Foster-care Sentence Examples

foster-care
  • In general, courts would prefer that a child remain with family members than be placed in foster care.

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  • In such cases, an individual or individuals other than the parents are granted custody or given a temporary guardianship or foster care arrangement by a court.

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  • A small percentage of children are in foster care because their parents feel unable to control them, and their behavior may have led to delinquency or fear of harm to others.

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  • Foster parents must be licensed by the agency that handles a specific region's foster care.

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  • When you decide you want to adopt it's important to know the facts which include the differences between foster care and adopting a child.

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  • Once the foster care adoption is final and post-placement visits are finished, you'll no longer be visited by social workers.

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  • If you're not sure whether it's the right time to add a pet to the household, find out if your local rescue group needs short-term foster care.

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  • A child may be placed in foster care with the parents' consent.

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  • Federal money supports most foster care programs, and federal law governs foster care policy.

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  • The Adoption Assistance and Child Welfare Reform Act of 1980 emphasizes two aims of foster care.

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  • Children are placed in foster care only after other options have failed, and social service agencies work with the family to resolve its problems so that children can return to their homes.

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  • In 1980, about 300,000 children in the United States spent some time in foster care placement.

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  • Young children with physical handicaps, mental delays or mental illness, and complex medical conditions have become the fastest-growing foster care population.

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  • The foster care population is quite young.

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  • About one-fourth of all children entering foster care for the first time are infants.

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  • Teenagers comprise one-third of the foster care population.

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  • Minority children comprise most of the foster care population, with the largest groups being African American and American Indian children.

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  • Poor children are more likely to be in foster care than middle-class children because their families have fewer resources.

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  • These children are also more likely to stay in foster care longer or to have been in foster care since infancy.

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  • More than half (57 percent) of all children in foster care are returned to their original homes; however, reunification rates have declined in the 1990s and early twenty-first century.

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  • The average length of stay for a child in foster care is 33 months.

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  • Instead of reunification, more children are being adopted from foster care.

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  • Most states doubled, and some tripled, the number of foster care adoptions since 1997.

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  • This steady increase is a response to the Adoption and Safe Families Act (ASFA) of 1997 that recommends termination of parental rights and encourages adoption if a child has been in foster care for 15 out of the previous 22 months.

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  • Half of all children in foster care live with nonrelative foster caregivers; about one-fourth live with relatives, and this number is growing.

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  • In most cases, children placed in foster care have been subjected to some form of abuse or neglect, and being removed from familiar surroundings is, in itself, usually highly traumatic.

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  • Children in foster care may have nightmares, problems sleeping or eating, and may be depressed, angry, and confused.

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  • Many young children in foster care are unable to understand why they have been taken from their parents.

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  • Half of all foster children spend as much as two years in foster care and are moved from placement to placement at least three times.

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  • One other problem inherent in the child welfare system is the teenager who "ages out," or turns 18 and moves out of foster care to live independently.

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  • This may be a direct result of the reasons for their initial placement, but these conditions continue throughout foster care.

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  • Other foster care placements are made by families who cannot afford medical or psychological services for their children.

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  • Age out-Become a legal adult at age 18 and move out of foster care.

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  • According to the United States Department of Health and Human Services, 33 percent of adoptions from foster care are by single parents.

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  • Children within the foster care system, American Indians living on reservations within California, and children with asthma may be eligible for additional medical services at no cost to the parents.

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  • He also has his own foundation, The Serpentine Project, which helps young people transition from foster care to lives of their own.

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  • In Sorrells' case, she had grown up in foster care after being abandoned by her mother, who was struggling with heroin addiction.

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  • T2 begins with Sarah locked up in a high-security mental institution for the criminally insane, and her ten-year-old son John (Edward Furlong) living in foster care.

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  • Articles written by well-known adoption authorities cover current and timely topics including expense of adoption, single parenting, federal foster care reform and more.

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  • For some, the process of adopting an older child, either through foster care or through an adoption agency, is much quicker than adopting an infant.

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  • Because older children aren't always the first choice when it comes to adoption, many of them live out their childhood in orphanages or foster care.

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  • Children in foster care may have been waiting for their "forever family" for years.

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  • Many children simply grow up in foster care and continue to look forward to the day when their situation changes to one of permanency.

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  • I have a friend that lives in North Carolina and he wants me to come and live with him when I get out of foster care.

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  • According the United States Department of Health and Human Services, 33 percent of children adopted from foster care are adopted by single parents.

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  • Children who are removed from their biological or adoptive parents, or other legal guardians, are placed in foster care in a variety of settings.

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  • Children come to foster care for a number of reasons.

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  • In all foster care cases, the child's biological or adoptive parents, or other legal guardians, temporarily give up legal custody of the child.

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  • Therapeutic or treatment foster care can be in a group home or foster home with a specific structure and treatment focus.

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  • State or county social service agencies oversee foster care decisions, although they may also work with private foundations.

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