Foundations sentence example

foundations
  • Foundations of other buildings are to be seen in other parts of the site, but of little interest.
    26
    7
  • Throughout the middle ages the sancta civitas Trevirorum abounded in religious foundations and was a great seat of monastic learning.
    21
    5
  • The foundations also of the moles that separate the harbours are of Hellenic work, though the existing moles were erected by the Knights of St John.
    13
    4
  • It was at this time that Marius's jealousy of his legate laid the foundations of their future rivalry and mutual hatred.
    15
    6
  • Having circulated a prophecy that the son of Apollo was to be born again, he contrived that there should be found in the foundations of the temple to Aesculapius, then in course of construction at Abonouteichos, an egg in which a small live snake had been placed.
    10
    4
    Advertisement
  • They were pious foundations created for mutual benefit and for purposes of charity.
    11
    5
  • The immense house on the old stone foundations was of wood, plastered only inside.
    21
    15
  • Here, on the 2nd of February, Mendoza laid the foundations of a settlement which in honour of the day he named Santa Maria de Buenos Aires.
    19
    14
  • In 1903 the foundations of this temple were discovered close to the Arch of Trajan, and many fragments of fine sculptures in both the Egyptian and the Greco-Roman style belonging to it were found.
    7
    2
  • He found Sweden in ruins, and devoted his whole life to laying the solid foundations of a new order of things which, in its essential features, has endured to the present day.
    9
    5
    Advertisement
  • But among their countrymen generally strict attendance to religious observances, a wide bounty to religious foundations, may be set down as national characteristics.
    5
    1
  • Jerusalem was rebuilt by Hadrian, orders to this effect being given during the emperor's first journey through Syria in 130, the date of his foundations at.
    8
    4
  • All these villas can be identified with more or less certainty, the best preserved being those on the east extremity, consisting of a large number of vaulted substructures and the foundations perhaps of a Pharos (lighthouse).
    9
    5
  • Among the foundations were discovered fragments of " Mycenaean " pottery.
    5
    1
  • The greatest of their foundations, the temple of Olympian Zeus, will be Academy referred to later.
    8
    4
    Advertisement
  • His second great work, Meditations on the First Philosophy, which had been begun soon after his settlement in the Netherlands, expounded in more detail the foundations of his system, 1 Ouvres, vi.
    6
    3
  • Under the Kin dynasty the walls extended to the south-west of the Tatar portion of the present city, and the foundations of the northern ramparts of the Khan-balik of Kublai Khan are still to be traced at a distance of about 2 m.
    5
    2
  • There were also elementary schools, and municipal foundations in which Latin was taught, in the dominions of the Order.
    6
    3
  • Under the foundations of the church are tombs hewn out of the solid rock.
    3
    0
  • His successors had only to build on his foundations.
    3
    0
    Advertisement
  • On the south side of the façade is a large brick campanile, and the foundations of another may be seen on the north.
    3
    1
  • The foundations of our knowledge of the relief of the Atlantic basin may be said to have been laid by the work of H.M.S.
    3
    1
  • Public charity is exercised through the permanent charitable foundations (opere pie), which are, however, very unequally distributed in the different provinces.
    2
    1
  • - Before leaving the 17th century we must just refer to the writers who laid the foundations of the essentially modern conception of human history as a gradual upward progress.
    6
    5
  • A little to the south of a village called Deir Diwan, and one hour's journey south-east from Bethel, is the site of an ancient place called Khirbet Haiydn, indicated by reservoirs hewn in the rock, excavated tombs and foundations of hewn stone.
    2
    1
    Advertisement
  • The monarchical principle was shaken to its foundations by the English revolution of 1688; it was shattered by the French revolution of 1789; and though it survives as a political force, more or less strongly, in most European countries, "monarchists," in the strict sense of the word, are everywhere a small and dwindling minority.
    4
    3
  • Of these a great proportion came from the cemetery and from the foundations of the railway station.
    1
    0
  • Many educational and benevolent foundations were endowed by him, and it is to Mahommed II.
    1
    0
  • The ministry of the Evkaf or pious foundations was established in 1827 and extended ten years later.
    1
    0
  • The defensive alliance of the city with Lubeck in 1241, extended for other purpose by the treaty of 1255, practically laid the foundations of the Hanseatic League, of which Hamburg continued to be one of the principal members.
    1
    0
    Advertisement
  • Piles are used as foundations in compressible or loose soil.
    1
    0
  • But these excuses were mere trifles, and well deserve to be forgiven, when we think that though the offender was in form acquitted, yet Burke succeeded in these fourteen years of laborious effort in laying the foundations once for all of a moral, just, philanthropic and responsible public opinion in England with reference to India, and in doing so performed perhaps the most magnificent service that any statesman has ever had it in his power to render to humanity.
    1
    0
  • But, after all, it is not as archbishop or statesman, persecutor, papalist or antipapalist that Chicheley is remembered, but for his educational foundations.
    0
    0
  • A zealot for monastic and clerical reform, he introduced a more severe discipline, including the practice of flagellation, into the house, which, under his rule, quickly attained celebrity, and became a model for other foundations.
    0
    0
  • Herod again raised the city to the position of an important capital, restoring the fortifications, and rebuilding the Temple from its foundations.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • This type of crane used to be in great favour, in consequence of the great clearance it gives under the jib, but it is expensive and requires very heavy foundations.
    0
    0
  • The religion of the Hebrew race - properly the Jews - now enters on a new stage, for it should be observed that it was Amos, Isaiah and Micah - prophets of Judah - who laid the actual foundations.
    0
    0
  • There are four Evangelical churches, a Roman Catholic church, a synagogue, several schools, a natural science museum, containing a collection of Harz minerals, the Fenkner museum of antiquities and a number of small foundations.
    0
    0
  • " Thomson and Tait," as it is familiarly called ("T and T" was the authors' own formula), was planned soon after Lord Kelvin became acquainted with Tait, on the latter's appointment to his professorship in Edinburgh, and it was intended to be an all-comprehensive treatise on physical science, the foundations being laid in kinematics and dynamics, and the structure completed with the properties of matter, heat, light, electricity and magnetism.
    0
    0
  • By these alliances the new Charlemagne seemed to have founded his supremacy in South Germany on sure foundations.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • The foundations seem to belong to the 7th century, except those of the colonnade, which was possibly added by Peisistratus.
    0
    0
  • The conclusion that the foundations are those of an old temple burnt by the Persians has been generally accepted, but other portions of Dorpfeld's theory - more especially his assumption that the temple was restored after the Persian War - have provoked much controversy.
    0
    0
  • Between this outlet and the Dipylon were found a boundary-stone, inscribed Epos Kepaµ€LKou, which remains in its place, and the foundations of a large rectangular building, possibly the Pompeium, which may have been a robing-room for the processions which passed this way.
    0
    0
  • The temple is entirely of Pentelic marble, except the foundations and lowest step of the stylobate, which are of Peiraic stone, and the zophoros of the cella, which is in Parian marble.
    0
    0
  • Here were discovered the foundations of the celebrated Asclepieum, together with several inscriptions and a great number of votive reliefs offered by grateful invalids and valetudinarians to the god of healing.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Here a series of excavations, carried out by the British School in 1896-1897 under the direction of Cecil Smith, revealed the foundations of an extensive Greek building, the outlines of which correspond with those of a gymnasium; it possessed a large bath or cistern, and was flanked on two sides by water-courses.
    0
    0
  • The foundations of a temple were laid on the site - probably that of an ancient sanctuary - by Peisistratus, but the building in its ultimate form was for the greater part constructed under the auspices of Antiochus IV.
    0
    0
  • With the exception of the foundations and two lower steps of the stylobate, it was entirely of Pentelic marble, and possessed 104 Corinthian columns, 56 ft.
    0
    0
  • Fragments of Doric columns and foundations were discovered, probably intended for the temple begun by Peisistratus, the orientation of which differed slightly from that of the later structure.
    0
    0
  • At the eastern end of the Acropolis a little circular temple of white marble with a peristyle of 9 Ionic columns was dedicated to Rome and Augustus; its foundations were discovered during the excavations of 1885-1888.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Strikingly similar in design and construction is a large quadrangular building, the foundations of which were discovered by the British School near the presumed Cynosarges; this may perhaps be the Gymnasium of Hadrian, which Pausanias tells us also possessed ioo columns.
    0
    0
  • This centralization of power (Synoecism), to which many Greek peoples never attained, laid the first foundations of Athenian greatness.
    0
    0
  • In addition to the high schools there were a number of academies and other schools, 77 in all, on private foundations.
    0
    0
  • Besides being a contributor to the magazines and encyclopedias on educational and philosophical subjects, he wrote An Introduction to the Study of Philosophy (1889); The Spiritual Sense of Dante's Divina Commedia (1889); Hegel's Logic (1890); and Psychologic Foundations of Education (1898); and edited Appleton's International Education Series and 'Webster's International Dictionary.
    0
    0
  • 705 on the foundations of the basilican church of St John: its plan differs therefore from the normal type in that its arcades run east and west, and the transept in the centre becomes the prayer chamber.
    0
    0
  • - This section is confined to tracing the general trend of the science from its infancy to the foundations of the modern theory.
    0
    0
  • The principles outlined above constitute the foundations of our science; and although it may happen that experiments may be made with which they appear to be not in complete agreement, yet in general they constitute a body of working hypotheses of inestimable value.
    0
    0
  • Bergman laid the foundations of systematic qualitative analysis, and devised methods by which the metals may be separated into groups according to their behaviour with certain reagents.
    0
    0
  • In i 501 he became vice-chancellor; and later on, when chancellor, he was able to forward, if not to initiate entirely, the beneficent schemes of his patroness in the foundations of St.
    0
    0
  • Of a Dominican convent and other religious foundations and churches there are no remains.
    0
    0
  • The making of the new foreshore led to the dredging up of remains of the Patriarchal Church; and the foundations of modern buildings are seldom laid without some objects of antiquity being discovered.
    0
    0
  • In the same year building operations in the Via di Sant' Onofrio revealed the presence of catacombs beneath the foundations: examination of the loculi showed that no martyrs or illustrious persons were buried here.
    0
    0
  • The group of instincts which we class as imitative (and they afford only the foundations on which intelligent imitation is based) are of biological value chiefly, if not solely, in those species which form larger or smaller communities.
    0
    0
  • Under the general heading "Analysis" occur the subheadings "Foundations of Analysis," with the topics theory of functions of real variables, series and other infinite processes, principles and elements of the differential and of the integral calculus, definite integrals, and calculus of variations; "Theory of Functions of Complex Variables," with the topics functions of one variable and of several variables; "Algebraic Functions and their Integrals," with the topics algebraic functions of one and of several variables, elliptic functions and single theta functions, Abelian integrals; "Other Special Functions," with the topics Euler's, Legendre's, Bessel's and automorphic functions; "Differential Equations," with the topics existence theorems, methods of solution, general theory; "Differential Forms and Differential Invariants," with the topics differential forms, including Pfaffians, transformation of differential forms, including tangential (or contact) transformations, differential invariants; "Analytical Methods connected with Physical Subjects," with the topics harmonic analysis, Fourier's series, the differential equations of applied mathematics, Dirichlet's problem; "Difference Equations and Functional Equations," with the topics recurring series, solution of equations of finite differences and functional equations.
    0
    0
  • Under the general heading "Geometry" occur the subheadings "Foundations," with the topics principles of geometry, non-Euclidean geometries, hyperspace, methods of analytical geometry; "Elementary Geometry," with the topics planimetry, stereometry, trigonometry, descriptive geometry; "Geometry of Conics and Quadrics," with the implied topics; "Algebraic Curves and Surfaces of Degree higher than the Second," with the implied topics; "Transformations and General Methods for Algebraic Configurations," with the topics collineation, duality, transformations, correspondence, groups of points on algebraic curves and surfaces, genus of curves and surfaces, enumerative geometry, connexes, complexes, congruences, higher elements in space, algebraic configurations in hyperspace; "Infinitesimal Geometry: applications of Differential and Integral Calculus to Geometry," with the topics kinematic geometry, curvature, rectification and quadrature, special transcendental curves and surfaces; "Differential Geometry: applications of Differential Equations to Geometry," with the topics curves on surfaces, minimal surfaces, surfaces determined by differential properties, conformal and other representation of surfaces on others, deformation of surfaces, orthogonal and isothermic surfaces.
    0
    0
  • The grand vizier (sadr-azam), who is nominated by the sultan, presides ex officio over the privy council (mejliss-i-khass), which, besides the Sheikh-ul-Islam, comprises the ministers of home and foreign affairs, war, finance, marine, commerce and public works, justice, public instruction and " pious foundations " (evkaf), with the grand master of ordnance and the president of the council of state.
    0
    0
  • Such foundations had been created from the earliest times, and the execution of the testator's wishes was generally left to his descendants, under the supervision of some high official designated in the act of endowment.
    0
    0
  • Just to the south of this are the foundations of a small temple of Artemis.
    0
    0
  • The foundations now visible present a very curious appearance, consisting of a series of concentric walls.
    0
    0
  • The stage buildings are not preserved much above their foundations, and show signs of later repairs; but their general character can be clearly seen.
    0
    0
  • (2nd ed., Göttingen, 1792-1801); and in several works he helped to lay the foundations of statistical science.
    0
    0
  • This observatory, the foundations of which were fixed in the snow that appears to cover the summit to a depth of ten metres, was built in September 1893, and Janssen, in spite of his sixty-nine years, made the ascent and spent four days taking observations.
    0
    0
  • The foundations of the modern science of magnetism were laid by William Gilbert.
    0
    0
  • Careful experiment and observation, not the inner consciousness, are, he insists, the only foundations of true science.
    0
    0
  • For many generations the charitable foundations for the teaching and training of youth were a conspicuous feature in the economy of the city.
    0
    0
  • The difficulties he encountered in producing it were very great, for the foundations had been ill-prepared b3 his predecessors, and he was obliged to be artisan and architect at the same time.
    0
    0
  • Within this broad division, however, have appeared from time to time political groups in bewildering variety, each adopting a party designation according to the exigencies of the moment, but each basing its programme on one or other of the theoretical foundations above mentioned.
    0
    0
  • By his discovery that the attracting force in any direction of a mass upon a particle could be obtained by the direct process of differentiating a single function, Laplace laid the foundations of the mathematical sciences of heat, electricity and magnetism.
    0
    0
  • Although the foundations of the geometrical resolution of cubic equations are to be ascribed to the Greeks (for Eutocius assigns to Menaechmus two methods of solving the equation x 3 = a and x 3 = 2a 3), yet the subsequent development by the Arabs must be regarded as one of their most important achievements.
    0
    0
  • Kolliker (Development of Cephalopods, 1844), Remak (Development of the Frog, 1850), and others had laid the foundations of this knowledge in isolated examples; but it was Kovalevsky, by his accounts of the development of Ascidians and of Amphioxus (1866), who really made zoologists see that a strict and complete cellular embryology of animals was as necessary and feasible a factor in the comprehension of their relationships as at the beginning of the century the coarse anatomy had been shown to be by Cuvier.
    0
    0
  • The earlier chapters, treating chiefly of the arithmetical foundations of the science, differ but little in their line of argument from the principles laid down by Pietro Aron, Zacconi, and other early writers of the Boeotian school; but in bk.
    0
    0
  • He was buried at the abbey he founded here, of which only a wall and the foundations below ground remain.
    0
    0
  • Here at our feet is the end of the earth where it reacheth unto air, but, below, its foundations are without end..
    0
    0
  • Of the stage nothing but cuttings in the rock for foundations are visible.
    0
    0
  • Cuttings in the rock for the foundations of such are numerous round the south edge of Temenites and Achradina, and are to be seen at various points near the city wall.
    0
    0
  • In another direction the foundations of modern medicine were being laid during the 16th century - namely, by the introduction of clinical instruction in hospitals.
    0
    0
  • We thus see that, while the great anatomists, physicists and chemists - men of the type of Willis, Borelli and Boyle - were laying foundations which were later on built up into the fabric of scientific medicine, little good was done by the premature application of their half-understood principles to practice.
    0
    0
  • In foreign affairs, the conclusion of a treaty with Russia for delimiting the British and Russian spheres of influence in the Middle East laid the foundations of entirely new relations between the British and Russian governments.
    0
    0
  • But no such model city was destined to be built; the necessity for haste and the jealous guardianship of rights to old foundations resulted in the old lines being generally followed.
    0
    0
  • The derivations of names may here be grouped into two classes, those having a commercial connexion, and those associated with ancient buildings, particularly the City wall and ecclesiastical foundations.
    0
    0
  • Of those associated with ecclesiastical foundations several occur in the course of this article (Section II., Ecclesiastical Architecture, &c.).
    0
    0
  • Those at St Peter's, Westminster, and St Paul's, attained a fame which has survived, while other similar foundations lapsed, such as St Anthony's (Threadneedle Street, City), at which Sir Thomas More, Archbishop Whitgift and many other men of eminence received education.
    0
    0
  • In some places where the Roman wall is not to be seen there still exist pieces of the old wall that stand upon Roman foundations.
    0
    0
  • In a subsequent proclamation Queen Elizabeth commanded that only one family should live in one house, that empty houses erected within seven years were not to be let and that unfinished buildings on new foundations were to be pulled down.
    0
    0
  • In this neighbourhood excellent building-stone is quarried, which was used for the foundations of the Houses of Parliament in London, and is despatched to all parts of England.
    0
    0
  • Samas-sum-yukin became more Babylonian than his subjects; the viceroy claimed to be the successor of the monarchs whose empire had once stretched to the Mediterranean; even the Sumerian language was revived as the official tongue, and a revolt broke out which shook the Assyrian empire to its foundations.
    0
    0
  • The Roman Catholic Church also recognizes a class of beneficed chaplains, supported out of "pious foundations" for the specific duty of saying, or arranging for, certain masses, or taking part in certain services.
    0
    0
  • These, however, as having arbitrary and inadequate foundations, and for other reasons, have not been accepted.
    0
    0
  • There are remains of a theatre of the time of the Antonines and the Ponte Vecchio rests on Roman foundations.
    0
    0
  • In conjunction with Josiah Latimer Clark, with whom he entered into partnership in 1861, he invented improved methods of insulating submarine cables, and a paper on electrical standards read by them before the British Association in the same year led to the establishment of the British Association committee on that subject, whose work formed the foundations of the system still in use.
    0
    0
  • The foundations are not more than 10 ft.
    0
    0
  • The city was famous for the temple of Venus Erycina, to the foundations of which a wall of 12 courses of masonry in the castle probably belongs.
    0
    0
  • Bagenal made it his private residence, and laid the foundations of its prosperity.
    0
    0
  • At Pompeii, for example, among other de- a astation, the temple of Isis was~ shaken into ruins, and, as an ii iscription records, it was rebuilt from the foundations by the d sunificence of a private citizen.
    0
    0
  • The most important fact in his history is his confession, recorded by Orosius, that he saw the inability of his countrymen to rear a civilized or abiding kingdom, and that consequently his aim should be to build on Roman foundations and blend the two nations into one.
    0
    0
  • By his work on language Uber den Ursprung der Sprache (1772), Herder may be said to have laid the first rude foundations of the science of comparative philology and that deeper science of the ultimate nature and origin of language.
    0
    0
  • Herder's services in laying the foundations of a comparative science of religion and mythology are even of greater value than his somewhat crude philological speculations.
    0
    0
  • Here he may be said to have laid the foundations of the science of primitive culture as a whole.
    0
    0
  • There are four other bridges across the Adige: one, the graceful Ponte di Pietra, rests upon ancient foundations, while the two arches nearest to the left bank are Roman; but it has been frequently restored.
    0
    0
  • About the year 1680 Hishigawa Moronobu achieved a great popularity for woodcut illustration, and laid the foundations of the splendid school which followed.
    0
    0
  • Hence both science and religion must come to recognize as the" most certain of all facts that the Power which the Universe manifests to us is utterly inscrutable."Thus to be buried side by side in the Unknowable constitutes their final reconciliation, as it is the refutation of irreligion which consists of" a lurking doubt whether the Incomprehensible is really incomprehensible."Such are the foundations of Spencer's metaphysic of the Unknowable, to which he resorts in all the fundamental difficulties which he subsequently encounters.
    0
    0
  • It has already been explained, however, that the biological foundations of the latter doctrine are questionable.
    0
    0
  • The fall of many of the monuments, according to Bent, was caused by the washing away of the foundations by the stream called Mai Shum, and indeed the native tradition states that " Gudert, queen of the Amhara," when she visited Axum, destroyed the chief obelisk in this way by digging a trench from the river to its foundation.
    0
    0
  • He was accused of undermining the foundations of philosophy and religion, and the matter was brought before the parlement of Paris, and finally before Francis I.
    0
    0
  • Calvin consented to the death of Servetus, whose views on the Trinity he regarded as most dangerous heresy, and whose denial of the full authority of the Scriptures he dreaded as overthrowing the foundations of all religious authority.
    0
    0
  • The present foundations are built of architectural fragments, probably from an earlier building of circular form on the same site.
    0
    0
  • Of that built by the Alcmaeonids in the 6th century B.C. considerable remains have been found, some in the foundations of the later temple and some lying where they were thrown by the earthquake.
    0
    0
  • The existing foundations are these of the temple built in the 4th century.
    0
    0
  • Though there are great hollow spaces in the structure of the foundations, these appear merely to have been intended to save material, and not to have been put to any religious or other use.
    0
    0
  • The foundations of the stage are extant, as well as the orchestra, and the walls and seats of the auditorium.
    0
    0
  • The temple which was seen by Pausanias, and of which the foundations were found by the excavators, was the one of which the building is recorded in inscriptions of the 4th century.
    0
    0
  • At Rome and Carthage, and in all other places where sincere Montanists were found, they were confronted by the imposing edifice of the Catholic Church, and they had neither the courage nor the inclination to undermine her sacred foundations.
    0
    0
  • In an age when the foundations of the system on which society had rested for centuries were seriously shaken, such subjects as the right of the magistrate to interfere with the belief of the individual, and the limits of his authority over conscience, naturally assumed a prominence hitherto unknown.'
    0
    0
  • These foundations are clearly those of a Roman triumphal arch, which perhaps took the name "propylaea" from an ancient Greek structure on the same spot.
    0
    0
  • On the upper (S.) side are excellent foundations of a long porch.
    0
    0
  • On the Lechaeum road, on which a bewildering wealth of fountains and statues is enumerated, only the Baths of Eurycles below the plane tree were found; deep diggings were made into them, and the foundations of the facade laid bare.
    0
    0
  • At the highest point of the road, according to Pausanias, there stood the famous temple of Aphrodite, but the remains excavated at this point seem to be those of a late tower, and the few foundations below it do not resemble those of a temple.
    0
    0
  • Towards the close of the rule of the knights in Malta feudal institutions had been shaken to their foundations, but the transition to republican rule was too sudden and extreme for the people to accept it.
    0
    0
  • It seemed to threaten the very foundations of religion itself.
    0
    0
  • De Emendatione Temporum, by Joseph Scaliger, in which were laid the foundations of chronological science.
    0
    0
  • These had been decapitated and otherwise mutilated, and thrown into the foundations of the new fortress.
    0
    0
  • The foundations were confiscated by Pertinax, after they had existed less than a century.
    0
    0
  • The altar of burnt-offering was set up, and in the second year of the return the foundations of the new temple were laid with great solemnity (iii.).
    0
    0
  • He admonished the pope, appointed the bishops, watched over the morals and work of the clergy, and took an active part in the deliberations of church synods; he founded bishoprics and monasteries, was lavish in his gifts to ecclesiastical foundations, and chose bishops and abbots for administrative work.
    0
    0
  • Renard, whose monograph,' published in 18 9 1, laid the foundations and 1 " Challenger " Reports, " Deep Sea Deposits."
    0
    0
  • This association offered a vigorous opposition to the movement, which succeeded only when it was too late, for obtaining alterations in the constitution limiting the power of the Emperor and laying the foundations of real parliamentary government in the Empire and in Prussia.
    0
    0
  • " This identification of extension with substance runs through the whole of Descartes's works, and it forms one of the ultimate foundations of the system of Spinoza.
    0
    0
  • In 1249 he led an expedition to Finland, built the fortress of Tavastthus, and thus laid the foundations of Sweden's oversea empire.
    0
    0
  • He displayed such radical and reforming inclinations that he laid the foundations of his popularity among the lower and middle classes, which lasted more than a quarter of a century, during which time the Progressists, Democrats and advanced Liberals ever looked to him as a leader and adviser.
    0
    0
  • The castle, of which nothing but the earthworks and foundations remain, is famous as the scene of the imprisonment of Mary queen of Scots from September 1586 to her trial and execution on the 8th of February 1587.
    0
    0
  • Under the inspiration of his friend Demetrius of Phalerum, the Athenian orator, statesman and philosopher, this Ptolemy laid the foundations of the great Alexandrian library and originated the keen search for all written works, which resulted in the formation of a collection such as the world has seldom seen.
    0
    0
  • Close to it are the foundations of several temples, one of them sacred to the hero Podaros.
    0
    0
  • The foundations of a square market-hall of earlier date were found beneath this.
    0
    0
  • Building upon the foundations laid by Hasak and other Catholic writers who have been too much neglected by Protestant historians, Janssen produced a monumental work in defence of the German Church before Luther's defection.
    0
    0
  • A " reformed " prince could seize the property of the monasteries, and appropriate such ecclesiastical foundations as he desired.
    0
    0
  • Twelve years later he was, like Marsiglio, attacking the very foundations of the papacy itself, as lacking all scriptural sanction.
    0
    0
  • The common man, to whom the diet of Augsburg alludes, had, long been raising his voice against the " parsons " (Pfaffen); the men of letters, Brand, Erasmus, Reuchlin, and above all Ulrich von Hutten, contributed, each in their way, to discredit the Roman Curia; and lastly, a new type of theology, represented chiefly by Martin Luther, threatened to sweep away the very foundations of the papal monarchy.
    0
    0
  • The revenues from ecclesiastical foundations, as well as those from the industrialilds were to be placed in a g ?
    0
    0
  • Thus during the reign of Edward we have not only the foundations of the Anglican Church laid, but there appears the beginning of those evangelical and puritanical sects which were to become the " dissenters " of the following centuries.
    0
    0
  • The foundations of idealism in the modern sense were laid by the thinkers who sought breathing room for mind and will in a deeper analysis of the relations of the subject to the world that it knows.
    0
    0
  • In 1630 the government of the company, with questionable right (for the charter seems evidently to have contemplated the residence of the company in England), transferred itself to their territory, and under the leadership of John Winthrop laid the foundations anew of the Massachusetts colony, when they first settled Boston in the autumn of that year.
    0
    0
  • In history, Winthrop and Bradford laid the foundations of her story in the very beginning; but the best example of the colonial period is Thomas Hutchinson, and in later days Bancroft, Sparks, Palfrey, Prescott, Motley and Parkman.
    0
    0
  • The foundations were laid in 1573, the walls were completed in 1615, the roof was finished in 1623, its consecration took place in 1645 and its dedication in 1667, the towers were completed in 1191, and the great church was finished about 1811.
    0
    0
  • There is some ground for believing that it was the third-abbot of Monte Cassino who began to spread a knowledge of the Rule beyond the circle of St Benedict's own foundations.
    0
    0
  • The ten years which Zwingli spent at Glarus laid the foundations of his work as a reformer.
    0
    0
  • The foundations of the census on the modern system were laid in Europe towards the middle or end of the 17th century.
    0
    0
  • Subsequently the Romans laid the foundations of modern minting.
    0
    0
  • Of the once splendid villas and baths of Baiae and its district, the foundations of which were often thrown far out into the sea, considerable, though fragmentary, remains exist.
    0
    0
  • But various of the changes proposed touched exceedingly delicate matters, going to the deepest foundations of Turkish belief and prejudice: so much so that some of the desired reforms could not be openly advocated as yet.
    0
    0
  • Granite is found about Puget Sound and in the extreme eastern part of the state; it is largely used in riprap or rough foundations.
    0
    0
  • Saxony claims to be one of the most highly educated countries in Europe, and its foundations of schools and universities were among the earliest in Germany.
    0
    0
  • On the other hand, when the bottom was rocky so that the piles could not be driven, they were steadied at their bases by being enveloped in a mound of loose stones, in the manner in which the foundations of piers and breakwaters are now constructed.
    0
    0
  • The general depth at which the foundations are laid is about 29 ft.
    0
    0
  • The anchor ties are connected to girders embedded in large concrete blocks in the foundations of the approach viaducts.
    0
    0
  • The substructure of a bridge comprises the piers, abutments and foundations.
    0
    0
  • In some soils foundations may be obtained by the device of building a masonry casing like that of a well and excavating the soil inside; the casing gradually sinks and the masonry is continued at the surface.
    0
    0
  • Baker described the condition of opinion as to the safe limits of stress as chaotic. " The old foundations," he said, " are shaken, and engineers have not come to an agreement respecting the rebuilding of the structure.
    0
    0
  • It depends mainly on the character of the foundations and height at which the bridge is carried.
    0
    0
  • The abbey itself consists of an assemblage of buildings in three storeys upon massive foundations around the church, the most important portion, the Merveille, extending to the north.
    0
    0
  • The floor of the church, built partly on the rock, partly upon foundations, and, at the east end, over a crypt, is on a level with the uppermost storey of the monastic buildings.
    0
    0
  • As was to he expected from its connexion with the early history of England, and from its beauty and fertility, Kent possessed a larger than average number of monastic foundations.
    0
    0
  • Other Saxon foundations were the nunneries at Folkestone (630), Lyminge (633; nunnery and monastery), Reculver (669), Minster-in-Thanet (670), Minster-in-Sheppey (675), and the priory of St Martin at Dover (696), all belonging to the Benedictine order.
    0
    0
  • The names of the oldest foundations which still survive, such as the Hotel Dieu in Paris, St Thomas's and St Bartholomew's in London, the order of St Augustine, and (in the form of a modern revival) that of St John of Jerusalem, sufficiently indicate the original religious connexion.
    0
    0
  • The monastery of Iona was reverenced as the mother house of all these foundations, and its abbots were obeyed as the chief ecclesiastical rulers of the whole nation of the northern Picts.
    0
    0
  • The foundations of this measure were laid so long ago as February 1867, when Palmer had moved for a royal commission on the constitution of the courts, and had taken an active part in the work of that commission, of which the first report was made in 1869.
    0
    0
  • Above them are the foundations of a Doric temple, probably dating from the last days of Mycenaean independence in the 5th century.
    0
    0
  • Its foundations were the first to be laid of the present church (which is on the site of an earlier one), but the construction was arrested until the Perpendicular period, of the work of which it is a magnificent example.
    0
    0
  • That building is of course of much later date, but it seems certain that when (c. 513-516) Sigismund, son of King Gundibald, built a stone church on the site, it took the place of an earlier wooden church, constructed on Roman foundations, all three layers being clearly visible at the present day.
    0
    0
  • On Mount Athos the first monastery was founded in the year 963, and in 1045 the number of monastic foundations had reached 180.
    0
    0
  • By this act were laid the foundations of the Scottish' Episcopal church.
    0
    0
  • The various hospitals, the poor-house, the orphanage and most of the other charitable foundations are Roman Catholic institutions.
    0
    0
  • The Masaryk and Comenius Universities are new foundations since 1918.
    0
    0
  • But this imposing superstructure rested on the flimsiest of foundations.
    0
    0
  • The issue was fought out on the field of Tannenberg, or Griinewald (July 15, 1410), when the Knights sustained a crushing defeat, which shook their political organization to its very foundations.
    0
    0
  • The prime mover of the great rebellion of 1648, which shook the Polish state to its very foundations, was the Cossack Bohdan Chmielnicki (q.v.), who had been initiated in all the plans of Wladislaus IV.
    0
    0
  • A well-nigh ubiquitous system of espionage, perhaps most fruitful when directed against official corruption, sapped the foundations of public confidence.
    0
    0
  • It was an octostyle, pseudo-dipteral temple of highly ornate Ionic order, built on older foundations by Hermogenes of Alabanda at the end of the 3rd century B.C. The platform has been greatly overgrown since the excavation, but many bases, capitals, and other architectural members are visible.
    0
    0
  • The whole population of Garz was then baptized, and Absalon laid the foundations of twelve churches in the isle of Rugen.
    0
    0
  • Foundations of the apse of a large preNorman church have been discovered below the present building.
    0
    0
  • They compelled a man like St Paul to theorize: thought was driven inward; it was made to search for foundations, to organize itself and knit together part with part.
    0
    0
  • He was commissioner for improving the streets and buildings of London, for examining into the affairs of charitable foundations, commissioner of the Mint, and of foreign plantations.
    0
    0
  • The other buildings which can be identified are the theatre, the stadium, the council chamber or Bouleuterion, and the propylaeum of the market, while on the shoulder of the mountain are the foundations of a small temple, probably that of Artemis Laphria.
    0
    0
  • In the meantime the foundations of palaeobotany were being laid (1804) by Ernst Friedrich von Schlotheim (1764-1832), (1811) by Kaspar Maria Sternberg (1761-1838) and (1838) by Theophile Brongniart (1801-1876).
    0
    0
  • Melchior Neumayr, the great Austrian palaeontologist, especially extended the philosophic foundations of modern invertebrate palaeontology, and traced a number of continuous genetic series (formenreihe) in successive horizons.
    0
    0
  • By such foundations Caesar began the extension to the provinces of that Roman civilization which the republic had carried to the bounds of the Italian peninsula.
    0
    0
  • At a considerable depth below the foundations of a temple-palace at Teotihuacan, Dr Lehmann discovered certain ceramic fragments of a type quite different from any hitherto classed as Mexican.
    0
    0
  • Educational foundations include the Royal College of Physicians, of Surgeons and of Science; the Royal Irish Academy, with an unequalled collection of national antiquities, including manuscripts and a library; and the Royal Hibernian Academy of painting, sculpture and architecture.
    0
    0
  • Brandenburg laid the foundations of her dominion in Westphalia by obtaining the counties of Mark and Ravensberg in 1614 (confirmed 1666), to which the bishopric of Minden was added by the peace of Westphalia.
    0
    0
  • Remains of the monastic buildings are to be found in every direction in the shape of raised stone platforms, foundations and stone pillars.
    0
    0
  • Two lofty platforms along the Tigris front had served as foundations of the palaces hitherto built, but the platforms had been wrecked and the palaces were in decay.
    0
    0
  • Its rigid rule was adopted by a vast number of the old Benedictine abbeys, who placed themselves in affiliation to the mother society, while new foundations sprang up in large numbers, all owing allegiance to the "archabbot," established at Cluny.
    0
    0
  • With their growth in wealth and dignity the Cluniac foundations became as worldly in life and as relaxed in discipline as their predecessors, and a fresh reform was needed.
    0
    0
  • Extending from the south-east angle of the main group of buildings are the walls and foundations of a secondary group of considerable extent.
    0
    0
  • The simplest form of weir is a solid, watertight dam of firm earthwork or rubble stone, faced with stone pitching, with cribs filled with rubble, with fascine mattresses weighted with stone, or with masonry, and protected from undermining by sheet piling or one or more rows of well foundations.
    0
    0
  • The merits of this weir in being easily raised against a strong current and in allowing of the perfect regulation of the discharge, are unfortunately, under ordinary conditions, more than counterbalanced by the necessity of carrying the drum and its foundations to a greater depth below the sill of the weir than the height of the weir above it.
    0
    0
  • While the older universities have increased greatly in influence and efficiency, the following new foundations have been made since confederation: - University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, 1877; Presbyterian College, Winnipeg, 1870; Methodist College, Winnipeg, 1888; Wesleyan College, Montreal, 1873; Presbyterian College, Montreal, 1868; School of Practical Science, Toronto, 1877; Royal Military College, Kingston, 1875; M`Master University, Toronto, 1888.
    0
    0
  • The town derives its name from the river Avon (corrupted from Avan), which also gave its name to a medieval lordship. On the Norman conquest at Glamorgan, Caradoc, the eldest son of the defeated prince, Lestyn ab Gwrgan, continued to hold this lordship, and for the defence of the passage of the river built here a castle whose foundations are still traceable in a field near the churchyard.
    0
    0
  • He introduced German settlers and customs. into the duchy, founded many towns, and was extremely generous towards ecclesiastical foundations.
    0
    0
  • The deeper spiritual intuition, present from the first, was only brought into clear relief in order to meet difficulties in the earlier statements, and the extension of the intuition itself beyond the limits of our own consciousness, which completely removes his position from mere subjectivism, rests on foundations uncritically assumed, and at first sight irreconcilable with certain positions of his system.
    0
    0
  • It answers well for fence-posts and river piles; many of the foundations of Venice rest upon larch, the lasting qualities of which were well known and appreciated, not only in medieval times, but in the days of Vitruvius and Pliny.
    0
    0
  • The foundations were once laid for a great cathedral on the Largo de Sao Francisco de Paula, but the building stone was taken for a neighbouring theatre, and the foundations were afterwards used for the Polytechnic School.
    0
    0
  • Charities and benevolent foundations are numerous.
    0
    0
  • He laid the foundations broadly in evangelism, finance, temperance and education, founding in the latter connexion a middleclass school at Shebbear, at which generations of ministers' sons and numerous students for the ministry have been educated.
    0
    0
  • Charles's "immersion in the Polish bog" (1702-1707), as Peter phrased it, enabled the tsar, not without considerable expense and trouble, to conquer Ingria and lay the foundations of St Petersburg.
    0
    0
  • The school system is essentially American in its text-books and in its methods, thanks to the foundations laid by American missionaries.
    0
    0
  • On these foundations he builds the details of his idealistic metaphysics.
    0
    0
  • Balfour, however, having from unproved assumptions denied the evidence of the senses, and the rational power of using them to infer things beyond oneself, has to look out for other, and non-rational, foundations of belief.
    0
    0
  • Later, the planning of his great foundations at Eton and King's College, Cambridge, was the one thing which absorbed his interest.
    0
    0
  • Though these have vanished wholly from the surface, the foundations and lowest courses of their walls survive fairly perfect below ground: thus the plan of North Ate ' 'Feet ' 'too too 400 w Amphitheatre ' 'Postern ' '0 Tem- ' 'East ' 'Gate 11 - forum, yielded some interesting inscriptions which relate to a gild (collegium) and incidentally confirm the name Calleva.
    0
    0
  • Among ecclesiastical buildings are remains of two monastic foundations - the priory of St Botolph, founded early in the 12th century for Augustinian canons, of which part of the fine Norman west front (in which Roman bricks occur), and of the nave arcades remain; and the restored gateway of the Benedictine monastery of St John, founded by Eudo, steward to William II.
    0
    0
  • Mr Balfour's other publications, not yet mentioned, include Essays and Addresses (1893) and The Foundations of Belief, being Notes introductory to the Study of Theology (1895).
    0
    0
  • The Hohenstaufen succumbed to it, and the papacy itself received a terrible shock, which shook its vast empire to the foundations.
    0
    0
  • But he was not content with laying the foundations for the renovation of the Eternal City: he was the architect who rebuilt the papal monarchy, which the schism had reduced to the verge of dissolution.
    0
    0
  • It was by members of this Oratory - especially St Gaetano di Tiene; Carafa (later Paul IV.), and the great bishop of Verona, Giberti - that the foundations of the Catholic reformation were laid.
    0
    0
  • Thus the pope laid the foundations of that wonderful and silent engine of universal government by which Rome still rules the Catholics of every land on the face of the globe.
    0
    0
  • On his death he left the Church shaken to its very foundations, and in feud with almost every government.
    0
    0
  • It also formerly enjoyed certain spiritual powers for the reduction of the obligations imposed by Fabric pious legacies and foundations, the objects of which, for of St want of funds or any other reason, could not be fully carried out, and for the condonation of past omission of such obligations, e.g.
    0
    0
  • This plan, which was first adopted by St Bruno and his twelve companions at the original institution at Chartreux, near Grenoble, was maintained in all the Carthusian establishments throughout Europe, even after the ascetic severity of the order had been to some extent relaxed, and the primitive simplicity of their buildings had been exchanged for the magnificence of decoration which characterizes such foundations as the Certosas of Pavia and Florence.
    0
    0
  • (In this outer court, in all the earlier foundations, as at Witham, there was a smaller church in addition to the larger church of the monks.) The outer and inner courts are connected by a long passage (F), wide enough to admit a cart laden with wood to supply the cells of the brethren with fuel.
    0
    0
  • The outlying farming establishments belonging to the monastic foundations were known as villae or granges.
    0
    0
  • So popular has it become that besides being used for massive constructions like breakwaters, dock walls, culverts, and for foundations of buildings, lighthouses and bridges, it is also proving its usefulness to the architect and engineer in many other ways.
    0
    0
  • It has been to a great extent superseded by Portland cement, on account of the much greater strength of the latter, though lime concrete is still used in many places for dry foundations and small structures.
    0
    0
  • Depositing concrete under water for breakwaters and bridge foundations requires special skill and special appliances.
    0
    0
  • The dates of the foundations cannot be fixed.
    0
    0
  • The principal charitable foundations are the Casa de Caridad or house of charity, the hospital general, dating from 1401, and the foundling hospital.
    0
    0
  • The foundations of St Anne of Munich and of St Anne of Wiirzburg for ladies are not properly orders.
    0
    0
  • - Thus they laid the foundations, aweing the heathen tribes by their indomitable spirit of selfsacrifice and the sternness of their rule of life.
    0
    0
  • In 1488 the Cape of Good Hope was rounded by Diaz, and in 1508 the foundations of the Portuguese Indian empire were laid by Albuquerque.
    0
    0
  • In the Straits Settlement the foundations of modern missionary effort were laid by the London Missionary Society pioneers who were waiting to get into China; they were succeeded by the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel (1856), English Presbyterians (1875), Methodist Episcopalians (1884), who have a fine Anglo-Chinese College at Singapore, and the Church of England Zenana Society (1900).
    0
    0
  • A type of building which is becoming increasingly popular for this purpose, and which is in many respects superior to the older, and often more expensive structures, is built of wood, with or without brick foundations, and is thickly thatched with reeds or other non-conducting material externally - on walls and roof - while the interior is matchboarded.
    0
    0
  • Traces of the moat and the foundations are still to be seen in Priory Close.
    0
    0
  • Owing to the unsuitability of the foundations, Dutch dikes are usually marked by a great width, which at the crown varies between 13 and 26 ft.
    0
    0
  • In 1900 the association for the preservation of Virginia antiquities, to which the site was deeded in 1893, induced the United States government to build a wall to prevent the further encroachment of the river; the foundations of several of the old buildings have since been uncovered, many interesting relics have been found, and in 1907 there were erected a brick church (which is as far as possible a reproduction of the fourth one built in 1639-1647), a marble shaft marking the site of the first settlement, another shaft commemorating the first house of burgesses, a bronze monument to the memory of Captain John Smith, and another monument to the memory of Pocahontas.
    0
    0
  • Nevertheless the press uses much less power than the hammer, because much of the force of the latter is dissipated in setting up useless - indeed harmful, and at times destructive - vibrations in the foundations and the surrounding earth and buildings.
    0
    0
  • The earliest cemeteries and hut foundations of the Alban Hills belong to the Iron age, and cemeteries and objects of a similar character have been found in Rome itself and in southern Etruria, especially the characteristic hut-urns.
    0
    0
  • Lyell concluded that, although no approximation can be given of the age of Etna, "its foundations were laid in the sea in the newer Pliocene period."
    0
    0
  • The university possesses considerable endowments and has several foundations for the assistance of poor students; the "regent's charity," for instance, founded by Christian, affords free residence and a small allowance to one hundred bursars.
    0
    0
  • His disappointment at its reception was great; and though he never entirely relinquished his metaphysical speculations, though all that is of value in his later writings depends on the acute analysis of human nature to which he was from the first attracted, one cannot but regret that his high powers were henceforth withdrawn for the most part from the consideration, of the foundations of belief, and expended on its practical applications.
    0
    0
  • So far as analysis of knowledge is concerned they are in harmony, and Hume's sceptical conclusions regarding belief in matters of fact are the foundations on which Butler's defence of religion rests.
    0
    0
  • In the first part Hume gives his own statement of the psychological foundations of his theory.
    0
    0
  • The foundations of cognition must be discovered by observation or analysis of experience so conceived.
    0
    0
  • In 1764 the foundations were laid of the present St Paul's (Protestant Episcopal), which was used through a part of the American War of Independence as a British military hospital.
    0
    0
  • Yet this was the king who with equal implacability brought the papacy under his yoke, carried out the destruction of the powerful order of the Temple, and laid the foundations of the national monarchy of France.
    0
    0
  • Of the choir only the foundations remain to indicate its extent; at the east end stood the high altar before which Robert III.
    0
    0
  • Foundations and scattered stones cover the slopes and the flat valley below.
    0
    0
  • The remains consist of foundations and piles of stones (in spring concealed by gigantic thistles) extending about half a mile along the shore.
    0
    0
  • The foundations of a fine synagogue, measuring 75 ft.
    0
    0
  • There are extensive ruins on flat ground, consisting of mounds and foundations.
    0
    0
  • Among the more prominent secular buildings are the Giirzenich, a former meeting-place of the diets of the Holy Roman Empire, built between 1441 and 1447, of which the ground floor was in 1875 converted into a stock exchange, and the upper hall, capable of accommodating 3000 persons, is largely utilized for public festivities, particularly during the time of the Carnival; the Rathaus, dating from the 13th century, with beautiful Gobelin tapestries; the Tempelhaus, the ancestral seat of the patrician family of the Overstolzens, a beautiful building dating from the 13th century, and now the chamber of commerce; the Wallraf-Richartz Museum, in which is a collection of paintings by old Italian and Dutch masters, together with some works by modern artists; the Zeughaus, or arsenal, built on Roman foundations; the Supreme Court for the Rhine provinces; the post-office (1893); the Imperial Bank (Reichsbank); and the municipal library and archives.
    0
    0
  • Wallis's Elenchus geometriae Hobbianae, published in 1655 about three months after the De corpore, contained also an elaborate criticism of Hobbes's whole attempt to relay the foundations of mathematical science in its place within the general body of reasoned knowledge - a criticism which, if it failed to allow for the merit of the conception, exposed only too effectually the utter inadequacy of the result.
    0
    0
  • In politics the revulsion from his particuar conclusions did not prevent the more clear-sighted of his opponents from recognizing the force of his supreme demonstration of the practical irresponsibility of the sovereign power, wherever seated, in the state; and, when in a later age the foundations of a positive theory of legislation were laid in England, the school of Bentham - James Mill, Grote, Molesworth - brought again into general notice the writings of the great publicist of the 17th century, who, however he might, by the force of temperament, himself prefer the rule of one, based his whole political system upon a rational regard to the common weal.
    0
    0
  • These were mostly military foundations, and served the purpose of securing civilization against the inroads of the natives, who were not in a condition to be used as material for town-life as in Gaul and Spain, but were under the immediate government of the procurators, retaining their own clan organization.
    0
    0
  • There are wonderful stories on record of his precocity in mathematical learning, which is sufficiently established by the well-attested fact that he had completed before he was sixteen years of age a work on the conic sections, in which he had laid down a series of propositions, discovered by himself, of such importance that they may be said to form the foundations of the modern treatment of that subject.
    0
    0
  • It was already surrounded by a wall of crude brick, which rested on stone foundations and was strengthened at certain points by courses of burnt brick.
    0
    0
  • Of course, with such a pressure as this, there was likely to be percolation under the foundations and a washing-out of the soil.
    0
    0
  • The working season lasted only from the end of November to the end of June, while the Nile was low; and the difficulty of getting in the foundations was increased, as, in the interests of irrigation and to supply the Menufia canal, water was held up every season while the work was in progress to as much as Io ft.
    0
    0
  • It having been found that considerable hollow spaces existed below the foundations of some of the piers, five bore-holes from the top of the roadway were pierced vertically through each pier of both barrages, and similar holes were drilled at intervals along all the lock walls.
    0
    0
  • F s '18,500 Acres necessity of laying under-water foundations.
    0
    0
  • The origin of this kingdom, famous alike in the political and religious history of India, is lost in the mists of antiquity; and though the Brahmanical Puranas give lists of its rulers extending back to remote ages before the Christian era, the first authentic dynasty is that of the Saisunaga, founded by Sisunaga (c. 600 B.C.), whose capital was at Rajagaha (Rajgir) in the hills near Gaya; and the first king of this dynasty of whom anything is known was Bimbisara (c. 528 B.C.), who by conquests and matrimonial alliances laid the foundations of the greatness of the kingdom.
    0
    0
  • The following table gives the names of the 21 universities, the dates of their respective foundations, the number of their professors and other teachers for the winter half -year 19o8i9o9, and of the students attending their lectures during the winter half-year of 1907-1908:
    0
    0
  • Prussia however, began laying the foundations of a small navy.
    0
    0
  • Whether or not this be the true explanation, the power of Otto was shaken to its foundations.
    0
    0
  • Still, its foundations were sapped.
    0
    0
  • Thus he undermined the foundations of the Reichskammergericlit and stole a march upon Bertold and his friends.
    0
    0
  • The latter had long been laying the foundations of her power.
    0
    0
  • They give, however, evidence of the great industry of their authors, and are the foundations upon which modern German scholarship has built.
    0
    0
  • The most remarkable, perhaps, of his foundations was the fraternity of the Oblates, a society whose members were pledged to give aid to the church when and where it might be required.
    0
    0
  • The Fragment on Mackintosh is a severe exposure of the flimsiness and misrepresentations of Sir James Mackintosh's famous Dissertation on the Progress of Ethical Philosophy (1830), and discusses the foundations of ethics from the author's utilitarian point of view.
    0
    0
  • By the conquest of Hungary and Transylvania Leopold completed the edifice of the Austrian monarchy, of which the foundations had been laid by Ferdinand I.
    0
    0
  • In the fight at Gdow (February 2 6th), where Benedek laid the foundations of the military reputation that was to end so tragically at KOniggratz, flail and scythe wrought more havoc in the rebel ranks than the Austrian musketry.
    0
    0
  • It was emphasized during the campaign of 1859, when Sardinia, in alliance with France, laid the foundations of united Italy.
    0
    0
  • We must always remember that Carthage - the new city - was one of settle-'' the latest of Phoenician foundations, and that the days of the Carthaginian dominion show us only the latest form of Phoenician life.
    0
    0
  • When in 1861 the Southern states seceded from the Union and took up arms against it, he saw clearly that slavery would perish in the struggle, that the constitution would be purged of its pro-slavery clauses, and that the Union henceforth would rest upon the sure foundations of libert y, justice and equality to all men.
    0
    0
  • The statements, for instance, of Josephus that the Jews were given full citizen rights in the new foundations are probably false (Willrich, Juden and Griechen vor der makkabciischen Erhebung, 18 95, p. 19 f.).
    0
    0
  • Then we have the great system of Seleucid foundations.
    0
    0
  • Besides the lectures noted he published Studies in Genesis (1880), The Foundations of Morality (1882) and some volumes of sermons.
    0
    0
  • Ismails exactions from the Egyptian peasantry reacted on the army, causing discontent; and when he was tottering on the throne he instigated military demonstrations against his own government, and, by thus sapping the foundations of discipline, assisted Arabis revolution; the result was the battle of Tell el-Kebir, the British occupation, and the disbandment of the army, which at that time in Egypt proper consisted of 18,000 men.
    0
    0
  • Egyptian lands were divided in it into four classesthe sultans domain, fiefs, land for the maintenance of the army, and lands settled on religious foundations.
    0
    0
  • But though he was hailed, especially in lb h France, as the pioneer of European civilization in (ii.) raim, the East, the unsound foundations of his authority d.
    0
    0
  • Thus, in 1901 he was able to growing prosperity, declare that the foundations on which the well-being and material prosperity of a civilized community should rest have been laid.
    0
    0
  • In 1675 appeared his Notitia Galliarum ordine litterarum digesta, a work of the highest merit, which laid the foundations of the scientific study of historical geography in France; but, like all the scholars of his age, he had no solid knowledge of philology.
    0
    0
  • A revolutionary conspiracy among the officers of the guard, and a foolish plot to kidnap him on his way to the congress of Aix-la-Chapelle, are said to have shaken the foundations of his Liberalism.
    0
    0
  • After three or four years, fortified with the certificates of his various professors, he seeks a place in a law-court or as a teacher, preacher, cadi, or mufti of a village or minor town, or else one of the innumerable posts of confidence for which the complicated ceremonial of Mahommedanism demands a theologian, and which are generally paid out of pious foundations.
    0
    0
  • Thus it comes about that the largest use of cement is for manufacturing concrete for dock and harbour work, and for the making of foundations.
    0
    0
  • The foundations of the successive temples were comprised within about 18 ft.
    0
    0
  • An act of 1545 dissolved chantries, colleges and other religious foundations; and in the autumn of 1546 the Spanish ambassador was anticipating further anti-ecclesiastical measures.
    0
    0
  • But at least Henry appreciated the necessity of union within the British Isles; and his work in Ireland relaid the foundations of English rule.
    0
    0
  • Other influences have of course contributed largely to the development of the country, but among them all the chief place must be assigned to that fortunate geological structure which, amid the revolutions of the past, has preserved in the centre of Scotland those fields of coal and ironstone which are the foundations of the national industry.
    0
    0
  • In his hands Sevres became the leading porcelain factory in Europe, and the researches of an able band of assistants enabled him to lay the foundations of ceramic chemistry.
    0
    0
  • So long as the number of pilgrims remained comparatively small, and the difficulties in their path proportionately great, they obtained open letters of recommendation from their bishops to the clergy and laity, which ensured them lodging in convents and charitable foundations, in addition to the protection of public officials.
    0
    0
  • Among its notable public buildings and institutions are the old government palace in Santo Antonio built upon the foundations of the official residence of Prince Maurice of Nassau, with a pretty garden attached; a theatre facing upon the Praga da Republica, dating from the second empire; the palace of the Provincial Assembly in Boa Vista, built in 1860-66, surmounted by a high dome; the municipal palace, or prefecture, on Rua do Imperador, with the public library (Biblioteca Publica) occupying its third floor and containing about 30,000 volumes; the Gymnasium, a large plain building of two floors standing near the legislative palace; the Pedro II.
    0
    0
  • They include the foundations of an amphitheatre, of a temple, of an aqueduct, of baths and of a castrum.
    0
    0
  • Lavoisier's name is indissolubly associated with the overthrow of the phlogistic doctrine that had dominated the development of chemistry for over a century, and with the establishment of the foundations upon which the modern science reposes.
    0
    0
  • In 1619 he founded a seminary for theological candidates at Nagyszombat, and in 1623 laid the foundations of a similar institution at Vienna, the still famous Pazmanaeum, at a cost of 200,000 florins.
    0
    0
  • In the English Church these priest-vicars remain in the cathedrals of the old foundations as beneficed clergy on the foundation; in the cathedrals of the new foundation they are paid by the chapters.
    0
    0
  • If the philosophy of Spinoza provided the poet with a religion which made individual creeds and dogmas unnecessary and impossible, so Leibnitz's doctrine of predestinism supplied the foundations for his faith in the divine mission of human life.
    0
    0
  • They met in conference in mid-winter at the little town of Schmalkald, and laid the foundations of what became the powerful Schmalkald League, which effectually protected the Protestants of Germany until it was broken up by the intrigues of the imperial party.
    0
    0
  • The medieval castle of the Frangipani, in which Conradin of Swabia vainly sought refuge after the battle of Tagliacozza in 1268, is built upon the foundations of a very large villa, of opus reticulatum with later additions in brickwork, and with a small harbour attached to it on the south-east.
    0
    0
  • He is credited with having himself designed candelabra and other objects in metal, and he directly encouraged the production of the sumptuous treatise on metal-work by Digby Wyatt, which laid the foundations of the revival.
    0
    0
  • The theatre, covered by a stream of lava, and built partly of small rectangular blocks of the same material, though in the main of concrete, has been superimposed upon the Greek building, some foundations of which, in calcareous stone, of which the seats are also made, still exist.
    0
    0
  • 3 His importance as a maker of modern America can scarcely be overstated, for the ideas he advocated have become the very foundations of American republicanism.
    0
    0
  • Aurangzeb had indeed enlarged the empire, but he had not strengthened its foundations.
    0
    0
  • If the foundations of the system of civil administration were laid by Hastings, the superstructure was erected by Cornwallis.
    0
    0
  • (bishop from 1000 to 1025)destroyed the castle of the Franconian house at Worms, built the cathedral and laid the foundations of the subsequent territorial power of the see.
    0
    0
  • These uprights are supported on huge piers of masonry and concrete, the foundations for which were carried down, by the aid of iron caissons and compressed air, to a depth of about 15 metres on the side next the Seine, and about 9 metres on the other side.
    0
    0
  • Its foundations were laid by Sir George Grey, home secretary, when transportation ended rather abruptly by the refusal of the chief colonies to continue to be the dumping ground for British convicts.
    0
    0
  • Medina and Mecca, though they continued to be the holy cities, had no longer their old political importance, which had already been shaken to its foundations by the murder of Othman and the subsequent troubles.
    0
    0
  • That is, logic is grounded by them, not upon an effete tradition but upon a new investigation of thought as it actually is in its psychological foundations, in its significance for knowledge, and its actual operation in scientific methods."
    0
    0
  • Aristotle's was a logic which steered, as Trendelenburg has shown, between Kantian formalism and Hegelian metaphysics; it was a logic which in the Analytics investigated the syllogism as a means to understanding knowledge and science: it was a logic which, starting from the psychological foundations of sense, memory and experience, built up the logical structure of induction and deduction on the profoundly Aristotelian principle that " there is no process from universals without induction, and none by induction without sense."
    0
    0
  • They had undermined the foundations of scientific certainty, and so far as the fecundity of contemporary science did not give them pause, were ready, notwithstanding the difference of their starting-point, to acquiesce in the formula as well as the temper of Pyrrhonism.
    0
    0
  • He is said to have worn an iron belt as penance for his share in his father's death; and by his frequent visits to shrines, and his benefactions to religious foundations, he won a reputation for piety.
    0
    0
  • New foundations were regularly provided by their lord with a charter embodying the most important points of the special law of the town in question.
    0
    0
  • Later foundations were frequently referred.
    0
    0
  • In 1811 the massacre of the Mamelukes left Mehemet Ali without a rival in Egypt, while the foundations of his empire beyond were laid by the war against the Wahhabis and the conquest of the holy cities of Mecca and Medina.
    0
    0
  • In 1820 the oasis of Siwa was subdued by his arms; in 1823 he laid the foundations of Khartum.
    0
    0
  • The age was indeed one of ferment, so that the foundations of society and of religion seemed threatened.
    0
    0
  • Hence the new world-view threatens the foundations of the ecclesiastical edifice.
    0
    0
  • The Act of Union with Scotland constituted one of the strongest foundations of the future empire.
    0
    0
  • Towards the eastern end of this terrace are the scanty remains of a building which can hardly be anything but the temple of Zeus; it appears to have consisted of pronaos, naos or cella, and opisthodomus, and some of the lower drums of the internal columns of the cella were still resting on their foundations.
    0
    0
  • Among his writings are: Introduction to the Study of Federal Government (1890), Formation of the Union (1892, in the Epochs of American History series), Practical Essays on American Government (1893), Studies in American Education (1895), Guide to the Study of American History (with Edward Channing, 1897), Salmon Portland Chase (1899, in the American Statesman series), Foundations of American Foreign Policy (1901), Actual Government (1903), Slavery and Abolition (1906, the volume in the American Nation series dealing with the period 1831-1841), National Ideals Historically Traced (1907), the 26th volume of the American Nation series, and many historical pamphlets and articles.
    0
    0
  • Rectangular foundations, intermediate kinds of ground I: 3 to I :2
    0
    0
  • And the tendency of contemporary religious discussion in India, so far as it can be followed from a distance, is towards an ethical reform on the old foundations, towards searching for some method of reconciling their Vedic theology with the practices of religion taken as a rule of conduct and a system of moral government.
    0
    0
  • On the south side are foundations of cloisters and domestic buildings.
    0
    0
  • But the most interesting of all these new foundations was the Sisters of Charity, also founded by St Vincent de Paul.
    0
    0
  • The act of 1829 provides that nothing therein contained is to enable a Roman Catholic to hold the office of guardian and justice of the United Kingdom, or of regent of the United Kingdom; of lord chancellor, lord keeper, or lord commissioner of the great seal of Great Britain or Ireland or lord lieutenant of Ireland; of high commissioner to the General Assembly of the Church of Scotland, or of any office in the Church of England or Scotland, the ecclesiastical courts, cathedral foundations and certain colleges.
    0
    0
  • The author of the sermo pointedly rejects the two theories that connected the holy virgins with the Theban band and brought them as pilgrims from the East to the West; but he adds that even in his days there still existed an inscription in the church, showing how it had been restored from its foundations by a certain "Clematius, vir consularis, ex partibus Orientis."
    0
    0
  • A little north of this wall are remains of a theatre and stadium, traces of aqueducts and foundations of buildings.
    0
    0
  • And finally, the researches of Aspelin (Foundations of Finno-Ugrian Archaeology,,in Finnish, and Atlas of Antiquities) led the Finnish ethnologists to direct more and more their attention to the basin of the Yenisei and the Upper Selenga.
    0
    0
  • Starting with careful and accurate observations on facts concerning the mysterious properties of amber and the lodestone, Gilbert laid the foundations of modern electric and magnetic science on the true experimental and inductive basis.
    0
    0
  • By his studies in electrostatics, his elegant method of electrical images, his development of the theory of potential and application of the principle of conservation of energy, as well as by his inventions in connexion with electrometry, he laid the foundations of our modern knowledge of electrostatics.
    0
    0
  • Weber had already laid the foundations of the absolute system of electric and magnetic measurement, and proved that a quantity of electricity could be measured either by the force it exercises upon another static or stationary quantity of electricity, or magnetically by the force this quantity of electricity exercises upon a magnetic pole when flowing through a neighbouring conductor.
    0
    0
  • Foundations and considerable remains of a Greek wall going back to the 4th century B.C. have been found beneath this in the eastern or original part of the site.
    0
    0
  • " The firm foundations of a purer natural philosophy are laid in natural history."
    0
    0
  • Diimmler opened tombs at Dali, Alambra and elsewhere, and laid the foundations of knowledge of the Bronze Age and Early Iron Age; 17 and Richter, on behalf of officials and private individuals, excavated parts of Frangissa (Tamassus), Episkopi and Dali.18 In the same year, 1885, and in 1886, a syndicate opened many tombs at Poli-tis-Khrysochou (Marium, Arsinoe), and sold the contents by auction in Paris.
    0
    0
  • Nantygof, the blacksmith's brook; Trefecca, the house of Rebecca; Llwyn Madoc, Madoc's grove; Pantsaeson, the Saxons' glen, &c. An historical origin is frequently commemorated, notably in the many foundations of the Celtic missionaries of the 5th, 6th and 7th centuries, wherein the word llan (church) precedes a proper name; thus every Llanddewi recalls the early labours of Dewi Sant (St David); every Llandeilo, those of St Teilo; and such names as Llandudno, Llanafan, Llanbadarn and the like commemorate SS.
    0
    0
  • Specimens of Latinized names in connexion with ecclesiastical foundations are preserved in Strata Florida and Valle Crucis Abbeys.
    0
    0
  • On the 4th of November 1555 Pole opened, in the chapel royal at Westminster, a legatine synod, consisting of the united convocations of the two provinces, for the purpose of laying the foundations of wise and solid reforms. In the Reformatio Angliae which he brought out in 1556, based on his Legatine Constitutions of 1555, he ordered that every cathedral church should have its seminary, and the very words he uses on this subject seem to have been copied by the Council of Trent in the twenty-third session (1563).
    0
    0
  • John of Gaunt is said to have been a great benefactor to Belper, and the foundations of a massive building have been believed to mark the site of his residence.