 m.

  • It is served by the Chicago & North-Western and Chicago, Milwaukee & St Paul railways, by interurban electric lines and by lake and river steamboat lines, it being the head of lake navigation on the Fox river.

  • Two bridges here span the Fox, which is from 3 m.

  • On the coming of the first European, Jean Nicolet, who visited the place in 1634-1635, De Pere was the site of a polyglot Indian settlement of several thousand attracted by the fishing at the first rapids of the Fox river.

  • Thence he went to England, where he was introduced to Pitt, but chiefly lived with the leading members of the opposition - Fox, Sheridan and Romilly.

  • Montana: Fox Hills; Fort 2.

  • Some of its characteristic mammals and birds are the long-eared desert fox, four-toed kangaroo rats, Sonoran pocket mice, big-eared and tiny white-haired bats, road runner, cactus wren, canyon wren, desert thrashers, hooded oriole, black-throated desert sparrow, Texas night-hawk and Gambels quail.

  • During the tenancy of Henry Fox, third Lord Holland (1773-1840), the house gained a European reputation as a meeting-place of statesmen and men of letters.

  • In British Columbia the puma or cougar, sometimes called the panther and the American lion, still frequently occurs; and in all parts the common fox and the silver fox, the lynx, beaver, otter, marten, fisher, wolverene, mink, skunk and other fur-bearing animals.

  • Charles James Fox >>

  • Parsons, accompanied by Governor Claiborne Fox Jackson (1807-1862), and 150o Union troops under Colonel Franz Sigel, were engaged about 7 m.

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