How to use For-it in a sentence

for-it
  • I should have shown it to you in private - prepared you for it.

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  • Alfonso assured him that it was no big deal - that Señor Medena would pay for it because he had lots of money.

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  • I think a few days cleaning in the stable would pay for it.

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  • If Alex needed help, he wouldn't ask her for it.

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  • I don't know why she didn't ask for it before - or why she didn't tell me about the baby.

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  • I wondered why you asked me to look for it.

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  • She simply wasn't looking at it – or maybe for it.

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  • They just aren't expected to stray too far from the homestead in the process – or get paid for it.

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  • I didn't mean for it to sound that way.

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  • I didn't mean for it to be that way.

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  • I'd better put it back before Scruffy comes looking for it.

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  • She wanted the best for it - better than what she had.

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  • Perhaps even kill for it!

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  • I'm all for it!

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  • I may be dead wrong, but I for one say, go for it.

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  • Not falling for it this time, she vowed to herself.

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  • He hung it up only for it to ring again.

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  • He's planning something big for the weekend, and it sounds like his pop will be in town for it.

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  • When her phone rang again, she stretched for it and found she couldn't move.

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  • You were forced into a transition without being prepared for it.

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  • She had a damn good point, Sofia admitted, and hated her for it.

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  • She was happy for it.

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  • She reached for it.

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  • She didn't feel ready for it yet.

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  • The time frame was right for it to be the body of Senior Dawkins's mine manager, slain there in 1961.

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  • I'm sure there's a Latin term for it.

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  • Take my word for it.

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  • There was too much blood for it to all be yours.

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  • That he understood now how he needed to break rules from time-to-time to preserve his domain was gratifying after years of him judging her for it.

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  • There was too much resentment in his voice for it to be the result of one week with the human she created.

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  • Gabriel rested a hand on the hilt of his sword, waiting for it.

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  • Alex refused to let her attach his name to that, so she had made provisions for it to be left to Jonathan and Destiny.

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  • I know we wouldn't have fought you for it.

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  • Once again she allowed him to fill his needs, simply waiting for it to be over.

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  • There are emerging procedures that will help people who need it, but the cost is beyond what any hospital will spend, knowing no one can pay for it.

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  • I intended for it to kill her over the course of a lifetime.

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  • You'll pay for it later, Death, came the deity's amused response.

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  • Having the world's best neurologist on call was one of the perks of the rich and famous, a world unfamiliar to her except that her sister had been gunning for it since her sixteenth birthday.

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  • Her sister had chosen the gown and --thankfully --paid for it.

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  • Arms, tentacles, and antennae stretched for it.

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  • With his scream echoing in her head, she staggered up and started pummeling the jaguar.s face, shouting for it to let the sobbing baby angel go.

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  • I have something you want and will trade her for it.

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  • He said to trade her for it.

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  • A'Ran compelled the sword into the ground deep enough for it to remain upright when he released it.

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  • She leaned the broom against the wall, unhappy to see the creature but feeling bad for it.

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  • Before we can read what she wrote, we can only guess the reason for it.

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  • It was a time before she died, though she knew she would and suffered for it.

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  • Three times what we paid you for it!

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  • Only if you're paying for it.

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  • Mrs. Martin did much good and she deserves to be honored for it.

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  • Just take my word for it.

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  • She paid for it.

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  • Jackson jumped away as she reached for it.

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  • It smelled natural and so minimal he had to search for it.

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  • He thought, this is definitely the right spot for it.

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  • I really never expected it to hang anywhere, but I think you have the perfect spot for it.

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  • If I had needed help, I would have asked for it.

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  • She just doesn't have the temperament for it.

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  • Maybe she would even begin to resent him for it.

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  • He could get into enough trouble without getting primed for it.

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  • She set one keypad on her micro, waiting for it to read the serial.

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  • Brady had killed him for it.

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  • I'll give you anything for it.

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  • The plateau was too small for it to land, but it hovered near the edge.

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  • Four, maybe five.  He can test for it by cutting himself.

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  • At first everyone was positive he'd taken a hike, but personally, I haven't seen a thing yet to tell me he didn't just do something stupid and pay the price for it.

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  • The boy asked for a room and paid for it in cash, getting the last two dollars from the girl.

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  • Whatever he wanted – he had given her the money for it.

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  • Maybe she was the one who was lonely for it.

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  • She had been the one who insisted that they wait until after marriage, but it was Alex who came up with sound reasoning for it.

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  • Maybe, but you can be frugal without the stress of wondering if you can pay for it.

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  • Its green gaze turned intent, and Darian waited for it to speak again.

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  • Surprised, Darian stared at the motionless body, waiting for it to spring up and attack him.

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  • They're demanding your life in exchange for it.

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  • At last, he gave up trying to make up for it with food and rose from the table.

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  • He'd remembered the immortal world with fondness, for it was the only place and time he'd ever been happy.

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  • She'd been looking for it for weeks now.

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  • She was searching in the jewelry box for it when Alex came into the bedroom.

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  • I know that, but you set yourself up for it.

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  • Remembering her cell phone, she reached for it.

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  • It didn't take long for it to work and she began to feel better.

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  • I could fix a place for it to get out of the cold and rain without coming inside.

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  • Do you hate me for it?

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  • Whatever it is you're after, I'll make you a deal for it.

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  • Her breath caught, and she hated herself for it.

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  • Jessi thought hard of some way to keep Jonny off her back long enough for her to make a break for it with the kids.

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  • It wasn't an honorable trade in my time, but money made up for it.

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  • Immediately after the death of archbishop Arundel he was nominated by the king to the archbishopric, elected on the 4th of March, translated by papal bull on the 28th of April, and received the pall without going to Rome for it on the 24th of July.

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  • This method did not give very certain results, for it could not be guaranteed that the growth in the inoculated flask was necessarily derived from a single bacterium.

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  • Hansen pointed out that this was by no means the case, for it is more difficult to separate the cells from each other in the gelatin than in the liquid.

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  • The fineness of the hair may perhaps be ascribed to some peculiarity in the atmosphere, for it is remarkable that the cats, dogs and other animals of the country are to 'a certain extent affected in the same way, and that they all lose much of their distinctive beauty when taken from their native districts.

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  • Minos, instead of sacrificing' it, spared its life, and Poseidon, as a punishment, inspired Pasiphae with an unnatural passion for it.

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  • For the purposes of a concordat the state recognizes the official status of the church and of its ministers and tribunals; guarantees it certain privileges; and sometimes binds itself to secure for it subsidies representing compensation for past spoliations.

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  • It was one of the ancient manors of the Butlers, who received for it the grant of a fair from Henry VIII.

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  • Among Servian cities, Nish is only surpassed by Belgrade in commercial and strategic importance; for it lies at the point where several of the chief Balkan highroads converge, and where the branch railway to Salonica leaves the main line between Belgrade and Constantinople.

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  • But in addition to bringing forward a fundamental and philosophical view of morbid processes, which probably contributed more than any other single cause to vindicate for pathology the place which he claimed for it among the biological sciences, Virchow made many important contributions to histology and morbid anatomy and to the study of particular diseases.

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  • The proprietors of Queen's Hall, London, did much for it when they undertook the alteration, at great expense, of their large concert organ, which had only just been erected.

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  • In one sense tt may be said to stand to theological literature in Scotland in something of the same position as that occupied by the Canon Mirificus with respect to the scientific literature, for it is the first published original work relating to theological interpretation, and is quite without a predecessor in its own field.

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  • The fox, of which several species exist, probably never ventured far into the plain, for it afforded him no shelter.

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  • Athens at once appealed to Sparta to punish this act of medism, and Cleomenes I., one of the Spartan kings, crossed over to the island, to arrest those who were responsible for it.

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  • But this gives no correct idea of the true character of the Darling, for it can hardly be said to drain its own watershed.

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  • The duties of this minister were of special importance, for it was to the Netherlands that Charles looked for much of the resources wherewith to carry on his many wars.

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  • Alva was triumphant; but though Alva's master had supplied him with an invincible army, he was unable to furnish him with the funds to pay for it.

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  • In life, however, its appearance must be wholly unlike, for it rarely flies, hops actively on the ground or among bushes, with its tail erect or turned towards its head, and continually utters various and strange notes, - some, says Darwin, are "like the cooing of doves, others like the bubbling of water, and many defy all similes."

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  • This result was apparently confirmed by some independent experiments, but it Is very far from the truth, for it is now known that the actual ratio, or factor as it is commonly called, of the velocity of the wind to that of the cups depends very largely on the dimensions of the cups and arms, and may have almost any value between two and a little over three.

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  • A bent spring possesses energy, for it is capable of doing work in returning to its natural form; a charge of gunpowder possesses energy, for it is capable of doingwork in exploding; aLeyden jar charged with electricity possesses energy, for it is capable of doing work in being discharged.

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  • The invention of the damper-pedal in the pianoforte epitomizes the difference between polyphony and symphonic art, for it is the earliest device by which sounds are produced and prolonged in a way contrary to the spirit of "real" part-writing.

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  • In the orchestras of his day this was perhaps the only safe proceeding for players unaccustomed to such responsibilities, and that may have been one of Beethoven's reasons for it.

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  • If he bought property belonging to a feudal holding, or to a ward in chancery, he had to return it and forfeit what he gave for it as well.

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  • It is used as a pigment (cadmium yellow), for it retains its colour in an atmosphere containing sulphuretted hydrogen; it melts at a white heat, and on cooling solidifies to a lemon-yellow micaceous mass.

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  • It is a striking example of the difficulty of getting people to use their own powers of investigation accurately, that this form of the doctrine of evolution should have held its ground so long; for it was thoroughly and completely exploded, not long after its enunciation, by Caspar Frederick Wolff, who in his Theoria generationis, published in 1759, placed the opposite theory of epigenesis upon the secure foundation of fact, from which it has never been displaced.

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  • Both Darwin and Wallace lay great stress on the close relation which obtains between the existing fauna of any region and that of the immediately antecedent geological epoch in the same region; and rightly, for it is in truth inconceivable that there should be no genetic connexion between the two.

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  • The amber of Sicily seems not to have been recognized in ancient times, for it is not mentioned by local authorities like Diodorus Siculus.

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  • Useful and suggestive as they often are, teratological facts played, at one time, too large a part in the framing of morphological theories; for it was thought that the monstrous form gave a clue to the essential nature of the organ assuming it.

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  • This voyage of the middle of the 9th century deserves to be held in happy memory, for it unites the first Norwegian polar explorer with the first English collector of travels.

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  • But a romantic interest attaches to the wreck of the " Wager," one of Anson's fleet, on a desert island near Chiloe, for it bore fruit in the charming narrative of Captain John Byron, which will endure for all time.

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  • Babhli is not only greater in bulk than Yerushalmi, but has also received far greater attention, so that the name Talmud alone is often used for it.

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  • Don Benito is a thriving and comparatively modern town; for it dates only from the 15th century, when it was founded by refugees from Don Llorente, who deserted their own town owing to the danger of floods from the Guadiana.

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  • If the later nobilitas of Rome had established an assembly in which every one who had the jus imaginum had a vote and none other, that would have been a real parallel to the shutting of the Venetian Great Council; for it would have come about through the working of causes which are essentially the same.

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  • Had Shakespeare treated it, he would hardly have contented himself with investing the hero with the nobility given by Ford to this personage of his play, - for it is hardly possible to speak of a personage as a character when the clue to his conduct is intentionally withheld.

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  • In return for these services Bismarck helped Russia to recover a portion of what she had lost by the Crimean War, for it was thanks to his connivance and diplomatic support that she was able in 1871 to denounce with impunity the clauses of the treaty of Paris which limited Russian armament in the Black Sea.

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  • But the Liverpool & Manchester railway, opened in 1830, first impressed the national mind with the fact that a revolution in the methods of travelling had really taken place; and further, it was for it that the first high-speed locomotive of the modern type was invented and constructed.

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  • Moreover, it was of little practical importance even within its narrow range, for it does not appear to have been generally enforced.

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  • A second advantage of the vestibule developed in use, for it was found that the lateral swaying of the cars was diminished by the friction between the vestibule frames.

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  • The current required for it is generated by dynamos driven from the axles of the coaches.

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  • The religion of the Hebrew race - properly the Jews - now enters on a new stage, for it should be observed that it was Amos, Isaiah and Micah - prophets of Judah - who laid the actual foundations.

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  • The development of the priestly code of legislation (Priestercodex) was a gradual process, and probably occupied a considerable part of the 5th century B.C. The Hebrew race now definitely entered upon the new path of organized Jewish legalism which had been originally marked out for it by Ezekiel in the preceding century.

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  • She was reported as saying that when the king gave opportunity by leaving England, she would put Mary to death even if she were burnt or flayed alive for it.

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  • He sought to establish a via media between the doctrines of Luther and Zwingli, and vainly hoped to obtain for it Luther's acceptance.

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  • Above all, he recognized the necessity for reconciling the Magyars to the monarchy; for it was their discontent that had mainly contributed to the collapse of the Austrian power.

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  • Mahommedan Babylonia (Persia) was the home of the gaonate, the central authority of religious Judaism, whose power transcended that of the secular exilarchate, for it influenced the synagogue far and wide, while the exilarchate was local.

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  • Ten years later, however, at the election of assemblymen, 33 of the western counties polled an extra-legal vote on the question of calling a constitutional convention, and 30,000 votes were cast for it to only l000 against it.

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  • At mass and vespers the mitra simplex may be substituted for it in the same way as the auriphrygiata for the pretiosa.

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  • Some have claimed for it apostolical sanction and found its origin in the liturgical head-gear of the Jewish priesthood.

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  • The final result of this latest determination is to place the Madras observatory 2' 27" to the west of the position adopted for it on the strength of absolute astronomical determinations.

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  • The Buddhist influence is not merely religious, for it is always accompanied by Indian art and literature, and often by an Indian alphabet.

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  • Pali, though only a form of Hindu literature, has a separate history, for it died in India and was preserved in Ceylon, whence it was imported to Burma and Siam as the language of religion.

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  • In particular, the Roman "North Road" which ran from York through Corbridge and over Cheviot to Newstead near Melrose, and thence to the Wall of Pius, and which has largely been in use ever since Roman times, is now not unfrequently called Watling Street, though there is no old authority for it and throughout the middle ages the section of the road between the Tyne and the Forth was called Dere Street.

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  • There are traces of monastic buildings near the church, for it belonged to a Benedictine house of early Norman foundation.

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  • In another sense also the coelom is not a closed cavity, for it communicates in several ways with the external medium.

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  • From the month of May 1790 to his death in April 1791 Mirabeau remained in close and suspected, but not actually proved, connexion with the court, and drew up many admirable state papers for it.

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  • He had prepared for it by his other works, Die Achtheit d.

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  • Butchers have palmed off upon their customers imported fresh meat as homegrown, and secured a dishonest profit by charging for it the prices of the latter, which are considerably in excess of those of the imported product.

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  • It was found, however, that the steam work was done with less care than had been bestowed upon the horse tillage, and the result was that steam came to be regarded as an auxiliary to horse labour rather than as a substitute for it.

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  • In this capacity it is capable of rendering most valuable assistance, for it can be utilized in moving extensive areas of land in a very short time.

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  • To many minds the interest and usefulness of economics depend entirely on the application of these methods, for it is the actual working of economic institutions about which the statesman, the publicist, the business man and the artisan wish to know.

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  • What was mistaken for it was fashioned in the heat of controversy by men whose interests were practical rather than scientific, who could not write correct English, and revealed in their reasoning the usual fallacies of the merely practical man' So the " old Political Economy " lies shattered.

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  • While he was preparing for it two cardinals arrived in England with a mission from Pope John XXII.

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  • This work is invaluable as a source for the history and situation of the church in the 2nd century; for it contains nearly the whole of the famous work of Celsus (Abyos angs) against Christianity.

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  • They shall answer for it to all Europe."

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  • It is noteworthy that though Napoleon at times sought to shift the responsibility for this deed on Talley-rand or Savary, yet during his voyage to St Helena, as also in his will, he frankly avowed his responsibility for it and asserted that in the like circumstances he would do the same again.

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  • The Bonapartes had intrigued for it with their usual persistence, and Napoleon was careful never to make it impossible.

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  • Its incompleteness displeased the liberals; only 1,532,527 votes were given for it in the plebiscite, a total less than half of those of the plebiscites of the Consulate.

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  • It is to be supposed that Richard de Bury sometimes brought undue pressure to bear on the owners, for it is recorded that an abbot of St Albans bribed him to secure his influence for the house by four valuable books, and that de Bury, who procured certain coveted privileges for the monastery, bought from him thirty-two other books, for fifty pieces of silver, far less than their normal price.

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  • This foundation was laid by the joint labours of Francis Willughby (1635-1672) and John Ray (1628-1705), for it is impossible to separate their share of work in natural history more than to say that, while the former more especially devoted himself to zoology, botany was the favourite pursuit of the latter.

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  • The little fly-sheet of Zorn l - for it is scarcely more - on the birds of the Hercynian Forest made its appearance at Pappenheim in 1745.

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  • The success it gained was doubtless due in some degree to the difficulty which most men had in comprehending it, for it was enwrapped in alluring mystery, but more to the confidence with which it was announced as being the long-looked-for key to the wonders of creation, since its promoters did not hesitate to term it the discovery of " the Natural System," though they condescended, by way of explanation to less exalted intellects than their own, to allow it the more moderate appellation of the Circular or, Quinary System.

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  • The purely artificial character of the System of Linnaeus and his successors had been perceived, and men were at a loss to find a substitute for it.

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  • To enable the reader to compare the several groups of Nitzsch with the families of L'Herminier, the numbers applied by the latter to his families are suffixed in square brackets to the names of the former; and, disregarding the order of sequence, which is here immaterial, the essential correspondence of the two systems is worthy of all attention, for it obviously means that these two investigators, starting from different points, must have been on the right track, when they so often coincided as to the limits of what they considered to be, and what we are now almost justified in calling, natural groups.'

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  • Again, the arrangement followed in the Pterylographie was of course based on pterylographical considerations, and we have its author's own word for it that he was persuaded that the limitation of natural groups could only be attained by the most assiduous research into the species of which they are composed from every point of view.

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  • The power as conferred at that time, however, is broader than usual, for it extends not only to items in appropriation bills, but to separate sections in other measures, and, in addition to the customary provision for passing a bill over the governor's veto by a two-thirds vote of each house it is required that the votes for repassage in each house must not be less than those given on the original passage.

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  • Though it is probably destined to be used even more extensively as a fertilizer before the demand for it as a feeding stuff becomes equal to the supply, practically all the cotton seed meal of the south will ultimately be used for feeding.

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  • This view is now generally abandoned; for it is recognized that acts of superhuman power, even if established by adequate historical evidence, do not necessarily certify their divine origin.

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  • The text of Ibelin became a textus receptus - but it also became overlaid by glosses, for it was used as authoritative in the kingdom of Cyprus after the loss of the kingdom of Jerusalem, and it needed expounding.

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  • Gauden stated that he had begun the book in 1647 and was entirely responsible for it.

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  • The claim of sacredness made for it was warmly contested by some Jewish scholars.

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  • The system, however, was not even then extinct, for it was described by Chaeremon the Stoic, a contemporary of Strabo's.

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  • The process of manufacturing soaps by boiling fatty acids with caustic alkalis or sodium carbonate came into practice with the development of the manufacture of candles by saponifying fats, for it provided a means whereby the oleic acid, which is valueless for candle making, could be worked up. The combination is effected in open vats heated by a steam coil and provided with a stirring appliance; if soda ash be used it is necessary to guard against boiling over.

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  • He was designed for the magistracy of his province; and in 1771, when for a time the provincial parlement was suppressed, with the others, by the chancellor Maupeou, he refused to sit in the royal tribunal substituted for it.

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  • In demeanour he was quiet, reserved and tactful, but when occasion called for it he proved himself a brilliant orator.

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  • Vincent attributes to Rhazes the statement that copper is potentially silver, and any one who can eliminate the red colour will bring it to the state of silver, for it is copper in outward appearance, but in its inmost nature silver.

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  • His influence with the extreme Socialists had already declined, for it was said that his departure from the true Marxist tradition had disintegrated the party.

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  • The oxychloride, bromides, and other compounds were subsequently discovered; here we need only notice Moissan's preparation of the trifluoride and Thorpe's discovery of the pentafluoride, a compound of especial note, for it volatilizes unchanged, giving a vapour of normal density and so demonstrating the stability of a pentavalent phosphorus compound (the pentachloride and pentabromide dissociate into a molecule of the halogen element and phosphorus trichoride).

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  • Industrial chemistry makes many claims upon the chemist, for it is necessary to determine the purity of a product before it can be valued.

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  • Therefore, when her inheritance was assailed at the beginning of her reign, she fought for it with every weapon an honest woman could employ, and for years she cherished the hope of recovering the lost province of Silesia, conquered by Frederick.

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  • For a time the government, while keeping itself informed of his activities, left him alone; for it suited the Directory to let the socialist agitation continue, in order to frighten the people from joining in any royalist movement for the overthrow of the existing regime.

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  • The former method, usually called the " natural scale," may be described as " international," for it is quite independent of local measures of length, and depends exclusively upon the size and figure of the earth.

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  • On the other hand a map drawn on the surface of a sphere representing a terrestrial globe will prove true to nature, for it possesses, in combination, the qualities which the ingenuity of no mathematician has hitherto succeeded in imparting to a projection intended for a map of some extent, namely, equivalence of areas of distances and angles.

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  • The geographical knowledge of Anaximander was naturally more ample than that of Homer, for it extended from the Cassiterides or Tin Islands in the west to the Caspian in the east, which he conceived to open out into Oceanus.

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  • In his text Eratosthenes ignored the popular division of the world into Europe, Asia and Libya, and substituted for it a northern and southern division, divided by the parallel of Rhodes, each of which he subdivided into sphragides or plinthia - seals or plinths.

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  • This is the oldest original of a map in existence, for it dates back to the 6th century.

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  • The front and rear ranks of the 28th were simultaneously engaged, and the conduct of the regiment won for it the distinction of wearing badges both at the front and at the back of their head-dress.

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  • But Yima, the secular man, felt himself unfitted for it and declined it.

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  • Even in the time of slavery tobacco was generally a white-man's crop; for it requires intelligent labour and intensive care.

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  • Tobacco is grown all over the empire, the most important market for it being Smyrna.

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  • The first, if it is the work of Clement, must be a book merely of excerpts, for it contains many opinions which Clement opposed.

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  • Apparently the old faith-healing had lost its efficacy, and the priests substituted for it elaborate prescriptions as to diet, baths and regimen which must have made Epidaurus and its visitors resemble their counterparts in a modern spa.

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  • Its commerce is, ho wever, almost entirely of the nature of transit trade, for it is not the chief distributing centre for the middle of Europe of the products of all other parts of the world, but is also the chief outlet for German, Austrian, and even to some extent Russian (Polish) raw products and manufactures.

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  • Van Buren did not originate the system, for it was already well developed when he entered public life; but the nickname of "Little Magician" which presently attached to him testifies to the skill with which he exploited it, and to the popular impression which his political methods produced.

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  • The Latin sermons of St Augustine, of which 384 are extant, have been taken as their models by all sensible subsequent divines, for it was he who rejected the formal arrangement of the divisions of his theme, and insisted that simplicity and familiarity of style were not incompatible with dignity and religion.

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  • The fine ruins which have been discovered at the last-mentioned place have earned for it the surname of the African.

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    0
  • The first column contains the symbols of the various elements which were added to the iron, and the second the percentage proportion in which each element was present; the sample containing 0.03% of carbon was a specimen of the best commercial iron, the values obtained for it being given for comparison.

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  • The sanjak is of great strategic importance, for it is the N.W.

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  • Cuvier went no further than Brongniart, and, in the Regne Animal, he dropped the term Amphibia, and substituted Reptilia for it.

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  • This was indeed a time when questions concerning boundaries were springing up on every side, for it was only through the moderation with which the high-handed action of Bolivia in regard to the Acre rubberproducing territory was met by the Brazilian government that war was avoided.

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  • His religious doctrine is Pantheistic; and, rejecting the belief in a future life as commonly conceived, he substitutes for it a theory of metempsychosis.

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  • The university was served by a body of teachers and investigators who won for it a prominent position among European schools.

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  • He unsuccessfully contested the borough of Stafford in 1826, but was elected for it in 1830 and again in 1831.

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  • If the Swedish Church has preserved the episcopal succession, it does not make much of that advantage, for it is in communion with the Danish and Norwegian bodies, which can advance no such claim.

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  • The soul is created by God when the body of which it is the entelechy is prepared for it.

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  • There can be no doubt that if Cobden had been satisfied to devote all his energies to commercial life he might soon have attained to great opulence, for it is understood that his share in the profits of the business he had established amounted to from £8000 to £10,000 a year.

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  • It is of great interest to the historical student, for it exhibits the influence of Greek science upon Indian mathematics at a period prior to Aryabhatta.

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  • Gabir ben Aflah of Sevilla, commonly called Geber, was a celebrated astronomer and apparently skilled in algebra, for it has been supposed that the word " algebra " is compounded from his name.

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  • The idea had considerable success; for it happened to march with the views of the secular princes.

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  • The modern Roman Catholic Church is episcopal, for it preserves the bishops, whose potestas ordinis not even the pope can exercise until he has been duly consecrated; but the bishops as such are now but subordinate elements in a system for which "Episcopacy" is certainly no longer an appropriate term.

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  • His fame was not confined to his own country, for it is said that Voltaire, when challenged to produce a character as perfect as that of Christ, at once mentioned Fletcher of Madeley.

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  • Unfortunately the exact nature of these men's performances is not quite clear, for it is said to have been connected with " harps set to the sheminith," or according to another interpretation, with " harps over the tenors."

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  • This does not necessarily prove that " the technical terms of the Temple music had gone out of use, presumably because they were already become unintelligible, as they were when the Septuagint version was made "; for it does not follow that technical musical terms which had originated in the Temple at Jerusalem and were intelligible in Palestine would have been understood in Egypt.

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  • Far firmer is the tone of his later letter to the same archbishop, where he contends from historical evidence that the papal judgment is not infallible, and encourages his brother prelate not to fear excommunication in a righteous cause, for it is not in the power even of the successor of Peter "to separate an innocent priest from the love of Christ."

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  • The former scruple, however, was not confined to Paulicians, for it inspires the answer made by Eusebius, bishop of Thessalonica, to the emperor Maurice, when the latter asked to have relics sent to him of Demetrius the patron saint of that city.

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  • It was longer-lived than that of Herophilus, for it still numbered many adherents in the 2nd century after Christ, a century after the latter had become extinct.

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  • Nearly all medieval medical literature was condemned under this name; and for it the humanists proposed to substitute the originals of Hippocrates and Galen, thus leading back medicine to its fountain-head.

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  • He did not originate this line of research, for it had been pursued, if not originated, by Haller, and cultivated systematically by Tommasini, an Italian "contra-stimulist"; but he carried it out with much elaboration.

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  • In the disease of the scalp called favus, Schonlein had discovered a minute mycelial fungus; a remarkable discovery, for it was the first conspicuous step in the attribution of diseases to the action of minute parasites.

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  • Coincidently therewith, the hope of neutralizing infections by fortifying individual immunity has grown brighter, for it appears that immunity is not a very radical character, but one which, as in the case of vaccination, admits of modification and accurate adjustment in the individual, in no long time and by no very tedious methods.

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  • His visiting espionage, as unkind critics put it - his secret diplomatic mission, as he would have liked to have it put himself - began in the summer of 1722, and he set out for it in company with a certain Madame de Rupelmonde, to whom he as usual made love, taught deism and served as an amusing travelling companion.

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  • Its use was obviously continued by the Buddhists during the prevalence of their religion in India, for it is still used by them in Nepal, Tibet, Ceylon, Burma, China and Japan.

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  • Its somewhat gloomy aspect, enhanced by the tortuous narrow lanes flanked by gabled houses of the 15th century, has gained for it among countryfolk the sobriquet of the "Witches' nest" (Hexen-Nest).

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  • From the Dorah to the Khawak pass (or group of passes, for it is seldom that one line of approach only is to be found across the Hindu Kush), which is between i i,000 and 12,000 ft.

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  • Arakan is in the worst position of all, for it is connected with Burma by neither railway nor river, nor even by a metalled road, and the only way to reach Akyab from Rangoon is once a week by sea.

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  • It would appear not improbable that the former was the case, for it must be remembered that articles formed of glass were in the later days of Roman civilization in constant daily use, and that the making of glass was carried on, not as now in large establishments, but by artisans working on a small scale.

    0
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  • The present book is possibly the long-lost AcaO'iuo Mwv04cos mentioned in some ancient lists, for it never speaks of the assumption of Moses, but always of his natural death.

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  • When once it had taught men that the next world was God's world, though it did so at the cost of relinquishing the present to Satan, it had achieved its real task, and the time had come for it to quit the stage of history, when Christianity appeared as the heir of this true spiritual achievement.

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  • Sir Alexander obtained for it in 1613 a charter as a burgh of royalty, and also in 1592 a charter for the founding of a university.

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  • Our knowledge of the chemical structure of the monosaccharoses may be regarded as dating from 1880, when Zincke suspected some to be ketone alcohols, for it was known that glucose and fructose, for example, yielded penta-acetates, and on reduction gave hexahydric alcohols, which, when reduced by hydriodic acid, gave normal and secondary hexyliodide.

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  • The facts suggested that the six carbon atoms formed a chain, and that a hydroxy group was attached to five of them, for it is very rare for two hydroxy groups to be attached to the same carbon atom.

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    0
  • The Krajewski crusher was invented some years ago by a Polish engineer resident in Cuba, who took out a patent for it and gave it his name.

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  • With ordinary care on the part of the men in charge Hatton defecators will work continuously for several days and nights, and the number required to deal with a given volume of juice is half the number of ordinary defecators of equal capacity which would do the same work; for it must be borne in mind that an ordinary double-bottomed defecator takes two hours to deliver its charge and be in readiness to receive a fresh charge, i.e.

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  • The good or bad qualities of a soil have reference to the needs of the crops which are to be grown upon it, and it is only after a consideration of the requirements of plants that a clear conception can be formed of what characters the soil must possess for it to be a suitable medium on which healthy crops can be raised.

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  • He must seek protection elsewhere wherever he could get it, and pay the price demanded for it.

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  • Nor was the king's aid lacking to this method of dividing up the royal authority, any more than to the immunity, for it became a frequent practice to make the administrative office into a fief, and to grant it to be held in that form of property by the count.

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  • His smaller neighbours who needed protection came to him for it.

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  • In Northern French and in Italian it has become the labio-dental v, and from French English has adopted this value for it.

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  • Under such conditions the deeply-rooted nature of the blood-sucking instinct is most remarkable; for insects whose ancestors for many generations may not have tasted blood will seek for it with the utmost keenness and pertinacity so soon as an opportunity presents itself.

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    0
  • The money, about L13000,000, could probably have been obtained to indemnify Chile if occasion for it arose.

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    0
  • A comet which appeared in 1861 had a very suggestive agreement of orbit when compared with that of the meteors, and the period computed for it was 415 year's.

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  • The harbour is too shallow to admit vessels of large size, but the proximity of the town to Odessa secures for it a thriving business in wine, salt, fish, wool and tallow.

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  • He was president of Columbia University from 1890 to 1901, and did much for it by his business administration, his liberality (he gave $1,000,000 for the erection of a library) and his especial interest in the department of Political Science.

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  • Moliere's medical student accounts for it by a soporific principle contained in the opium.

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  • The modern physiologist knows that he cannot account for it at all.

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  • Yet even in this way he helped to found the historical school in literature and science, for it was only after an excessive and sentimental interest in primitive human culture had been awakened that this subject would receive the amount of attention which was requisite for the genetic explanation of later developments.

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    0
  • The circumstances of General Gordon's untimely death awoke an outburst of indignation against those who were, or seemed to be, responsible for it.

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  • As a port, moreover, it subsequently rose into some importance, for it was able to supply eight ships and men to the expedition of Edward III.

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  • The remarkable grace of this moun- Fe L tams curvean inverted catenarymakes it one of the most beautiful in the world, and has obtained for it a prominent place in Japanese decorative art.

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  • Towards the south this starfish disappears, it seems, completely; for it is not yet known with certainty to exist either in the Mediterranean or in the southern parts of the Atlantic Ocean.

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  • He said "It seems easier to talk of such a machine than to put it into actuality, for it requires greater force and less weight than exists in a human body.

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  • Nor is this its only association with science; for it was one of the spots chosen by Sir Edward Sabine for his series of pendulum experiments in 1823.

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  • About 1893 a satisfactory machine was ready, and a new series of troubles had to be faced, for it had to be launched at a certain initial speed, and in the face of any wind that might be blowing.

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  • It is unique among the careers of British statesmen of the first rank, for it was passed almost wholly in opposition.

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  • This idea was certainly entertained to some extent at the time, and derives some colour of justification from words of Defoe's, but there seems to be no serious foundation for it.

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  • Its appearance is modern, for it was burnt in 1843.

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  • Language is no better guide, for it is not clear that the Dorian dialect is that of the most recent conquerors, and not rather that of the conquered Achaean inhabitants of southern Greece; in any case it presents no such affinities with any non-Hellenic speech as would serve to trace its origin.

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  • The permanent gain to the service due to his exertions was far more than formal, for it is to him that the general staff owes its tradition of thorough and patient individual effort.

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  • This provides us with a definition of a unit of electric force, for it is the strength of an electric field at that point where a small conductor carrying a unit charge is acted upon by unit mechanical force, assuming the dielectric constant of the surrounding medium to be unity.

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  • A special interest belongs to the Macedonian kingdom as it was shaped by Philip, since it forestalls a system which was not to find the time ripe for it in European history till many centuries later - the national kingdom quickened with the culture developed by the ancient city-states.

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  • The Lar familiaris has been regarded' as the embodiment of all the family dead and his cult as a consummation of ancestor-worship, but a more probable explanation regards him as one of the Lares (q.v.; numina of the fields worshipped at the compita, the places where properties marched) who had special charge of the house or possibly of the household servants (familia); for it is significant that his worship was committed to the charge of the vilica.

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  • It may be noticed that the potassium zinc cyanide is useless in gold extraction, for it neither dissolves gold nor can potassium cyanide be regenerated from it.

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  • The Hebrew text used by the translators appears to have been practically identical with the Massoretic. The version was held in high esteem in Babylon, and, later, in Palestine, and a special Massora was made for it.

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  • It is not, however, a revision of the Fragmentary Targum - for it is clearly independent of that version - but is rather a parallel, if somewhat later, production, in which the text of Onkelos is already combined with a number of variants and additions.

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  • The publication of the Allgemeine and General-Reformation der ganzen weiten Welt (Cassel, 1614), and the Fama Fraternitatis (Cassel, 1615) by the theologian Johann Valentin Andrea (1586-1654), caused immense excitement throughout Europe, and they not only led to many re-issues, but were followed by numerous pamphlets, favourable and otherwise, whose authors generally knew little, if anything, of the real aims of the original author, and doubtless in not a few cases amused themselves at the expense of the public. It is probable that the first work was circulated in MS. about 1610, for it is said that a reply was written in 1612 (according to Herder), but if so, there was no mention of the cult before that decade.

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    0
  • Sodium in boiling amyl alcohol reduces it to aromatic tetrahydro-a-naphthylamine, a substance having the properties of an aromatic amine, for it can be diazotized and does not possess an ammoniacal smell.

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    0
  • The older one, which still existed in Roman times, was backed up against the temple hill, which was cut away to make room for it.

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  • Here as elsewhere he had but one rule to guide him in matters of doctrine and discipline - the practice of Rome and the West; for it is singular to see how Jerome, who is daringly original in points of scholarly criticism, was a ruthless partisan in all other matters; and, having discovered what was the Western practice, he set tongue and pen to work with his usual bitterness (Altercatio luciferiani et orthodoxi).

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  • The result of all this labour was the Latin translation of the Scriptures which, in spite of much opposition from the more conservative party in the church, afterwards became the Vulgate or authorized version; but the Vulgate as we have it now is not exactly Jerome's Vulgate, for it suffered a good deal from changes made under the influence of the older translations; the text became very corrupt during the middle ages, and in particular all the Apocrypha, except Tobit and Judith, which Jerome translated from the Chaldee, were added from the older versions.

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  • The denomination of Era of Martyrs, subsequently given to it in commemoration of the persecution of the Christians, would seem to imply that its commencement ought to be referred to the year 303 of our era, for it was in that year that Diocletian issued his famous edict; but the practice of dating from the accession of Diocletian has prevailed.

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  • The advantages claimed for it were its cheapness, smallness and portability; that there was no appreciable distortion, and that its field was much larger than that of the camera obscura.

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  • The first congress of the new republic assembled in August 1825, when Bolivar was declared perpetual protector, and requested to prepare for it a constitution of government.

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    0
  • The year 1666 (called the annus mirabilis, for it included the plague and the fire of London) was marked by fierce fighting and changes of fortune.

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    0
  • The principle is readily adapted to the determination of the relative densities of two liquids, for it is obvious that if W be the weight of a solid body in air, W, and W2 its weights when immersed in the liquids, then W - W, and W - W 2 are the weights of equal volumes of the liquids, and therefore the relative density is the quotient (W - W,)/(W - W2).

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    0
  • The claim which he put forward involved, to all appearance, a strange falsification of history, for it seemed to rest upon the supposition that Edmund of Lancaster, and not Edward I., was the eldest son of Henry III.

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  • But the way has been prepared for it.

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  • The publication in 1889 of Lux Mundi, a series of essays attempting to harmonize Anglican Catholic doctrine with modern thought, was a severe blow to him, for it showed that even at the Pusey House, established as the citadel of Puseyism at Oxford, the principles of Pusey were being departed from.

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    0
  • Sorensen and Martin Knudsen after a careful investigation decided to abandon the old definition of salinity as the sum of all the dissolved solids in sea-water and to substitute for it the weight of the dissolved solids in 1000 parts by weight of sea-water on the assumption that all the bromine is replaced by its equivalent of chlorine, all the carbonate converted into oxide and the organic matter burnt.

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    0
  • Only a few of the larger wild animals remain, but the Texas fauna is still varied, for it includes not only many species common to northern and eastern United States but also several Mexican species.

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  • However, should the husband neglect to sue for the recovery of any separate property of his wife she may, with the permission of the court, sue for it in her own name; or should the husband refuse to support his wife and educate her children as her fortune would warrant, the county court may in answer to her complaint require a fixed portion of the proceeds from her property to be paid to her.

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  • By means of lighted candles violently dashed to the ground and extinguished the faithful were graphically taught the meaning of the greater excommunication - though in a somewhat misleading way, for it is a fundamental principle of the canon law that disciplina est excommunicatio, non eradicatio.

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  • This to some extent reconciled the king to the Liberal movement, for it accorded with his religious views.

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    0
  • There are, in addition, various other forms (Seroand Exo-sporidia), also primitive in character, but which are as yet too insufficiently known for it to be certain whether they are of distinct ordinal rank, or should be placed with the Haplosporidia.

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  • But it is not necessary to stand in such fear of the thunder of Christ's vicar, but rather to fear Christ Himself, for it is the Florentine's business, not Christ's, that is at issue."

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  • Charles finally reluctantly accepted it, although he would gladly have had it milder, for it made reconcilia tion hopeless.

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    0
  • The colour of the human hair is an accident, for it belongs in no way to the essence of humanity.

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    0
  • From the side of literature the way was prepared for it by the genius of Coleridge, Wordsworth and Carlyle; from the side of morals and politics by the profound discontent of the constructive spirit of the century with the disintegrating conceptions inherited from utilitarianism.

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  • Literature.-Of his works the Manual of Private Devotions is the best known, for it appeals to Christians of every church.

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    0
  • Weimar owes its importance not to any industrial development, which the grand-dukes discourage within the limits of their Residenz, but to its intimate association with the classical period of German literature, which earned for it the title of the "poets' city" and "the German Athens."

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  • Without doubt, the personal risk to which Blucher exposed himself at this crisis was far too great; for it was essential that the command of the Prussian army should remain vested in a chief who would loyally keep in touch and act entirely in concert with his colleague.

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    0
  • However, Gneisenau was very remiss in not immediately reporting this vital move and the necessity for it to the duke, as it left the Anglo-Dutch inner flank quite exposed.

    0
    0
  • In early times these sectaries produced little literature of their own; when they produced a literature at the beginning of the 15th century they attempted to claim for it a much earlier origin.

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    0
  • This was adopted in September 1893, though the majority for it in the Upper House was but two votes.

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    0
  • Although Hippocrates could not determine the proportionals, his statement of the problem in this form was a great advance, for it was perceived that the problem of trisecting an angle was reducible to a similar form which, in the language of algebraic geometry, is to solve geometrically a cubic equation.

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  • I of course, it is pressed into the space made for it by the rest of the air, and flowing into this space it is extended.

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    0
  • This investigation is obviously not exact, for it assumes that the form is unchanged, i.e.

    0
    0
  • It is not easy to determine the exact point at which the impulses fuse into a continuous tone, for higher tones are usually present with the deepest of which the frequency is being counted, and these may be mistaken for it.

    0
    0
  • When the air rushes out from one pipe, it has not to force its way into the open air, but finds a cavity being prepared for it close at hand in the other pipe, and so the extensions and compressions at the ends are more easily reduced.

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    0
  • The "On to Richmond" appeal, which appeared day after day in The Tribune, was incorrectly attributed to him, and it did not wholly meet his approval; but after the defeat in the first battle of Bull Run he was widely blamed for it.

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    0
  • So far as Spain is concerned there is evidence for it in the decrees of the 4th council of Toledo (633),(633), and for Rome that of the 8th century Ordo of Mabillon.

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    0
  • Some better monumental illustration may some day be found, for it is clear that the Babylonian sacred literature had much to tell of offences against the gods in the primeval age.

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  • The attitude of Ultramontanism, for instance, towards the right claimed and exercised by the state to make laws concerning marriage is wholly negative; for it recognizes no marriage laws except those of the Church, the Church alone being regarded as competent to decide what impediments are a bar to marriage, and to exercise jurisdiction over such cases.

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  • That science must be left free to determine the aims of her investigation, to select and apply her own methods, and to publish the results of her researches without restraint, is a postulate which Ultramontanism either cannot understand or treats with indifference, for it regards as strange and incredible the fundamental law governing all scientific research - that there is for it no higher aim than the discovery of the truth.

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  • As regards internal politics, it may be remarked that the queen and Prince Albert were much relieved when Peel, who had come in as the leader of the Protectionist party, adopted Free Trade and repealed the Corn Laws, for it closed a dangerous agitation which gave them much anxiety.

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    0
  • It was in some ways the herald of a new school of German historical thought, for it shows that idealization of power and success which he had learnt from the teaching of Hegel.

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    0
  • Much attention has been paid to the explanation of this fact, since knowledge on this point might enable an artificial product, without the disadvantages of this oil, to be substituted for it.

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    0
  • Candidates for it must be between 25 and 35 years, single or widows and of good social status.

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  • The fusion of races may be said to have begun then, for it was during the succeeding centuries that the kings of Swankalok-Sukhotai gradually assumed Lao characteristics, and that the Siamese language, written character and other racial peculiarities were in course of formation.

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  • Nowhere perhaps does his style appear to more advantage than in his four series of essays entitled Short Studies on Great Subjects(1867-1882), for it is seen there unfettered by the obligations of narrative.

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    0
  • He wrote many books, and countless articles for reviews, newspapers and other publications, and was a constant contributor to the Saturday Review until 1878, when he ceased to write for it for political reasons.

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    0
  • Linnaeus himself claimed nothing higher for it.

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  • In its structure and cranial capacity it is entitled to a higher place in the zoological scale than any anthropoid, for it almost certainly walked erect; and, on the other hand, in its intellectual powers it must have been much below the lowest of the human race at present known.

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    0
  • If leaf-mould is not at hand, turfy peat may be substituted for it.

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    0
  • The case of the Kum-kol valley is altogether exceptional, for it lies not higher, but 680 ft.

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    0
  • But these standards proved inadequate to the emergency, for it was possible, especially by the use of the allegorical method, to interpret them in more than one way, and their apostolic origin and authority were not everywhere admitted.

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    0
  • And rightly so, for it was the old Greek piety minted afresh.

    0
    0
  • This was in fact the case; for it knew how to treat the question, which divided the Greeks, in a more dispassionate and practical manner than they.

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  • The temple at Shiloh, where the ark was preserved, was the lineal descendant of the Mosaic sanctuary - for it was not the place but the palladium and its oracle that were the essential thing - and its priests claimed kin with Moses himself.

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    0
  • The influence of the Hebrew priesthood on the thought and organization of Christendom was the influence not of a living institution, for it hardly began till after the fall of the Temple, but of the theory embodied in the later parts of the Pentateuch.

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  • This fatal parsimony had the most serious political consequences, for it crippled the king at every step. Strive and scheme as he might, his needs were so urgent, his enemies so numerous, that, though generally successful in the end, he had always to be content with compromises, adjustments and semi-victories.

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  • This further act of repression led to two terrible Cossack risings, in 1635 and 1636, put down only with the utmost difficulty, whereupon the diet of 1638 deprived the Cossacks of all their ancient privileges, abolished the elective hetmanship, and substituted for it a commission of Polish noblemen with absolute power, so that the Cossacks might well declare that those who hated them were lords over them.

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  • These were the men who, a little later, at the bidding of their "benefactors," dissolved one inconvenient diet after another; for it is a significant fact that during the reigns of the two Augustuses every diet was dissolved in this way by the hirelings of some great lord or, still worse, of some foreign potentate.

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  • At least 40,000 men were necessary for the purpose, and these could have been obtained for 200,000 ducats; but a congress of magnates, whose collective fortunes amounted to hundreds of millions, having decided that it was impossible to raise this sum, there was nothing for it but to fight a few skirmishes and then take refuge abroad.

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  • Taking advantage of the Easter recess, when most of the malcontents were out of town, they suddenly, on the 3rd of May, brought the whole question before the diet and demanded urgency for it.

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  • His parents were poor, and he received a meagre education, but made up for it by careful self-culture.

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  • The delightful gardens of Denizli have obtained for it the name of the "Damascus of Anatolia."

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  • In 1908 the average school year was nine and seven-tenths months - ten in the cities and nine and four-tenths in the counties; the aim is ten months throughout, and a law of 1904 provides that if a school is taught less than nine months a portion of the funds set apart for it shall be withheld.

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  • Moreover, all his martial energy notwithstanding, his personality must have been singularly winning; for it is said of him that he left behind not a single enemy, all his opponents having long since been converted by him into friends.

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  • The metal, however, is not in great demand, for it is generally found that sodium, which is cheaper, and, weight for weight, more reactive, will fulfil any purpose for which potassium may be desired.

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  • Canu (1892) distinguishes eight sub-families, Longipediinae, Peltidiinae, Tachidii.nae, Amymoninae, Harpacticinae, Idyinae, Canthocamptinae (for which Canthocampinae should be read), and Nannopinae, adding Stenheliinae (Brady) without distinctive characters for it.

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  • This is the consummation towards which events had been steadily moving - not at first consciously, for it was some time before the tendencies at work were consciously realized - but ending at last in the complete equation of Old Testament and New, and in the bracketing together of both as the first and second volumes of a single Bible.

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  • The rule of Alstahoug extended over all the neighbouring districts, including Dass's native island of Hero, and its privileges were accompanied by great perils, for it was necessary to be constantly crossing stormy firths of sea.

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  • The Burley Tobacco Society attempted to pool the entire crop and thus force the buyers of the American Tobacco Company of New Jersey (which usually bought more than three-fourths of the crop of Burley) to pay a much higher price for it.

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  • When a distinction was made between the souls in the under world, Sisyphus was supposed to be rolling up the stone perpetually as a punishment for some offence committed on earth; and various reasons were invented to account for it.

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  • The manuscript was in the hands of the printers in 1775, and most of the experimental work for it was done before 1773.

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  • Secondly, it is founded on scepticism; for it has neither interest in, nor reliance upon, empirical knowledge.

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  • The evidence for it is not to be confused with that for the law of rapid efflorescence of groups just considered.

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  • The Jesuits themselves deny the existence of any such body, and are able to adduce the negative disproof that no provision for it is to be found in their constitutions.

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  • Cromwell had planned the work on a large scale, too large evidently for the resources of the English presses, for it was determined that the printing should be entrusted to Francis Regnault, a famous Paris printer.

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  • The site chosen for it was that of the ancient priory of Kilmainham, founded by Strongbow for Knights Templars.

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  • They are carried into battle to assist the tribe, are regularly anointed, fondled and invoked; for it is believed that the souls present in them are powerful to work weal and woe to friend and enemy respectively.

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  • The more complete the picture, however, which may here be obtained of Manichaeisrn, the more cautious must we be in making generalizations from it, for it is beyond doubt that Western Manichaeism adopted Christian elements which are wanting in the original and in the Oriental Manichaeism.

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