Foreign sentence example

foreign
  • He has also been the recipient of many foreign orders.
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  • He must minimize foreign influence, whether French, Spanish or German, in Italy.
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  • This resignation was possibly due to his dislike of Henry's foreign policy.
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  • Large movements in any large foreign market are newsworthy.
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  • Her file --two inches thick --was yet more proof that the world that seemed foreign to her really wasn't.
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  • "How do you survive a life and a world that's so … foreign?" she rested her temple against her knee.
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  • This is all that his foreign education has done for him!
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  • The concept of something more was as foreign to him as peace, and yet he wanted the image on the leaf to be real.
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  • They exchanged a greeting in a foreign language that sounded like Russian before he held out his hand to her.
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  • Imagine, he's even considering playing this game, and in some foreign country!
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  • The room was a-chatter with foreign conversation, the words having nothing to do with national roots but the fanatic avocation of the gathered guests.
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  • In point #7, war would cost you your foreign customers.
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  • She got the language from the language itself, and this is, next to hearing the language spoken, the way for any one to get a foreign tongue, more vital and, in the end, easier than our schoolroom method of beginning with the grammar.
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  • The summary of results might as well have been in a foreign language with the medical terminology, abbreviations and sprinkling of what seemed like random numbers.
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  • The idea of having to "earn a living" will be completely foreign to us.
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  • I wanted to say the entire French Foreign hiding in the other room but before I could speak, we both could barely hear a voice.
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  • There's nothing like it in old paintings, nothing like it in foreign lands--unless when we were off the coast of Spain.
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  • Besides the soldiers who formed the picket line on either side, there were many curious onlookers who, jesting and laughing, stared at their strange foreign enemies.
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  • Her grip on his hand tightened, while she loosened her grip on the foreign magic in her body.
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  • There were two people present; their scent, although foreign, smelled deliciously inviting.
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  • The frontier which they form is inconveniently long, enclosing an acute-angled wedge of foreign territory - the modern Baden and Wurttemberg.
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  • Once a nation shows its willingness to seize foreign-owned property at will, foreign investors are reluctant to do business there again.
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  • These feelings were totally foreign and unwelcome.
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  • Vara gave a flurry of urgent words in the foreign tongue, succeeding in dragging him to the edge of the forest before Taran yanked free.
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  • He is one of the most remarkable, but to me most unpleasant of men--the Minister of Foreign Affairs, Prince Adam Czartoryski....
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  • This foreign bird's note is celebrated by the poets of all countries along with the notes of their native songsters.
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  • The foreign trade is not large, and consists chiefly in the exportation of pineapples and other fruit.
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  • During his tenancy of office the system adopted at Shanghai was applied to the other treaty ports, so that when on Mr Lay's resignation Mr Hart was appointed inspector-general of foreign customs, he found himself at the head of an organization which collected a revenue of upwards of eight million taels per annum at fourteen treaty ports.
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  • The effort includes secretive projects to create independent cellphone networks inside foreign countries, the paper reported.
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  • Both the foreign minister and our ambassador in Vienna knew him and valued him.
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  • In the Goblet ministry of1886-1887he was minister of public instruction, and in the Bourgeois cabinet of1895-1896he held the portfolio for foreign affairs.
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  • They would say, If government is obligated to protect its citizens from a foreign invader, then it is obligated to protect them from a criminal.
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  • It has one of the highest per-capita incomes in the world, almost no crime, and no public or foreign debt.
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  • He was in a place, emotionally, that was totally foreign, and he couldn't begin to predict how this night would unfold.
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  • This is how our Founding Fathers intended our nation to behave: To try to achieve our foreign policy aims through negotiation and, if that failed, through economic sanctions.
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  • Mission Park (10 acres) here is adorned by native and foreign shrubs and by maples, elms, pines and arbor vitae, and "Haystack Monument" in this park marks the place where Samuel John Mills (1783-1818), in 1806, held the prayer meeting which was the forerunner of the American foreign missionary movement.
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  • To this party belonged the foreign nobles, Wolzogen, Wintzingerode, and others, chiefly Germans.
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  • They might even own foreign currencies the same way.
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  • Then war can become obsolete, as foreign to us as slavery and public hangings.
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  • The Nabataeans had already some tincture of foreign culture when they first appeared in history.
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  • Rouvier himself took the portfolio of foreign affairs at this anxious juncture.
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  • Rouvier reproached the Foreign Minister with imprudence in the matter of Morocco, and after a heated discussion M.
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  • Why cannot we know as much about heaven as we do about foreign countries?
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  • On all disputed points, whether commercial, religious or political, his advice was invariably sought by the foreign ministers and the Chinese alike.
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  • An attempt late in 1519 to seize Ferrara failed, and the pope recognized the need of foreign aid.
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  • That province was under the able government of Ali Vardi Khan, who peremptorily forbade the foreign settlers at Calcutta and Chandernagore to introduce feuds from Europe.
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  • Hardly had the Horse Guards passed Rostov before he heard them shout, "Hurrah!" and looking back saw that their foremost ranks were mixed up with some foreign cavalry with red epaulets, probably French.
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  • He had no lambskin cap on his head, nor had he a loaded whip over his shoulder, as when Rostov had seen him on the eve of the battle of Austerlitz, but wore a tight new uniform with Russian and foreign Orders, and the Star of St. George on his left breast.
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  • It is evident that the normal blue is more or less diluted with extraneous white light, having its origin in reflections from the grosser particles of foreign matter with which the air is usually charged.
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  • But besides considerations of foreign policy, the attention of Russian society was at that time keenly directed on the internal changes that were being undertaken in all the departments of government.
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  • An agreement was come to by which Francis received patronage for his circle of friends, while Hastings was to be unimpeded in the control of foreign affairs.
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  • As long as these states were to share a currency, a military, provide for interstate trade, and have a single foreign policy, they could retain the economic advantages of being a large nation while maximizing individual liberty and self-determination.
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  • Hastings himself always regarded them as incidents in his general scheme of foreign policy.
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  • He accompanied Peter to the White Sea (1694-1695); took part in the Azov campaign (1695); and was one of the triumvirate who ruled Russia during Peter's first foreign tour (1697-1698).
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  • In Vilna she had formed an intimacy with a young foreign prince.
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  • A crisis was now approaching in foreign affairs which demanded all the experience and all the genius of Hastings for its solution.
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  • How strange, how extraordinary, how joyful it seemed, that her son, the scarcely perceptible motion of whose tiny limbs she had felt twenty years ago within her, that son about whom she used to have quarrels with the too indulgent count, that son who had first learned to say "pear" and then "granny," that this son should now be away in a foreign land amid strange surroundings, a manly warrior doing some kind of man's work of his own, without help or guidance.
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  • In men Rostov could not bear to see the expression of a higher spiritual life (that was why he did not like Prince Andrew) and he referred to it contemptuously as philosophy and dreaminess, but in Princess Mary that very sorrow which revealed the depth of a whole spiritual world foreign to him was an irresistible attraction.
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  • How much then must the probability of fire be increased in an abandoned, wooden town where foreign troops are quartered.
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  • She was beguiled by the romantic atmosphere of the foreign city.
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  • Norfolk is combined with Portsmouth in one customs district, the foreign trade of which in 1908 amounted to $11,326,817 in exports and $1,150,044 in imports.
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  • The flight of the tsarevich to a foreign potentate was a reproach and a scandal.
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  • Public attention, however, was chiefly concentrated on foreign policy.
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  • But to the generals, especially the foreign ones in the Russian army, who wished to distinguish themselves, to astonish somebody, and for some reason to capture a king or a duke--it seemed that now--when any battle must be horrible and senseless--was the very time to fight and conquer somebody.
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  • The vibrant downtown has restaurants on every corner, some of them with authentic foreign offerings that keep guests coming back for more.
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  • Foreign.
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  • Evelyn spoke to her, her words foreign.
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  • He is violently opposed to the court and the foreign favourites.
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  • His order was calm, the slight accent in his voice foreign.
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  • Another difficulty is that Italian and foreign capitalists, have produced a great rise in prices which has not been compensated by a rise in wages.
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  • We may clearly distinguish two periods in his administration of foreign affairs.
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  • The whole apparatus of "forensic" ideas (law, punishment, satisfaction, &c.) is summarily rejected as foreign to God's purpose of love.
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  • The United Presbyterian Church has a board of foreign missions (reorganized in 1859) with missions in Egypt (1853), now a synod with four presbyteries (in 1909, 71 congregations, 70 ministers and 10,341 members), in the Punjab (1854), now a synod with four presbyteries (in 1 909, 35 congregations, 51 ministers and 17,321 members), and in the Sudan (1901); and boards of home missions (reorganized, 1859), church extension (1859), publication (1859), education (1859), ministerial relief (1862), and missions to the freedmen (1863).
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  • The rapid development of the foreign trade of the republic since 1881 is due to settled internal conditions and to the prime necessity to the commercial world of many Argentine products, such as beef, mutton, hides, wool, wheat and Indian corn.
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  • The cabinet is composed of eight ministers - the heads of the government departments of the interior, foreign affairs, finance, war, marine, justice, agriculture, and public works.
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  • From this port foreign merchandise found its way duty free into the Spanish provinces of Buenos Aires, Tucuman and Paraguay, and even into the interior of Peru.
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  • He was exceedingly jealous of foreign interference, and quarrelled with France on questions connected with the rights of foreign residents.
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  • With respect to the calculating rods, he mentions in the dedication that they had already found so much favour as to be almost in common use, and even to have been carried to foreign countries; and that he has been advised to publish his little work relating to their mechanism and use, lest they should be put forth in some one else's name.
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  • He subsequently undertook the preparation of a new edition of the Hebrew Bible for the British and Foreign Bible Society.
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  • The government of intervention at first directed its main effort simply to holding the country together, without undertaking much that could divide public opinion or seem of unpalatably foreign impulse; and later to the establishment of a few fundamental laws which, when intervention ceased, should give greater simplicity, strength and stability to a new native government.
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  • In 1855 he turned Roman Catholic and entered the Austrian service as court and ministerial councillor in the department of foreign affairs.
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  • He also spent some time in the Foreign Office in Berlin.
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  • The Cotton States and International Exposition, also held at Atlanta, in 1895, attracted widespread attention, and had exhibits from thirty-seven states and thirteen foreign countries.
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  • The most important free institution in this class is the cole des Sciences Politiques, which prepares pupils for the civil services and teaches a great number of political subjects, connected with France and foreign countries, not included in the state programmes.
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  • In the other colonies and protectorates more than half the trade is with foreign countries.
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  • The foreign countries trading most largely with the French colonies are, in the order named, British colonies and Great Britain, China and Japan, the United States and Germany.
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  • From England he passed to the Low Countries, Germany, Switzerland and Italy, and on his return to the Peninsula in 1796 was appointed official translator to the foreign office.
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  • houses, ran through several Spanish editions in a year, and was soon translated into a number of foreign languages.
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  • A number of his letters from France are in the foreign state papers.
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  • This last word is the regular French for "knight," and is chiefly used in English for a member of certain foreign military or other orders, particularly of the Legion of Honour.
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  • The change in Athenian foreign policy, which was consequent upon the ostracism of Cimon in 461, led to what is sometimes called the First Peloponnesian War, in which the brunt of the fighting fell upon Corinth and Aegina.
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  • The principal spring in the neighbourhood of Jericho still bears (among the foreign residents) the name of Elisha; the natives call it, Ain es-Sultan, or "Sultan's spring."
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  • The Catalans, who had adopted the cause of Charles and who had grievances of their own, called in a succession of foreign pretenders.
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  • The chief success of the government lay in the field of foreign politics, where it prudently avoided entanglement in the ambitious schemes of Hellenistic monarchs, but gained great prestige by energetic interference against aggressors who threatened the existing balance of power or the security of the seas.
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  • The nationality of the tonnage was, British 2,771,000, including Australian 288,000, and foreign 948,000.
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  • The destination of the shipping was, to British ports 2,360,000 tons, and to foreign ports 1,350,000 tons.
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  • The government is carried on by a ministry of five, with departments for the ducal house and foreign affairs, home affairs, justice, education and public worship and finance.
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  • But while he was negotiating, the elections in France had caused a change in the foreign policy of the government.
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  • In 1555 there were but three dioceses in the Netherlands - those of Tournay, Arras and Utrecht, - all of unwieldy size and under the jurisdiction of foreign metropolitans.
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  • The Netherlanders detested the Spaniards and everything Spanish, and this foreign mercenary force, together with the new bishops, was looked upon as part of a general plan for the gradual overthrow of their rights and liberties.
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  • In the spring of 1575 conferences with a view to peace were held at Breda, and on their failure Orange, in the face of Spanish successes in Zeeland, was forced to seek foreign succour.
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  • He also had authority to confer the protectorate of the federated provinces upon a foreign prince.
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  • 1922 he became Foreign Minister in the Wirth Ministry.
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  • The department he specially cultivated was that of continental history and foreign politics.
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  • He published Lives of Foreign Statesmen (1830), The Greek and the Turk (1853), and Reigns of Louis X VIII.
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  • He was elected a foreign member of the Royal Society.
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  • To prevent foreign states from giving official recognition to the Confederacy was the task of the hour, and in this he was successful.
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  • Shaw (1900); The Protestant Interest in Cromwell's Foreign Relations, by J.
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  • Depretis thereupon reconstructed his administration, excluding Nicotera, Melegari and Zanardelli, placing Crispi at the home office, entrusting Magliani with finance, and himself assuming the direction of foreign affairs.
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  • At first he concentrated his attention on foreign affairs.
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  • Whatever the predominant party might think of foreign marriages, the tradition of the half-Moabite origin of David serves, in the beautiful idyll of Ruth (q.v.), to suggest the debt which Judah and Jerusalem owed to one at least of its neighbours.
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  • His foreign policy was essentially one of peace and non-intervention, and in pursuing it he was accused of favouring the despotisms of Europe.
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  • In 1886 he was made under secretary for foreign affairs; in 1892 he joined the cabinet as chancellor of the duchy of Lancaster; in 1894 he was president of the Board of Trade, and acted as chairman of the royal commission on secondary education; and in Sir Henry Campbell-Bannerman's cabinet (1905) he was made chief secretary for Ireland; but in February 1907 he was appointed British ambassador at Washington, and took leave of party politics, his last political act being a speech outlining what was then the government scheme for university reform in Dublin - a scheme which was promptly discarded by his successor Mr Birrell.
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  • Owing to the inadequate supply of labour two important immigration leagues of business men were formed in 1904 and 1905, and in 1907 the state government began officially to attempt to secure desirable foreign immigration, sending agents abroad to foster it.
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  • before the adoption of the Fourteenth and Fifteenth Amendments of the United States Constitution); also the sons or grandsons of such voters, not under 21 years of age, on the 12th of May 1898; and males of foreign birth who have resided in the state for five years next preceding the date of application for registration and who were naturalized prior to 1898.
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  • Mainly owing to the large element of transient foreign whites without families (long characteristic of Cuba), males outnumber females - in 1907 as 21 to 19.
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  • He sanctions, promulgates and executes the laws, and supplements them (partly co-ordinately with congress) by administrative regulations in harmony with their ends; holds a veto power and pardoning power; controls with the senate political appointments and removals; and conducts foreign relations, submitting treaties to the senate for ratification.
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  • Its powers are extensive, including, in addition to ordinary legislative powers, control of financial affairs, foreign affairs, the power to declare war and approve treaties of peace, amnesties, electoral legislation for the provinces and municipalities, control of the electoral vote for president and vice-president, and designation of an acting president in case of the death or incapacity of these officers.
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  • So early also began dissatisfaction with the economic regulations of the colonial system, even grave resistance to their enforcement; and illicit trade with privateers and foreign colonies had begun long before, and in the 17th and 18th centuries was the basis of the island's wealth.
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  • Property of an individual who has abandoned Ottoman nationality without legal authority so to do does not pass to heirs, whether Ottoman or foreign, but devolves to the state if legal authority has been granted the government under which the foreign heirs live must have accepted the protocol above cited.
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  • Thus Ali (q.v.), Pasha of Iannina, the most famous of these, though insubordinate and inclined to intrigue with foreign powers in the hope of making himself independent, had used his influence to keep the Greeks quiet; and it was only after his power had been broken in 1821 that the agitation of the Hetairia issued in widespread dangerous revolt.
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  • Opening it, she found the wooden covers rough and the symbols foreign.
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  • The total exports of the province of Cagliari in 1905 attained a value of £1,388,735, of which £J50,023 was foreign trade, while the imports amounted to £1,085,514, of which £360,758 was foreign trade.
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  • The tonnage of the shipping entering and clearing the ports of the province in 1905 was 1,756,866, of which 352,992 was foreign.
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  • Up to 1848 he was a government official in Nassau; in that year he became a member of the German national parliament and undersecretary of state for foreign affairs.
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  • As Graetz says: "To Jeremiah and Mar Samuel Judaism owes the possibility of existence in a foreign country."
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  • Numerous objects had been discovered in the course of excavations, but not one of them could be recognized as more than a few centuries old, while those that were not demonstrably foreign imports were of African type.
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  • It was opened to foreign trade towards the latter end of the 18th century.
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  • The resolutions on questions affecting foreign missions (20-26) deal with e.g.
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  • An important effect of these books was the grecizing of Roman religion by the introduction of foreign deities and rites (worshipped and practised in the Troad) and the amalgamation of national Italian deities with the corresponding Greek ones (fully discussed in J.
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  • In 1892 the number of live sheep shipped for foreign ports was 40,000; in 1898 the export reached a total of 577,813, which in 1901 fell off to 25,746.
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  • Two days of desultory street fighting ensued, during which the fleet began to bombard the city, but was compelled to desist by the interference of foreign men-of-war, on the ground that the bombardment was.
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  • His knowledge of foreign affairs was, however, peculiarly useful at a juncture when boundary ques tions were the subjects that chiefly attracted public attention.
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  • Uriburu found in 1897 the financial position so far improved that he was able to resume cash payments on the entire foreign debt.
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  • It left the government free either to apply to foreign countries the general tariff or to enter into negotiations with them for the application, under certain conditions, of a minimum tariff.
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  • The trade of France was divided between foreign countries and her colonies in the following proportions (imports and exports combined).
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  • Shipping.The following table thhows the increase in tonnage of sailing and steam shipping engaged in foreign trade entered and cleared at the ports of France over quinquennial periods from 1890.
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  • Despite these monopolies, three-fourths of the shipping in French ports is foreign, and France is without shipping companies comparable in importance to those of other great maritime nations.
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  • In foreign policy Cromwell's chief aims appear to have been to support and extend the Protestant faith, to promote English trade, and to prevent a Stuart restoration by foreign policy.
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  • The religious element, however, which predominated in Cromwell's foreign policy inclined him to peace, and in April of that year terms were arranged by which England on the whole was decidedly the gainer.
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  • As late as the accession of Assur-bani-pal and Samas-sum-yukin we find the Babylonians appealing to their city laws that groups of aliens to the number of twenty at a time were free to enter the city, that foreign women once married to Babylonian husbands could not be enslaved and that not even a dog that entered the city could be put to death untried.
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  • The Belgian state telegraphs were started in 1850 and were at first very profitable, but for the years 1866-9 they yielded an average profit of only 2.8 per cent., and subsequently failed to earn operating expenses, the reasons for the steady decline of the profits being the opening of relatively unprofitable lines and offices, increases in wages, and a diminution in growth of the foreign and transit messages which had constituted the most profitable part of the whole business.
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  • Great difficulty was experienced in finding a foreign minister willing to challenge comparison with Visconti-Venosta.
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  • In regard to foreign affairs, the debut of the Left as a governing party was scarcely more satisfactory than its home policy.
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  • Cairoli succeeded in forming an administration, in which his friend Count Corti, Italian ambassador at Constantinople, accepted the portfolio of foreign affairs, Zanardelli the ministry of the interior, and Seismit Doda the ministry of finance.
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  • Though brief, Cairolis term of office was momentous in regard to foreign affairs.
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  • In Bonghis mordant phrase, the foreign policy of Italy during this period may be said to have been characterized by enormous intellectual impotence counterbalanced by equal moral feebleness.
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  • The men of the Left believed themselves subtle enough to retain the confidence and esteem of all foreign powers while coquetting at home with elements which some of these powers had reason to regard with suspicion.
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  • Documents subsequently published have somewhat attenuated the responsibility of Ferry and Saint Hilaire for this breach of faith, and have shown that the French forces in Tunisia acted upon secret instructions from General Farre, minister of war in the Ferry cabinet, who pursued a policy diametrically opposed to the official declarations made by the premier and the foreign minister.
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  • Had the blow thus struck at Italian influence in the Mediterranean induced politicians to sink for a while their personal differences and to unite in presenting a firm front to foreign nations, the crisis in regard to Tunisia might not have been wholly unproductive of good.
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  • Depretis then succeeded in recomposing the Cairoli cabinet without Cairoli, Mancini being placed at the foreign office.
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  • In this condition of home and foreign affairs occurred disorders at i~ome in connection with the transfer of the remains of Pius IX.
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  • The scandal and the pressure of foreign Catholic opinion compelled Depretis to pursue a more energetic policy, and to publish a formal declaration of the intangibility of the Law of Guarantees.
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  • Danger of foreign interference in the relations between Italy and the papacy had never been so great since the Italian occupation of Rome, as when, in the summer of 1881,the disorders during the transfer of the remains of Pius IX.
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  • Count Hatzfeldt, on behalf of the German Foreign Office, informed the Italian ambassador in Berlin that whatever was done at Vienna would be regarded as having been done in the German capital.
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  • From it the exact time is conveyed each day at one o'clock by electric signal to the chief towns throughout the country; British and the majority of foreign geographers reckon longitude from its meridian.
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  • Pop. (1900) 12,681, of whom 4296 were foreign born; (estimated 1906) 14,085.
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  • In his foreign policy Pericles differs from those statesmen of previous generations who sought above all the welfare of Greece as a whole.
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  • (2) This private connexion developed into a custom according to which a state appointed one of the citizens of a foreign state as its representative (7rpo Evos) to protect any of its citizens travelling or resident in his country.
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  • The wild and inaccessible character of the country, the fierce and lawless disposition of the people, the difficulties presented by their language and their complex social institutions, and the inability of the Turkish authorities to afford a safe conduct in the remoter districts, combine to render Albania almost unknown to the foreign traveller, and many of its geographical problems still remain unsolved.
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  • Unity of aim and effort, however, seems foreign to the Albanians, except in defence of local or tribal privileges.
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  • The chief subjects of discussion were: the relations of faith and modern thought, the supply and training of the clergy, education, foreign missions, revision and "enrichment" of the Prayer-Book, the relation of the Church to "ministries of healing" (Christian Science, &c.), the questions of marriage and divorce, organization of the Anglican Church, reunion with other Churches.
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  • Foreign editions were published in Italian at Verona in 1623, in Latin at Leiden in 1626 and 1628, and in Dutch at Gouda in 1626.
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  • Macdonald at Edinburgh in 1889, and that there is appended to this edition a complete catalogue of all Napier's writings, and their various editions and translations, English and foreign, all the works being carefully collated, and references being added to the various public libraries in which they are to be found.
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  • On one occasion when Colonel Napier was called from home on foreign service, these papers, together with a portrait of John Napier and a Bible with his autograph, were deposited for safety in a room of the house at Milliken, in Renfrewshire.
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  • The Church now has, besides these missions, others in India (1834), Siam (1840), China (1846),(1846), Colombia (1856), Brazil (1859),(1859), Japan (1859), Laos (1867),(1867), Mexico (transferred in 1872 by the American and Foreign Christian Union), Chile (transferred in 1873 by the same Union; first established in 1845), Guatemala (1882),(1882), Korea (1884)(1884) and the Philippine Islands (1899).
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  • The oak of Britain is still in demand for the construction of merchant shipping, though teak has become in some measure its substitute, and foreign oak of various quality and origin largely takes.
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  • This alliance, though the exact terms were not known to Cromwell - "the attempt to vassalize us to a foreign nation," to use his own words - convinced him of the uselessness of any plan for maintaining Charles on the throne; though he still appears to have clung to monarchy, proposing in January 1648 the transference of the crown to the prince of Wales.
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  • The vigour and success with which he organized the national resources and upheld the national honour, asserted the British sovereignty of the seas, defended the oppressed, and caused his name to be feared and respected in foreign courts where that of Stuart was despised and neglected, command praise and admiration equally from contemporaries and from modern critics, from his friends and from his opponents.
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  • The whole of the surrounding country is covered with vineyards, which (with the entertainment of foreign visitors) occupy the inhabitants.
    1
    1
  • In 1878 he was elected a Foreign Associate of the Royal Astronomical Society.
    1
    1
  • The last years of Bela's life were embittered by the ingratitude of his son Stephen, who rebelled continuously against his father and ultimately compelled him to divide the kingdom with him, the younger prince setting up a capital of his own at Sarospatak, and following a foreign policy directly contrary to that of his father.
    1
    1
  • At the time of Rienzi's unfortunate enterprise it sent ten ambassadors to pay him honour; and, when papal legates sought to coerce it by foreign soldiers, or to exact contributions, they met with vigorous resistance.
    1
    1
  • The profits when earned were derived mainly from foreign messages and transit messages between foreign countries, while the receipts from inland messages did not always cover expenses.
    1
    1
  • At the very moment when Matthias was about to profit by the disappearance of his most capable rival, another dangerous rebellion, headed by the primate and the chief dignitaries of the state, with the object of placing Casimir, son of Casimir IV., on the throne, paralysed Matthias's foreign policy during the critical years 1470-1471.
    1
    1
  • The inhabitants of the north—the Piedmontese, Lombards and Genoese especially—have suffered less than those of the rest of the peninsula from foreign domination and from the admixture of inferior racial elements, and the cold winter climate prevents the heat of summer from being enervating.
    1
    1
  • The P0 valley and the valleys of Emilia and the Romagna are best adapted for rice, but the area is diminishing on account of the competition of foreign rice and of the impoverishment of the soil by too intense cultivation.
    1
    1
  • In 1901, 1985 imperial tuns of oil were shipped from Gallipoli for abroadtwo-thirds to the United Kingdom, one-third to Russiaand 666 to Italian ports; while in 1904 the figures were reversed, 1633 tuns going to Italian ports, and only 945 tuns to foreign ports.
    1
    1
  • The principal reasons for the general decrease are the fall in prices through foreign competition and the closing of certain markets, the diseases of plants and the increased outlay required to combat them, and the growth of State and local taxation.
    1
    1
  • A considerable proportion was obtained by foreign boats.
    1
    1
  • Many articles formerly imported are now made at home, and some Italian manufactures have begun to compete in foreign markets.
    1
    1
  • A sign of industrial development is to be found in the growing number of manufacturing companies, both Italian and foreign.
    1
    1
  • For steelmaking foreign pig iron is chiefly used.
    1
    1
  • Home products not only supply the Italian market in increasing degree, but find their way into foreign markets.
    1
    1
  • The value of the foreign orders paid in Italy increased from 1,280,000 to ~2,356,oo0owing to the increase of emigration and of the savings sent home by emigrants.
    1
    1
  • In the movement of shipping, trade with foreign countries prevails (especially as regards arrivals) over trade between Italian ports.
    1
    1
  • Must of the merchandise and passengers bound for and hailing from foreign ports sail under foreign flags.
    1
    1
  • Similarly, foreign vessels prevail over Italian vessels in regard to goods embarked.
    1
    1
  • Italian trade with foreign countries (imports and exports) during the quinquennium 1872-1876 averaged 94,000,000 a year; in the quinquennium 1893f 897 it fell to 88,960,000 a year.
    1
    1
  • Thus: Trade with Foreign Countries in 1000
    1
    1
  • Protestants number some 65,000, of whom half are Italian and half foreign.
    1
    1
  • The law of 1873 created a special charitable and religious fund of the city, while it left untouched 23 monasteries and 49 convents which had either the character of private institutions or were supported by foreign funds.
    1
    1
  • Treaties with foreign powers, however, must have the consent of parliament.
    1
    1
  • The gold reserve in the possession of the Banca dItalia on September 30th 1907 amounted to 32,240,984, and the silver reserve to 4,767,861; the foreign treasury bonds, &c. amounted to 3,324,074, making the total reserve 40,332,919; while the circulation amounted to 54,612,234.
    1
    1
  • Odoacer inaugurated that long series of foreign rulersGreeks, Franks, Germans, Spaniards and Austrians who have successively contributed to the misgovernment of Italy from distant seats of empire.
    1
    1
  • The hierarchy of dukes and marquises and counts consisted of foreign soldiers imposed on.
    1
    1
  • Fr8nkislj After them followed ten sovereigns, some of whom have been misnamed Italians by writers too eager to catch at any resemblance of national glory for a ~ people passive in the hands of foreign masters.
    1
    1
  • In Italy, divided between feudal nobles and almost hereditary ecclesiastics, of foreign blood and alien sympathies, there was no national feeling.
    1
    1
  • But the conditions under which it could arise, casting from itself all foreign and feudal trammels, recognizing its true past in ancient Rome, and reconstructing a civility out of the ruins of those glorious memories, were now at last granted.
    1
    1
  • It was only the habit of interurban jealousy which prevented the communes from at once combining to resist demands which threatened their liberty of action, and would leave them passive at the pleasure of a foreign master The diet was opened at Roncaglia near Piacenza, where Fredericli listened to the complaints of Como and Lodi against Milan, of Pavia against Tortona and of the marquis of Montferrat against Asti and Chieri.
    1
    1
  • They had humbled and utterly defeated their foreign lord.
    1
    1
  • By these measures the counts became citizens, the rural population ceased to rank as serfs, and the Italo-Roman population of the towns absorbed into itself the remnants of Franks, Germans and other foreign stocks.
    1
    1
  • Meanwhile each party forms its own organization of chiefs, finance-officers and registrars at home, and sends ambassadors to foreign cities of the same complexion.
    1
    1
  • The necessities of war and foreign affairs soon placed Florence in the power of an oligarchy headed by the great Albizzi family.
    1
    1
  • He only exchanged one set of foreign masters for another, and taught a new barbarian race how pleasant were the plains of Italy.
    1
    1
  • Their annals are filled with records of dynastic changes and redistributions of territory, consequent upon treaties signed by foreign powers, in the settlement of quarrels which no wise concerned the people.
    1
    1
  • These two foreign occupations, which were almost as displeasing to the pope as to the Liberals, lasted until 1838.
    1
    1
  • These various movements proved in the first place that the masses were by no means ripe for revolution, and that the idea of unity, although now advocated by a few revolutionary leaders, was far from being generally accepted even by the Liberals; and, secondly, that, in spite of the indifference of the masses, the despotic governments were unable to hold their own without the assistance of foreign bayonets.
    1
    1
  • All these forces were equally necessarythe revolutionists to keep up agitation and make government by bayonets impossible; the moderates to curb the impetuosity of the revolutionists and to present a scheme of society that was neither reactionary nor anarchical; the volunteers abroad to gain military experience; and the more peaceful exiles to spread the name of Italy among foreign peoples.
    1
    1
  • After Novara the chief question was iow to avoid an Austrian occupation, and owing to the prevailing ~onfusion the town council of Flor~nce took matters into its)Wfl hands and declared the grand-duke reinstated, but on a ~onstitutional basis and without foreign help (April 12).
    1
    1
  • Thus were despotism and foreign predominance re-established throughout Italy save in Piedmont.
    1
    1
  • Da Bormida, the minister for foreign affairs, resigned nab rather than agree to the proposal, and other statesmen ana the were equally opposed to it.
    1
    1
  • Both the king and his minister realized that Piedmont alone, even with the help of the National Society, could not expel Austria from Italy without foreign assistance.
    1
    1
  • Farini, who succeeded, suf retired almost at once on account of ill-health, and th inghetti became premier, with Visconti-Venosta as minister its foreign affairs.
    1
    1
  • 1869 by Giovanni Lanza, with Visconti-Venosta at the foreign office and Q.
    1
    1
  • The secretary-general of the Italian foreign office, Baron Blanc, who had accompanied General Cadorna to Rome, was received almost daily by Cardinal Antonelli, papal secretary of state, in order to settle innumerable questions arising out of the Italian occupation.
    1
    1
  • Article 10 extended immunity to ecclesiastics employed by the Holy See, and bestowed upon foreign ecciesiastics in Rome the personal rights of Italian citizens.
    1
    1
  • Article 12 provided for the transmission free of cost in Italy of all papal telegrams and correspondence both with bishops and foreign governments, and sanctioned the establishment, at the expense of the Italian state, of a papal telegraph office served b~ papal officials in communication with the Italian postal and telegraph system.
    1
    1
  • This portion of the law, designed to reassure foreign Catholics, met with little opposition; but the second portion, regulating the relations between state and church in Italy, was sharply criticized by deputies who, like Sella, recognized the ideal of a free church in a free state to be an impracticable dream.
    1
    1
  • To the pope was made over 16,000 per annum as a contribution to the expense of maintaining in Rome representatives of foreign orders; the Sacred College, however, rejected this endowment, and summoned all the suppressed confraternities to reconstitute themselves under the ordinary Italian law of association.
    1
    1
  • It was fortunate for Italy that during the whole period 1869 1876 the direction of her foreign policy remained in the experienced hands of Visconti-Venosta, a statesman whose Foreign trustworthiness, dignity and moderation even political policy opponents have been compelled to recognize.
    1
    1
  • On the occasion of the Metrical Congress, which met in Paris in 1872, he, however, successfully protested against the recognition of the Vatican delegate, Father Secchi, as a representative of a state, and obtained from Count de Rmusat, French foreign minister, a formal declaration that the presence of Father Secchi on that occasion could not constitute a diplomatic precedent.
    1
    1
  • The Austrian government, for its part, desired that the king should be accompanied by Depretis, though not by Mancini, lest the presence of the Italian foreign minister should lend to the occasion too marked a political character.
    1
    1
  • In the long and important debate upon foreign policy in the Italian Chamber of Deputies (6th to 9th December) the fear was repeatedly expressed lest Bismarck should seek to purchase the support of German Catholics by raising the Roman question.
    1
    1
  • They hastened Mancinis downfall (17th June 1885), and prepared the advent of count di Robilant, who three months later succeeded Mancini at the Italian Foreign Office.
    1
    1
  • The period between May 1881 and July 1887 occupied, in the region of foreign affairs, by the negotiation, conclusion and renewal of the triple alliance, by the Bulgarian crisis and by the dawn of an Italian colonial policy, was marked at home by urgent political and economic problems, and by the parliamentary phenomena known as trasformismo.
    1
    1
  • Contemporaneously with the vicissitudes of home and foreign policy under the Left there grew up in Italy a marked tendency towards colonial enterprise.
    1
    1
  • The Egyptian government being unwilling to recognize the sovereignty of Beheran over Assab or his right to sell territory to a foreign power, sTisconti-Venosta thought it opportune not then to occupy Assab.
    1
    1
  • at Constantinople, promoted by Mancini, Italian minister for foreign affairs, in the hope of preventing European intervention.
    1
    1
  • Within four months the death of Depretis (29th July 1887) opened for Crispi the way to the premiership. Besides assuming the presidency of the council of ministers and retaining the ministry of the interior, Crispi took over the portfolio of foreign affairs which Depretis had held since the resignation of Count di Robilant.
    1
    1
  • It became clear that neither the influence of the regular clergy, of which the Society of Jesus is the most powerful embodiment, nor that of foreign clerical parties, which largely control the Peters Pence fund, would ever permit renunciation of the papal claim to temporal power.
    1
    1
  • The sudden fall of Crispi wrought a great change in the character of Italian relations with foreign powers.
    1
    1
  • The chief advantage derived by Italy from Crispis foreign policy was the increase of confidence in her government on the part of her allies and of Great Britain.
    1
    1
  • Crispis so-called megalomania gave place to retrenchment in home affairs and to a deferential attitude towards all foreign powers.
    1
    1
  • None of Rudinis public utterances justify the supposition that he assumed office with the intention of allowing the alliance to lapse on its expiry in May 1892; indeed, he frankly declared it to form the basis of his foreign policy.
    1
    1
  • Apart from the lack of scruple manifested by Giolitti in the bank scandals, he exhibited incompetence in the conduct of foreign and home affairs.
    1
    1
  • The Italian foreign minister, Brin, began by demanding the punishment of the persons guilty of the massacre, but has~ned to accept as satisfactory the anodyne measures adopted by the French government.
    1
    1
  • The foreign policy of the second Crispi Administration, in which the portfolio of foreign affairs was held by Baron Blanc, was, as before, marked by a cordial interpretation of CompI!ca- the triple alliance, and by close accord with Great ~ Britain.
    1
    1
  • any foreign question were the complications in Eritrea.
    1
    1
  • Fortunately for Italy, the marquis Visconti Venosta shortly afterwards consented to assume the portfolio of foreign affairs, which had been resigned by Duke Caetani di Sermoneta, and again to place, after an interval of twenty years, his unrivalled experience at the service of his country.
    1
    1
  • The home administration of the Rudini cabinet compared unfavourably with that of foreign affairs.
    1
    1
  • The later course of Italian foreign policy was marked by many vicissitudes.
    1
    1
  • Admiral Canevaro, who had gained distinction as commander of the international forces in Foreign affairs.
    1
    1
  • Crete (1896-1898), assumed the direction of foreign affairs in the first period of the Pelloux administration.
    1
    1
  • Shortly afterwards his term of office was brought to a close by the failure of an attempt to secure for Italy a coaling station at Sanmen and a sphere of influence in China; but his policy of active participation in Chinese affairs was continued in a modified form by his successor, the Marquis Visconti Venosta, who, entering the reconstructed Pelloux cabinet in May 1899, retained the portfolio of foreign affairs in the ensuing Saracco administration, and secured the despatch of an Italian expedition, 2000 strong, to aid in repressing the Chinese outbreak and in protecting Italian interests in the Far East (July 1900).
    1
    1
  • Upon the fall of the Saracco cabinet (9th February 1901) Visconti Venosta was succeeded at the foreign office by Signor Prinetti, a Lombard manufacturer of strong temperament, but without previous diplomatic experience.
    1
    1
  • In January 1903 Sign.or Prinetti, the minister for foreign affairs, resigned on account of ill-health, and was succeeded by 1903 Admiral Mon., while Admiral Bettolo took the latters 1905.
    1
    1
  • The latter accepted the task, and the new administration included Signor Tittoni, late prefect of Naples, as foreign minister, Signor Luigi Luzzatti, the eminent financier, at the treasury, General Pedotti at the war office, and Admiral Mirabello as minister of marine.
    1
    1
  • The characteristic feature of Italys foreign relations during this period was the weakening of the bonds of the Triple Alliance and the improved relations with France, while the ~
    1
    1
  • Loubet, the French president, came to Rome; this action was strongly resented by the pope, who, like his predecessor since 1870, objected to the presence of foreign Catholic rulers in Rome, and led to the final rupture between France and the Vatican.
    1
    1
  • 29 of the Berlin Treaty) in a note presented to the Italian foreign office on the 12th of April 1909.
    1
    1
  • In foreign affairs Danby showed a stronger grasp of essentials.
    1
    1
  • In any case, in 1676, together with Lauderdale alone, he consented to a treaty between Charles and Louis according to which the foreign policy of both kings was to be conducted in union, and Charles received an annual subsidy of £10o,000.
    1
    1
  • Early in 1783 the marquess of Carmarthen, as he was called, was selected as ambassador to France, but he did not take up this appointment, becoming instead secretary for foreign affairs under William Pitt in December of the same year.
    1
    1
  • and Foreign; Foxe's Acts and Monuments; Strype's Memorials of Cranmer (1694); Anecdotes and Character of Archbishop Cranmer, by Ralph Morice, and two contemporary biographies (Camden Society's publications); Remains of Thomas Cranmer, by Jenkyns (1833); Lives of Cranmer, by Gilpin (1784), Todd (1831), Le Bas, in Hook's Lives of the Archbishops of Canterbury, vols.
    1
    1
  • He appealed to the pope, and hoped to crush his enemies by the aid of foreign troops, while the barons prepared for war, and the prelates strove to keep the peace.
    1
    1
  • give permission to merchants, both English and foreign, to enter and leave the kingdom, except in time of war.
    1
    1
  • says that as soon as peace is made all foreign mercenaries are to be banished.
    1
    1
  • His advocacy of an American episcopate, in connexion with which he wrote the Answer to Dr Mayhew's Observations on the Charter and Conduct of the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel in Foreign Parts (London 1764), raised considerable opposition in England and America.
    1
    1
  • He will eliminate foreign accretions, that the gospel of Christ may stand forth in its native purity, and that Christ Himself may in all things have the pre-eminence.
    1
    1
  • The most constantly occurring changes that beset a plant are connected with illumination, temperature, moisture, and contact with foreign bodies.
    1
    1
  • When a sensitive tendril comes into contact with a foreign body, its growth becomes so modified that it twines round it.
    1
    1
  • Three-quarters of the native species are endemic; they seem, however, to be quite unable to resist the invasion of new-comers, and already 600 plants of foreign origin have succeeded in establishing themselves.
    1
    1
  • of State Pap., Foreign, 1566-1568, p. 212.
    1
    1
  • of State Pap., Foreign, 15691 57 1, p. 372.
    1
    1
  • of State Papers, Foreign, Scottish, Venetian, vii; Exchequer Rolls of Scotland, xix.
    1
    1
  • Pisgah or Mt Nebo (the name suggests a foreign god), to the north-east of the Dead Sea became the scene of the death of Moses; his burial-place was never known (Deut.
    1
    1
  • The traditions would seem to point to the institution of new principles in the religion of Yahweh, and would associate with it not merely Moses but those foreign elements which are subsequently found in Israel and Judah.
    1
    1
  • In 1905 he replaced the duc d'Audiffret-Pasquier as senator for the department of Marne, and in May 1906 became minister of foreign affairs in the Sarrien cabinet.
    1
    1
  • Though outside foreign affairs he played but a small part in the period of Liberal opposition between 1895 and 1905, he retained public confidence as one who was indispensable to a Liberal administration.
    1
    1
  • When Sir Henry Campbell-Bannerman's cabinet was formed in December 1905 he became foreign minister, and he retained this office when in April 1908 Mr Asquith became prime minister.
    1
    1
  • He was five times president of the Royal Astronomical Society, was correspondent of the French Academy and belonged to many other foreign and American societies.
    1
    1
  • The characteristic point of Norman rule in Sicily is that it is the rule of princes who were foreign to all the inhabitants of the island, but who were not more foreign to the inhabitants of the island than different classes of them were to one another.
    1
    1
  • In England the Norman duke came in as a foreign intruder, without a native supporter to establish his rule over a single nation in its own land.
    1
    1
  • If a man of one people knew the speech of any of the others, he knew it strictly as a foreign language.
    1
    1
  • He was, moreover, an Imperialist and a Colonial Federationist at a time when Liberalism was tied and bound to the Manchester traditions; and, to the consternation of, the official wire-pullers, he vigorously supported Disraeli's foreign policy, and in 1881 opposed the Gladstonian settlement with the Boers.
    1
    1
  • The great majority of the foreign population are Italians or Spaniards, with lesser numbers, in descending scale, of Brazilian, Argentine and French birth.
    1
    1
  • Uruguayan wool is favourably regarded in foreign markets, on account of the clean state in which it is shipped, this being largely due to the natural conditions of the land and climate.
    1
    1
  • The foreign trade passes mainly through Montevideo, wherekhe port has been greatly improved.
    1
    1
  • He is assisted by a council of ministers representing the departments of the interior, foreign affairs, finance, war and marine, industry, labour and instruction and public works.
    1
    1
  • On leaving the lyceum Gorchakov entered the foreign office under Count Nesselrode.
    1
    1
  • For the time, however, he made a virtue of necessity, and Alexander II., recognizing the wisdom and courage which Gorchakov had exhibited, appointed him minister of foreign affairs in place of Count Nesselrode.
    1
    1
  • Not long after his accession to office Gorchakov issued a circular to the foreign powers, in which he announced that Russia proposed, for internal reasons, to keep herself as free as possible from complications abroad, and he added the now historic phrase, "La Russie ne boude pas; die se recueille."
    1
    1
  • After the congress he continued to hold the post of minister for foreign affairs, but lived chiefly abroad, and resigned formally in 1882, when he was succeeded by M.
    1
    1
  • Prince Gorchakov devoted himself entirely to foreign affairs, and took no part in the great internal reforms of Alexander II.'s reign.
    1
    1
  • In short, there is no real nobility in England; for the class which answers to foreign nobility has so long ceased to have any practical privileges that it has long ceased to be looked on as a nobility, and the word nobility has been transferred to another class which has nothing answering to it out of the three British kingdoms. 2 This last ' This statement is mainly interesting as expressing the late Professor Freeman's view; it is, however, open to serious criticism.
    1
    1
  • There again his proficiency, especially in physical science, was marked, and he was one of the young Russians chosen to complete their education in foreign countries.
    1
    1
  • The foreign monarch was astonished, and, at the request of Theodoric, Boetius had to prepare others of a similar nature, which were sent as presents to Gunibald.
    1
    1
  • About 1836 he entered the civil service as an official of the foreign ministry.
    1
    1
  • In that year he became minister for foreign affairs, a post to which he was appointed also on four subsequent occasions and which he held at the time of his death.
    1
    1
  • Generally regarded as the partisan of a pro-English policy, he rendered most valuable service to his country by his able management of the foreign relations of Turkey, and not least by his efficacious settlement of affairs in Syria after the massacres of 1860.
    1
    1
  • Some tracts of territory, such as the greater part of the Kru coast, still, however, remain without foreign - Americansettlers, and in a state of quasi-independence.
    1
    1
  • Meantime the attempts of the Liberian government to control the Kru coast led to various troubles, such as the fining or firing upon foreign steamships for alleged contraventions of regulations.
    1
    1
  • In foreign missions the distinctive feature about the Moravians is, not that they were so early in the field (1732), but that they were the first Protestants to declare that the evangelization of the heathen was the duty of the Church as such.
    1
    1
  • Enterprises: (1) Foreign missions in Labrador, Alaska, Canada, California, West Indies, Nicaragua, Demerara, Surinam, Cape Colony, Kaffraria, German East Africa, North Queensland, West Himalaya.
    1
    1
  • The foreign missions are managed by a mission board, elected by the General Synod.
    1
    1
  • Pop. (1910), about 30,000, of whom nearly one-half were foreign-born or of foreign parentage.
    1
    1
  • The public buildings include the cathedral (1760), the government palace, the municipal palace, the episcopal palace, the church of Santa Ana, a national theatre, a school of arts and trades, a foreign hospital, the former administration building of the Canal Company, Santo Tomas Hospital, the pesthouse of Punta Mala and various asylums. The houses are mostly of stone, with red tile roofs, two or three storeys high, built in the Spanish style around central patios, or courts, and with balconies projecting far over the narrow streets; in such houses the lowest floor is often rented to a poorer family.
    1
    1
  • Yet there is no doubt that the rule of Peisistratus was most beneficial to Athens both in her foreign and in her internal relations.
    1
    1
  • Shortly, his services to Greece and to the world may be summed up under three heads: In foreign policy, he sketched out the plan on which Athens was to act in her external relations.
    1
    1
  • To appreciate the significance of the doctrines of Heraclitus, it must be borne in mind that to Greek philosophy the sharp distinction between subject and object which pervades modern thought was foreign, a consideration which suggests the conclusion that, while it is a great mistake to reckon Heraclitus with the materialistic cosmologists of the Ionic schools, it is, on the other hand, going too far to treat his theory, with Hegel and Lassalle, as one of pure Panlogism.
    1
    1
  • On the other hand, in the six years, 1892-97, the excess of Russian emigration over immigration was 207,353, as compared with an excess of foreign immigration over emigration of only 136,740.
    1
    1
  • The ministries are as follows: (1) of the Imperial Court, to which the administration of the apanages, the chapter of the imperial orders, the imperial palaces and theatres, and the Academy of Fine Arts are subordinated; (2) Foreign Affairs; (3) War and Marine; (4) Finance; (5) Commerce and Industry (created in 1905); (6) Interior (including police, health, censorship and press, posts and telegraphs, foreign religions, statistics); (7) Agriculture; (8) Ways and Communications; (9) Justice; (10) Public Instruction.
    1
    1
  • But even this sheet of water is an inland sea, the only outlet of which, the Bosphorus, is in foreign hands, while the Caspian, an immense shallow lake, mostly bordered by deserts, possesses more importance as a link between Russia and her Asiatic settlements than as a channel for intercourse with other countries.
    1
    1
  • Any idea of proselytism is quite foreign to the ordinary Russian mind, and the outbursts of proselytizing zeal occasionally manifested by the clergy are really due to the desire for " Russification," and traceable to the influence of the higher clergy and of the government.
    1
    1
  • The imports of foreign metals in the rough and of coal are steadily increasing, while the exports, never otherwise than insignificant, show no advance.
    1
    1
  • But of the vessels that visit the Russian ports in the way of trade every year only 8.3% are Russian, the rest being of course foreign.
    1
    1
  • breaking out occasionally into armed conflicts, and among the princes of the other principalities the old struggle for precedence and territory went on unceasingly until it was suddenly interrupted, in the first half of the thirteenth century, by the unexpected irruption of an irresistible foreign foe coming from the mysterious.
    1
    1
  • y i strong enough to pursue at once an aggressive foreign policy, and the tsar prudently determined to make peace with Sweden and conclude an armistice of fourteen years with Poland.
    1
    1
  • As in all previous insurrections the Poles proved stronger in the field, and Khmelnitski in desperation sought foreign assistance, first in Constantinople and then in Moscow.
    1
    1
  • The political and the commercial proposals were alike received with coldness, because the native diplomatists had aims which could not be reconciled completely with the policy of any other country, and the native merchants were afraid of foreign competition.
    1
    1
  • Reckless of consequences, he swept away the venerated ceremonial formalities which his ancestors had scrupulously observed, openly scoffed at ancient usage, habitually dressed in foreign costume, and generally chose foreign heretics as his boon companions.
    1
    1
  • In adopting foreign innovations, he showed, like the Japanese of the present day, no sentimental preference for any particular nation, and was ready to borrow from the Germans, Dutch, English, Swedes or French whatever seemed best suited for his purpose.
    1
    1
  • Coming after a series of incompetent rulers, the German princess 11., proved herself a worthy successor to Peter the Great both in home and in foreign affairs; but she was not a mere imitator.
    1
    1
  • In foreign affairs Catherine devoted her attention mainly to pushing forward the Russian frontier westwards and south- Foreign wards, and as France was the traditional ally of policy of Sweden, Poland and Turkey, she adopted at first Cath- the so-called systeme du Nord, that is to say, a close erine.
    1
    1
  • Whilst Russia, Austria, Prussia and France were becoming powerful monarchies with centralized administration, Poland had remained a weak feudal republic with an elected king chosen under foreign influence and fettered by constitutional restrictions.
    1
    1
  • All political authority was in the hands of turbulent nobles who quarrelled among themselves, who were always inclined to submit the questions at issue to the arbitrament of arms, and who did not scruple to invite foreign powers to intervene on their behalf.
    1
    1
  • In foreign affairs he displayed the same capriciousness and want of perseverance.
    1
    1
  • At that time, in respect of foreign affairs, Russia was entering on a new phase of her history.
    1
    1
  • For this purpose he created a very severe press-censorship and an expensive system of passports, which made it more difficult for Russians to visit foreign countries.
    1
    1
  • " This steadfast faith in autocratic methods and the exaggerated fear of revolutionary principles were shown in foreign as well as in home affairs.
    1
    1
  • (For details of this revolutionary movement, see Nihilism.) In respect of foreign policy the reign of Alexander II.
    1
    1
  • In the foreign policy of the empire Alexander III.
    1
    1
  • died, and was succeeded by his son, Nicholas II., who, partly from similarity of character and partly from veneration for his father's memory, continued the existing lines of policy in home and foreign affairs.
    1
    1
  • In foreign affairs Nicholas II.
    1
    1
  • Indian affairs, the committee on foreign relations and others, was prominent in the discussion of matters brought before the Senate from these committees, advocated the enlargement of the navy and the reform of the civil service, and opposed the pension veto messages of President Cleveland.
    1
    1
  • His administration was marked by a revival of American industries and a reduction of the public debt, and at its conclusion the country was left in a condition of prosperity and on friendly terms with foreign nations.
    1
    1
  • In 1909-1910 the institution had 20 buildings, 32 acres of recreation grounds, 16 instructors and 488 students, representing 38 states and territories of the United States and 4 foreign countries.
    1
    1
  • the kadishtu of the temples of the Babylonian Ishtar) were foreign Canaanite elements which became imported into Hebrew worship during the period of the Hebrew settlement in Canaan.
    1
    1
  • External danger from a foreign foe, such as Midian or the Philistines, at once brought into prominence the claim and power of Yahweh, Israel's national war-god since the great days of the exodus.
    1
    1
  • An invasion of foreign territory would bring Israel under the power of its patron-deity.
    1
    1
  • But the arts of the necromancer were always and without exception treated as foreign to the religion of Yahweh.
    1
    1
  • This necessarily involved in that primitive age an extreme jealousy of foreign importations or innovations in ritual.
    1
    1
  • According to the dominating popular conception, the destruction of the national power by a foreign army meant the overthrow of the prestige of the national deity by the foreign nation's god.
    1
    1
  • It is shown, moreover, in foreign alliances.
    1
    1
  • Compacts with a powerful foreign state, under whose aegis Israel was glad to shelter, involved covenants sealed by sacrificial rites in which the deity or deities of the foreign state were involved as well as Yahweh, the god of the weaker.
    1
    1
  • As with his elder contemporary, the foreign peoples - (but in Isaiah's oracles Assyria and Egypt as well as the Palestinian races) - come within his survey.
    1
    1
  • xl.-lv.) we have no longer a Jewish but a foreign messiah.
    1
    1
  • One of such enclosures constitutes the British legation, and most of the other foreign legations are similarly, though not so sumptuously, lodged.
    1
    1
  • The inhabitants of Peking being consumers only, and in no way producers, the trade of the city is very small, though the city is open to foreign commerce.
    1
    1
  • of State Pap. England and Spain, Venetian and Foreign (1558-1559), p. 5 2 5 (an account full of obvious errors); Cotton MSS.
    1
    1
  • Kiu-kiang, the treaty port of the province, opened to foreign trade in 1861, is on the Yangtsze-kiang, a short distance above the junction of the Po-yang Lake with that river.
    1
    1
  • In London he seems to have seen but little select society - partly from his father's taste, "which had always preferred the highest and lowest company," and partly from his own reserve and timidity, increased by his foreign education, which had made English habits unfamiliar, and the very language 2 The affair, however, was not finally broken off till 1763.
    1
    1
  • After the birth of his first child, Augusta, in 1737, Frederick was ordered by the king to quit St James' Palace, and the foreign ambassadors were requested to refrain from visiting him.
    1
    1
  • Large quantities of cranberries are raised in the township. Plymouth is a port of entry, but its foreign commerce is unimportant; it has a considerable coasting trade, especially in coal and lumber.
    1
    1
  • On the 24th of July 1663 he alone signed a protest against the bill " for the encouragement of trade," on the plea that owing to the free export of coin and bullion allowed by the act, and to the importation of foreign commodities being greater than the export of home goods, " it must necessarily follow.
    1
    1
  • that OUT silver will also be carried away into foreign "parts and all trade fail for want of money."
    1
    1
  • For his work on etherification Williamson in 1862 received a Royal medal from the Royal Society, of which he became a fellow in 1855, and which he served as foreign secretary from 1873 to 1889.
    1
    1
  • He served in the Virginia house of delegates in 1823-1827, in the state constitutional convention of 1829-1830, and from 1831 to 1837 in the National House of Representatives, being chairman of the committee on foreign affairs in 1835-1836.
    1
    1
  • He owed his influence partly to the fact that he was the governor of Paul, who was greatly attached to him; partly to the peculiar circumstances in which Catherine had mounted the throne; and partly to his knowledge of foreign affairs.
    1
    1
  • Although acting as minister of foreign affairs he was never made chancellor; but he was the political mentor of Catherine during the first eighteen years of her reign.
    1
    1
  • The foreign policy of this period brought about the complete isolation of Austria, and the ingratitude towards Russia, as shown during the period of the Crimean War, which has become proverbial, caused a permanent estrangement between the two great Eastern empires and the imperial families.
    1
    1
  • The next six years, both in home and foreign policy, were marked by great vacillation.
    1
    1
  • In foreign affairs he succeeded in achieving as satisfactory a solution of the Adriatic problem as was possible under the circumstances.
    1
    1
  • (I) The Philistines, a foreign people whose presence in Palestine 2 The story of Joseph has distinctive internal features of its own, and appears to be from an independent cycle, which has been used to form a connecting link between the Settlement and the Exodus; see also Ed.
    1
    1
  • The situation was conducive to the spread of foreign customs, and the condemnation passed upon Manasseh thus perhaps becomes more significant.
    1
    1
  • But Israel after the fall of Samaria is artificially excluded from the Judaean horizon, and lies as a foreign land, although Judah itself had suffered from the intrusion of foreigners in the preceding centuries of war and turmoil, and strangers had settled in her midst, had formed part of the royal guard, or had even served as janissaries (§ 15, end).
    1
    1
  • Tobiah was cast out, the offending priest expelled, and a general purging followed, in which all the foreign element was removed.
    1
    1
  • But the former gained the day, and, realizing that the only hope of maintaining a pure worship of Yahweh lay in a forcible isolation from foreign influence, its adherents were prepared to take measures to ensure the religious independence of their assembly.
    1
    1
  • hostility to foreign marriages.
    1
    1
  • But while such men went out into the world and brought back wealth of one kind or another to Palestine, other Jews were content to make their homes in foreign parts.
    1
    1
  • The popes themselves, within their own immediate jurisdiction, were often far more tolerant than their bulls issued for foreign communities, and Torquemada was less an expression than a distortion of the papal policy.
    1
    1
  • At this period they controlled more of the foreign and colonial trade than all the other alien merchants in London put together.
    1
    1
  • The preface to his Ever Green is a protest against "imported trimming" and "foreign embroidery in our writings," and a plea for a return to simple Scottish tradition.
    1
    1
  • On the 15th of May 1870 he was appointed minister of foreign affairs in the 0111vier cabinet, and was thus largely, though not entirely, responsible for the bungling of the negotiations between France and Prussia arising out of the candidature of Prince Leopold of Hohenzollern for the throne of Spain, which led to the disastrous war of 1870-71.
    1
    1
  • was suggested by 0111vier; the paragraph asserting that France would not allow a foreign power to disturb to her own detriment the actual equilibrium of Europe was inserted by the emperor.
    1
    1
  • According to a law published in 1899, Turkish merchandise became subjected to the same rates as that of foreign nations.
    1
    1
  • He convokes, prorogues and dissolves the chamber, sanctions laws, exercises the right of pardon in case of political offences, represents the island in its foreign relations and is chief of its military forces.
    1
    1
  • Serious disturbances broke out at Canea on the 24th of May, and were only quelled by the arrival of foreign warships.
    1
    1
  • The foreign consuls intervened in the hope of bringing about a peaceful settlement, but the Sultan resolved on the employment of force, and an expedition despatched to Vamos effected the relief of that town with a loss of 200 men.
    1
    1
  • Since the outbreak in May 1896 the Greek government had loyally co-operated with the powers in their efforts for the pacification of the island, but towards the close of the year a secret society known as the Ethnike Hetaeria began to arrogate to itself the direction of Greek foreign policy.
    1
    1
  • Affairs were brought to a climax by a series of conflicts which took place at Canea on the 4th of February; the Turkish troops fired on the Christians, a conflagration broke out in the town, and many thousands of Christians took refuge on the foreign warships in the bay.
    1
    1
  • Against this the Mussulman deputies protested, in a memorandum addressed to the British secretary of state for foreign affairs.
    1
    1
  • and to gain opinions from foreign universities in favour of the king's divorce from Catherine of Aragon.
    1
    1
  • But the prosperity of the island depends mainly upon foreign visitors (some 30,000 annually), who are attracted by the remarkable beauty of the scenery (that of the coast being especially fine), the views of the sea and of the Bay of Naples, and the purity of the air.
    1
    1
  • Gifford Palgrave and Sir Lewis Pelly amongst Englishmen, and Karsten Niebuhr, John Lewis Burckhardt, Visconte, Joseph Halevy and others, amongst foreign travellers.
    1
    1
  • Unlike the Chinese and Indians, they have hitherto not had the smallest influence on the intellectual development of Asia, and though they have in the past sometimes shown themselves intensely nationalist and conservative, they have, compared with India and China, so little which is really their own that their assimilation of foreign ideas is explicable.
    1
    1
  • Almost all Asiatic countries have a literature, but it is often not indigenous and consists of foreign works, chiefly religious, read either in translations or the original.
    1
    1
  • After speaking of Ranulf's unique position in the kingdom, which "fitted him for the part of a leader of opposition to royal or ministerial tyranny," Stubbs sums up his character in these words: "On more than one occasion he refused his consent to taxation which he deemed unjust; his jealousy of Hubert (de Burgh), although it led him to join the foreign party in 1223, did not prevent him from more than once interposing to prevent his overthrow.
    1
    1
  • He kept in touch, however, with foreign politics, and having refused to join the ministry of George Canning in 1827, became a member of the cabinet of the duke of Wellington as 'chancellor of the duchy of Lancaster in January 1828.
    1
    1
  • During the short administration of Sir Robert Peel in 1834 and 1835, Aberdeen had filled the office of secretary for the colonies, and in September 1841 he took office again under Peel, on this occasion as foreign secretary; the five years during which he held this position were the most fruitful and successful of his public life.
    1
    1
  • In 1845 he supported Peel when in a divided cabinet he proposed to suspend the duty on foreign corn, and left office with that minister in July 1846.
    1
    1
  • After Peel's death in 1850 he became the recognized leader of the Peelites, although since his resignation his share in public business had been confined to a few speeches on foreign affairs.
    1
    1
  • Although united on free trade and in general on questions of domestic reform, a cabinet which contained Lord Palmerston and Lord John Russell, in addition to Aberdeen, was certain to differ on questions of foreign policy.
    1
    1
  • He smoothed the way for Palmerston to succeed rim, and while the earl of Clarendon remained at the foreign office he aided him with advice and was consulted on matters of moment.
    1
    1
  • 1919, Stamboliiski became President of the Council and Minister for Foreign Affairs; on Nov.
    1
    1
  • English readers, who know the story only through the medium of Malory's noble prose and Tennyson's melodious verse, carry away an impression entirely foreign to that produced by a study of the original literature.
    1
    1
  • He soon found such work not sufficiently remunerative to keep his petite horde in comfort, and then turned his thoughts to employment from the French foreign office, either in writing or in diplomacy.
    1
    1
  • He first sent Mme de Nehra to Paris to make peace with the authorities, and then returned himself, hoping to get employment through an old literary collaborateur of his, Durival, who was at this time director of the finances of the department of foreign affairs.
    1
    1
  • Before Mirabeau's influence on foreign policy is discussed, his behaviour on several important points must be noticed.
    1
    1
  • Of Mirabeau's attitude with regard to foreign affairs it is necessary to speak in more detail.
    1
    1
  • He held it to be just that the French people should conduct their Revolution as they would, and that no foreign nation had any right to interfere with them while they kept themselves strictly to their own affairs.
    1
    1
  • But he knew also that neighbouring nations looked with unquiet eyes on the progress of affairs in France, that they feared the influence of the Revolution on their own peoples, and that foreign monarchs were being prayed by the French emigres to interfere on behalf of the French monarchy.
    1
    1
  • To prevent this interference, or rather to give no pretext for it, was his guiding thought as to foreign policy.
    1
    1
  • He had been elected a member of the comite diplomatique of the Assembly in July 1790, and became its reporter at once, and in this capacity he was able to prevent the Assembly from doing much harm in regard to foreign affairs.
    1
    1
  • He had long known Armand Marc, comte de Montmorin, the foreign secretary, and, as matters became more strained from the complications with the princes and counts of the empire, he entered into daily communication with the minister, advised him on every point, and, while dictating his policy, defended it in the Assembly.
    1
    1
  • In March his illness was evidently gaining on him, to his great grief, because he knew that he alone could yet save France from the distrust of her monarch and the present reforms, and from the foreign interference, which would assuredly bring about catastrophes unparalleled in the history of the world.
    1
    1
  • Willert, Mirabeau (1898) in the "Foreign Statesman" series; C. F.
    1
    1
  • Henry Clay, the speaker, appointed him a member of the Committee on Foreign Relations, of which John C. Calhoun was chairman, and for some forty years these three constituted a great triumvirate in American politics.
    1
    1
  • Notwithstanding the disadvantages of its open roadstead, the foreign trade has rapidly expanded, the annual value of the exports having increased from 62 millions sterling in 1899 to over ro millions sterling in 1904.
    1
    1
  • This ambition distinguishes his foreign policy from that of Henry VII., to which it has been likened.
    1
    1
  • His domestic was sounder than his foreign policy: by his development of the star chamber, by his firm administration of justice and maintenance of order, and by his repression of feudal.
    1
    1
  • They are Cleveland, Toledo, Sandusky, Cincinnati, Columbus and Dayton, and the value of the foreign commerce passing through these in 1909 amounted to $9,483,974 in imports (more than one-half to Cleveland) and $10,920,083 in exports (nearly eight-ninths from Cleveland).
    1
    1
  • Of far greater volume than the foreign commerce is the domestic trade in coal, iron, lumber, &c., largely by way of the Great Lakes.
    1
    1
  • Butler, in regard to foreign governments, and reversed all those decisions to the entire satisfaction of the administration.
    1
    1
  • The necessity of accurate acquaintance with any foreign language and of obtaining good texts, is a subject Bacon is never weary of descanting upon.
    1
    1
  • Pop. (1900) 560,892, (197,129 being foreign born); (1905, state census) 595,580; (1910), 670,585.
    1
    1
  • The North End, the original city and afterwards the fashionable quarter, is now given over to the Jews and foreign colonies.
    1
    1
  • The total tonnage in foreign trade entering and leaving in 1907 was 5,148,429 tons; and in the same year 9616 coasting vessels (tonnage, 10, 261,474) arrived in Boston.
    1
    1
  • In 1900 35.1% of the inhabitants were foreign-born, and 72.2% wholly or in part of foreign parentage.
    1
    1
  • Large foreign colonies, like adjoining but unmixing nations, divide among themselves a large part of the city, and give to its life a cosmopolitan colour of varied speech, opinion, habits, traditions, social relations and religions.
    1
    1
  • Despite, however, its heavy foreign admixture the old Americanism of the city remains strikingly predominant.
    1
    1
  • Prices were low, foreign commerce was already large, business thriving; wealth gave social status; the official British class lent a lustre to society; and Boston " town " was drawing society from the " country."
    1
    1
  • His original bent was towards foreign mission.
    1
    1
  • Foreign and Colonial Laws: Field, Landholding and the relation of Landlord and Tenant in various Countries; Ruling Cases (American Notes), (London and Boston, 1894-1901).
    1
    1
  • Flinders Petrie began the systematic exploration of the ruins of Bedreshen, and in three seasons cleared up much of the topography of the ancient city, identifying the mound of the citadel and palace, a foreign quarter, &c. Among his finds not the least interesting is a large series of terra-cotta heads representing the characteristic features of the foreigners who thronged the bazaars of Memphis.
    1
    1
  • Commercially, New Haven is primarily a distributing point for the Atlantic seaboard, but the city is a port of entry, and foreign commerce (almost exclusively importing) is carried on to some extent, the imports in 1909 being valued at $404,805.
    1
    1
  • It has, however, certain characteristics which cause it to be in demand even in the United States, where during recent years Egyptian cotton has comprised about 80% of all the " foreign " cottons imported.
    1
    1
  • Foreign policy was largely determined by Hughes, financial by Mellon, and the problem of unemployment was thrown upon Hoover.
    1
    1
  • His " gospel of understanding " had proved effective both in domestic and foreign politics.
    1
    1
  • According to the custom-house returns the value of the foreign imports and exports in the year 1880 was L691,954 and L1,117,790 respectively, besides a large native trade carried on in junks.
    1
    1
  • In 1904 the value of foreign imports had risen to -'2,7 57,962, but the exports amounted to {1,742,859 only, the comparatively low figure being accounted for by the Russo-Japanese war.
    1
    1
  • As such a novum salutis genus, the Crusades connect themselves with the history of the penitentiary system; as the foreign policy of the Church they belong to that clerical purification and direction of feudal society and its instincts, which appears in the institution of "God's Truce" and in chivalry itself.
    1
    1
  • Through them the popes had deposed the emperors of the West from their headship of the world, partly because through the Crusades the popes were able to direct the common Christianity of Europe in a foreign policy of their own without consultation with the emperor, partly because in the 13th century they were ultimately able to direct the Crusade itself against the empire.
    1
    1
  • With the exception of the extreme north (Commagene), which is shut off by a barrier of hills and belongs to foreign hydrographic systems, the whole country is roughly a gable-shaped plateau, falling north and south from a medial ridge, which crosses Syria at about its central point.
    1
    1
  • But in the Syrian mythology foreign influences frequently betray themselves.
    1
    1
  • But the connexion with foreign parts led to the gradual introduction of a procedure resembling that coming into use on the continent and based on the Roman civil law.
    1
    1
  • The king's advocate also represented the crown in the ecclesiastical courts, and was its standing adviser in matters of international and foreign law.
    1
    1
  • Thus Hull district inaugurated a bold policy of chapel-buildings; Norwich that of a foreign mission; Sunderland and Manchester the ideal of a bettereducated ministry, Sunderland institute being opened in 1868; Nottingham district founded a middle-class school; Leeds promoted a union of Sunday-schools, and the placing of chapel property on a better financial footing.
    1
    1
  • In January 1870 the first piece of real foreign missionary work was begun at Fernando Po, followed in December of the same year by the mission at Aliwal North on the Orange River in South Africa.
    1
    1
  • The history of the Malays amply accounts for the number and variety of foreign ingredients in their language.
    1
    1
  • It is of consequence that they should, as far as possible, be free from excess of alkali and all other salts and foreign ingredients which may have an injurious effect on the skin.
    1
    1
  • The city is still very favourably situated for obtaining supplies of oils both local and foreign, including sesame, ground nut, castor oil, &c. In England, during the reign of Charles I.
    1
    1
  • In the course of the year 1795, as president of the Committee of Public Safety, and as responsible especially for foreign affairs, he was largely instrumental in bringing about peace with Spain.
    1
    1
  • Here they remained, and with one or two other great families governed Geneva, and sent forth many representatives to seek their fortune and win distinction in the service of foreign princes, both as soldiers and ministers.
    1
    1
  • He was a member of the Pennsylvania Constitutional Convention of 1789-1790, and of the Pennsylvania Assembly in 1790, 1791, and 1792, and rose with surprising rapidity, despite his foreign birth and his inability to speak English with correctness or fluency.
    1
    1
  • He resisted the navy, the mainspring of Washington's foreign policy; he opposed commercial treaties and diplomatic intercourse in a similar fashion.
    1
    1
  • Commercial warfare failed, the Embargo was repealed, and Jefferson, having entangled foreign relations and brought the country to the verge of civil war, retired to private life, leaving to his successor Madison, and to Gallatin, the task of extricating the nation from its difficulties.
    1
    1
  • Martin Van Buren, then in the Crawford interest, came to the conclusion that the candidate for the second place, by his foreign origin, weakened the ticket, and in October Gallatin retired from the contest.
    1
    1
  • Later still the word came to mean "foreign," i.e.
    1
    1
  • Under his administration the Church was severely taxed for the prosecution of Henry's foreign wars; and the chancellor incurred the reproach "of plunging his sword into the bowels of his mother."
    1
    1
  • Numerous and costly excavations have been carried out by the Greek government and by native and foreign scientific societies, while accidental discoveries have been frequently made during the building of the modern town.
    1
    1
  • have occupied the site of the Monastery of the Asomati Barges a great commonwealth; they were the tribute paid to the intellectual renown of Athens by foreign potentates or dilettanti, who desired to add their names to the list of its illustrious citizens and patrons.
    1
    1
  • Owing to the numbers and activity of its institutions, both native and foreign, for the prosecution of research and the encouragement of classical studies, Athens has become Scientific once more an international seat of learning.
    1
    1
  • Their vigorous foreign policy first made Athens an Aegean power and secured connexions with numerous mainland powers.
    1
    1
  • The issue of this conflict was determined less by any intrinsic superiority on the part of her enemies than by the blunders committed by a people unable to carry out a consistent foreign policy on its own initiative, and served since Pericles by none but selfish or short-sighted advisers.
    1
    1
  • During the 18th century many works of art, which still remained in situ, fell a prey to foreign collectors.
    1
    1
  • The use of Manchester prints and other European goods is fairly general; and the women, who make a fine native cloth from hemp, introduce coloured threads from the foreign stuffs, so as to produce ornamental devices.
    1
    1
  • The foreign settlement at Taipe lies outside the walls of the city, and is called Twatutia (Taitotei by the Japanese).
    1
    1
  • It is the site of the first foreign settlement, has a population of about 7000, but cannot be made a good harbour without considerable expenditure.
    1
    1
  • In the meantime the value of its exports to foreign countries increased only from $3,002,679 to $4,565,598, and the value of its imports from foreign countries only from $1,952,728 to $3,054,318.
    1
    1
  • Trade between Porto Rico and the United States is free, but upon imports to Porto Rico from foreign countries the Federal government collects custom duties and pays the net proceeds to the insular government.
    1
    1
  • To the difficulties caused by disaster, depopulation and maladministration there was added the danger of foreign invasion when war broke out in Europe between Francis I.
    1
    1
  • The foreign trade of St.
    1
    1
  • He was one of the first Muscovites who diligently collected foreign books, and we hear of as many as sixty-nine Latin works being sent to him at one time from abroad.
    1
    1
  • On his return to Russia he was created a boyar of the first class and entrusted with the direction of the foreign office, with the title of "Guardian of the great Tsarish Seal and Director of the great Imperial Offices."
    1
    1
  • In general European politics Baron Marschall had taken during his Foreign Secretaryship a strongly imperialist attitude.
    1
    1
  • His materials, he tells us, were collected from foreign rather than native sources, the latter of which had been put beyond his reach by circumstances.
    1
    1
  • In company, therefore, with the earl of Norfolk he refused to render foreign service in Gascony, on the plea that they were only bound to serve with the king, who was himself bound for Flanders.
    1
    1
  • Meanwhile his academic honours from home and foreign universities multiplied, and he became a fellow of the Royal Society in 1894.
    1
    1
  • In 1798, after trying his hand at farming in America, Hauterive was appointed to a post in the French foreign office.
    1
    1
  • In 1805 he was made a councillor of state and member of the Legion of Honour, and between 1805 and 1813 he was more than once temporarily minister of foreign affairs.
    1
    1
  • In 1805 a difference of opinion with Talleyrand on the question of the Austrian alliance, which Hauterive favoured, led to his withdrawal from the political side of the ministry of foreign affairs, and he was appointed keeper of the archives of the same department.
    1
    1
  • Fisher was summoned (13th of April) to take the oath prescribed by the Act of Succession, which he was ready to do, were it not that the preamble stated that the offspring of Catherine were illegitimate, and prohibited all faith, trust and obedience to any foreign authority or potentate.
    1
    1
  • How to equate this foreign civilizing race from Asia with the Semitic elements in the ancient Egyptian speech we do not yet know.
    1
    1
  • The object is of Egyptian workmanship, representing this powerful deity of the foreign sea people with whom the predynastic Nilotes no doubt often fought.
    1
    1
  • Megalithic town walls were naturally common in that stony land, Palestine, and very typical specimens of them were found in the Palestine Exploration Fund's excavations at Bethshemesh (`Ain Shems) directed by Dr. Duncan Mackenzie, 29 whose work also threw new light on the phenomenon of the appearance in Palestine between the 12th and 10th centuries B.C. of subMycenaean (Greek) pottery, which can only be ascribed to the Philistines, whose historical position as a foreign invading force from the Aegean area (Lycia and Crete-Kaphtor) is now entirely vindicated.
    1
    1
  • His first official appointment was that of under-secretary of state for foreign affairs, in the administration formed by Sir Robert Peel in 1841 - his chief being the earl of Aberdeen.
    1
    1
  • Hence in transcription from foreign languages and in works on phonetics it is represented by s or š.
    1
    1
  • styled " civil agents " and charged with the supervision of the local authorities in the application of reforms, were placed by the side of the inspector-general while the reorganization of the gendarmerie was entrusted to a foreign general in the Turkish service aided by a certain number of officers from the armies of the great powers.
    1
    1
  • Alexanderzuges, 1903); whilst on the other hand attempts were made to acclimatize the plants of the motherland in the foreign soil (Theophr., Hist.
    1
    1
  • Transplanted into this foreign soil, the monarchy became an absolute despotism, unchecked by a proud territorial nobility and a hardy peasantry on familiar terms with their king.
    1
    1
  • Adams, The Influence of Grenville on Pitt's Foreign Policy (Washington, 1904).
    1
    1
  • The general political outlook in Italy was of the gloomiest, and the country was on the eve of the catastrophe of foreign invasion.
    1
    1
  • Alexander was not the only person responsible for the general unrest in Italy and the foreign invasions, but he was ever ready to profit by them.
    1
    1
  • The meridian of Greenwich has been universally accepted as the initial meridian, but in the case of most topographical maps of foreign countries local meridians are still adhered to - the more important among which are: The outline includes coast-line, rivers, roads, towns, and in fact all objects capable of being shown on a map, with the exception of the hills and of woods, swamps, deserts and the like, which the draughtsman generally describes as " ornament."
    1
    1
  • Meantime another and more radical reform had been in preparation and was already in progress, namely, the abolition of slavery itself in the foreign possessions of the several states of Europe.
    1
    1
  • The words " slave" and " slavery " were, however, excluded from the constitution, " because," as Madison says," they did not choose to admit the right of property in man " in direct terms; and it was at the same time provided that Congress might interdict the foreign slave trade after the expiration of twenty years.
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  • The acquisition of Louisiana in 1803, which gave a new field for the growth of the slave power, though not made in its interest, the Missouri Compromise (1820), the annexation of Texas (1845), the Fugitive Slave Law (1850), the Kansas-Nebraska bill (1854), the Dred Scott decision (1857), the attempts to acquire Cuba (especially in 1854) and to reopen the foreign slave trade (1859-1860), were the principal steps - only some of them successful - in its career of aggression.
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  • We have seen that the last vestiges of the monstrous anomaly of modern colonial slavery are disappearing from all civilized states and their foreign possessions.
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  • Baker, the writings of Livingstone, and the biographies of Gordon may be consulted, besides the many documents on these subjects published by the British and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society.
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  • She was received with great consideration at foreign courts, and her literary and scientific reputation procured her the entree to the society of the learned in most of the capitals of Europe.
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  • Being the starting-point of the "overland route" to India, and the residence of the chief foreign consuls, it quickly acquired a European character and attracted not only Frank residents, but great numbers of Greeks, Jews and Syrians.
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  • of live-stock, a stud-farm was opened near Serajevo, and foreign horses, cattle, sheep and poultry are imported.
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  • Thus foreign speculators in land were excluded,.
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  • In respect of foreign trade Bosnia and Herzegovina were in 1882 included in the customs and commercial system of AustriaHungary, to the extinction of all intermediate imposts.
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  • At the time of the Austrian annexation in 1908, the only remaining token of Ottoman suzerainty was that the foreign consuls received their exequatur from Turkey, instead of Austria; otherwise the government of the country was conducted in the name of the Austrian emperor, through the imperial minister of finance at Vienna, who controlled the civil service for the occupied territory.
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  • The territory now called Herzegovina was also subject to various foreign powers.
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  • Instead of extending the foreign conquests of their sultan, the Bosnians were hard pressed to defend their own borders.
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  • The Turkish or Ottoman Empire comprises Turkey in Europe, Turkey in Asia, and the vilayets of Tripoli and Barca, or Bengazi, in North Africa; and in addition to those provinces under immediate Turkish rule, it embraces also certain tributary states and certain others under foreign administration.
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  • Caillard, Babington-Smith and Block, Reports on the Ottoman Public Debt (London, 1884-1898, 1899-1902, 1903 -1910); Annuaire oriental du commerce (Constantinople); Journal de la chambre de commerce (Constantinople, weekly); Annual Report of the Regie Co-interessee des Tabacs (Constantinople); Annual Report of the Council of Foreign Bondholders (London); C. Morawitz, Les Finances de la Turquie (Paris, 1902); G.
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  • The codes of law were by him revised and improved, and he was the first sultan to enter into relations with foreign states.
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  • Towards the middle of Suleiman's reign even this practice was abandoned, and the sultans henceforth attended the divans only on the distribution of pay to the troops or the reception of a foreign ambassador, which occasions were usually made to coincide.
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  • The reis was the secretary-general of the divan, and in more modern times became minister for foreign affairs.
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  • The governors of the more distant provinces enjoyed a considerable amount of independence, which in the case of the Barbary states was more or less complete; these entered into treaties with foreign powers, and by their piratical outrages frequently caused the Porte considerable embarrassment.
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  • But the sultan could not bend his pride to suffer foreign intervention in a matter that touched his honour, and the return of Napoleon from Elba threw the Eastern Question into the background.
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  • The foreign missionary work of the General Assembly had been carried on after 1812 through the (Congregational) American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions (organized in 1810) until the separation of 1837, when the Old School Assembly established its own board of foreign missions; the New School continued to work through the American board; after the union of 1869 the separate board was perpetuated and the American board transferred to it, with the contributions made to the American board by the New School churches, the missions in Africa (1833), in Syria (1822), and in Persia (1835).
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