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founded

founded Sentence Examples

  • But Dean's denial of Cynthia's implication appeared well founded given her reaction to the discovery of the body in Norfolk.

  • Perhaps Byrne was afraid someone would connect him to the theft, a fear that would be eliminated by his "death"—a fear that was turning out to be well founded.

  • Theveste was founded towards the close of the 1st century A.D.

  • The Society of St Vincent de Paul was founded by Frederic Ozanam and others in 1833, in reply to a charge brought by some free-thinking contemporaries that the church no longer had the strength to inaugurate a practical enterprise.

  • In 1811 he founded at the mouth of the Columbia river a settlement named after him Astoria, which was intended to serve as the central depot; but two years later the settlement was seized and occupied by the English.

  • Destutt de Tracy was the last eminent representative of the sensualistic school which Condillac founded in France upon a one-sided interpretation of Locke.

  • Vico founded no school, and though during his lifetime and for a while after his death he had many admirers both in Naples and the northern cities, his fame and name were soon obscured, especially as the Kantian system dominated the world of thought.

  • Weissenfels is a place of considerable antiquity, and from 1656 till 1746 it was the capital of the small duchy of Saxe-Weissenfels, a branch of the electoral house of Saxony, founded by Augustus, second son of the elector John George I.

  • He adopted the economic principles of List, and founded a society, the "Vedegylet," the members of which were to consume none but home produce.

  • In 1895 he bought the New York Journal and the following year founded the Evening Journal, the morning paper being known after 1902 as the New York American.

  • The almshouses, known as St John's hospital, were founded in 1602; and in 1637 a free grammar school was endowed by Lady Grace Manners.

  • HERMAGORAS, of Temnos, Greek rhetorician of the Rhodian school and teacher of oratory in Rome, flourished during the first half of the 1st century B.C. He obtained a great reputation among a certain section and founded a special school, the members of which called themselves Hermagorei.

  • St Mary's College was in fact formally founded in 1382, and the school had been going on since 1373 (A.

  • He founded no less than three colleges, two at Oxford, one at Higham Ferrers, while there is reason to believe that he suggested and inspired the foundation of Eton and of King's College.

  • This was St Bernard's College, founded by Chicheley under licence in mortmain in 1437 for Cistercian monks, on the model of Gloucester Hall and Durham College for the southern and northern Benedictines.

  • Delaware is the seat of the Ohio Wesleyan University (co-educational), founded by the Ohio Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church in 1841, and opened as a college in 1844; it includes a college of liberal arts (1844), an academic department (1841), a school of music (1877), a school of fine arts (1877), a school of oratory (1894), a business school (1895), and a college of medicine (the Cleveland College of Physicians and Surgeons, at Cleveland, Ohio; founded as the Charity Hospital Medical College in 1863, and the medical department of the university of Wooster until 1896, when, under its present name, it became a part of Ohio Wesleyan University).

  • The city of Leon, founded by Francisco Hernandez de Cordova in 1523, was originally situated at the head of the western bay of Lake Managua, and was not removed to its present position till 1610.

  • Thus the court of king's bench (curia regis de banco) was founded, and the foundation of the court of common pleas was provided for in one of the articles of Magna Carta.

  • Unlike Victor Hugo and Balzac, she founded ' no school, though Fromentin, Theuriet, Cherbuliez, Fabre and Bazin might be claimed as her collateral descendants.

  • The church of St Just, founded in the 10th century, has good wood-carving.

  • For a further discussion founded upon the observations of Q.

  • Lever's grammar school, founded in 1641, had Robert Ainsworth, the Latin lexicographer, and John Lempriere, author of the classical dictionary, among its masters.

  • According to the story, Evander left the Arcadian town of Pallantion about sixty years before the Trojan War and founded Pallanteum or Palatium on the hill afterwards called the Palatine.

  • To the west of the town is the grammar school of Giggleswick, one of the principal public schools in the north of England, founded in 15.12.

  • The same year German settlers from Pennsylvania founded New Mecklenburg, the present Shepherdstown, on the Potomac, and others soon followed.

  • Under the influence of Archbishop Chicheley, who had himself founded two colleges in imitation of Wykeham, and Thomas Bekynton, king's secretary and privy seal, and other Wyke - hamists, Henry VI., on the 11th of October 1440, founded, in imitation of Winchester College, "a college in the parish church of Eton by Windsor not far from our birthplace," called the King's College of the Blessed Mary of Eton by Windsor, as "a sort of first-fruits of his taking the government on himself."

  • Having obtained a papal bull, he founded it by deed of the 12th of June 1458, converting the hospital into a college with a president and six fellows, to which college two days later Magdalen Hall surrendered itself and its possessions, its members being incorporated into "the New College of St Mary Magdalen."

  • The foundation is commonly dated from this year and not from 1448, when Magdalen Hall was founded, though if not dated from 1448 it surely dates from 1458, when that hall and St John's Hospital were converted into Magdalen College.

  • Equity here is defined to mean "any body of rules existing by the side of the original civil law, founded on distinct principles, and claiming incidentally to supersede the civil law in virtue of a superior sanctity inherent in those principles."

  • Another was the jealousy prevailing in England against the principles of the Roman law on which English equity to a large extent was founded.

  • The city is served by the Chesapeake & Ohio, and the Southern railways, and is best known as the seat of the University of Virginia, which was founded by Thomas Jefferson.

  • Here are also the Rawlings Institute for girls, founded as the Albemarle Female Institute in 1857, and a University school.

  • The university, founded in 1869, built mainly of basalt, has schools of arts, medicine, chemistry and mineralogy.

  • He founded the Madrasa or college for Mahommedan education at Calcutta, primarily out of his own funds; and he projected the foundation of an Indian institute in England.

  • The town is one of the oldest in Norway, founded in the 8th or 9th century, but the present town is modern, though narrow, winding streets and wooden houses give it an antique appearance.

  • Though the bishop's see was removed to Christiansand in 1685, the Romanesque cathedral church of St Swithun, founded by the English bishop Reinald in the end of the 11th century, and rebuilt after being burned down in 1272, remains, and, next to the cathedral of Trondhjem, is the most interesting stone church in Norway.

  • A Congregational society was founded in 1662, and its old church, dating from 1702, stood until 1906.

  • to Gilbert de Gaunt, whose son and heir Walter founded the priory and endowed it with the manor of Bridlington and other lands.

  • For a short time he assisted Charles Osborne in editing the Philanthropist; in 1819 he went to St Louis, Missouri, and there in 1819-1820 took an active part in the slavery controversy; and in 1821 he founded at Mount Pleasant, Ohio, an anti-slavery paper, the Genius of Universal Emancipation.

  • In 1836-1838 Lundy edited in Philadelphia a new anti-slavery weekly, The National Enquirer, which he had founded, and which under the editorship of John G.

  • He supported Gambetta's candidature there in 1867, and in 1870 he founded an anti-imperial journal, L'Egalite.

  • In 1637 he emigrated with Davenport to Massachusetts, and in the following year (March 1638) he and Davenport founded New Haven.

  • It was founded (perhaps on the site of an early Sicanian settlement) by colonists from Gela about 582 B.C., and, though the lastest city of importance founded by the Greeks in Sicily, soon acquired a position second to that of Syracuse alone, owing to its favourable situation for trade with Carthage and to the fertility of its territory.

  • Copland about 1550, is founded on a French romance La Genealogie ...

  • retained the rest of Bavaria, but made several divisions of their territory, the most important of which was in 1392, when the branches of Ingoldstadt, Munich and Landshut were founded.

  • Crossing the Orange River at this spot in September 1848, Sir Harry noted that it was "a beautiful site for a town," and in the May following the town was founded.

  • From 1701 to 17 21 Collier was employed on his Great Historical, Geographical, Genealogical and Poetical Dictionary, founded on, and partly translated from, Louis Moreri's Dictionnaire historique, and in the compilation and issue of the two volumes folio of his own Ecclesiastical History of Great Britian from the first planting of Christianity to the end of the reign of Charles II.

  • Institutions possessing a special character are the monti frumentarii, public grain deposits, founded for the purpose of supplying peasant proprietors with seed corn, debts being paid in kind with interest after harvest.

  • - p west coast, which must from their names have been Greek, though we do not know when or by whom they were founded.

  • 61) states that he founded other cities also.

  • The cities which they founded - Cornus, Tharros, Sulci, Nora, Caralesare all on the coast of the island, and it is doubtful to what extent they penetrated into the interior.

  • It is the seat of the New York State Agricultural Experiment Station and of Hobart College (nonsectarian), which was first planned in 1812, was founded in 1822 (the majority of its incorporators being members of the Protestant Episcopal church) as successor to Geneva Academy, received a full charter as Geneva College in 1825, and was renamed Hobart Free College in 1852 and Hobart College in 1860, in honour of Bishop John Henry Hobart.

  • He contributed to the Antologia, a celebrated Florentine review, and in 1847 founded a newspaper called L' Italia, the programme of which, was "Reform and Nationality."

  • Of the old castle, called Nenagh Round, dating from the time of King John, there still exists the circular donjon or keep. There are no remains of the hospital founded in 1200 for Austin canons, nor of the Franciscan friary, founded in the reign of Henry III.

  • To the north of the village, which has extended greatly as a residential suburb of the metropolis, is Mill Hill, with a Roman Catholic Missionary College, opened in 1871, with branches at Rosendaal, Holland and Brixen, Austria, and a preparatory school at Freshfield near Liverpool; and a large grammar school founded by Nonconformists in 1807.

  • founded a town here, which was peopled chiefly with Protestant refugees from Holland.

  • It is the oldest existing European settlement on the South American continent, having been founded by Diego Castellon in 1523 under the name of Nueva Toledo.

  • In 1847 he began to act as Privatdozent in the university, and founded with Reinhardt the Archiv fiir pathologische Anatomie and Physiologic, which, after his collaborator's death in 1852, he carried on alone, and in 1848 he went as a member of a government commission to investigate an outbreak of typhus in upper Silesia.

  • In literature Megara figures as the reputed home of the comedian Susarion, and in the 4th century gave its name to a school of philosophy founded by Euclid.

  • had lately founded and endowed for the Jesuits.

  • Attempts have been made, principally founded on some remarks of Huygens, to show that Descartes had learned the principles of refraction from the manuscript of a treatise by Willebrord Snell, but the facts are uncertain; and, so far as Descartes founds his optics on any one, it is probably on the researches of Kepler.

  • A Latin abridgment of philosophy, dated 1784, tells us that the innate ideas of Descartes are founded on no arguments, and are now universally abandoned.

  • The free grammar-school was founded in 1548 by William Ermysted, a canon of St Paul's, London.

  • Near the cathedral is the episcopal palace, and in the same part of the town is the Batthyaneum, founded by Bishop Count Batthyany in 1794.

  • The bishopric was founded in the 1th century by King Ladislaus I.

  • From this period dates the castle, and also the buildings of the university, founded by Gabriel Bethlen, and now used as barracks.

  • In support of his theory he founded, in combination with H.

  • Paris was founded about 1825, was incorporated in 1853, and was re-incorporated in 1873.

  • Near Palo is the modern sea-bathing resort Ladispoli, founded by Prince Odescalchi.

  • In Ireland the game took root very gradually, but in Ulster, owing doubtless to constant intercourse with Scotland, such clubs as have been founded are strong in numbers and play.

  • The Bowling Associations of Victoria and New South Wales were established in 1880, and it was not until 1892 that the Scottish Bowling Association was founded.

  • In the Yale Divinity School his influence was powerful, and in 1833 one of his foremost opponents, Bennet Tyler (1783-1858), founded in East Windsor a Theological Institute to offset Taylor's teaching at Yale.

  • As a thank-offering he dedicated his daughter ZElfled to the Church, and founded the monastery of Whitby.

  • The latter selected a position a few hundred yards to the north-east of the old city of Chung-tu or Yenking, where he founded the new city of Ta-tu ("great capital"), called by the Mongols Taidu or Daitu, but also KhanBalik; and from this time dates the use of the latter name as applied to this site.

  • Stahl founded his doctrine of "phlogiston."

  • Tubingen's chief claim to attention lies in its famous university, founded in 1477 by Duke Eberhard of Wurttemberg.

  • The country in the neighbourhood of Tubingen is very attractive; one of the most interesting points is the former Cistercian monastery of Bebenhausen, founded in 1185, and now a royal hunting-château.

  • It was about this time that she founded the order of St Saviour, or Bridgittines, of which the principal house, at Vadstena, was richly endowed by King Magnus II.

  • The free grammar school was founded in 1525.

  • In 1002 Wulfric, earl of Mercia, founded here a Benedictine abbey, and by charter of 1004 granted to it the town with other large endowments.

  • Chesterfield grammar school was founded in 1574.

  • The village was founded by David Dale (1739-1806) in 1785, with the support of Sir Richard Arkwright, inventor of the spinning-frame, who thought the spot might be made the Manchester of Scotland.

  • The Old Church, founded in the 11th century, but in its present form dating from 1476, contains the monuments of two famous admirals of the 17th century, Martin van Tromp and Piet Hein, as well as the tomb of the naturalist Leeuwenhoek, born at Delft in 1632.

  • The most important educational institutions are the Birmingham medical college and college of pharmacy; the Birmingham dental college; a school of art and a conservatory of music. At East Lake station, in the north-east of the city, is Howard College (Baptist; founded at Marion, Perry county, in 1841 as an academy; granted first collegiate degrees in 1848; opened in East Lake in 1887); and 2 m.

  • In 1871 a land company, promoted by railway officials, founded Birmingham.

  • Of the Latin version there were about thirty editions, founded on the original translation by Gerard of Cremona.

  • The Albanian settlements in southern Italy and Sicily were founded in 1444, 1464 and 1468; minor immigrations followed in the three succeeding centuries.

  • There are also several Albanian settlements in European Turkey and Asia Minor, some founded by military colonists who received grants of land from successive sultans, others owing their origin to enforced migrations after insurrections in Albania.

  • A little north of Preveza are the considerable ruins of Nikopolis, founded by Octavian to commemorate the victory of Actium.

  • A new Bulgarian dynasty, that of Shishman, was founded at Ochrida after the death of Simeon.

  • Southern Albania and Epirus remained under Byzantine domination till 1204, when, after the capture of Constantinople by the crusaders, Michael Comnenus, a member of the imperial family, withdrew to Epirus and founded an independent sovereignty known as the Despotate of Epirus at Iannina; his realm included the whole of southern Albania, Acarnania and Aetolia.

  • At the grammar school, founded in 1528, Dr Samuel Johnson was a master about 17 3 2, but found the work unbearable.

  • Neustadt was founded in 1192, and was a favourite residence of numerous Austrian sovereigns, acquiring the title of the "everfaithful town" (die allezeit getreue Stadt) from its unfailing loyalty.

  • Other buildings include the grammar school, founded in 1532 and rebuilt in 1893, a town hall and corn exchange, erected in 1866 in Italian style, with an assembly room.

  • They are: Methodist New Connexion (founded 1797-1798); Bible Christians (1815); United Methodist Free Churches 2 (about 1836); Primitive Methodists (founded 1807-1810); Independent Methodist Churches (about 1 806); Wesleyan Reform Union (1850, reorganized 1859).

  • The church of St Mary and St German belonged to a Benedictine abbey founded under a grant from William the Conqueror in 1069 and raised to the dignity of a mitred abbey by Pope Alexander II.

  • 17 The principle of ministerial parity which is fundamental in Presbyterianism is founded not merely on apostolic example but on the words of Christ Himself:" Ye know that the princes of the Gentiles exercise dominion over them, and they that are great exercise authority upon them.

  • Following the lead of the Independents, who set up Mansfield College at Oxford, the Presbyterian Church has founded Westminster College at Cambridge as a substitute for its Theological Hall in London.

  • But there were exceptions: Irish Presbyterians from Ulster formed a church at Londonderry, New Hampshire, which, about 1729, grew into a presbytery; the Boston presbytery, organized in 1745, became in 1774 the synod of New England with three presbyteries and sixteen ministers; and there were two independent presbyteries, that of "the Eastward" organized at Boothbay, Maine, in 1771, and that of Grafton, in New Hampshire, founded by Eleazar Wheelock and other ministers interested in Dartmouth College.

  • Troy is the seat of Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, founded.

  • The Emma Willard School, founded as the Troy Female Seminary in 1821 by Mrs Emma Willard (1787-1870), 1 is one of the oldest schools for women in the United States.

  • Dumas's novel, Memoirs of a Physician, is founded on his adventures; see also a series of papers in the Dublin University Magazine, vols.

  • Giovanni Evangelista, which was founded along with the Benedictine monastery in 981, but as a building dates from 1510, and has a façade erected by Simone Moschino early in the 17th century.

  • The royal university of Parma, founded in 1601 by Ranuccio I., and reconstituted by Philip of Bourbon in 1768, has faculties in law, medicine and natural science, and possesses an observatory, and natural science collections, among which is the Eritrean Zoological Museum.

  • At this time the Ostrogothic kingdom, founded in Italy by Theodoric the Great, was shaken by internal dissensions, of which Justinian resolved to avail himself.

  • He also defended the privileges of the Irish Protestants in the press, and especially in the Freeman's Journal, founded in 1763.

  • This university was founded in 1621 and the university of Buenos Aires in 1821, but although Bonpland and some other European scientists were members of the faculty of Buenos Aires in its early years, neither there nor at Cordoba was any marked attention given to the natural sciences until President Sarmiento (official term, 1868-1874) initiated scientific instruction at the university of Cordoba under the eminent German naturalist, Dr Hermann Burmeister (1807-1892), and founded the National Observatory at Cordoba and placed it under the direction of ' There are two distinct statistical offices compiling immigration returns and their totals do not agree, owing in part to the traffic between Buenos Aires and Montevideo.

  • The normal schools, maintained by the state on a secular basis, were founded by President Sarmiento, who engaged experienced teachers in the United States to direct them; their work is excellent; notably, their model primary schools.

  • The national government has founded several scholarships (some in art) for study abroad.

  • Churches and chapels are founded and maintained by religious orders and private gift as well.

  • Finding their comrades did not return, Irala and his companions determined to descend the river, and on their downward journey opposite the mouth of the river Pilcomayo, finding a suitable site for colonizing, they founded (1536) what proved to be the first permanent Spanish settlement in the interior of South America, the future city of Asuncion (15th August 1536).

  • In 1573 Juan de Garay, at the head of an expedition despatched from Asuncion, founded the city of Santa Fe near the abandoned settlements of San Espiritu and Corpus Christi.

  • In 1553 an expedition from Peru made their way through the mountain region and founded the city of Santiago del Estero, that of Tucuman in 1565, and that of Cordoba in 1573.

  • In 1889 the association of the " Union Civica " was founded, and the organization undertaken by Dr Leandro Alem, Dr Aristobulo del Valle, Dr Ber nardo Irigoyen, Dr Vicente Lopez, Dr Lucio Lopez, Dr Oscar Lilliedale and other leading citizens.

  • - 1 Bert Nancy, founded in 1824..

  • The Hotel des Invalides founded by Louis XIV.

  • A lyce is founded in a town by decree of the president of the republic, with the advice of the superior council of public instruction.

  • Salem was founded in 1766 by Friedrich Wilhelm von Marschall (1721-1802), a friend of Zinzendorf, and the financial manager of the board controlling the Moravian purchase made in North Carolina in 1753, consisting of 100,000 acres, and called Wachovia.

  • Winston was founded in 1851 as the countyseat and was named in honour of Major Joseph Winston (1746-1815), a famous Indian fighter, a soldier during the War of Independence and a representative in Congress in1793-1795and 1803-1807.

  • His chief celebrity, however, is founded upon the consummate ability with which he discharged the civil duties of his office.

  • She afterwards resided at Somerset House and at Hammersmith, where she had privately founded a convent.

  • founded at Patzcuaro in 1540 by Bishop Quiroga.

  • Morelia, first known as Valladolid, was founded in 1541 by Viceroy Mendoza.

  • Among the educational establishments of the place must be mentioned the classical school (Gymnasium), founded in 1560, and a school of navigation.

  • Stralsund was founded in 1234, and, though several times destroyed, steadily prospered.

  • some 300 inhabitants living in low thatched or iron-roofed huts, under the supervision of a police commissioner and other officials of Ecuador, by which country the group was annexed in 183 2, when General Villamil founded Floreana on Charles Island, naming it in honour of Juan Jose Flores, president of Ecuador.

  • William founded and richly endowed the abbey at Arbroath, and many of the Scottish towns owe their origin to his charters.

  • Corinth, Chalcis, Eretria and Miletus, Aegina founded no colonies.

  • 1842 -),whom he had met when he was at Widnes, and thus founded the great chemical manufacturing firm of Brunner, Mond & Co.

  • The kingdom reached its highest point of importance during the reign of Solomon, but, shortly after his death, it was broken up by the rebellion of Jeroboam, who founded the separate kingdom of Israel with its capital at Shechem.

  • About the middle of the 12th century the country was subdued by the duke of Saxony, Henry the Lion, who founded a bishopric at Ratzeburg, and after Henry's fall in 1180 it formed part of the smaller duchy of Saxony, which was governed by Duke Bernhard.

  • It is a military station, and was founded towards the close of the 11th century.

  • It was founded on the 16th of July 17 9 1 by several members of the Jacobin Club, who refused to sign a petition presented by this body, demanding the deposition of Louis XVI.

  • A monastery founded here by St Carthagh in 633 became so celebrated as a seat of learning that it is said no fewer than twenty churches were erected in its vicinity.

  • The two classes are supposed to have been founded separately (Exod.

  • Other buildings of note are the massive episcopal palace (1470-1500), afterwards a royal palace, and the old gymnasium founded by Gustavus Adolphus in 1627, which contains the valuable library of old books and manuscripts belonging to the diocese and state college, and collection of coins and antiquities.

  • The three cities founded by these settlers - Lindus, Ialysus and Camirusbelonged to the "League of Six Cities," by which the Dorian colonists in Asia Minor sought to protect themselves against the barbarians of the neighbouring mainland.

  • Four years later the inhabitants for the most part abandoned their former residences and concentrated in the newly founded city of Rhodes.

  • The Norwegian order of knighthood of St Olaf was founded in 1847 by Oscar I., king of Sweden and Norway, in memory of this king.

  • His efforts met with great success, and in 1800 he founded what was virtually a new and independent church organization on the Methodist system, of which he became the presiding elder, and eventually (1807) bishop. This church is officially the Evangelical Association, but its adherents have been variously known as "New Methodists."

  • Troy he founded, in conjunction with Mopsus, another famous seer, the oracle of Mallos in Cilicia.

  • According to another story, he returned to Argos from Troy, but, being dissatisfied with the condition of things there, left it for Acarnania, where he founded Amphilochian Argos on the Ambracian gulf.

  • Among institutions are the Battersea Polytechnic, the Royal Masonic Institution for girls, founded in 1788, and Church of England and Wesleyan Training Colleges.

  • The former was founded in 1880 by an act of the state legislature as the Tuskegee State Normal School, and was opened in July 1881 by Booker T.

  • In honour of this great deliverance, the state of Holland founded the university, which was speedily to make the name of Leiden illustrious throughout Europe.

  • We already hear of them as attacking Babylonia in the 9th year of Samsu-iluna the son of Khammurabi, and about 1780 B.C. they overran Babylonia and founded a dynasty there which lasted for 576 years and nine months.

  • It was founded upon original sources, in order to consult which the author resided for a considerable time in Paris.

  • The grammar school was founded in 1618.

  • On the same side of the Gede is the health resort of Sindanglaya (founded 1850-1860), with a mineral spring containing salt, and close by is the country residence of Chipanas, belonging to the governor-general.

  • The present city was founded in 944 by Bulukkin b.

  • It occupies the site of the ancient Beneventum, originally Maleventum or Maluentum, supposed in the imperial period to have been founded by Diomedes.

  • The new town kept the old name until 313, when a Latin colony under the name Suessa Aurunca was founded here.

  • Milton Academy (a non-sectarian school) was founded in 1798, opened in 1805, and suspended in 1867; a new academy was opened in 1885.

  • But the principles on which the theory was founded compelled a further advance.

  • in the same direction lies the old and wealthy abbey of Tepl, founded in 1193.

  • He founded a new readership in Divinity, and presented Greek MSS.

  • In 1657 he founded a new university at Durham, which was suppressed at the Restoration.

  • DEWAS, two native states of India, in the Malwa Political Charge of Central India, founded in the first half of the 18th century by two brothers, Punwar Mahrattas, who came into Malwa with the peshwa, Baji Rao, in 1728.

  • The city has a public library (1905), and is the seat of an Institute of Telegraphy (founded in 1874; chartered in 1900) and of Valparaiso University (1873; formerly known as the Valparaiso Normal Training School).

  • This university was founded to furnish a practical education at a low cost, and in 1910 had 187 instructors and a total enrolment of 5367 students.

  • He founded no system; he contributed nothing of importance to philosophical science; he initiated nothing which has survived him.

  • He is said to have baptized the emperor Philip and his son, to have done some building in the catacombs, to have improved the organization of the church in Rome, to have appointed officials to register the deeds of the martyrs, and to have founded several churches in France.

  • Of English plays, the interlude called Jack Juggler (between 1547 and 1553) was based on the Amphitruo, and the lost play called the Historie of Error (acted in 1577) was probably based on the Menae-chmi; Nicholas Udall's Ralph Royster Doyster, the first English comedy (acted before 1551, first printed 1566), is founded on the Miles gloriosus; Shakespeare's Comedy of Errors (about 1591) is an adaptation of the Menaechmi; and his Falstaff may be regarded as an idealized reproduction or development of the braggart soldier of Plautus and Terence - a type of character which reappears in other forms not only in English literature (e.g.

  • 1 It was said to have been founded by a band of emigrants from Phocis, under the guidance of two Athenian leaders, named Philogenes and Damon, but it joined the Ionian confederacy by accepting the government of Athenian rulers of the house of Codrus.

  • The modern town in the immediate neighbourhood, still known as Fokia, was founded by the Genoese in 1421 on account of the rich alum mines in the neighbourhood.

  • A college, founded by government in 1853, was made over in 1888 to a local committee, being mainly supported by the munificence of the rani Svarnamayi.

  • He received his education first at La Roche, in the Arve valley, then at the college of Annecy, founded by Eustace Chappius, ambassador in England of Charles V., in 1549.

  • A complete life, founded on the lately discovered process of 1626 and the new letters, was being prepared by the author of the present article at the time of his death.

  • Bela, which was founded in 1802 as a cantonment, became a district headquarters after the mutiny.

  • The collegiate church at Dammartin was founded by him in 1480, and his tomb and effigy are in the chancel.

  • San Pietro de' Cassinensi (outside the Porta Romana) is a basilica with nave and aisles, founded in the beginning of the i 1th century by San Pietro Vincioli on the site of a building of the 6th century, and remarkable for its conspicuous spire, its ancient granite and marble columns, its walnut stall-work of 1535 by Stefano de' Zambelli da Bergamo, and its numerous pictures (by Perugino, &c.).

  • In 1837 he had founded the Zeitschrift fiir Philosophie as an organ of his views, more especially on the subject of the philosophy of religion, where he was in alliance with C. H.

  • 1584), discoverer of the northern passage to Archangel in Russia (1553) St Bartholomew's chapel, originally attached to the hospital for lepers (one of the first in England), founded by Gundulph, bishop of Rochester, in 1070, is in part Norman.

  • Cartagena was founded about the year 243 B.C. by the Carthaginian Hasdrubal, and was called Carthago Nova or New Carthage, to distinguish it from the African city of Carthage.

  • Cuyaba was founded in 1719 by Paulista gold hunters, and its goldwashings, now apparently exhausted, yielded rich results in the 18th century.

  • The suggestion of Bourseul and the experiments of Reis are founded on the idea that a succession of currents, corresponding in number to the successive undulations of the pressure on the membrane of the transmitting instrument, could reproduce at the receiving station sounds of the same character as those produced at the sending station.

  • Forest nurseries have also been founded.

  • Founded in 1735 by the marquis Carlo Ginori, they maintained a reputation of the very highest kind down to about 1860; but since then they have not kept pace with their younger rivals in other lands.

  • In 1893, after many vicissitudes, the Italian Socialist Labor Party was founded, and has now become the Italian Socialist Party, in which the majority of Italian workmen enrol themselves.

  • On the i7th of July 1898 a national fund for the insurance of workmen against illness and old age was founded by law on the principle of optional registration.

  • Each college is founded by royal decree, and consists of a president, with not fewer than ten and not more than twenty members.

  • The institutions which co-operate with the universities are the special schools for engineers at Turin, Naples, Rome and Bologna (and others attached to some of the universities), the higher technical institute at Milan, the higher veterinary schools of Milan, Naples and Turin, the institute for higher studies at Florence (Istituto di studi superiori, pratici e di perfezionamento), the literary and scientific academy of Milan, the higher institutes for the training of female teachers at Florence and Rome, the Institute of Social Studies at Florence, the higher commercial schools at Venice, Ban and Genoa, the commercial university founded by L.

  • There are in Italy six clearing houses, namely, the ancient one at Leghorn, and those of Genoa, Milan, Rome, Florence and Turin, founded since 1882.

  • kingdom, founded by the Lombards, recognized by the Franks and recently claimed by eminent Italian feudatories, virtually ceased to exist.

  • Philip founded the Bourbon line of Spanish kings, renouncing in Italy all that his Habsburg predecessors had gained.

  • Robilants opposition to a precipitate acceptance of the Austrian hint was founded upon fear lest King Humbert at Vienna might be pressed to disavow Irredentist aspirations, and upon a desire to arrange for a visit of the emperor Francis Joseph to Rome in return for King Humberts visit to Vienna.

  • Upon this clause Italy founded her claim to a protectorate over Abyssinia.

  • Despite the prevailing poverty, it has also a real-school with good buildings, founded in 1865, and attended by about 300 pupils in 1900.

  • According to Strype, he was invited about this time to become a fellow of the college founded by Cardinal Wolsey at Oxford; but Dean Hook shows that there is some reason to doubt this.

  • The city is the seat of the state asylum for feeble-minded children (established at Jacksonville in 1865 and removed to Lincoln in 1878), and of Lincoln College (Presbyterian) founded in 1865.

  • Rene Descartes, a faithful though not an unsuspected Roman Catholic, founded modern philosophy by his startingpoint of universal doubt and by his arguments in reply.

  • On this second visit he became acquainted with some of the leading Abolitionists, and founded later in Paris a Societe des Amis des Noirs, of which he was president during 1790 and 1791.

  • Groups founded on polypcharacters are printed in ordinary type, those founded on medusacharacters in italics.

  • He founded an oriental institute at Woking, and for some years edited the Asiatic Quarterly Review.

  • The university, founded in 1473, existed until 17 9 7.

  • A bishopric was again founded in 1821, with nearly the same boundaries as the old archbishopric, but it was placed under Cologne.

  • In 1879 he founded the Aachener Geschichtsverein, and having spent his concluding years at Bonn and at Aix-la-Chapelle, he died in the latter city on the 27th of April 1887.

  • From Hartlepool Hilda moved to Whitby, where in 657 she founded the famous double monastery which in the time of the first abbess included among its members five future bishops, Bosa, 'Etta, Oftfor, John and Wilfrid II.

  • sees traditionally founded by Apostles, or of sees with a special secular position.

  • In 1787 he was appointed lecturer in chemistry to the Royal Artillery, and when the university was founded in 1810 he was selected to be the professor of chemistry.

  • He lived first as an anchorite in the forest of Mendonk, and afterwards in the monastery founded with his assistance by Amandus at Ghent.

  • Among the educational establishments is the State University, founded by King William I.

  • The oldest Belgian newspaper, the Gazet van Gent, was founded here in 1667.

  • Loretto School, one of the foremost public schools in Scotland, occupies the site of the chapel of Our Lady of Loretto, which was founded in 1534 by Thomas Duthie, a hermit from Mt Sinai.

  • Her father (the Congregational minister of the town) and her mother were both descended from members of the company that, under John Davenport, founded New Haven in 1638; and the community in which she spent her childhood was one of the most intellectual in New England.

  • In 1832 her father, who had for six years been the pastor of a church in Boston, accepted the presidency of the newly founded Lane Theological Seminary at Cincinnati.

  • He established an extraordinary reputation; his personality had a winning attractiveness; and he founded a school of mystics who powerfully affected Judaism after the master's death.

  • The town was founded as capital of the colony in 1840 by Governor Hobson.

  • He also in 1332 founded a.

  • The Gild of the Holy Cross, founded in the 13th century for the support of poor priests and others, exercised great authority over the town for many years.

  • The Russian plant-anatomist, Russow, may be said to have founded the consideration of plant tissues from the point of view of descent (Vergleichende Untersuchungen ber die Leilbundelkryptogamen, St Petersburg, 1872; and Betrachtungen ber Leitbndel und Grundgewebe, Dorpat, 1875).

  • Hales (1727I 733) discussed the rotting of wounds, cankers, &c., but much had to be done with the microscope before any real progress was possible, and it is easily intelligible that until the theory of nutrition of the higher plants had been founded by the work of Ingenhouss, Priestley and De Saussure, the way was not even prepared for accurate knowledge of cryptogamic parasites and the diseases they induce.

  • Darius founded a new city about 30 m.

  • Of Greek towns which they founded here we know Alexandria in Carmania (Plin.

  • s.v.), Antiochia in Persis, founded apparently by Seleucus I.

  • But it shared the fate of its predecessor; when the empire was founded the Sassanids could no longer remain in Persis but transferred their headquarters to Ctesiphon.

  • This system of geography founded a new epoch, and the book - translated into English, Dutch and French - was the unchallenged standard for more than a century.

  • stock of first-hand information on which an improved system of geography might be founded.

  • The great Phoenician colony of Carthage, founded before 800 B.C., perpetuated the commercial enterprise of the parent state, and extended the sphere of practical trade to the ocean shores of Africa and Europe.

  • In the year 1519 Panama was founded by Pedrarias; and the conquest of Peru by Pizarro followed a few years afterwards.

  • The first of the existing geographical societies was that of Paris, founded in 1825 under the title Of La Societe de Geographie.

  • The Berlin Geographical Society (Gesellschaft fiir Erdkunde) is second in order of seniority, having been founded in 1827.

  • The Royal Geographical Society, which was founded in London in 1830, comes third on the list; but it may be viewed as a direct result of the earlier African Association founded in 1788.

  • In later times, towns have been more often founded in proximity to valuable mineral resources, and at critical points or nodes on lines of communication.

  • So it seems that the dynasty, which more than half a century later succeeded in throwing off the Assyrian yoke and founded the Median empire, was derived from this Dayukku, and that his name was thus introduced into the Median traditions, which contrary to history considered him as founder of the kingdom.

  • He soon, however, became entirely engrossed with colonial affairs, and, having impressed John Stuart Mill, Colonel Torrens and other leading economists with the value of his ideas, became a leading though not a conspicuous manager of the South Australian Company, by which the colony of South Australia was ultimately founded.

  • Of the other thirty-three churches in the city those of St Foillan (founded in the 12th century, but twice rebuilt, in the 15th and 17th centuries, and restored in 1883) and St Paul, with its beautiful stained-glass windows, are remarkable.

  • Among the schools may be mentioned the magnificently equipped Rhenish-Westphalian Polytechnic School (built 1865-1870) and the school of mining and electricity, founded in 1897.

  • It possesses a Roman Catholic seminary for priests, and was the seat of a university founded in 1635, which was transferred to Budapest in 1777.

  • The Portland Society of Natural History, founded in 1843 and incorporated in 1850, has a building (1880) containing a library and natural history collections.

  • Before his death his eldest son, John Howard, was a knight and already advanced by his marriage with Joan of Cornwall, one of the bastard line founded by Richard of Cornwall, king of the Romans.

  • From this time the spreading genealogy of the Howards drew its origins from most of the illustrious names of the houses founded after the Norman Conquest.

  • Thomas, son of the fourth duke of Norfolk's marriage with the daughter and heir of Thomas, Lord Audley of Walden, founded the line of the present earls of Suffolk and Berkshire and of the extinct Lords Howard of Escrick.

  • There may be mentioned further the old buildings of the grammar school, founded in 1563, and of the charity called Christ's Hospital (1583); while the town-hall in the marketplace, dating from 1677, is attributed to Inigo Jones.

  • Abingdon (Abbedun, Abendun) was famous for its abbey, which was of great wealth and importance, and is believed to have been founded in A.D.

  • founded the hospital under its present name.

  • 1489), son of Stephen, count palatine of Zimmern-Veldenz, founded the line of the dukes of Zweibriicken, which became extinct in 1731, when the duchy passed to the Birkenfeld branch, whence it came under the sway of Bavaria in 1799.

  • Meanwhile he had, in 1862, founded the Atheneium as the organ of Liberal Catholicism.

  • The present parish church belonged to an abbey founded in 837 by St Bernard, bishop of Vienne.

  • In the modern church of St Stephen (1854) are preserved tiles from the former Cistercian abbey of Bordesley, founded in 1138, of which the site may be traced at Bordesley Park, 2 m.

  • The remarkably definite and original style formed by Mantegna may be traced out as founded on the study of the antique in Squarcione's atelier, followed by a diligent application of principles of work exemplified by Paolo Uccello and Donatello, with the practical guidance and example of Jacopo Bellini in the sequel.

  • Pernambuco was first settled in 1526 by Christovao Jacques who founded a settlement on the Rio Iguarassu that was afterwards abandoned.

  • The sect was founded by 'Anan in the 8th century, and, after many vicissitudes, still exists.

  • In 1881 Mahommed Ahmed ibn Seyyid Abdullah, a Dongolese, proclaimed himself al-mandi and founded in the eastern Sudan the short-lived empire overthrown by an AngloEgyptian force at the battle of Omdurman in 1898.

  • Don Benito is a thriving and comparatively modern town; for it dates only from the 15th century, when it was founded by refugees from Don Llorente, who deserted their own town owing to the danger of floods from the Guadiana.

  • Agrippa made the fine natural harbour into the main naval station of the Mediterranean fleet, and founded a colony there probably in 31 B.C. The emperor Tiberius died in his villa here.

  • (b) Gaul proper first enters ancient history when the Greek colony of Massilia was founded (?

  • The old Celtic tribes were broken up: instead, municipalities of Roman citizens were founded to rule their territories.

  • The place suffered greatly from the earthquake of 1638, which also destroyed the Benedictine abbey of S Eufemia, founded by Robert Guiscard.

  • In 1827, with Stephen Elliott (1771-1830), the naturalist, he founded the Southern Review, of which he was the sole editor after Elliott's death until 1834, when it was discontinued, and to which he contributed articles on law, travel, and modern and classical literature.

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