Fossils sentence example

fossils
  • Fossils have been found in many localities.

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  • Marine fossils are very abundant in the marl.

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  • In the absence of fossils their age cannot be determined.

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  • All the strata intersected by the Rhine between Bingen and Bonn contain fossils of the same classes.

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  • A long list of fossils has been obtained from Umkivelane Hill, Zululand.

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  • In the western Sierras, which are more or less closely attached to the main chain of the Cordillera, Cambrian and Silurian fossils have been found at several places.

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  • This classification is based almost wholly on the fossils, for there seems to be little physical reason for the differentiation of the Oligocene anywhere on the continent.

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  • Most of the fossils of the bess are shells of terrestrial gastropods, but bones of land mammals are also found in not a few places.

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  • The Plecoptera are world-wide in their range and fossils referable to them have been described from rocks of Eocene, Miocene and Jurassic age, while C. Brongniart states that allied forms lived in the Carboniferous Period.

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  • In 1849 he became curator of the Natural History Museum at Wiesbaden, and began to study the Tertiary strata of the Mayence Basin, and also the Devonian fossils of the Rhenish provinces, on which he published elaborate memoirs.

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  • The latter are represented in the Upper Cambrian formations, together with Lamellibranchia and Gastropoda, and there are no earlier Molluscan fossils than these.

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  • For many years extinct representatives of the Hyracoidea were unknown, partly owing to the fact that certain fossils were not recognized as really belonging to that group. The longest known of these was originally named Leptodon graecus, but, on account of the preoccupation of the generic title, the designation has been changed to Pliohyrax graecus.

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  • Volcanic rocks are also present but they are not so extensively developed as in the islands of the Javan arc. The Permian beds consist chiefly of limestone and contain numerous fossils similar to those of the middle and upper divisions of the Productus limestone of northern India and the Artinsk stage of the Urals.

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  • Only the Muschelkalk, which does not reach so far as England, and the uppermost beds, the Rhaetic, contain fossils in any abundance.

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  • Tithonian fossils, characteristic of southern Europe, occur in the upper Jurassic, while the Gosau beds, belonging to the upper Cretaceous, contain many of the forms of the Hippuritic sea.

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  • The age of a great part of the Palaeozoic belts is somewhat uncertain, but Permian, Carboniferous, Devonian and Silurian fossils have been found in various parts of the chain, and it is not unlikely that even the Cambrian may be represented.

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  • By means of the fossils, several more or less distinct stages of deposition have been recognized.

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  • Under these conditions sediments from the high lands were washed out and distributed widely over the plains, giving rise to a thin but widespread formation of ill-assorted sediment, without marine fossils, and, for the most part, without fossils of any kind, and resting unconformably on Cretaceous, Eocene and Miocene formations.

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  • The Flysch is an extraordinarily thick and uniform mass of sandstones and shales with scarcely any fossils excepting fucoids.

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  • He was distinguished for his researches on the Carboniferous and Cretaceous rocks and fossils of Saxony, and in particular for those relating to the fauna and flora of the Permian or Dyas formation.

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  • Many fossils are mineralized with pyrites, which has evidently been reduced by the action of decomposing organic matter on a solution of ferrous sulphate, or perhaps less directly on ferrous carbonate dissolved in water containing carbonic acid, in the presence of certain sulphates.

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  • The fossil plants connect this group with the coal-measures; the marine fossils have, to some extent, a Carboniferous limestone aspect.

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  • Annelids (Spirorbis, Serpulites, &c.) are common fossils on certain horizons.

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  • The Alluvium was distinguished from Diluvium by the fact that its mammalian fossils were representatives of still living forms, but it is a matter of great difficulty to separate these two divisions in practice.

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  • Its museum, like the ethnological and natural history collection of the Essex Institute, was bought by the Peabody Academy of Science, whose museum now includes Essex county collections (natural history, mineralogy, botany, prehistoric relics, &c.), type collections of minerals and fossils; implements, dress, &c. of primitive peoples, especially rich in objects from Malaysia, Japan and the South Seas; and portraits and relics of famous Salem merchants, with models and pictures of Salem merchant vessels.

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  • Limestones, with fossils indicating a Tertiary age, have been found near Sokoto.

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  • The London clay, of which the island is composed, abounds in fossils.

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  • Traces of annelids have been detected in some of the quartzites, and some of the less changed parts of the limestones may be searched for fossils.

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  • They constitute the lowest group of the most interesting series of strata in the Highlands, and yield a large number of fossils.

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  • Abundant fossils (grapholites principally) in certain parts of these rocks have shown that representatives of both the Ordovician and Upper divisions are present.

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  • Among the best localities for fossils are Moffat Water, in Dumfriesshire, for graptolites, and the Pentlands, in Midlothian.

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  • Fossils are less common in the Upper Old Red Sandstone, though they are found - particularly fishes - in large numbers in certain spots, as at Dura Den, near Cupar-Fife.

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  • The plant-life of the Carboniferous was exceedingly luxuriant and varied, and the system is rich also in fossils of fishes, crustaceans, mollusca, insects and other forms of animal life.

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  • On the east side of Scotland, where so many fragments of the Secondary rocks occur as boulders in the glacial deposits, a large mass of strata was formerly exposed at Linksfield to the north of Elgin, containing fossils which appear to show it to belong to the Rhaetic beds at the top of the Trias.

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  • Among these the Lower and Middle Lias can be identified by their fossils.

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  • The Middle Oolite consists mostly of sandstones with bands of shale and limestones, and includes fossils which indicate the English horizons from the Kellaways Rock up to the Coral Rag.

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  • Some greenish sandstones containing recognizable and characteristic fossils are the equivalents of the Upper Greensand of the south of England.

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  • The presence of these fossils indicates that the eruptions were subaerial, and a comparison of them with those elsewhere found among Older Tertiary strata shows that they probably belong to the Oligocene stage of the Tertiary series of formations, and therefore that the basalt eruptions took place in early Tertiary time.

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  • He was distinguished for his folio work The Natural History of Oxfordshire (1677), in which various fossils, as well as other objects of interest, were figured and described.

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  • The Eastern Cordillera is composed of gneiss, mica and chlorite schist and other crystalline rocks of ancient date; the Western Cordillera, on the other hand, is formed of porphyritic eruptive rocks of Mesozoic age, together with sedimentary deposits containing Cretaceous fossils.

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  • The oldest beds which have yet been recognized are shales and hornstones with Liassic fossils.

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  • The fossils include Syringopora, Zaphrentis, Productus, Spirifer, &c., and belong to the Carboniferous.

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  • No unconformity, however, has yet been detected anywhere in the sandstone series, and in the absence of fossils the upper sandstone may represent any period from the Carboniferous to the Cretaceous.

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  • The Upper Cretaceous is represented by limestones with bands of chert, and contains Ammonites, Baculites, Hippurites and other fossils.

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  • The end of the Cretaceous period saw the beginning of a series of great earth movements ushered in by volcanic eruptions on a scale such as the earth has never since witnessed, which resulted in the upheaval of the Himalayas by a process of crushing and folding of the sedimentary rocks till marine fossils were forced to an altitude of 20,000 ft.

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  • The lowest beds of this series, which from their position may belong either to the Permian or to the upper part of the Carboniferous, have yielded no recognizable fossils; but they include a conglomerate which closely resembles the boulder bed near the base of the Talchir series in India.

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  • The Upper Trias has been definitely identified by the occurrence of Halobia and other fossils; while in the higher beds of the series marine forms belonging to the middle and upper Jurassic have been found.

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  • There can be no doubt that the series as a whole is the equivalent of the Gondwana system, and when the country has been more closely examined the association of marine fossils with Gondwana plants will be of the greatest value in determining the precise homotaxis of the Indian deposits.

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  • The lowest beds consist of red grits which contain Neocomian fossils, while the middle and upper Cretaceous consist chiefly of limestone and chalk.

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  • As yet they have yielded no trace of fossils, and their exact age is consequently unknown.

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  • The total absence of fossils is a remarkable fact, and one for which it is difficult to account, as the beds are for the most part quite unaltered.

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  • The Gondwana beds contain fossils which are of very great interest.

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  • There is a striking difference between the Cretaceous faunas of the two areas, the fossils from the north being closely allied to those of Europe, while those of the south (Pondicherry and Trichinopoly) are very different and are much more nearly related to those from the Cretaceous of Natal.

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  • The land probably extended as far as Assam, for the Cretaceous fossils of Assam are similar to those of the south.

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  • The fossils from the Rhaetic beds belong to the Avicula contorta zone, those from the Lias to the Ammonites angulatus zone, while the blocks of limestone with chert contain Inoceramus, Cretaceous foraminifera and other organisms. The materials yielding these fossils are embedded in a course volcanic agglomerate which gives rise to crags and is pierced by acid and basic igneous ricks.

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  • The sedimentary deposits were formerly believed to be Palaeozoic, but Jurassic fossils have since been found in them, and it is probable that several different formations are represented.

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  • Undoubted Jurassic fossils, belonging to several horizons, have been described from west Borneo and Sarawak.

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  • Sedgwick attacked the problem in the Snowdon district, where the rocks are highly altered and displaced and where fossils are comparatively difficult to obtain; Murchison, on the other hand, began to work at the upper end of the series where the stratigraphy is simple and the fossils are abundant.

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  • Murchison naturally made the most of the fossils collected, and was soon able to show that the transition series could be recognized by them, just as younger formations had fossils peculiar to themselves; as he zealously worked on he followed the fossiliferous rocks further afield and continually lower in the series.

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  • So far, the two workers had been in agreement; but in his presidential address to the Geological Society of London in 1842 Murchison stated his opinion that the Cambrian contained no fossils that differed from those of the Lower Silurian.

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  • Meanwhile in Europe and America fossils were being collected from similar rocks which were classed as Silurian, and the use of "Cambrian" was almost discarded, because, following Murchison, it was taken to apply only to a group of rocks without a characteristic fauna and therefore impossible to recognize.

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  • This attitude he maintained until the year of his death (1873), when there appeared his introduction to Salter's Catalogue of Cambrian and Silurian Fossils.

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  • It is true that these fossils are not invariably present in every occurrence of Cambrian strata, but this fact notwithstanding, the threefold division holds with sufficient constancy.

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  • No definite conclusions can be drawn from the fossils as to the climatic peculiarities of the earth in Cambrian times.

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  • Further, there is a marked likeness between the Cambrian of western Europe and eastern America; many fossils of this period are common to Britain, Sweden and eastern Canada; therefore it is likely that a north Atlantic basin existed.

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  • Devonian and Carboniferous fossils have been found in several places in the Anti-Taurus.

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  • Devonian fossils have been found near the Bosporus and Carboniferous fossils at Balia Maden in Mysia.

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  • Some Finnish geologists - Sederholm for one - consider it probable that during the Glacial period an Arctic sea (Yoldia sea) covered all southern Finland and also Scania (Sickle) in Sweden, thus connecting the Atlantic Ocean with the Baltic and the White Sea by a broad channel; but no fossils from that sea have been found anywhere in Finland.

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  • These are supposed to be of Cretaceous age, but no fossils have been found in them.

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  • The fossils are very similar to those of the South Indian Cretaceous, but very different from those of the corresponding beds in the Nerbudda valley.

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  • These porphyritic rocks form a characteristic feature of the southern Andes, and were at one time supposed to be metamorphic; but they are certainly volcanic, and as they contain marine fossils they must have been laid down beneath the sea.

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  • Its nearest allies are Pinna among living forms, Eligmus among fossils.

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  • Where this intervening band is not covered by recent gravel deposits, it exhibits beds of limestone, clays and sandstone with fossils, which, in age, range from the Lower Eocene to the Miocene.

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  • In the peninsula, however, no marine fossils have yet been found of earlier date than J urassic and Cretaceous, and these are confined to the neighbourhood of the coasts; the principal fossiliferous deposits are the plantbearing beds of the Gondwana series, and there can he no doubt that, at least since the Carboniferous period, nearly the whole of the Peninsula has been land.

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  • The oldest beds which have hitherto yielded fossils, belong to the Ordovician system, but it is highly probable that the underlying " Haimantas " of the central Himalaya are of Cambrian age.

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  • From the Permian to the Lias the sequence in the central Himalaya shows no sign of a break, nor has any unconformity been proved between the Liassic beds and the overlying Spiti shales, which contain fossils of Middle and Upper Jurassic age.

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  • The next succeeding deposit is a sandstone, often highly inclined, which rests unconformably upon the Nummulitic beds and resembles the Lower Siwaliks of the SubHimalaya (Pliocene) but which as yet has yielded no fossils of any kind.

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  • The sub-Himalaya are formed of Tertiary beds, chiefly Siwalik or upper Tertiary, while the lower Himalaya proper consist mainly of pre-Tertiary rocks without fossils.

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  • The Triassic fossils are still more closely allied, more than a third of the species being identical.

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  • The Siwalik fossils contain 84 species of mammals of 45 genera, the whole bearing a marked resemblance to the Miocene fauna of Europe, but containing a larger number of genera still existing, especially of ruminants, and now held to be of Pliocene age.

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  • Descriptions of the fossils, with some notes on stratigraphical questions, will be found in several of the volumes of the Palaeontologia Indica, published by the Geological Survey of India, Calcutta.

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  • The Ordovician beds have yielded fossils in several places, Vallongo and Bussaco being amongst the best-known localities.

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  • Supposed Silurian beds have been described at Portalegre, and in the same neighbourhood Devonian fossils have been found.

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  • The Palaeozoic beds have yielded fossils of Cambrian, Ordovician, Devonian and Carboniferous age.

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  • Marine fossils found by Gustav Steinmann in the middle of the series are said to indicate an age not earlier than the Jurassic, and Steinmann refers them to the Lower Cretaceous.

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  • That bacteria have existed from very early periods is clear from their presence in fossils; and although we cannot accept all the conclusions drawn from the imperfect records of the rocks, and may dismiss as absurd the statements that geologically immured forms have been found still living, the researches of Renault and van Tieghem have shown pretty clearly that large numbers of bacteria existed in Carboniferous and Devonian times, and probably earlier.

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  • The Russian Altai is composed mainly of mica and chlorite schists and slates, together with beds of limestone, and in the higher horizons Devonian and Carboniferous fossils occur in many places.

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  • It consists of a thick series of shales containing marine fossils.

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  • The opal beds contain Cretaceous fossils such as Cimoliosaurus.

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  • The Anomura are hardly known as fossils.

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  • Whether any of the obscure fossils generally referred to the Phyllopoda or Phyllocarida may have approximated to this hypothetical form it is impossible to say.

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  • In this notable work Steno described various gems, minerals and petrif actions (fossils) enclosed within solid rocks.

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  • Fossils are extremely rare in these beds; Buthotrephis has long been known, and doubtful traces of Calamites and ferns have been found, but it was not until 1897 that undoubted Palaeozoic fossils were obtained.

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  • The fossils are all characteristic Oolite forms and include species of Hemicidaris, Pholadomya, Ceromya, Trigonia and Alaria.

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  • Many interesting mammalian fossils, rhinoceros, mammoth, &c., with palaeolithic implements, have been found in the valley gravels of the river Ouse and its tributaries.

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  • Cretaceous fossils have been found abundantly in this series, but it is still possible that earlier systems may be represented.

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  • The hope that they will yield fossils has been held out but not yet fulfilled.

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  • The lowest beds contain many fossils, including Phacops, Homalonotus, Leptocoelia, Spirifer, Chonetes, Orthothetes, Orthoceras, Bellerophon.

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  • Plants constitute the chief fossils of the Ecca series; among others they include Glossopteris, Gangamopteris, Phyllotheca.

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  • Linnaeus included them in his group of false fossils (Graptolithus = written stone).

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  • Both groups make their first appearance together near the end of the Cambrian; but while in the succeeding Ordovician and Silurian the Dendroidea are comparatively rare, the Graptoloidea become the most characteristic and, locally, the most abundant fossils of these systems.

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  • The morphologist may propose classifications, and the embryologist may erect genealogical trees, but all schemes which do not agree with the direct evidence of fossils must be abandoned; and it is this evidence, above all, that gained enormously in volume and in value during the last quarter of the 19th century.

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  • The limestone has yielded Proetus, Chonetes and other fossils, and is believed to be of Carboniferous age.

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  • In the sandstone Myophoria and other Triassic fossils have been found, and it appears to belong to the Rhaetic or Upper Trias.

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  • The oldest rocks of Elba consist of schist and serpentine which in the eastern part of the island are overlaid by beds containing Silurian and Devonian fossils.

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  • The older rocks are early Tertiary or late Cretaceous but there are no fossils to indicate age.

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  • Borlase was well acquainted with most of the leading literary men of the time, particularly with Alexander Pope, with whom he kept up a long correspondence, and for whose grotto at Twickenham he furnished the greater part of the fossils and minerals.

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  • The fossils are few, and in some cases probably derived from the underlying formations.

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  • In the paraschists, though fossils are exceedingly rare, sedimentary structures such as bedding and the alternation of laminae of fine and coarse deposit may frequently be preserved.

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  • The Devonian rocks of Canada (New Brunswick) have yielded several fossils which are undoubtedly wings of Hexapods.

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  • It is believed that insects of this group are represented among Silurian fossils.

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  • These ancient rocks have hitherto yielded no fossils and their age is therefore uncertain, but they are probably pre-Cretaceous at least.

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  • The Trilobites are known only as fossils, mostly Silurian and prae-Silurian; a few are found in Carboniferous and Permian strata.

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  • The Fonacza cave, in the county of Bihar, has also yielded fossils.

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  • No fossils have been discovered, and except that they represent some portion or portions of rocks of the Pre-Cape formation the age of the upper Witwatersrand beds, as well as that of the lower division, remains an open question.

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  • The carbonaceous sandstone contains Gault fossils.

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  • The Ctenostomata are ill adapted for preservation as fossils, though remains referred to this group have been 1 Calcareous spicules have been described by Lomas in Alcyonidium gelatinosum.

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  • Cotton yarn and cloth, petroleum, timber and furs are among the chief imports; copper, tin, hides and tea are important exports; medicines in the shape not only of herbs and roots, but also of fossils, shells, bones, teeth and various products of the animal kingdom; and precious stones, principally jade and rubies, are among the other exports.

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  • Mesozoic rocks are represented by slates containing Ammoniles and Monotis, evidently of Triassic age, rocks containing Ammonites Bucklandi of Liassic age, a series of beds rich in plants of Jurassic age, and beds of Cretaceous age containing Trigonia and many other fossils.

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  • The oldest beds which have yielded fossils in any abundance belong to the Carboniferous System.

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  • In 1700 he became acquainted with Dr John Woodward (1665-1728) physician to the duke and author of a work entitled The Natural History of the Earth, to whom he entrusted a large number of fossils of his own collecting, along with a mass of manuscript notes, for arrangement and publication.

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  • Larger quantities of deposit may be conveniently collected by means of the dredge, which can be worked in any depth and brings up large stones, concretionary nodules or fossils, of the existence of which a sounding-tube could give no indication.

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  • The manganese nodules afford the most ample proof of the prodigious period of time which has elapsed since the formation of the red clay began; the sharks' teeth and whales' ear-bones which serve as nuclei belong in some cases to extinct species or even to forms derived from those familiar in the fossils from the seas of the Tertiary period.

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  • The commencement of the Carboniferous period is marked by a mass of limestones known as the Carboniferous or Sequences Mountain Limestone,which contains a large assemblage of carbon- of marine fossils, and has a maximum thickness in iferous S.W.

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  • The Texas Cretaceous is notably rich in the fossil remains of an invertebrate fauna and in the vicinity of Waco Cretaceous fossils of vertebrates have been obtained.

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  • Fossils of both vertebrates and invertebrates are also common in the Permian and Jurassic formations.

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  • These fossils, which are now in the British Museum, were interpreted by Dr Mantell, who made comparisons with the skeleton of Iguana, on the erroneous supposition that the resemblance in the teeth denoted some relationship to this existing lizard.

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  • The phosphate beds contain Eocene fossils derived from the underlying strata and many fragments of Pleistocene vertebrata such as mastodon, elephant, stag, horse, pig, &c. The phosphate occurs as lumps varying greatly in size, scattered through a sand or clay; they often contain phosphatized Eocene fossils (Mollusca, &c.).

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  • The deposits near Caylus and in Quercy occupy fissures and pockets in Jurassic limestone, and have yielded a remarkable assemblage of the relics of Tertiary mammals and other fossils.

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  • Phosphatic nodules and concretions, with phosphatized fossils and their casts, occur at various geological horizons in Great Britain.

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  • Post-Pliocene "Aral-Caspian deposits," containing the usual fossils (Hydrobia, Neritina, eight species of Cardium, two of Dreissena, three of Adacna and Lithoglyphus caspius), attain thicknesses varying from 105 ft.

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  • But Professor Park has obtained Jurassic fossils in the Maitai series; so that it will probably be ultimately divided between the Carboniferous and Jurassic. The two systems should, however, be separable by an unconformity, unless the Maitai series also includes representatives of the Kaihiku series (the New Zealand Permian), and of the Wairoa series, which is Triassic.

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  • Their fossils include belemnites, ammonites, scaphites and marine saurians, such as Cimoliosaurus.

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  • Some of its fossils also occur in the Oamaru series, but the two series are unconformable.

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  • They consist of fine clays with nodular calcareous concretions rich in fossils.

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  • The Bad Lands of the White river are also noted for their wealth of animal fossils, which have been found in such quantities as to cause geologists to believe that the vertebrates perished there in droves during a severe storm or flood.

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  • In 1845 he issued his Catalogue of British Fossils (2nd ed., 1854), a work of essential service to geology.

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  • The valley, which extends from the borders of Sussex to Hythe, is occupied chiefly by the Weald clays, which contain a considerable number of marine and freshwater fossils.

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  • Palaeontology is the study of the fossils found in the various strata of which the earth is composed.

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  • Bogdanovich, the same fossils occur in both sets of border ranges, in the Sarik-kol and in their eastward continuations, e.g.

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  • One of the best known of these is the Stonesfield slate, which is a Jurassic limestone occurring near Oxford and famous for its fossils.

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  • The action of pressure is shown also by the fossils which sometimes occur in slates; they have been drawn out and distorted in such a way as to prove that the rock has undergone deformation and has behaved like a plastic mass.

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  • The gypsiferous and saliferous marls of Shellata, Suk Ahras and Ain Nussi have yielded Triassic fossils.

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  • I.-First Historic Period The scientific recognition of fossils as connected with the past history of the earth, from Aristotle (384-322 B.C.) to the beginning of the 19th century, in connexion with the rise of comparative anatomy and geology.

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  • There were the retarding influences of the Mosaic account of sudden creation, and the belief that fossils represented relics of a universal deluge.

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  • There were crude medieval notions that fossils were " freaks " or " sports " of nature (lusus naturae), or that they represented failures of a creative force within the earth (a notion of Greek and Arabic origin), or that larger and smaller fossils represented the remains of races of giants or of pygmies (the mythical idea).

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  • Successive observers in Italy, notably Fracastoro (1483-1553), Fabio Colonna (1567-1640 or 1650) and Nicolaus Steno (1638 - c. 1687), a Danish anatomist, professor in Padua, advanced the still embryonic science and set forth the principle of comparison of fossil with living forms. Near the end of the 17th century Martin Lister (1638-1712), examining the Mesozoic shell types of England, recognized the great similarity as well as the differences between these and modern species, and insisted on the need of close comparison of fossil and living shells, yet he clung to the old view that fossils were sports of nature.

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  • In England Robert Hooke (1635-1703) held to the theory of extinction of fossil forms, and advanced the two most fertile ideas of deriving from fossils a chronology, or series of time intervals in the earth's history, and of primary changes of climate, to account for the former existence of tropical species in England.

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  • Geikie assigns high rank to Jean Etienne Guettard (1715-1786) for his treatises on fossils, although admitting that he had no clear idea of the sequence of formations.

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  • Invertebrate fossils employed for the definite division of all the great periods of time.

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  • Beginning in 1793 he boldly advocated evolution, and further elaborated five great principles--namely, the method of comparison of extinct and existing forms, the broad sequence of formations and succession of epochs, the correlation of geological horizons by means of fossils, the climatic or environmental changes as influencing the development of species, the inheritance of the bodily modifications caused by change of habit and habitat.

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  • Observing for himself (1794-1800) the stratigraphic value of fossils, he began to distinguish the great Mesozoic formations of England (1801).

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  • The Jurassic beds are marls, sandstones and limestones, which contain marine fossils.

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  • They contain many fossils, including Hippurites and Ammonites.

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  • These are steeped in water from the mineral springs until they become encrusted with a calcareous deposit which gives them the appearance of fossils.

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  • This knob or ridge may be appropriately regarded as an ancient physiographic fossil, inasmuch as, being a monadnock of very remote origin, it has long been preserved from the destructive attack of the weather by burial under sea-floor deposits, and recently laid bare, like ordinary organic fossils of much smaller size, by the removal of part of its cover by normal erosion.

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  • A few geologists regard the sedimentary rocks here classed as Keweenawan as Palaeozoic; but they have yielded no fossils, and are unconformable beneath the Upper Cambrian, which is the oldest sedimentary formation of the region which bears fossils.

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  • The Proterozoic formations have yielded a few fossils in several places, especially Montana and northern Arizona; but they are so imperfect, their numbers, whether of individuals or of species, are so small, and the localities where they occur so few, that they are of little service in correlation throughout the United States.

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  • The carbon-bearing shales, slates and schists, and the limestone, are indications that life was relatively abundant, even though but few fossils are preserved.

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  • In all but a few places where their relations are known, the Proterozoic rocks are unconformable beneath the Palaeozoic Where conformity exists the separation is made on the basis of fossils, it having been agreed that the oldest rocks carrying the Olenellus fauna are to be regarded as the base of the Cambrian system.

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  • The lower, middle and upper parts of the system all contain marine fossils.

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  • As in other parts of the world, the system here contains abundant fossils, among which trilobites, brachiopods and worms are the most abundant.

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  • The fossils of the Ordovician system show that life made great progress during the, period, in numbers both of individuals and of species.

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  • They give some clue to the amount of erosion which the system has suffered, and also afford a clue to the route by which the animals whose fossils are found in the United States entered this country., Thus, the Niagara fauna of the interior of the United States has striking resemblances to the mid-Silurian fatinasof Sweden and Great Britain.

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  • The life of the land waters was also noteworthy, especially for the great deployment of what may be called the crustacean-ostracodermo-vertebrate group. The crustacea were represented by eurypterids, the ostracoderms by numerous strange, vertebrate-like forms (Cephalaspis, Gyathaspis, Trematopsis, Bothriolepss, &c.), and the vertebrates by a great variety of fishes, The land life of the period is represented more fully among the fossils than that of any preceding period.

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  • The explanation of the apparent conformity of the strata from the Cambrian to the Pennsylvanian in some parts of the west, with no fossils defining with certainty any horizon between the Ordovician and the Mississippian, is one of the open problems in the geology of the United States.

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  • Where the seas were less clear, as in Ohio, the conditions are reflected in the character of the fossils.

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  • The larger part of the system in this part of the country is not of marine origin; yet the sea had access to parts of the interior more than once, as shown by the marine fossils in some of the beds.

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  • They are distinguished with difficulty from the succeeding Triassic, for the beds have very few fossils.

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  • Perhaps the most remarkable feature of the palaeontology of the system is its paucity of fossils, especially in those parts of the system, such as the Red Beds, which are of terrestrial origin.

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  • Salt and gypsum deposits, and other features of the Permian beds, together with the fewness of fossils, indicate that the climate of the Permian was notably arid in many regions.

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  • The climate of the period, at least in its earlier part, seems to have been arid like that of the Permian, as indicated both by the paucity of fossils and by the character of the sediments.

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  • Jurassic SystemThis system is not known with certainty in the eastern half of the United States, though there are some beds on the mid-Atlantic coast, along the inland border of the coastal plain, which have been thought by some, on the basis of their reptilian fossils, to be Jurassic. The lower and middle parts of the system are but doubtfully represented in the western interior.

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  • In the first two of these positions, the formations show by their fossils that they are of terrestrial origin in some places, and partly of terrestrial and partly of marine origin in others.

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  • That the chalk was deposited in shallow, clear seas is indicated both by the character of the fossils other than foraminifera and by the relation of the chalk to the elastic portions of the series.

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  • Good rock exposures were found containing coal and fossils.

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  • For, whereas to one brilliant suggestion of far-reaching homology another can always be opposed, by the detailed comparison of individual growth-stages in carefully selected series of fossils, and by the minute application to these of the principle that individual history repeats race history, it actually is possible to unfold lines of descent that do not admit of doubt.

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  • That this view must be correct is urged by students of fossils.

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  • Palaeontology, so far as it goes, is a sure guide, but some of the oldest fossiliferous rocks yield remains of distinctly differentiated crinoids, asteroids and echinoids, so that the problem is not solved merely by collecting fossils.

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  • Now comes a great change, unfortunately difficult to follow whether in the fossils or in the modern embryos.

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  • No existing classification of the Asterida is satisfactory even for the recent forms, still less when the older fossils are considered.

    0
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  • The formation of the lower part is Nubian sandstone, that of the upper part is a hard dark-grey crystalline limestone belonging to the Neocomian period, and full of fossils.

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  • He described many fossils in the British Museum in a classic work entitled Icones fossilium sectiles (1820-1825).

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  • Objects of this kind are familiar to all collectors of fossils in chalk districts.

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  • The radial or fan-shaped markings known as Oldhamia were first detected in this series, but are now known from Cambrian beds in otter countries; in default of other satisfactory fossils, the series of Bray and Howth has long been held to be Cambrian.

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  • Westward of and above these strata, the Middle and Upper Jurassic formations are found (Lias, Lower Oolite, Oxfordian, &c.), with well-marked and numerous fossils (Ammonites, Nerinaea, Natica, Astarte, Rhynchonella, Echinodermata, &c.); then the Cretaceous rocks, both these and the Jurassic series being largely developed, the Cretaceous fossils including Nautilus, Belemnites, Ostrea, Gryphaea, &c., and some very large Ammonites (Pachydiscus).

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  • Some unfossiliferous conglomerates, sandstones and dolomites in South Africa and on the west coast are considered to belong to the Cambrian, Ordovician and Silurian formations, but merely from their occurrence beneath strata yielding Devonian fossils.

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  • The Cretaceous seas appear to have extended into the central Saharan regions, for fossils of this age have been discovered in the interior.

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  • Strata of Upper Cretaceous age occur in Pondoland and Natal, and are of exceptional interest since the fossils show an intermingling of Pacific types with other forms having European affinities.

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  • Deshayes (1830) worked out the percentages of recent fossils found at several horizons in those strata, and upon this Sir C. Lyell (1852) founded the main periods, viz.

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  • The Upper Carboniferous is formed to a large extent of sandstones and shales, with seams of coal; but beds of massiye limestones are often intercalated, and some of these contain Fusaljna and other fossils like those of the Russian Ftisulina limestone.

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  • The Lower Palaeozoic systems begin with the Cambrian, which are found in northern Tasmania near Latrobe, and contain Cambrian fossils as Dikelocephalus Tasmanicus and Conocephalites stephensi.

    0
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  • The great majority of vegetable fossils are of this kind, and the term incrustation is used as a general term to cover all such methods of fossilization.

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  • Although some information as to minute structure may often be gleaned from the carbonaceous coating of impressions, the fossils preserved by petrifaction are the main source of our knowledge of the structural characters of ancient plants.

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  • A large number of the most important remains of plants with structure preserved are silicious; this is the case, for example, with the famous French Permo-Carboniferous fossils of St Etienne, Autun, &c., which in the hands of Brongniart, Renault and others have yielded such brilliant scientific results.

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  • Calcified specimens are especially characteristic of the British Carboniferous formation; their preservation is equally perfect with that of the silicified fossils, and their investigation by Witham, Binney, Williamson and others has proved no less fertile.

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  • This is often a difficult task, and generally the fragmentary nature of practically all vegetable fossils is the chief hindrance to their investigation.

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  • For this view however, there is no evidence, though the tissues of the two fossils are somewhat similar.

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  • Pteridophyta, is as yet scarcely represented among known fossils of Palaeozoic age.

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  • Similar fossils have been described from still older rocks.

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  • A great group of Palaeozoic fossils, showing evident affinity to Ferns, has proved to consist of seed-bearing plants allied to Gymnosperms, especially Cycads.

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  • It is among the fossils of the Palaeozoic rocks that we first learn the possibilities of Pteridophytic organization.

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  • Some analogy among recent Lycopods is afforded by the stem of Isoetes, and by the base of the stem in Selaginella spinosa; in the fossils the process was of a more normal type, but some of its details need further investigation.

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  • In a large majority of the Fern-like fossils of that period the evidence is in favour of reproduction by seeds, rather than by the cryptogamic methods of the true Ferns.

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  • The curious, transversely-ribbed fossils known as Sternbergia or Artisia have proved to be casts of the medullary cavity of Cordaiteae; their true nature was first demonstrated by Williamson in 1850.

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  • The extraordinary abundance of Glossopteris in PermoCarboniferous rocks of Australia, and in strata of the same age in India and South Africa, gave rise to the term " Glossopteris flora for the assemblage of plants obtained from southern hemisphere rocks overlying beds containing Devonian and Lower Carboniferous fossils.

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  • There is some evidence for the occurrence of similar Chara " fruits" in middle Triassic rocks; some doubtful fossils from the much older Devonian rocks have also been quoted as possible examples of the Charophyta.

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  • Of the Ophioglossaceae there are no satisfactory examples; one of the few fossils compared with a recent species, Ophioglossum palmatum, was described several years ago from Triassic rocks under the name Cheiropteris, but the resemblance is one of external form only, and practically valueless as a taxonomic criterion.

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  • Seeds like those of Ginkgo biloba have also been recorded as fossils in Jurassic rocks, and it is possible that the type of flower known as Beania, from the Inferior Oolite rocks of Yorkshire, may have been borne by Ginkgo or Baiera.

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  • Some of the fossils referred to the genus Kaidocarpon, and originally described as monocotyledonous inflorescences, are undoubted Araucarian cones; other cones of the same type have been placed in the genus Cycadeostrobus and referred to Cycads.

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  • Breaks in the chain of life, as represented by gaps in the blurred and incomplete documents afforded by fragmentary fossils, are a necessary consequence of the general plan of geological evolution; they mark missing chapters rather than sudden breaks in an evolutionary series.

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  • This it is obvious must commonly be the case, as most leaves and fruits are not calculated to drift far in the sea without injury or in abundance; nor are they likely as a rule to be associated with marine organisms. Deposits containing marine fossils can be compared even when widely separated, for the ocean is continuous and many marine species are world-wide.

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  • If, however, we discover plantbearing strata interstratified with deposits containing marine fossils, we can fix the period to which the plants belong, and may be able to correlate them in distinct areas, even though the floras be unlike.

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  • This also contains occasional marine Upper Cretaceous fossils, as well as reptiles of Cretaceous types.

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  • At last, in the latest Pliocene strata (often called " pre-Glacial ") we find a flora consisting almost entirely of existing species belonging to the Palaearctic regions, and nearly all still living in the country where the fossils are found.

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  • No fossils have yet been discovered.

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  • The element often termed "coracoid" in these fossils would be the scapula.

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  • The only fossils of the clay are radiolaria, sharks' teeth and the ear-bones of whales, precisely those parts of the skeleton of marine creatures which are hardest and can longest survive exposure to sea-water.

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  • Scholarly review of the many uses for fossils, up to the present day, including adornment, magic and medicine.

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  • During beach scouring, a wider range of fossils can be found including many whole ammonites.

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  • This location is superb for its geology but also for its cretaceous ammonites and other fossils.

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  • Fossils and asteroid Impacts Find out how examining the rocks and fossils around an asteroid impact crater can help us reveal its full effects.

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  • See the quarry where many dinosaur fossils were unearthed at the dinosaur fossils were unearthed at the Dinosaur National Monument.

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  • Derived fossils can be collected along the foreshore including echinoid 's in flint, shells and occasional mammal bones.

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  • Fossils, coal deposits, petroleum deposits, all of them took immense eons to form.

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  • The coast around Osmington Mills is a good place to see trace fossils.

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  • In the Middle Devonian deeper water conditions have produced mudstones, thin limestones and slates which rarely yield fossils.

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  • Watch our experts at work while they uncover fossils in the Paleontology Conservation Unit.

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  • The best location for collecting fossils from the London Clay, highly rich in fossils.

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  • It became known in the scientific community for the discovery of well preserved fossils.

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  • Scientists have discovered fossils of the world's oldest genitals belonging to 400 million-year-old insects in ancient rocks in Scotland.

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  • The area is an internationally important place for Jurassic plant fossils.

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  • In the 19th and 20th centuries the foreshore has produced robust vertebrate fossils, washed out.

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  • Fundamentalists ask, " Where are the transitional fossils?

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  • Yellow Finches were busy on the low cliff ledges, unaware that they were hopping along a raised beach full of marine fossils.

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  • See the quarry where many dinosaur fossils were unearthed at the Dinosaur National Monument.

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  • Would you be interested in examining the magnetic iron containing specimens that were apparently poured over ammonite fossils?

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  • Other fossils include numerous gastropods and bivalves, particularly small colonies of oysters.

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  • Their seemingly irrefutable evidence may be no more than the presence of marine fossils in high elevations.

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  • The frost eroded limestone is littered with coral and sea shell fossils confirming this raised mountain was once below sea level.

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  • Being regularly washed by wave action at every high tide, the softer marl is soon eroded away from the harder calcite fossils.

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  • The calcareous mudstones and limestones are rich in fossils.

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  • These dark gray mudstones, gray to black shales and minor limestones contain ammonite and rare reptile fossils.

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  • Stop off at Blue Anchor Bay for a swim or at the ancient seaport of Watchet to hunt for fossils.

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  • Other fossils include the sea urchins (echinoids ), which occur in a number of varieties.

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  • Nodules can be a good source of whole fossils - they are rounded pale gray stones, often with faint horizontal striations in them.

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  • What are we to say about the dating of these fossils in the light of biblical teaching?

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  • There are lots of opportunities to examine various rocks, minerals and fossils -- and particularly two very large trilobites called Fred and Barney!

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  • Around one hundred of these remarkable trees, ' living fossils ', are known to be growing wild.

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  • Palaeontology, the study of the fossils found in the various strata of which the earth is composed (see Palaeobotany).

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  • The Quaternary period includes an older stage containing fragments of fossils from the underlying formations; a later stage containing the bones of Hippopotamus, Elephas, Rhinoceros, Camelus, Equus; and finally the vast accumulations of sand which began to be formed in prehistoric times.

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  • Pyrite fossils need to be kept in very dry conditions.

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  • The Marine reptile fossils were collected locally from Jurassic Oxford Clay beds.

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  • Great quantities of large, well-preserved saurian fossils new to science were found in the Grentzbitumenzone.

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  • Other fossils include the sea urchins (echinoids), which occur in a number of varieties.

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  • Visit the quarry to see some exposed strata and search for fossils.

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  • As the tephra layers can also be accurately dated you have a great series of time points to assign any fossils to.

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  • Current visual sources of inspiration include illustration of marine creatures and science fiction hardware, fossils, tin plate toys and various eroded objects.

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  • There are lots of opportunities to examine various rocks, minerals and fossils -- and particularly two very large trilobites called Fred and Barney !

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  • Most trilobite fossils are only fragments of their exoskeletons.

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  • Titles for kids can cover amazing facts about space, insects, the human brain, the body, nature, fossils, and other topics.

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  • These fossils fuels can be in a solid, liquid, or gas form.

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  • Minerals, fossils, mountains, plains and plateaus are all focused upon, and kids may also learn how to read maps as well as draw their own.

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  • What's in style today may manifest in a pair of Fossils, but that doesn't mean you won't be able to wear them next year.

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  • Be sure to check out the available cheats and tips for this game as they can help you acquire some of the rarest fossils, discover the powerful golden tools, and understand how to get to the secretive Treasure Island.

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  • Shovel - Used to dig up fossils, gyroids and other surprises.

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  • You can donate fossils to fill the museum and you can sell them to Tom Nook for bells.

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  • Fossils can also be placed as objects in your house, but they don't do anything except sit there.

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  • Listed are the codes for all the fossils in the game as well as their value.

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  • That's why fossils of marine creatures are found in high cliffs in the desert; the land was once under water.

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  • Every summer, a team sets out to find new fossils to add to Tyrrell's collection, and now they boast over 120,000 different specimens.

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  • Iguanodons, okapis and coelacanths are examples of living fossils.

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  • Make your own fossil- While kids are making their fossils, talk about how fossils are usually discovered and what we can learn from them.

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  • Take a two-mile hike on an unimproved trail from the parking lot and spend the day hunting for fossils along the beach.

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  • To the Lias also can be traced back the Neuroptera, the Trichoptera, the orthorrhaphous Diptera and, according to the determination of certain obscure fossils, also the Hymenoptera (ants).

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  • The fossils of the Cenomanian have affinities with those in the Cenomanian of Spain, Egypt, Madagascar, Mozambique and India.

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  • Old schists, free from fossils and rich in quartz, overlie it in parallel chains through the whole length of the peninsula, especially in the central and highest ridges, and bear the ores of Chu-goku (the central provinces), principally copper pyrites and magnetic pyrites.

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  • Huxley questioned the time value of fossils, but recent research has tended to show that identity of species and of mutations is, on the whole, a guide to synchroneity, though the general range of vertebrate and invertebrate life as well as of plant life is generally necessary for the establishment of approximate synchronism.

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  • Since fossils afford an immediate and generally a decisive clue to the mode of deposition of rocks, whether marine, lacustrine, fluviatile, flood plain or aeolian, they lead us naturally into palaeophysiography.

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  • As already intimated, our knowledge of palaeometeorology, or of past climates, is derivable chiefly from fossils.

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  • Suggested two centuries ago by Robert Hooke, this use of fossils has in the hands of Barrande, Neumayr, the marquis de Saporta (1895), Oswald Heer (1809-1883), and an army of followers developed into a sub-science of vast importance and interest.

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  • It is true that a great variety of evidence is afforded by the composition of the rocks, that glaciers have left their traces in glacial scratchings and transported boulders, also that proofs of arid or semiarid conditions are found in the reddish colour of rocks in certain portions of the Palaeozoic, Trias and Eocene; but fossils afford the most precise and conclusive evidence as to the past history of climate, because of the fact that adaptations to temperature have remained constant for millions of years.

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  • Silurian and Devonian fossils have been reported at one or two localities, but for the present the observations are open to doubt.

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  • The former consists of sandstones and clays, and the fossils found in.

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  • They are usually beds containing numbers of fossils of marine mollusks, the calcareous shells of which supply calcium.

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  • Fossils can be found dating back from when elephants, rhinos and giant moose roamed the land.

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  • Before proceeding further it may be mentioned that the remains of many of these mammals are very scarce, even in formations apparently in every -way suitable to the preservation of such fossils, and it hence seems probable that these creatures are stragglers from a country where primitive small mammals were abundant.

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  • In the same way the entire absence of any marine fossils in the peninsula of India, excepting near its borders, and the presence of the terrestrial and freshwater deposits of the Gondwana series, representing the whole of the geological scale from the top of the Carboniferous to the top of the Jurassic, show that this region also has been land since the Carboniferous period.

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  • Griesbach mentions the occurrence of some small bivalves in the shales of Greytown, but Anderson failed to find any fossils.

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  • The public buildings include the town hall, a fine and commodious house on the site of the old tolbooth; the Falconer museum, containing among other exhibits several valuable fossils, and named after Dr Hugh Falconer (1808-1865), the distinguished palaeontologist and botanist, a native of the town; the mechanics' institute; the agricultural and market hall; Leanchoil hospital and Anderson's Institution for poor boys.

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  • In the centre of the folds fossiliferous beds with crinoids have been found, and the black slates at the top of the series contain Myophoria and other fossils, indicating that the rocks are of Triassic age.

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  • The later beds of the island belong to the Jurassic, Cretaceous and Tertiary systems. At the western foot of the Ida massif calcareous beds with corals, brachiopods (Rhvnchonella inconstans, &c.) have been found, the fossils indicating the horizon of the Kimmeridge clay.

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  • They are exceedingly prolific in fossils which prove them to be of Upper Cretaceous age.

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  • The distribution of fossils frequently makes it possible to map out approximately the general features of land and sea in long-past geological periods, and so to enable the history of crustal relief to be traced.'

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  • He presented to the Ashmolean museum, Oxford, a variety of fossils and antiquities, which he had described in his works, and received the thanks of the university and the degree of LL.D.

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  • The Grand Gulf group, of formations of different ages, consisting of sands, sandstones and clays, and showing a few fossil plants, but no marine fossils, extends southward from the last to within a few miles of the coast, and is 750-800 ft.

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  • From the evidence of fossils it seems that the higher sub-order - Apocrita - can be traced back to the Lias, so that we believe the Hymenoptera to be more ancient than the Diptera, and far more ancient than the Lepidoptera.

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  • Two houses of the 16th century, the Hotel d'Estrades and the Hotel de Vaurs, are used as the museum, which has a rich collection of fossils, prehistoric and Roman remains, and other antiquities and curiosities.

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  • It is, however, likely that this formation occurs in Greenland, for in Dana Bay, Captain Feilden found a species of Spirifera and Productus mesolobus or costatus, though it is possible that these fossils represent the " Ursa stage " (Heer) of the Lower Carboniferous.

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  • The facies of the fossils is, according to Mr Etheridge, North American and Canadian, though many of the species are British.

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  • Dr Madsen has recognized fossils that correspond with those from the Inferior oolite, Cornbrash and Callovian of England.

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  • The crystalline rocks are succeeded by beds which have been referred to the Cambrian and Silurian systems. In the valley of the Trombetas, one of the northern tributaries of the Amazon, fossils have been found which indicate either the top of the Ordovician or the bottom of the Silurian.

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  • In the latter range a few Ordovician fossils have been found, but in general the oldest strata which have yielded organic remains belong to the Cretaceous system.

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  • Filhol, the fossils themselves represent two genera, Peratherium, containing the greater part of the species, about twenty in number, and Amphiperatherium, with three species only.

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  • Besides these interesting European fossils, a certain number of didelphian bones have been found in the caves of Brazil, but these are either closely allied to or identical with the species now living in the same region.

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  • In later years the attention of the best palaeontologists has been withdrawn from the hodman's work of making " new species " of fossils, to the scientific task of completing our knowledge of individual species, and tracing out the succession of the forms presented by any given type in time.

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  • They are at a depth of about 12 ft., in slaty shale containing Llandeilo fossils and contemporaneous felspathic ash and scoriae.

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  • So long as the characters of new fossils are only of specific and generic value, it is mostly possible to assign the birds to their proper place, but when these characters indicate new families or orders, for instance Hesperornithes, Ichthyornithes, Palaelodi, their owners are put outside the more tersely constructed classifications applicable to modern birds.

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  • Russia, rich in salt-springs, but very poor in fossils, are now held by most Russian geologists to be Triassic. The Permian deposits contain marine shells and also remains of plants similar to those of England and Germany.

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  • In the parish of Ludgvan were rich copper works, abounding with mineral and metallic fossils, of which he made a collection, and thus was led to study somewhat minutely the natural history of the county.

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  • Basilosaurus (or Zeuglodon) bones are found only in the Jackson marls, and other marine fossils are abundant.

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  • Excepting in the extreme north, where marine Jurassic and Cretaceous fossils have been found, there is no evidence that this part of Siberia has been beneath the sea since the early part of the Palaeozoic era.

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  • Several Silurian fossils have been identified as insects, including a Thysanuran from North America, but upon these considerable doubt has been cast.

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  • In Palestine a limestone containing Carboniferous fossils is found in the midst of the sandstone series, and here the sandstone is immediately succeeded by limestones with Hippurites and other fossils belonging to the Upper Cretaceous.

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  • On the south coast of the same island are coarse-grained, brownish micaceous and light-coloured calcareous sandstone and marls, containing fossils, which render it probable that they are of the same age as the coal-bearing Jurassic rocks of Brora (Scotland) and the Middle Dogger of Yorkshire.

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  • The chief features of the museum are collections of the fossils, birds and flora of Wales and of obsolete Welsh domestic appliances, casts of the pre-Norman monuments of Wales, and reproductions of metal and ivory work illustrating various periods of art and civilization.

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  • Gneiss and granite occur; Ordovician fossils have been found in the Upper Shan States, and Carboniferous fossils in Tenasserim and near Moulmein.

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  • Even the Scotland series probably belongs to the Tertiary system, but owing to the want of characteristic fossils, it is impossible to determine with any degree of certainty the precise homotaxis of the several formations.

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  • Its buildings and institutions include the old Gothic church of St Mary, the Powysland Museum, with local fossils and antiquities, and a library, vested (with its science and art school) in the corporation in 1887.

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  • The ethnographical museum, the cabinet of coins, and the collections of fossils, minerals, and physical and optical instruments, are also worthy of mention.

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  • Fossils are abundant, and forty species are recorded.

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  • Its marine fossils are admirably preserved, and one hundred and eight species have been described.

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  • The Hexapoda, being aerial, terrestrial and fresh-water animals, are but occasionally preserved in stratified rocks, and our knowledge of extinct members of the class is therefore fragmentary, while the description, as insects, of various obscure fossils, which are perhaps not even Arthropods, has not tended to the advancement of this branch of zoology.

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  • A diagnosis covering all the Ratitae (struthio, rhea, casuarius, dromaeus, apteryx and the allied fossils dinornis and aepyornis) would be as follows - (i) terrestrial birds without keel to the sternum, absolutely flightless; (ii) quadrate bone with a single proximal articulating knob; (iii) coracoid and scapula fused together and forming an open angle; (iv) normally without a pygostyle; (v) with an incisura ischiadica; (vi) rhamphotheca compound; (vii) without apteria or bare spaces in the plumage; (viii) with a complete copulatory organ, moved by skeletal muscles.

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  • In the Maecuru, another northern affluent, graptolites of Ordovician age have been discovered, and Silurian fossils are said to have been found in the Maraca.

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  • It is no exaggeration to say that the genus, often even the species, can be determined from almost any recent bone, but in the case of Miocene, and still more, of Eocene fossils, we have often to deal with strange families, which either represent an extinct side branch, or which connect several recent groups with each other.

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  • The fossils show many notable affinities with those in the Lower Cretaceous of the Pyrenees.

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