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  • I've waited at that station for five hours.
  • Old deeds for old people, and new deeds for new.
  • The guinea-fowl likes to hide her nest in out-of-the-way places, and it was one of my greatest delights to hunt for the eggs in the long grass.
  • "I'll get us some coffee," she said, heading for the kitchen.
  • He was going to like the clothes she bought for the trip.
  • He had been taking care of her for nearly a year now.
  • You've paid a dear price for this thing.
  • "As for that, we are in the same scrape ourselves," answered Dorothy, cheerfully.
  • "Well, then," said the teacher, "you may take your slate and go out behind the schoolhouse for half an hour.
  • "She's gone out for a walk," said Jim, gruffly.
  • * "Food for cannon."
  • Little Benjamin Franklin was very happy; for he was only seven years old.
  • She is the Ruler destined to be my successor, for she is a Royal Princess.
  • The main point, however, was that they flew, and flew swiftly, if a bit unevenly, toward the rock for which they had headed.
  • The impulse gone, I fell down and cried for her to take me up in her arms.
  • Seeing the position we are in, I think there is little need for discussion.
  • With his head bent, and his big feet spread apart, he began explaining his reasons for thinking the abbe's plan chimerical.
  • "Yes, and this is not a time for discussing," he continued, "but for acting: there is war in Russia!
  • The day after his son had left, Prince Nicholas sent for Princess Mary to come to his study.
  • She feared for her brother who was in it, was horrified by and amazed at the strange cruelty that impels men to kill one another, but she did not understand the significance of this war, which seemed to her like all previous wars.
  • "Go and get it for me," said the old prince to Mademoiselle Bourienne.
  • "How CAN we 'scape?" asked Dorothy, nervously, for an unseen danger is always the hardest to face.
  • The milkers would let me keep my hands on the cows while they milked, and I often got well switched by the cow for my curiosity.
  • These preparations had not consumed a great deal of time, but the sleeping Gargoyles were beginning to wake up and move around, and soon some of them would be hunting for their missing wings.
  • Just you light out and make for that rock, Jim; and don't waste any time about it, either.
  • "That will prove a barrier for some time to come," said the little man, smiling pleasantly all over his wrinkled face at the success of their stratagem.
  • Pressing his lips together he made that effort for the twenty-thousandth time and lay down.
  • Everything not connected with the execution of the prince's orders did not interest and did not even exist for Alpatych.
  • He asked for a samovar and for hay for his horses, and when he had had his tea he went to bed.
  • Our friends had a good start and were able to maintain it, for with their eight wings they could go just as fast as could the Gargoyles.
  • There is no hieroglyph for the word "progress" because the very idea of progress didn't exist.
  • I knew my own mind well enough and always had my own way, even if I had to fight tooth and nail for it.
  • Anna Pavlovna's alarm was justified, for Pierre turned away from the aunt without waiting to hear her speech about Her Majesty's health.
  • Yes, I have heard of his scheme for perpetual peace, and it is very interesting but hardly feasible.
  • Pierre suddenly saw an outlet for his excitement.
  • "We will all arise, every one of us will go, for our father the Tsar!" he shouted, rolling his bloodshot eyes.
  • For God's sake send me somewhere else if only in command of a regiment.
  • After that Princess Mary did not see her father for a whole week.
  • No one spoke for a long time.
  • So he called Tikhon and went through the rooms with him to show him where to set up the bed for that night.
  • She stretched and sat up, reaching for her clothes.
  • It should have arrived at Hugson's Siding at midnight, but it was already five o'clock and the gray dawn was breaking in the east when the little train slowly rumbled up to the open shed that served for the station-house.
  • The shed at Hugson's Siding was bare save for an old wooden bench, and did not look very inviting.
  • She could count his ribs easily where they showed through the skin of his body, and his head was long and seemed altogether too big for him, as if it did not fit.
  • The buggy seemed almost new, for it had a shiny top and side curtains.
  • I work for Uncle Bill on his ranch, and he pays me six dollars a month and my board.
  • Tomorrow Uncle Henry and I must start back for Kansas.
  • We've been away for a long time, you know, and so we're anxious to get home again.
  • Neither the boy nor the girl spoke again for some minutes.
  • As the horse ambled along, drawing the buggy, the people of the glass city made way for them and formed a procession in their rear.
  • What is your sorcery good for if it cannot tell us the truth?
  • It was all they could do, for to go away and leave that strange sight was impossible; nor could they hurry its fall in any way.
  • Dorothy was surprised to find how patient the people were, for her own little heart was beating rapidly with excitement.
  • But it took a good many years for them to grow as large and fine as they are now.
  • In the center of each plant grew a daintily dressed Mangaboo, for the clothing of all these creatures grew upon them and was attached to their bodies.
  • If we keep cool and moist, and meet with no accidents, we often live for five years.
  • I think I shall keep this Wizard until a new Sorcerer is ready to pick, for he seems quite skillful and may be of use to us.
  • He won't need to destroy ME, for if I don't get something to eat pretty soon I shall starve to death, and so save him the trouble.
  • But the foes were too many to be repulsed for long.
  • Jim stopped sometimes to rest, for the climb was rather steep and tiresome.
  • And--pardon me for the foolish question--but, are you all invisible?
  • "What is he good for?" was the next question.
  • Yes; for they eat of the dama-fruit, as we all do, and that keeps them from being seen by any eye, whether human or animal.
  • "For two reasons, my dear," the woman's voice answered.
  • The strangers took their seats at the table willingly enough, for they were all hungry and the platters were now heaped with good things to eat.
  • Neither can we see the cruel bears, for they also eat the fruit.
  • Now you must feed me, Dorothy, for I'm half starved.
  • "Very well, I won't touch it," decided the kitten; "but you must keep it away from me, for the smell is very tempting."
  • As for reaching the top of the earth, I have never heard that it is possible to do that, and if you succeeded in getting there you would probably fall off.
  • "The Valley of Voe is certainly a charming place," resumed the Wizard; "but we cannot be contented in any other land than our own, for long."
  • But they were in great numbers, and the Champion could not shout much because he had to save his breath for fighting.
  • "That is true," agreed the Wizard, "and as the river seems to be flowing in the direction of the Pyramid Mountain it will be the easiest way for us to travel."
  • At such times they were all glad to wait for him, for continually climbing up stairs is sure to make one's legs ache.
  • They wound about, always going upward, for some time.
  • Once I lived on top the earth, but for many years I have had my factory in this spot--half way up Pyramid Mountain.
  • Well, I make Assorted Flutters for flags and bunting, and a superior grade of Rustles for ladies' silk gowns.
  • "I do not want money," returned the braided man, "for I could not spend it in this deserted place if I had it.
  • Also I made pores for porous plasters and high-grade holes for doughnuts and buttons.
  • They are no bigger than mice, and I'm sure mice are proper for me to eat.
  • No one replied to this, because they found they needed all their breath for the climb.
  • These were very numerous, for the place was thickly inhabited, and a large group of the queer people clustered near, gazing sharply upon the strangers who had emerged from the long spiral stairway.
  • But Jim was ready for them, and when he saw them coming he turned his heels toward them and began kicking out as hard as he could.
  • But the noise and clatter seemed as dreadful to them as Jim's heels, for all who were able swiftly turned and flew away to a great distance.
  • The others picked themselves up from the ground one by one and quickly rejoined their fellows, so for a moment the horse thought he had won the fight with ease.
  • "No," returned Dorothy, stoutly, "it won't do to go back, for then we would never get home.
  • "But only for a time," replied the Wizard, shaking his head gloomily.
  • These revolvers are good for six shots each, but when those are gone we shall be helpless.
  • This daunted the enemy for a time, but the defenders were soon out of breath.
  • "They are probably keeping us for some ceremony," the Wizard answered, reflectively; "but there is no doubt they intend to kill us as dead as possible in a short time."
  • "That," said Zeb, "explains why this house is used by them for a prison.
  • Then the line was let down again for Zeb to climb up by.
  • A sort of inclined tunnel led upward for a way, and they found the floor of it both rough and steep.
  • She has gone up to the top of the earth to hunt for our dinner.
  • But they've been very scarce for a few years and we usually have to be content with elephants or buffaloes, answered the creature, in a regretful tone.
  • Oh, she is sometimes gone for several weeks on her hunting trips, and if we were not tied we would crawl all over the mountain and fight with each other and get into a lot of mischief.
  • Mother usually knows what she is about, but she made a mistake this time; for you are sure to escape us unless you come too near, and you probably won't do that.
  • We consider ourselves very beautiful in appearance, for mother has told us so, and she knows.
  • For, if we told you truly, you might escape us altogether; and if we told you an untruth we would be naughty and deserve to be punished.
  • But they knew now that there was a means of escape and so waited patiently until the path appeared for the second time.
  • "Then we're all right," said the girl, "for if the dragon went the other way she can't poss'bly get to us now."
  • For my part, if we manage to get out of here I'll be glad it isn't the way the dragon goes.
  • But their journey was almost over, for in a short time they reached a small cave from which there was no further outlet.
  • "But we're ALMOST on earth again," cried Dorothy, "for there is the sun--the most BEAU'FUL sun that shines!" and she pointed eagerly at the crack in the distant roof.
  • It wouldn't be possible for even me to get up to that crack--or through it if I got there.
  • Don't forget them, for I may have to eat them, after all.
  • But don't you lose heart, Jim, for I'm sure this isn't the end of our story, by any means.
  • Our friend Oz is merely a humbug wizard, for he once proved it to me.
  • "Thank you, my dear, for doing me justice," responded the Wizard, gratefully.
  • She's a friend of mine, for I met her in the Land of Ev, not long ago, and went to Oz with her.
  • "For the second time?" asked the Wizard, with great interest.
  • Ozma has it; for its powers won't work in a common, ordinary country like the United States.
  • "Then we must wait for half an hour," she continued; "but it won't take long, after that, to carry us all to the Emerald City."
  • They sat silently thinking for a time.
  • "I believe we will soon follow her," announced the Wizard, in a tone of great relief; "for I know something about the magic of the fairyland that is called the Land of Oz.
  • Let us be ready, for we may be sent for any minute.
  • For they were in the streets of a beautiful emerald-green city, bathed in a grateful green light that was especially pleasing to their eyes, and surrounded by merry faced people in gorgeous green-and-gold costumes of many extraordinary designs.
  • He had seen considerable of life in the cities in his younger days, and knew that this regal palace was no place for him.
  • It perplexed even Jellia Jamb, for a time, to know what to do with the animal.
  • It will seem like being at home again, for I lived in that room for many, many years.
  • Over this Land I ruled in peace for many years, until I grew old and longed to see my native city once again.
  • "That is quite a history," said Ozma; "but there is a little more history about the Land of Oz that you do not seem to understand--perhaps for the reason that no one ever told it you.
  • "We owe a great deal to the Wonderful Wizard," continued the Princess, "for it was you who built this splendid Emerald City."
  • "But you ruled it wisely and well for many years," said she, "and made the people proud of your magical art.
  • I'm very certain, Oz, that you gave me the best brains in the world, for I can think with them day and night, when all other brains are fast asleep.
  • "You have everything you wish for," said the Princess.
  • But it was never noticed that they became very warm friends, for all of that.
  • Do you take me for a salamander?
  • Do you take me for a tom-cat?
  • Do you take me for a weasel?
  • What would your Highness like for dinner?
  • But there is any quantity of oatmeal, which we often cook for breakfast.
  • For goodness sake, what sort of a being are you?
  • "It is not necessary for me to eat," observed the Sawhorse.
  • "I'm glad of that," said Jim; "for I, also, have a conscience, and it tells me not to crush in your skull with a blow of my powerful hoof."
  • If I could eat grass I would not need a conscience, for nothing could then tempt me to devour babies and lambs.
  • I was then for a time the Head of the finest Flying Machine that was ever known to exist, and we did many wonderful things.
  • But here comes Ozma; so I'd better hush up, for the Princess doesn't like me to chatter since she changed her name from Tip to Ozma.
  • When he had made them all disappear again Ozma declared she was sorry they were gone, for she wanted one of them to pet and play with.
  • There was a beautiful canopy for Ozma and her guests to sit under and watch the people run races and jump and wrestle.
  • I only wish there was a real horse here for me to race with.
  • So they unharnessed Jim and took the saddle off the Sawhorse, and the two queerly matched animals were stood side by side for the start.
  • "I ought to be a fairy," grumbled Jim, as he slowly drew the buggy home; "for to be just an ordinary horse in a fairy country is to be of no account whatever.
  • It's no place for us, Zeb.
  • Several days of festivity and merry-making followed, for such old friends did not often meet and there was much to be told and talked over between them, and many amusements to be enjoyed in this delightful country.
  • Hearing this, Dorothy and the Wizard exchanged startled glances, for they remembered how often Eureka had longed to eat a piglet.
  • "Come, Ozma," she said, anxiously; "let us go ourselves to search for the piglet."
  • Carry this cat away to prison, and keep her in safe confinement until she is tried by law for the crime of murder.
  • Sending for the Tin Woodman the Wizard took him into a corner and whispered:
  • And finally she made a wicked plan to satisfy her depraved appetite for pork.
  • Prisoner, what have you to say for yourself?
  • "Why, that's for you to find out," replied Eureka.
  • Tell them it would be foolish for me to eat the piglet, because I had sense enough to know it would raise a row if I did.
  • As for the jury, the members whispered to each other for a few minutes before they appointed their spokesperson.
  • "Your Highness," said he, "see how easy it is for a jury to be mistaken.
  • The kitten could not have eaten your piglet--for here it is!
  • As the Princess held the white piglet in her arms and stroked its soft hair she said: Let Eureka out of the cage, for she is no longer a prisoner, but our good friend.
  • "But justice prevailed at the last," said Ozma, "for here is my pet, and Eureka is once more free."
  • "Don't be foolish," advised the Tin Woodman, "or you may be sorry for it."
  • "The piglet that belonged to the Princess wore an emerald collar," said Eureka, loudly enough for all to hear.
  • I will confess that I intended to eat the little pig for my breakfast; so I crept into the room where it was kept while the Princess was dressing and hid myself under a chair.
  • Zeb also wanted to see his home, and although he did not find anyone morning for him, the sight of Hugson's Ranch in the picture made him long to get back there.
  • Next morning they all assembled for the final parting, and many of the officials and courtiers came to look upon the impressive ceremonies.
  • The four lawyers rode along, one behind another; for the pathway was narrow, and the mud on each side of it was deep.
  • He prayeth best, who loveth best All things both great and small; For the dear God who loveth us, He made and loveth all.
  • They were glad to see Mr. Harris, for he was the minister.
  • And now, my friends, please to excuse My lisping and my stammers; I, for this once, have done my best, And so--I'll make my manners.
  • Then try to tell what it is, what it is like, what it is good for, and what is done with it.
  • Then he tried to tell what it was like, what it was good for, and what was done with it.
  • The lesson you have learned to-day is never to pay too dear for a whistle.
  • With his lighted lantern in his hand, he went up and down the rough hills calling for his lambs.
  • There were no libraries near him, and it was hard for him to get books.
  • Where the pools are bright and deep, Where the gray trout lies asleep, Up the river and o'er the lea, That's the way for Billy and me.
  • Where the mowers mow the cleanest, Where the hay lies thick and greenest, There to trace the homeward bee, That's the way for Billy and me.
  • Where the hazel bank is steepest, Where the shadow falls the deepest, Where the clustering nuts fall free, That's the way for Billy and me.
  • But this I know, I love to play In the meadow, among the hay-- Up the water, and o'er the lea, That's the way for Billy and me.
  • Keep the third piece of wisdom for your own use, and let me have the gold.
  • Then he ordered his treasurer to pay the poet five hundred pieces of gold; for, indeed, the poem which he had recited was wonderfully fine.
  • In it were many great cities; and from one end of it to the other there were broad fields of grain and fine pastures for sheep and cattle.
  • The people of Egypt were very proud; for they believed that they were the first and oldest of all nations.
  • There he cared for them with love and kindness; but no word did he speak in their hearing.
  • This was an odd way of proving something, for, as every one can readily see, it proved nothing.
  • If the people of Boston must fight for their liberty, we will help them.
  • For this reason they had bought some powder and stored it at Concord,[Footnote: Concord (_pro_. kong'krd).] nearly twenty miles away.
  • When the king's soldiers heard about this powder, they made up their minds to go out and get it for themselves.
  • The people for miles around were roused as though a fire were raging.
  • All along the road the farmers were waiting for them.
  • His mother smiled, for she felt quite sure that there was no danger.
  • "Now for the wolf!" he said to himself.
  • "This is just the place for that wolf," he thought.
  • They could be seen very plainly, for here the ground was quite muddy.
  • The four men followed them for some distance, and then lost them on the hillside.
  • The next day twenty men and boys came together for the grand wolf hunt.
  • He crept into the cave for the third time.
  • "Shoe him quickly, for the king wishes to ride him to battle," said the groom who had brought him.
  • The king's enemies are even now advancing, and all are ready for the fight.
  • The battle had been raging for some time.
  • My kingdom for a horse.
  • But there was no horse for him.
  • For the want of a nail the shoe was lost; For the want of a shoe the horse was lost; For the want of a horse the battle was lost; For the failure of battle the kingdom was lost;-- And all for the want of a horseshoe nail.
  • For the want of a nail the shoe was lost; For the want of a shoe the horse was lost; For the want of a horse the battle was lost; For the failure of battle the kingdom was lost;-- And all for the want of a horseshoe nail.
  • Instead of a trunk for his clothing, he carried a pair of saddlebags.
  • "Have you a room here for me?" he asked the landlord.
  • "Well, then," answered the stranger, "I will see what they can do for me at the Planters' Tavern, round the corner;" and he rode away.
  • A farmer is as good as any other man; and where there's no room for a farmer, there can be no room for me.
  • "Here's something else for the Dean," he said roughly, and tossed it into the servant's arms.
  • And here is something for your trouble.
  • The lesson in manners was not forgotten; for, always after that, the man was very polite when he brought his presents.
  • And the Dean also took the hint; for he always remembered to give the man a "tip" for his trouble.
  • At last the day came for the ship to sail.
  • He stood still for a moment, thinking.
  • Send word to the captain not to wait for me, for I have changed my mind.
  • It was a good place for a fly, and I never thought of spoiling your picture.
  • But Cimabue only praised him for his great skill.
  • There was once a painter whose name was Zeuxis. He could paint pictures so life-like that they were mistaken for the real things which they represented.
  • For if the boy had been as well painted as the cherries, the birds would have been afraid to come near him.
  • The king, for once, was puzzled.
  • His father and mother were Quakers, and they did not think it was right to spend money for such things.
  • He was glad to do this; for he loved the baby.
  • For some time he sat very still.
  • Does thee suppose that it is very wrong for Benjamin to do such a thing?
  • The good minister looked at the picture for a long time.
  • He was strong and ready for every duty.
  • He was elected to Congress, he was chosen judge of the supreme court of Tennessee, he was appointed general in the army, and lastly he was for eight years the president of the United States.
  • He soon learned all that his teacher could teach; for he was bright and quick, and had a good memory.
  • So it was decided that the boy should go to some school where he might be prepared for college.
  • The academy at Exeter was a famous school for preparing boys for college.
  • But our neighbor, Johnson, is sending the nag to Exeter for the use of a lady who is to ride back with me.
  • But won't it look rather funny for me to ride to Exeter on a sidesaddle?
  • And so we will keep the game going till it is time for school to be dismissed.
  • Mary looked around and saw Samuel Miller asking his neighbor for a pencil, and Samuel was called.
  • Then all became very good and very careful, for no one wished to be standing at the time of dismissal.
  • The clock ticked loudly, and Tommy Jones, who was standing up for the fourth time, began to feel very uneasy.
  • But Tommy didn't care for that.
  • She was very much ashamed and hurt, for it was the first time that she had ever been in disgrace at school.
  • The other girls felt sorry that she should suffer for so small a fault.
  • It lacked only one minute till the bell would strike the time for dismissal.
  • Everybody was astonished, for that boy was the best scholar in the school, and he had never been known to break a rule.
  • They admired the book very much, for they had never seen anything like it.
  • But I am a prince, and it is foolish for princes to waste their time with such things.
  • But after he had learned to read, she taught him to look in books for that which he wished to know.
  • He was noted for his great knowledge, the most of which he had obtained from books.
  • One day King Astyages planned to make a great feast for the lad.
  • The hour for the feast came.
  • "Well," said he, "all these rich foods that were prepared for the feast are yours.
  • You would hardly have known the young prince when the time came for him to appear before his grandfather.
  • For the other day, when you sat at dinner with your officers, I noticed that the wine made you act queerly.
  • For in that country, people never wear shoes in the house, but take them off at the door.
  • The two boys ran for the teacher's shoes, and each claimed the honor of carrying them to him.
  • When the caliph heard of this he sent for Al Farra and asked him, "Who is the most honored of men?"
  • It is the man who rose to go out, and two young princes contended for the honor of giving him his shoes but at last agreed that each should offer him one.
  • They went but slowly, for the sun was hot and the way was rough.
  • "It was not for gold that I came here," said Alexander.
  • This treasure does not belong to me, for I bought only the ground; but when I offered it to my neighbor he refused it.
  • The shah sat silent for a while, as if in thought.
  • In war, they were savage and cruel; for war always makes men so.
  • For three days he lay in his strange prison.
  • It ran into a narrow cleft which he had not seen before, and then through a long, dark passage which was barely large enough for a man's body.
  • But soon the way became too narrow for his body to pass through.
  • He lived two hundred years ago, and was famous for his courage in defending his country.
  • Coriolanus began at once to make ready for war against Rome.
  • Agree to obey the laws that I shall make for you.
  • Give us a few days to learn what sort of laws you will make for us, and then we will say whether we can submit to them or not.
  • The next day, all the priests and learned men went out to beg for mercy.
  • For a long time his mother pleaded with him.
  • For a long time his wife begged him to be merciful.
  • One summer he went over the sea to Italy; for his name was well known there, and many people wished to hear him sing.
  • He visited several cities, and in each place he was well paid for his music.
  • There was a ship just ready to sail for Corinth, and the captain agreed to take him as a passenger.
  • The sailors agreed; for they were anxious to hear the musician whose songs were famous all over the world.
  • Once when a boy gave him a pair of doves which he had snared, St. Francis had a nest made for them, and the mother bird laid her eggs in it.
  • And many other stories are told of this man's great love and pity for the timid creatures which lived in the fields and woods.
  • For think what He has given you.
  • So, do not be ungrateful, but sing His praises and thank Him for his goodness toward you.
  • A number of bundles were made up for them to carry.
  • There is one for each of you.
  • For the bundle which he had chosen had contained the food for the whole party.
  • For the bundle which he had chosen had contained the food for the whole party.
  • "Because, since these other slaves do everything, there is nothing left for me to perform," said Aesop.
  • In Samos the little slave soon became known for his wisdom and courage.
  • "No use to make laws," said another, "for they will never be needed."
  • When night came on he stopped at a pleasant roadside inn and asked for lodging.
  • He called for his bill and paid it.
  • He paused for a while.
  • He was a member of Congress for many years, and was noted for his odd manners and strong self- will.
  • For this reason many people were glad when he ran away from home and went to sea.
  • They also put in some bread and meat and other food, enough for several weeks.
  • He built him a little hut for shelter at night and in stormy weather.
  • For four years and four months he lived alone on the island.
  • For a long time Robinson Crusoe was all alone.
  • He made a boat for himself.
  • _Dearest Carl; You are a good boy to send me all your wages, for now I can pay the rent and buy some warm clothing for your little sister.
  • I thank you for it, and pray that God will bless you.
  • The king himself was obliged to hide in the wild woods while his foes hunted for him with hounds.
  • For many days he wandered through rough and dangerous places.
  • "May a poor traveler find rest and shelter here for the night?" he asked.
  • The woman answered, "All travelers are welcome for the sake of one; and you are welcome"
  • The king sat down by the fire, and the woman hurried to get things ready for supper.
  • The two young men got down their bows and arrows, and all were busy making plans for the next day.
  • They are resting there for the night and have no fear of danger from us.
  • For a long time he wandered in fear from place to place.
  • His foes were looking for him.
  • He had now been a wanderer for twenty days.
  • "I wish to get a fowl for to-morrow's dinner," he said.
  • The market man showed him a fat turkey, plump and white and ready for roasting.
  • He asked the price and paid for it.
  • "Shall I wrap it up for you?" asked the market man.
  • "Who is that polite old gentleman who carried my turkey for me?" he asked of the market man.
  • They sat in a heavy flat-bottomed boat, each holding a long, crooked rod in his hands and eagerly waiting for "a bite."
  • "Oh, I have a plan for making a boat move without poling it or rowing it," he answered.
  • No doubt the bird had mistaken the purple silk for something good to eat.
  • A year ago he was so poor that he had scarcely clothes for his back.
  • His children were crying for food.
  • But lately everything had changed for him.
  • The caliph at once gave orders for the gardener to be brought before him the next day.
  • At sight of his lost treasure, the merchant began to dance and shout for joy.
  • I had no shoes for my feet, no coat for my back.
  • "No," said Al Mansour, "it is for me to reward the man as he deserves."
  • Then he rewarded the gardener with ten more pieces for his honesty.
  • So he sat there trembling and afraid; for he was a timid, bashful man and did not like to be noticed.
  • Inside of the great kitchen, beside the fire, the men were shouting and laughing; for the blacksmith had finished his song, and it was very pleasing.
  • Caedmon, sing for me.
  • It was for this reason that I left my fellows in the abbey kitchen and came here to be alone.
  • So she called her clerk, who was a scholar, and bade him write the song, word for word, as it came from Caedmon's lips.
  • At first he did not see anything that disturbed him; for word had gone before him to remove from sight everything that might be displeasing or painful.
  • Their lives are spent in toiling for the rich.
  • The children were hungry and could hardly wait for their father to come.
  • But they will be looking for you.
  • They let you fall into the water, and you would have been drowned, if it hadn't been for me.
  • She is always doing something for us, said Blondel.
  • All your court has been looking for you for the past two hours.
  • I thank you for what you have done for me.
  • As he came out of the forest he saw a little boy by the roadside, who seemed to be watching for some one.
  • "Well, my boy," said the king, "are you looking for your father?"
  • I am looking for the king.
  • "How much will you take for the fish that you are drawing in?" he asked.
  • "Well, I will give three pieces of silver for all that are in the net," answered the merchant.
  • The fishermen talked in low tones with one another for a little while, and then one said, It's a bargain.
  • Be they many or few, you may have all for three pieces of silver.
  • Let him decide the matter for us.
  • The people of his country had made him their king; but as soon as he had made good laws for them he gave up his crown.
  • "It is well," said he, "that neither a merchant nor a fisherman shall have it; for such men think only of their business and care really nothing for beauty."
  • "Educate the children," he said; and for that reason his name is remembered to this day.
  • They told him that it was not for sale, but that it was to be given to the wisest of the wise.
  • Strangers admired him for his wisdom.
  • His own people despised him for his wickedness.
  • They had never heard of Chilon, for his name was hardly known outside of his own country.
  • The oracle at Delphi has ordered that it shall be given to the wisest of wise men, and for that reason we have brought it to you.
  • Carry it to Delphi and leave it there in the Temple of Apollo; for Apollo is the fountain of wisdom, the wisest of the wise.
  • This book is unusual for two reasons.
  • It took a decade or two for the new medium to be seen in light of itself, not just in terms of what it displaced.
  • Think, for example, of Twitter.
  • Let's say Linda has come up with a pretty interesting idea: A social network for couples.
  • She hires a contract programmer in Russia for $3000 to code it and advertises on Craig's List for a designer who will work for some stock.
  • She gets web hosting set up for the princely sum of $30 a month.
  • She wants to do business as a limited liability company, so she creates an LLC online for $200.
  • She researches credit card processors and decides to go with PayPal for now.
  • Linda thinks about this and decides she wants to keep it ad-free for now.
  • I spend less time waiting for Excel to do a recalculation of my formulas today than I did on my 386 in the 1990s, even though my spreadsheets are thousands of times more complex.
  • Filmmakers such as James Cameron and George Lucas used to talk about putting off film projects to wait for the computer technology to catch up to their visions.
  • But once cars improved enough, for all intents and purposes we stopped increasing their top speed.
  • Though it isn't so much a time as a state of mind, historians plot the Renaissance as moving around Europe for a couple of centuries.
  • In his day, Shakespeare was low-brow entertainment for the common class.
  • We are suitably impressed that Da Vinci sketched a design for a submarine and a flying machine.
  • The Internet has allowed for the creation of thousands of new ways to give, both time and money.
  • Before technology and prosperity, virtually everyone spent long hard days scraping together enough calories for themselves and their family to survive.
  • If my reasoning stopped there, you would probably start fishing around for the receipt for this book and read up on your bookseller's return policy.
  • The Internet is not unique in solving for this access to information.
  • If somebody outside your village knew something, it did not matter; for you, it did not exist.
  • In fact, the book could survive for centuries, as could new perfect copies of the book, and thus the ideas could be distributed.
  • This accounted for the odd answers.
  • It is wisdom that King Solomon asked God for, not intelligence.
  • The reason for this is what I call "The You Don't Know What to Ask Problem."
  • And wisdom probably concludes, "I should not apply for this credit card."
  • To avoid privacy issues at this point, let's stipulate that everything is recorded only for your future reference.
  • Schell regards sensors largely in terms of gameplay—but for our purposes, think of them passively logging your life.
  • A contest awhile back called for people to speculate what would be the best device to hook up to the Internet.
  • Remember the notion that the Internet wouldn't turn out to be only for one purpose—that while my car is clearly for taking me places, the Internet won't be for doing one single task, but many?
  • That said, if I had to pick one function I think the Internet will turn out to "be," it is this: The Internet will become a repository and a set of applications for storing the sum total of all life experiences of all people on earth.
  • I know the list of nefarious uses of the Internet—but on balance, we are building it for good purposes.
  • They will take time to write a great big forum post just for you, a total stranger they will never meet.
  • The Internet is full of sites that offer good to humanity and yield no profit for the people working on them.
  • The Open Directory Project—where fifty thousand editors try to organize the web into a directory of sites for no reward at all—comes instantly to mind.
  • Of course, Wikipedia is another textbook example where people toil for no payment, and anonymously as well.
  • More precisely, we will probably teach machines to teach themselves how to process it for us and surface findings to us.
  • You could start looking around for lines that connect things we didn't previously think were connected.
  • The machine should start looking for correlations we would not expect.
  • What if the capability to see connections and even to have them detected was all there for us?
  • You are being helped by an excellent salesperson who has been working there for twenty-five years.
  • When I watch a Terminator movie, I am rooting for the people, not the machines.
  • But give credit where credit is due: For certain tasks, machines perform vastly better than humans.
  • For instance, they will learn subtleties such as suggesting beach gear if a person buys a cooler in July and tailgating gear if the same purchase is made in October.
  • No human could ever do this, for in these purely computational matters, machines are vastly superior to us, and always will be.
  • They might balk at getting on an airline flight flown by a computer and prefer having a pilot on board to take over if he "feels in his gut" that something is wrong (even if that feeling is the airport burrito he had for lunch).
  • For each dinner, sixty or more people show up.
  • Once Jim extends the invitation, he memorizes all the individuals' names, where they are from, what they do for a living, information about their families, and so forth.
  • Jim Haynes has had well over 100,000 people come over for dinner.
  • These guidebooks are lists of people who live in that area who would be willing to meet you for coffee.
  • (It would have many more, but for now let's just say it includes a million things about you.)
  • You are not from there, and you want to go out for Italian food for dinner.
  • You need an answer to a basic question: "Where should I go for Italian food?"
  • In the future, something very much like the Amazon suggestion engine, but for all of life, will change that.
  • First, it will consider all your friends, people with whom you have actual intimate relationships, and it will look at where they go for Italian food.
  • The system will also look for anything they've written publicly about this place (Yelp, Facebook, personal blog) and which superlatives they used to describe it.
  • Where do they go for Italian food?
  • The system has data from all their GPS records and infers that to drive across town several times for a place is a stronger vote than eating at the corner restaurant.
  • It will look at all other people who like the same restaurants and see where they repeatedly go for Italian food in San Francisco.
  • This system will look at all the Italian restaurants around the country that you already like and look at all the ingredients they order online and look for restaurants in San Francisco using the same set of ingredients.
  • It will build a table of all the words used by people like you who have reviewed those restaurants and will look for San Francisco restaurants described with the same words.
  • How many of them have filed for unemployment since they graduated?
  • We cannot deal with equations that big—but a computer will solve for that in a minute if it has enough data.
  • Millions of pieces of minutia per life, for billions of lives.
  • We know for certain that these feats, and hundreds more like them, are true.
  • Likewise for mental illnesses: We should be able to cure them to the extent the person in question would wish them to be.
  • So how about this instead: What if I can show you a future where everyone on the planet will live in good health as long as it is possible for their body to live?
  • Interestingly, political cartoons of the era, both for and against FDR, showed him unaffected by the disease.
  • And near the end of 1937, Roosevelt created the National Foundation for Infant Paralysis to join in the fight.
  • His call for a "march of dimes" was a play on "The March of Time," a well-known newsreel series.
  • With a grant from the National Foundation for Infant Paralysis, he went to work on a polio vaccine.
  • Today, it is hard for us to imagine what that time was like.
  • This goal is within our grasp—and with the vaccine presently priced at about thirty cents a child, shame on us for not ending polio once and for all.
  • Next, imagine that happening every week for one hundred years.
  • In the eradication of smallpox, as in the near-elimination of polio, I find both fascinating lessons of history and enormous reason for hope.
  • Smallpox has been with us for thousands of years.
  • The Latin word for "cow" is vacca.
  • And Jenner had created this vaccine for smallpox without even understanding the basics of germ theory!
  • The factors that enable us to solve for and eliminate disease are getting better all the time, like wind at our back, pushing us forward.
  • He laid out how doctors should conduct themselves professionally, how to record patient records, and even suggested matters of personal hygiene for physicians, right down to their fingernails.
  • (The use of such practices continued into the scientific age: While Jenner was inoculating people with his new smallpox vaccine, doctors were draining half a gallon of blood from George Washington for his sore throat, a procedure that hastened his death.
  • And today's primary method for treating cancer is, in a way, very tenth century: Essentially, chemotherapy is a medical way of saying, Let's fill you so full of poison either you or the cancer dies.
  • When the ancients could not find these solutions, it was not for a lack of intelligence but for a lack of technology.
  • Louis Pasteur came along around this same time and proffered the germ theory of disease and a vaccine for rabies.
  • In 1879 a vaccine for cholera was invented.
  • The same year, a technique for treating diabetes, insulin therapy, was developed.
  • In the 1920s, we got a vaccine for diphtheria, pertussis, tuberculosis, and tetanus.
  • In 1935, a vaccine for yellow fever was created.
  • Some years ago, a few people taking Wellbutrin reported that their cravings for cigarettes diminished.
  • For instance: Imagine all people with skin cancer voluntarily shared their Digital Echo files on an anonymous basis.
  • Not long from now, computers will systematically look through trillions upon trillions of pieces of data for these associations.
  • Our brains weren't designed for that, which is completely fine—that's why we build computers.
  • Say, for instance, you believe redheads cause more traffic accidents than those with other colors of hair.
  • Then you ask the computer for any other statistical anomalies between these two populations.
  • It should know what the food on my fork weighs, run a chemical analysis of every bite I take, and log it in my Digital Echo file for my future reference.
  • Essentially, we will be able to run as many controlled experiments as we can imagine instantly and for no cost—and that will revolutionize medicine.
  • Finally, this system will not just solve for human illness, but all kinds of other problems as well.
  • In every cell of your body except your red blood cells exists a copy of your DNA.
  • Stop and consider that for a moment.
  • That three-billion-letter recipe for making you is what was sequenced—deciphered and written down—in the human genome project.
  • Today, for just a few hundred dollars, you can get a copy of your genome.
  • Knowing this allowed for the creation of a drug called Imatinib, which inhibits this process.
  • For instance, have you ever seen one of those people on TV who is turning one hundred and says he ate bacon every day of his life?
  • Even smallpox has been sequenced and is available for download.
  • You would know before you received a treatment how likely it was to work for you—not merely how likely it was to work for the larger population, but for you.
  • Highly specialized experts are a few keystrokes away and can be hired for just a few minutes or hours at a time.
  • A disease-free future for everyone is within our grasp.
  • The additional possibility of access to all humans' Digital Echoes, to be studied for a million unnoticed causal correlations, will hasten the demise of disease as well and will increase quality of life and longevity.
  • When you trade with someone in a free market, you are giving up something you have for something the other person has, which you value more.
  • Both parties must win for the trade to occur.
  • Trading is able to create value for two reasons.
  • This is a good thing because it means that high degrees of utility (the economists' word for "happiness") can be achieved with a wide variety of goods.
  • So when people have excess goods, they are able to trade those goods away for things they want and suffer less of a decrease in utility than the amount they are increasing in their trading partners.
  • It means I can trade you a good or service for an intermediate store of value known as money, and then trade that money to the person who actually has the goods I want.
  • Governments (and thieves, for that matter) reallocate wealth—but they do it by increasing the wealth of one party at the expense of another party.
  • One form of trade is to exchange your labor for money.
  • The ability to instantly and, for a very low cost, reliably transfer money to anyone on the planet is a key ingredient in increasing the amount of trade that occurs online.
  • It would not take much of this for businesses to no longer take credit cards.
  • They allow for easy return of merchandise that doesn't meet my expectations, decreasing my fear of making a bad purchasing decision.
  • The Internet solves for this in a way no library ever could. 7.
  • This makes business a meritocracy and encourages business owners to focus on quality, service, and reputation since these are so easy for customers to check.
  • For instance, I could hand carve bird calls and then advertise them only to people who are looking at online content about hand-carved bird calls or who search the Internet for information about hand-carved bird calls.
  • For instance, I could hand carve bird calls and then advertise them only to people who are looking at online content about hand-carved bird calls or who search the Internet for information about hand-carved bird calls.
  • By "make a car," I mean really make a car: dig iron ore out of the ground, smelt it to steel, wildcat for oil, find oil and refine it into gasoline, and so on.
  • And it doesn't matter that the person who paints the pencils doesn't know how the paint is made, for his job is to paint them.
  • For instance, you may manufacture widgets from lightweight plastic.
  • For the foreseeable future, technological advance will drive the world of wealth creation—and it is capable of producing more wealth than everything that has come before it.
  • It may have some limit in theory, because there is an optimal arrangement of atoms in the universe; but for practical purposes, it has no limit.
  • But for now, I want to leave you with a preposterous thought: In the future, a new Mercedes Benz will cost just $50.
  • To build a case for the end of poverty, we begin by discussing scarcity.
  • For all practical purposes, we have an unlimited supply of air to breathe.
  • It is as if each person has one hundred assistants working for him.
  • I won't base my reasoning for how the Internet and technology will end poverty on this idea alone.
  • But think about how it could play out: If energy truly were free and unlimited, you could, for instance, power tractors everywhere in the world.
  • But the price of the tractor would have plummeted, for a constellation of reasons.
  • Is it finite, or is it for all practical purposes infinite?
  • And then technology opens up completely new ideas and methods for us.
  • That was indeed the hope for atomic energy in that era, and it did not pan out.
  • I don't mean that in a motivational poster kind of way but in a literal sense: Failures (and what we learn from them) will help build the energy solutions for our future.
  • And in that future, I believe the world can have—in fact, will have—plentiful, free, clean energy that will result in dramatically lower costs for everything, everywhere.
  • Here is what I think he meant: If you could see a theoretical possibility for something in physics—"something that might be true"—then given enough time, you eventually could achieve it in reality.
  • Remember when Janis Joplin sang "Freedom's just another word for 'nothing left to lose'"?
  • Well, scarcity is just another word for "we don't know how to get it."
  • The idea of free trade has divided people for as long as trade has existed.
  • If prices for an item fall, this is a net good.
  • Let's consider examples of how the effect is positive for some, negative for some, but the net is a gain in the overall wealth of the system.
  • Even though this allowed cotton prices to plummet and demand for cotton to increase, some of those fifty people got laid off, no doubt shaking their fists at the infernal gin as they stormed off the property.
  • Then, make them all soak their fingers in ice water so they are numb and work even slower, creating another thirty jobs for cold-fingered, blindfolded cotton seed removers.
  • Consider a factory that makes widgets for a dollar each.
  • They are able to produce widgets for ten cents, putting the Dollar Widget Company (with its unfortunate name) out of business.
  • Worker Chang, located in China, is willing to do the same job, remotely, for a dollar an hour.
  • But Chad merely stopped selling his labor to the employer for that price.
  • You are leaving town for a week and a day and will completely avoid your spouse's meltdown.
  • The maximum wage you can earn, though, is defined by supply and demand for labor, and by your negotiating ability, but it also has a cap.
  • If you take something worth a dollar, spend an hour working on it, and your employer sells it for three dollars, no way in the world can you ever make more than two dollars an hour.
  • Any task that could be done a machine is, by definition, dehumanizing to a human being.
  • He is freed from being a stand-in for a machine.
  • Those things were never necessary for prosperity and even less so in the Internet age.
  • If this is not the case, people will not trade their labor for things that can easily or capriciously be taken away. 3.
  • We are about to enter a world where robots do more and more of our work for us.
  • To that extent, the contraption that automatically metes out the daily allotment of cat food for your pet is a robot.
  • We have fallen into the habit of anthropomorphizing computers and robots for a simple reason: The more we program them to do things that we presently do, the more we think of them as being like us.
  • Okay, maybe for novelty value.
  • Artificial surrogates for human companionship are always vastly inferior to the real thing; we crave connections with people, not machines.
  • I hesitate to start talking about nanotechnology for fear I will not be able to stop—the entire field is amazing to me!
  • And the principle at work in this technology could lead to a cure for other autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis and rheumatoid arthritis.
  • Frictionless coatings that never wear out in machines that last for centuries.
  • A Mercedes for $50?
  • Please bear with me and keep your mind open for a minute longer.
  • I'll make this case for you.
  • The memory for that computer cost me $40 per MB, just under $200.
  • Everyone knows that has been happening for computer stuff.
  • That could be true, but I don't think so, for reasons laid out in the chapter on scarcity.
  • Finally, you might argue that fees paid as royalties to the owners of the intellectual property needed to build the Mercedes for $50 will not fall by a thousandfold.
  • (Of course, I can't go buy a thousand cans for $2,000 and have them worth $10,000 to me.
  • Let's say you paid $30 for it and you love it.
  • How much would you pay for that pan today?
  • They can't even put a value on it; they wouldn't sell it for a million dollars.
  • Buying this pan for a dollar basically gets you a $2,000 benefit.
  • The house will need scheduled maintenance but will remember when and will ask you for permission.
  • This house will be cheaper to build than a house today and worth vastly more to you for all the cool things it does.
  • Look how far we have come in creating prosperity with almost no technology for so long.
  • This will create a cascading effect; once energy, for instance, is free, it will make precious metals free.
  • How would it affect the world for everyone's buying power to increase a hundredfold?
  • A poor person with a six-year-old car today has more wealth than a poor person with a six-year-old car did back in 1911, for the simple reason that cars are so much better now.
  • In 2009, in the United States of America, the poverty threshold for a single person under sixty-five was about $11,000 a year; the threshold for a family group of four, including two children, was about $22,000 a year.
  • At that point, people flee the land looking for a better deal.
  • The United Kingdom famously did this after World War II by raising marginal tax rates on earned income to more than 99 percent and, for some other kinds of income, to more than 100 percent.
  • That meant for every pound someone made, he owed more than a pound in taxes.
  • A third radical method of redistribution is called land reform, which is actually a polite term for taking land from one person and giving it to another.
  • Expropriation is an act that simultaneously violates two of the three ingredients for prosperity that I have enumerated: private property and rule of law.
  • Such radical redistribution attempts are dangerous games, for the rich are creators of economic opportunity, not just for themselves, but as employers, for society.
  • This is a straight shot to economic poverty for any country desperate enough to try it.
  • Here I'll make a point which I believe to be a historic constant and to which we will be returning: If property rights of the rich are respected and tax rates, while high, still allow for indefinite gain, then the rich will keep producing.
  • In its most basic form (which I'll discuss here for simplification's sake), it is a guarantee of a minimum income above the poverty line for every citizen.
  • Although the poor may not believe that wealth is attainable for them, they do not want to rock the boat and risk disrupting the system that guarantees them at least some income.
  • They develop methods for the accurate measuring and recording of boundaries of land as well as the sale thereof.
  • They institute legal protection for copyrights, patents, and trademarks.
  • Instead, forget which is "right" for the moment and simply consider the flow of history, for better or worse.
  • In 58 BC, Clodius Pulcher ran on a "free grain for the poor" platform as he tried to become tribune.
  • We've seen this: If you are running for president of the United States, merely using the words "freeze" and "Social Security" in the same sentence has the retirees of the nation heating up pots of tar and emptying their down pillows.
  • All is well and good until things turn down for a nation.
  • Like a TV star that doesn't scale back his expenses after his show is cancelled, these benefits expand, not contract, during periods of economic decline, for two main reasons.
  • Now, let me pose a different question: In the vastly-more-prosperous future, what will "working hard for our money" even mean?
  • Why do we have to work for a living?
  • Let's think about that for a moment.
  • Some stocks pay dividends very regularly: Coca Cola, for instance, has paid a dividend every year since 1920.
  • Is there anything wrong with you collecting this dividend check for which you did no work at all?
  • The people in Alaska who get the checks don't work for them.
  • They aren't responsible for the oil being in Alaska and do nothing to extract the oil from the earth.
  • Once technology allowed for the recording and sale of records, their income shot way up—they could use technology to magnify their ability.
  • Therefore millions of people were willing to pay hundreds of dollars for the software to make them more productive.
  • Somebody else—actually, a lot of somebody elses—worked really hard for a long time to build the United States and its freedoms.
  • In a world without abundance, socialism removes the one reliable creator of abundance—the individual profit motive—and that results in a lower standard of living for everyone.
  • Now, what if the bottom half of jobs disappeared and were replaced by robots who did them for almost free?
  • So these former farmers got jobs in factories, learned to repair equipment, solved problems, became line managers, suggested improvements to processes, and got paid for their effort.
  • The iceman delivered ice for your icebox until the electric freezer put him out of business.
  • It will be regarded as a human right—a dividend for being born a human being, your share of the inheritance that all the prior generations accumulated.
  • They long for retirement.
  • And that meant, for too many of us, ditching what we loved to do and doing the work of a machine.
  • Thus, because Chad is not good at painting, he cannot paint for a living.
  • In the future, all people will be able to follow their passions without regard for market forces.
  • But we take it largely for granted—and I think that is just fine.
  • In my experience, people who challenge themselves and strive for goals are happier and healthier than those who don't.
  • Economic changes that have long-term positive benefits for society often have short-term negative ones.
  • Citizens in these countries are grateful for any job that pays anything at all, and their primary concern is simply survival.
  • And we got them all, more or less, by trade and the wealth generated by our work doing some function for which we are trained.
  • For computations, we developed processes that required us to perform many intermediate, error-prone steps to achieve an answer.
  • As machines do ever more things that we used to do, we will have more choices for how we spend our time.
  • Poverty will be redefined upward until, for all intents and purposes, poverty as we know it today no longer will exist.
  • After touring the United States for more than nine months in the 1830s, Alexis de Tocqueville returned to his native France and penned the two-volume Democracy in America.
  • This can-do, care-for-our-own spirit permeated the nation.
  • In a speech to the House of Representatives at this same time, Congressman Davy Crockett told the story of getting chewed out by a constituent for voting for a $20,000 emergency relief bill for the homeless in a city just wiped out by a fire.
  • This all began to change in the twentieth century for a variety of reasons.
  • Much change was due to the efforts of William Jennings Bryan, who received the Democratic Party nomination for president three times, in 1896, 1900, and 1908.
  • After this came the Great Depression, which so overwhelmed the social support structures that Americans turned to the government for help and have never turned back.
  • Penalty for vagrancy rose over the years from time served in stocks, to whipping, to branding, and then to death.
  • According to the National Center for Charitable Statistics, more than 1.5 million 501(c) charitable organizations exist in the United States.
  • And that doesn't even count the many other charitable organizations that have not filed for this tax-exempt status with the federal government.
  • Governments create entitlements due to public demand for them, and public demand exists where the need is not filled.
  • The Amish have no need for Social Security.
  • First, it is only useful for factors that are immediately bad for you, not factors that will kill you in ten years.
  • Whether you are for the organic food movement or against it, for genetically modified crops or against them, for corporate farms or seed banks or raw food or anything else, is influenced significantly by your larger view of politics.
  • For instance, if you think large corporation are greedy and evil, then when you read about how large corporations produce low-nutrition food or are putting family farms out of business, you will believe it.
  • If you love "Western medicine" and think all acupuncturists are "quacks," then you are not likely to heed (or even appreciate) your friend's well-meaning efforts to get you to drink your own urine for its health benefits.
  • So our ability to find cause and effect in that—and to really discern fact from fallacy, what's good from what's bad for us—is highly suspect.
  • The Internet will solve for this problem.
  • This will produce extremely specific nutritional information for just you, will add years to your life, and will increase its quality as well.
  • But in the future when we have more and better information, if it turns out that some of these methods are not net gains, we will know that and look elsewhere for solutions.
  • I can go to Sam's Club and buy a twenty-pound bag of rice for $10 and a twenty-pound bag of pinto beans for $13.
  • These foodstuffs alone contain sixty thousand calories, or two thousand calories a day for a month, for a total of $30.
  • Even at the retail price, we could feed all the world's hungry for a billion dollars a day or $365 billion a year.
  • At one point, Tiger Woods got a dime for every box of Wheaties cereal with his photo on it, while the farmer was paid only a nickel for the wheat in that same box—and the farmer still made a profit.
  • Given these agricultural strengths, is there anyone who believes the United States alone couldn't produce an extra $365 billion worth of food, at full retail price, if there were a ready buyer for it?
  • In part, for the following reasons:
  • Then again, don't the fat years make up for all this?
  • Those who argue they should not say there is no way for poor countries to compete with mechanized Western farming and the extremely high yields it produces.
  • Still others argue for a system of government price supports, incentives, and subsidies, as is found in the United States and Europe.
  • Cheap food is great for the poor but bad for the poor farmer.
  • If, on the other hand, they want self-sufficiency in agriculture, then farm subsidies in other countries are bad for them.
  • As nice as it would be for the Japan strategy to work in the developing world, I don't think these countries can count on it.
  • It has a large number of landlocked nations without ports to access the international markets, both for imports and exports.
  • It means we have plenty of room for improvement.
  • Six hundred years after that, we get the windmill for irrigation.
  • To pay for his college education, Borlaug would periodically put his education on hold to find work.
  • Government buildings were converted into silos to hold the abundance, as other countries in the region placed orders for massive amounts of these seeds.
  • Consider for a moment how much Borlaug accomplished with almost no technology.
  • He basically followed old agriculture; he planted a lot of seed and hoped for rain.
  • Plants themselves are pretty inefficient machines, at least from the standpoint of being good food sources for us.
  • The same worked for ever smaller and smaller pea plants.
  • If the farm of the future plugs into the national grid, it will become part of the national food strategy and can be optimized for financial yield for the owners.
  • Can you imagine a better life for a turnip?
  • Both of these are hugely important parts of life, and I know of no one who would trade them away for a pill they swallow in the morning that gives them all their nutrition for the day.
  • Fast food chains optimize for two of them: taste and price, at the expense of nutrition.
  • Other businesses in the food industry—say those pricey health foods you see at fancy grocery stores—optimize for taste and nutrition at the expense of price.
  • And we all know about those that optimize for cost and nutrition but the resulting food tastes awful; I have consumed enough wheatgrass to attest to this.
  • Bonus points are given for resiliency, low water requirements, and appearance.
  • The gene mutated accidently, but once noticed, breeders bred for it.
  • If the first order of genetic modification is deliberately keeping desirable mutations, then this is the second order: creating conditions for such genetic modifications to occur more rapidly.
  • We don't fault, at the first order, Native Americans or Norman Borlaug for cross-breeding better corn or wheat.
  • It affects more than one hundred million people in a hundred countries, kills more than a million people a year, and blinds another half million for good measure.
  • By one count, rice is the principle source of calories for about half the planet.
  • It is not presently available for human consumption.
  • Me ordering a second helping of corn on the cob while dining at the Black Eyed Pea also increases demand for corn, but for doing so, I shouldn't stand trial for murder.
  • If you worry about gas emissions from cows contributing to climate change, lobby for a cow that doesn't have gas.
  • For environmentalist organizations like Greenpeace to be against GMO in all its forms under all conditions does nothing at all to serve them or the constituencies they purport to represent.
  • By taking this "Absolutely no GMOs" stance they completely remove themselves from the debate and as such have no voice in the discussion about what direction to take GM: what are safe testing practices, what factors will we optimize for, and the whole host of questions that face us on this, the eve of a momentous leap forward.
  • Sunscreens for plants protects them from ultraviolet and infrared radiation.
  • As mentioned earlier, farmers suffer when they do not have reliable markets for their goods.
  • There they can see the world commodity prices for their produce in real time.
  • He can sell the certificate, use it as collateral, or hold it for the future.
  • It can sell produce abroad for better rates, give farmers predictability in pricing and flexibility on when to sell, and act as a storehouse against lean times in the future.
  • The United Nations World Food Programme was so inspired by this success that pilot programs for an exchange were launched in twenty-one countries.
  • According to the Center for Systemic Peace's tally, the world went from just twenty democracies in 1946 to ninety-two in 2009.
  • To think of the right to life as somehow different than a right to food is hard for me.
  • It was his view that "the attainment of human rights in the fullest sense cannot be achieved so long as hundreds of millions of poverty-stricken people lack the basic necessities for life."
  • But what if everyone in the nation, rich and poor, were to be mailed a $2,000 food card annually, redeemable at the grocery store for any of several hundred nutritious foods?
  • What good is our high economic standing in the world if we do not use it for good purposes?
  • People who buy organic food, for instance, are not doing it simply because they have more money.
  • As we understand our own genome better, we will know better how to eat in a way that is custom tailored for us.
  • Why would we settle for anything less?
  • But in making the case that war can and will be ended, I have my work cut out for me.
  • For they cut the cheeks of the males with a sword, so that before they receive the nourishment of milk they must learn to endure wounds.
  • While inequalities still exist around the world for women, the tide of history is flowing inexorably in favor of women's rights.
  • We no longer force prisoners to kill each other for our amusement.
  • During World War II, when General Patton got sacked for slapping a soldier whom he regarded as cowardly, the Germans couldn't believe it: Their officers could have soldiers shot without trial!
  • The idea that a person can be a political prisoner, jailed for his beliefs about government, politics, or politicians, is ancient but happily fading.
  • It is no longer legal for people to be secretly arrested, not charged, and left to rot in jail.
  • We have come to expect due process for all.
  • They do this for a variety of reasons, not the least of which is that it often works.
  • As Scottish historian Thomas Carlyle once observed, "Man seldom, or rather never for a length of time and deliberately, rebels against anything that does not deserve rebelling against."
  • We have eliminated debtors prisons, developed the idea of "women and children first," stigmatized child labor, made accommodations for conscientious objectors, widely adopted freedom of speech and the press and freedom of assembly, and a hundred more.
  • It is true that there is much disagreement over how to achieve these ideals, but the fact remains we want a just society for all.
  • Yes, pro football player Michael Vick raised dogs for dogfighting.
  • The point is that he went to jail for it.
  • These documents, products themselves of civilization, try to provide legal protections for the most elemental features of civilization.
  • I do believe some ideals are worth fighting for and, by logical extension, worth killing for—but not many.
  • By declaring a pretty broad range of things worth killing and dying for, we say that each of those is more precious to us than human life.
  • A full-scale, no-holds-barred, nuclear-missiles-raining-down kind of world war would profoundly change the course of human history for all time.
  • It was a way for that generation to ask, Why is there war?
  • Those asking it didn't offer a means for the world to escape from war.
  • War occurs for a very simple reason: To some nations at some time, war is preferable to peace.
  • For these reasons and a hundred more, government should be the smallest unit that is economically and politically viable.
  • And life went on for a decade.
  • So, when I tell you we will see the end of war, if you are over thirty-five years of age, you have every reason to roll your eyes and tell me you have seen this movie before and aren't up for the sequel.
  • You could have the libertarian state, the green state, the clothing-optional state, the state with free public housing for all, the state where puns are outlawed, the state with a two-drink minimum, the fiercely pro-business state—even a state that guarantees free speech but requires that you sing your speech like a show tune.
  • As long as these states were to share a currency, a military, provide for interstate trade, and have a single foreign policy, they could retain the economic advantages of being a large nation while maximizing individual liberty and self-determination.
  • Parents whose children are in the military generally aren't the ones hawkishly pushing for war.
  • Anyone who has a child knows the love and concern parents feel for their offspring.
  • Economic accomplishments replacing military ones for men.
  • This need for competition existed in the past the same as it does in the present.
  • It was the basis for the movie War Games in which the military's computer finally figures out it can't win in a nuclear launch scenario and says of such a war, Strange game.
  • It is hard to see how all-out war turns a profit for anyone in any scenario.
  • That is good for peace.
  • War disrupts this, and people will have little patience for it if there is not an extremely compelling reason for it.
  • I wouldn't give it up for a million dollars, just like I wouldn't sell my left arm for a million dollars.
  • The decline in the economic benefits of war for businesses.
  • In World War II, for instance, the Singer Corporation, of sewing-machine fame, made handguns for the war effort.
  • It is nothing but downside for them.
  • But let's adopt the cynic's view for a moment and assume people in these corporations are chiefly concerned about their financial benefit, not about human suffering, when it comes to war.
  • Are you for it?
  • Your contract goes on for years.
  • That's certainly good for you; more C2000s means more profit.
  • I, for one, would vote for peace.
  • Anything that creates a more intertwined world without compromising autonomy, self-rule, and self-determination is good for peace.
  • Because of this, "two bits" is still slang for twenty-five cents in the United States.
  • When might no longer makes right for the strong, they think twice about preying on the weak.
  • Monarchies—the most prevalent form of government in human history—are disproportionately warlike for a number of reasons.
  • For many of the same reasons as monarchies, dictatorships are inherently warlike.
  • Like kings, dictators have little regard for their subjects.
  • Weakness in neighbors is regarded as an opportunity for conquest or, at least, coercion.
  • No matter why the theory works, is it good for the world that it does.
  • It is unprecedented for so many nations to change their form of government so quickly and peacefully.
  • It took one week for a localized event to escalate to world war.
  • If NATO is responsible for the bulk of the world's military spending and NATO no longer has the stomach for full-on war with modern states, then large-scale war seems less likely.
  • I am saying that for small nations to be economically and politically viable is good news for peace.
  • Once this became known, the question was submitted for arbitration to the king of the Netherlands, who ruled the St. John River to be the border.
  • In a fine Alfred Hitchcock movie called Notorious, the troubled character played by Ingrid Bergman gets very drunk at a party and asks Cary Grant to come for a drive.
  • Some might argue this is not in and of itself a force for peace.
  • First, the web promotes access to information, a huge force for peace.
  • It is the ultimate manifestation of the marketplace of ideas; the more people who proffer their ideas to the world, the better the outcome will be for us all.
  • Public opinion is a powerful force, and if it is generally a force for peace, then the web magnifies it.
  • The web is a force for truth, connectedness, understanding, and communication—all things whose absence can trigger war.
  • While the few may be for war, the many are almost always for peace.
  • For instance, if you have a Facebook friend Abigail in Albania whom you only met once at a rock-paper-scissors competition years ago, you will generally regard Abigail's first-hand account as authoritative, even though you don't really know Abigail all that well.
  • Organizations have encouraged "pen pals for peace" exchanges—but such efforts tend to be limited in scale, and if there is one thing Facebook has, it is scale.
  • And truth is a force for peace.
  • However, practically speaking, it sometimes has a corrupting influence on those whom it empowers to act for the state.
  • They need the Internet, mobile phones, computers, and the other accoutrements of the modern age for the wealth they bring.
  • And this is a force for peace.
  • Everything is up for scrutiny.
  • The National Security Agency even has a website with a section called CryptoKids for "America's Future Codemakers & Codebreakers."
  • They were not, for the most part, military men.
  • Enabling people to communicate in a method with which their governments cannot interfere is a force for freedom and peace.
  • To be successful in the world, for a while both English and one's native tongue will be requirements.
  • As difficult as it might be to "let go," this is good for peace.
  • If it were a person, it still couldn't even order a beer to toast itself for all it has done in such a short time.
  • As education rises, a thousand other things rise with it: income, health, political engagement, and an overall concern for world affairs.
  • However, at present—and for the future as far as we can see—growth in technology outpaces growth in wealth.
  • This is a force for peace, as more and more people have family members in more than one culture and share the interests of more than one nationality.
  • Being educated in the United States has long been a mark of distinction for the elites of other nations.
  • That is a huge change and a force for peace.
  • This is a force for peace—to the extent that as we share the same set of cultural references, we understand each other better.
  • These are forces for peace.
  • But the decline of nationalism is a force for peace.
  • In World War I, in the Battle of the Somme, were over a million casualties, and the action advanced the Allied line just seven miles, or about two deaths for every inch of ground.
  • We seem to have lost our stomach for these kinds of losses.
  • It has increased our desire for peace and our unwillingness to wage war.
  • War as the remedy will fall out of favor for the many reasons I outline above.
  • If they had not, lengthy epics would never have survived oral transmission for centuries.
  • When the final work included extensive praise for the twin gods Castor and Pollux, Scopas complained.
  • Later that evening when Simonides was at a banquet with Scopas, he got word that two young men were outside looking for him.
  • He went to the door but didn't see anyone so went outside to look for them.
  • The implication was that Castor and Pollux, knowing of the imminent collapse of the roof, had come calling with the purpose of saving Simonides's life as their payment for the poem.
  • After staring for two or three minutes, Ambrose turned a page and continued staring.
  • In the second case, the technique of reading without vocalizing allowed for faster reading and a new, visual way to process verbal information—again, a net gain.
  • So it was natural that to earn extra money, Jason and I would buy cool, old cars we found in junkyards for a few hundred dollars apiece.
  • We would then work feverishly on them for months before selling them for slightly less than we had paid.
  • I remember in autumn of '87 thinking it was perfectly reasonable to take the red 1964 Corvair convertible for a test drive, despite its lack of functioning brakes.
  • It also seemed perfectly reasonable to take the 1962 Nash Metropolitan for a spin around the block, even though it didn't have brakes either.
  • The problem for us was always that it is easier to get a car running than it is to fix the brakes.
  • Through all of this, we can end war by making it a worse choice than the status quo for everyone. 3.
  • Having said all of that, government should certainly be watched with a suspicious eye, for it could conceivably delay or derail our ascent to the next golden age.
  • It can take growth for granted and thus overtax.
  • Many technological problems I don't address in this book, but I believe technology will provide solutions for those also.
  • But a world without want and without disease, a world with opportunity for all, is a world where getting along—even when we don't see eye to eye—is going to be a good bit easier.
  • I hope that, after reading this far, you appreciate that for our age, this is no idle boast.
  • We live at a defining moment for humanity, as the compounding effects of technology and civilization reach an inflection point.
  • After all, we live in a universe that looks like it has plenty of room for us to expand into.
  • I look for the day when a billion planets are populated with a billion people each.
  • We were not born in that age that had no word for change.
  • And because it changed for the better, wondrously better, we can proudly claim our part in its forming.
  • But, except for these fleeting memories, if, indeed, they be memories, it all seems very unreal, like a nightmare.
  • Thinking that turn and turn about is fair play, she seized the scissors and cut off one of my curls, and would have cut them all off but for my mother's timely interference.
  • Except for my hands and hair I was not badly burned.
  • But I did not find out the secret for several years.
  • For a long time I regarded my little sister as an intruder.
  • She was, alas, the helpless victim of my outbursts of temper and of affection, so that she became much the worse for wear.
  • We lived a long way from any school for the blind or the deaf, and it seemed unlikely that any one would come to such an out-of-the-way place as Tuscumbia to teach a child who was both deaf and blind.
  • My parents at once determined to take me to Baltimore to see if anything could be done for my eyes.
  • My father made holes in these so that I could string them, and for a long time they kept me happy and contented.
  • Curled up in a corner of the seat I amused myself for hours making funny little holes in bits of cardboard.
  • The beads were sewed in the right place and I could not contain myself for joy; but immediately I lost all interest in the doll.
  • Anger and bitterness had preyed upon me continually for weeks and a deep languor had succeeded this passionate struggle.
  • Running downstairs to my mother I held up my hand and made the letters for doll.
  • In despair she had dropped the subject for the time, only to renew it at the first opportunity.
  • Then my eyes filled with tears; for I realized what I had done, and for the first time I felt repentance and sorrow.
  • I do not remember what they all were; but I do know that mother, father, sister, teacher were among them--words that were to make the world blossom for me, "like Aaron's rod, with flowers."
  • I learned how the sun and the rain make to grow out of the ground every tree that is pleasant to the sight and good for food, how birds build their nests and live and thrive from land to land, how the squirrel, the deer, the lion and every other creature finds food and shelter.
  • I longed for my teacher's return; but above all things I wanted to get down from that tree.
  • I had some difficulty in holding on, for the branches were very large and the bark hurt my hands.
  • I sat there for a long, long time, feeling like a fairy on a rosy cloud.
  • Finally I noticed a very obvious error in the sequence and for an instant I concentrated my attention on the lesson and tried to think how I should have arranged the beads.
  • For a long time I was still--I was not thinking of the beads in my lap, but trying to find a meaning for "love" in the light of this new idea.
  • For a long time I was still--I was not thinking of the beads in my lap, but trying to find a meaning for "love" in the light of this new idea.
  • I quickly learned that each printed word stood for an object, an act, or a quality.
  • My teacher and I played it for hours at a time.
  • I took my "Reader for Beginners" and hunted for the words I knew; when I found them my joy was like that of a game of hide-and-seek.
  • For a long time I had no regular lessons.
  • Added to this she had a wonderful faculty for description.
  • I built dams of pebbles, made islands and lakes, and dug river-beds, all for fun, and never dreamed that I was learning a lesson.
  • These were the keys which unlocked the treasures of the antediluvian world for me.
  • Again, it was the growth of a plant that furnished the text for a lesson.
  • Every one in the family prepared surprises for me, but what pleased me most, Miss Sullivan and I prepared surprises for everybody else.
  • When I learned that there was a gift for each child, I was delighted, and the kind people who had prepared the tree permitted me to hand the presents to the children.
  • In the pleasure of doing this, I did not stop to look at my own gifts; but when I was ready for them, my impatience for the real Christmas to begin almost got beyond control.
  • One morning I left the cage on the window-seat while I went to fetch water for his bath.
  • She was covered with dirt – the remains of mud pies I had compelled her to eat, although she had never shown any special liking for them.
  • This was too much for poor Nancy.
  • When I next saw her she was a formless heap of cotton, which I should not have recognized at all except for the two bead eyes which looked out at me reproachfully.
  • We had scarcely arrived at the Perkins Institution for the Blind when I began to make friends with the little blind children.
  • I could not quite convince myself that there was much world left, for I regarded Boston as the beginning and the end of creation.
  • I also remember the beach, where for the first time I played in the sand.
  • Mr. Endicott told me about the great ships that came sailing by from Boston, bound for Europe.
  • Just before the Perkins Institution closed for the summer, it was arranged that my teacher and I should spend our vacation at Brewster, on Cape Cod, with our dear friend, Mrs. Hopkins.
  • I was delighted, for my mind was full of the prospective joys and of the wonderful stories I had heard about the sea.
  • Suddenly my ecstasy gave place to terror; for my foot struck against a rock and the next instant there was a rush of water over my head.
  • The breakers would swoop back to gather themselves for a mightier leap, and I clung to the rock, tense, fascinated, as I felt the dash and roar of the rushing sea!
  • The tang of the untainted, fresh and free sea air was like a cool, quieting thought, and the shells and pebbles and the seaweed with tiny living creatures attached to it never lost their fascination for me.
  • Later in the morning we made preparations for a barbecue.
  • I did not eat them; but I loved their fragrance and enjoyed hunting for them in the leaves and grass.
  • I had never crossed it until one day Mildred, Miss Sullivan and I were lost in the woods, and wandered for hours without finding a path.
  • I had to feel for the rails with my toe; but I was not afraid, and got on very well, until all at once there came a faint "puff, puff" from the distance.
  • Long after dark we reached home and found the cottage empty; the family were all out hunting for us.
  • Shrunk and cold, As if her veins were sapless and old, And she rose up decrepitly For a last dim look at earth and sea.
  • For one wild, glad moment we snapped the chain that binds us to earth, and joining hands with the winds we felt ourselves divine!
  • In such cases I was forced to repeat the words or sentences, sometimes for hours, until I felt the proper ring in my own voice.
  • It astonished me to find how much easier it is to talk than to spell with the fingers, and I discarded the manual alphabet as a medium of communication on my part; but Miss Sullivan and a few friends still use it in speaking to me, for it is more convenient and more rapid than lip-reading.
  • I had made my homeward journey, talking constantly to Miss Sullivan, not for the sake of talking, but determined to improve to the last minute.
  • Joy deserted my heart, and for a long, long time I lived in doubt, anxiety and fear.
  • A little story called "The Frost King," which I wrote and sent to Mr. Anagnos, of the Perkins Institution for the Blind, was at the root of the trouble.
  • This question surprised me very much; for I had not the faintest recollection of having had it read to me.
  • I spoke up and said, "Oh, no, it is my story, and I have written it for Mr. Anagnos."
  • Accordingly I copied the story and sent it to him for his birthday.
  • He was unusually tender and kind to me, and for a brief space the shadow lifted.
  • One thing is certain, the language was ineffaceably stamped upon my brain, though for a long time no one knew it, least of all myself.
  • I have never played with words again for the mere pleasure of the game.
  • For a long time, when I wrote a letter, even to my mother, I was seized with a sudden feeling of terror, and I would spell the sentences over and over, to make sure that I had not read them in a book.
  • I represent my teacher as saying to me of the golden autumn leaves, "Yes, they are beautiful enough to comfort us for the flight of summer"--an idea direct from Miss Canby's story.
  • For two years he seems to have held the belief that Miss Sullivan and I were innocent.
  • It was with the hope of restoring my self-confidence that she persuaded me to write for the Youth's Companion a brief account of my life.
  • I searched in the washings for a diamond and found it myself--the only true diamond, they said, that was ever found in the United States.
  • I learned for the first time to know an author, to recognize his style as I recognize the clasp of a friend's hand.
  • There it was arranged that I should go to the Wright-Humason School for the Deaf in New York City.
  • In October, 1896, I entered the Cambridge School for Young Ladies, to be prepared for Radcliffe.
  • The thought of going to college took root in my heart and became an earnest desire, which impelled me to enter into competition for a degree with seeing and hearing girls, in the face of the strong opposition of many true and wise friends.
  • My studies for the first year were English history, English literature, German, Latin, arithmetic, Latin composition and occasional themes.
  • For a while, indeed, I had to copy my Latin in braille, so that I could recite with the other girls.
  • In study hours she had to look up new words for me and read and reread notes and books I did not have in raised print.
  • At the Cambridge school, for the first time in my life, I enjoyed the companionship of seeing and hearing girls of my own age.
  • So Mildred stayed with me in Cambridge, and for six happy months we were hardly ever apart.
  • It was thought advisable for me to have my examinations in a room by myself, because the noise of the typewriter might disturb the other girls.
  • In the finals, no one read my work over to me, and in the preliminaries I offered subjects with some of which I was in a measure familiar before my work in the Cambridge school; for at the beginning of the year I had passed examinations in English, History, French and German, which Mr. Gilman gave me from previous Harvard papers.
  • The classes I was in were very large, and it was impossible for the teachers to give me special instruction.
  • As I have said before, I had no aptitude for mathematics; the different points were not explained to me as fully as I wished.
  • At the beginning we had agreed that I should, if necessary, take five years to prepare for college, but at the end of the first year the success of my examinations showed Miss Sullivan, Miss Harbaugh (Mr.
  • I did not like his plan, for I wished to enter college with my class.
  • For eight months Mr. Keith gave me lessons five times a week, in periods of about an hour.
  • In this way my preparation for college went on without interruption.
  • The college authorities did not allow Miss Sullivan to read the examination papers to me; so Mr. Eugene C. Vining, one of the instructors at the Perkins Institution for the Blind, was employed to copy the papers for me in American braille.
  • Both Mr. Keith and I were distressed and full of forebodings for the morrow; but we went over to the college a little before the examination began, and had Mr. Vining explain more fully the American symbols.
  • The struggle for admission to college was ended, and I could now enter Radcliffe whenever I pleased.
  • It was a day full of interest for me.
  • I had looked forward to it for years.
  • It is impossible, I think, to read in one day four or five different books in different languages and treating of widely different subjects, and not lose sight of the very ends for which one reads.
  • You ransack your budget of historic facts much as you would hunt for a bit of silk in a rag-bag.
  • At first I had only a few books in raised print--"readers" for beginners, a collection of stories for children, and a book about the earth called "Our World."
  • Then my teacher went to visit some friends in Boston, leaving me for a short time.
  • We had hurried through the dish-washing after luncheon, in order that we might have as long an afternoon as possible for the story.
  • The hammock was covered with pine needles, for it had not been used while my teacher was away.
  • When her fingers were too tired to spell another word, I had for the first time a keen sense of my deprivations.
  • Circumscribed as my life was in so many ways, I had to look between the covers of books for news of the world that lay outside my own.
  • I did not care especially for "The Pilgrim's Progress," which I think I did not finish, or for the "Fables."
  • My admiration for the Aeneid is not so great, but it is none the less real.
  • One could have traveled round the word many times while I trudged my weary way through the labyrinthine mazes of grammars and dictionaries, or fell into those dreadful pitfalls called examinations, set by schools and colleges for the confusion of those who seek after knowledge.
  • I do not think that the knowledge which I have gained of its history and sources compensates me for the unpleasant details it has forced upon my attention.
  • For a long time the ghosts and witches pursued me even into Dreamland.
  • Anger seized me, my fingers refused to move, I sat rigid for one long moment, the blood throbbing in my temples, and all the hatred that a child can feel concentrated in my heart.
  • I remember that I was sorry for them.
  • The little songs and the sonnets have a meaning for me as fresh and wonderful as the dramas.
  • But, with all my love for Shakespeare, it is often weary work to read all the meanings into his lines which critics and commentators have given them.
  • When he speaks, it is not to impress others, but because his heart would burst if he did not find an outlet for the thoughts that burn in his soul.
  • I like Scott for his freshness, dash and large honesty.
  • Our hearts beat fast, and our hands trembled with excitement, not fear, for we had the hearts of vikings, and we knew that our skipper was master of the situation.
  • As they passed us, the large craft and the gunboats in the harbour saluted and the seamen shouted applause for the master of the only little sail-boat that ventured out into the storm.
  • As soon as my examinations were over, Miss Sullivan and I hastened to this green nook, where we have a little cottage on one of the three lakes for which Wrentham is famous.
  • In the country one sees only Nature's fair works, and one's soul is not saddened by the cruel struggle for mere existence that goes on in the crowded city.
  • Once while I was calling on him in Boston he acted the most striking parts of "The Rivals" for me.
  • The reception-room where we sat served for a stage.
  • "Yes," he replied, "the Charles has many dear associations for me."
  • He made me sit in his armchair, while he brought different interesting things for me to examine, and at his request I recited "The Chambered Nautilus," which was then my favorite poem.
  • I have known him since I was eight, and my love for him has increased with my years.
  • His dominating passion is his love for children.
  • When I find my work particularly difficult and discouraging, she writes me letters that make me feel glad and brave; for she is one of those from whom we learn that one painful duty fulfilled makes the next plainer and easier.
  • Those are passages of which one would ask for more.
  • One cause for the excellence of her letters is the great number of them.
  • Many of those written before 1892 were published in the reports of the Perkins Institution for the Blind.
  • Except for two or three important letters of 1901, these selections cease with the year 1900.
  • They had a pretty Christmas-tree, and there were many pretty presents on it for little children.
  • I had many lovely things for Christmas.
  • Aunt gave me a trunk for Nancy and clothes.
  • Mother will make ice-cream for dinner, we will have ice-cream and cake for dinner.
  • I am sorry for him.
  • He is picking strawberries for dinner.
  • Toward the end of May Mrs. Keller, Helen, and Miss Sullivan started for Boston.
  • I hope she will not eat too many of the delicious fruit for they will make her very ill.
  • Then we rode for a long time to see all the beautiful things in West Newton.
  • People did not like to go to church with the king; but they did like to build very nice little churches for themselves.
  • I am sorry for them because they cried much.
  • Poor people were not happy for their hearts were full of sad thoughts because they did not know much about America.
  • Every day the people went upon deck to look out for land.
  • One day there was a great shout on the ship for the people saw the land and they were full of joy because they had reached a new country safely.
  • Are you very sad for Edith and me?
  • I named it Annie, for my teacher.
  • Bells are used for many purposes.
  • They tell us when breakfast is ready, when to go to school, when it is time for church, and when there is a fire.
  • Cedric is my little boy, he is named for Lord Fauntleroy.
  • I thank you very much for the beautiful story about Lord Fauntleroy, and so does teacher.
  • I will tell you what he did, and I think you will feel very sorry for the little child.
  • During the summer Miss Sullivan was away from Helen for three months and a half, the first separation of teacher and pupil.
  • Only once afterward in fifteen years was their constant companionship broken for more than a few days at a time.
  • Her little brown mate has flown away with the other birds; but Annie is not sad, for she likes to stay with me.
  • Give them many sweet kisses for me.
  • We had some of them for supper, and they were very nice.
  • I think mother will be glad to make the dress for you, and when you wear it you will look as pretty as a rose.
  • I wish you could be here to play three little squirrels, and two gentle doves, and to make a pretty nest for a dear little robin.
  • Give father and mother a great deal of love and many hugs and kisses for me.
  • Thank you very much for the nice gift.
  • I should like to call her Lioness, for your dog.
  • "Browns" is a lapse of the pencil for "brown eyes."
  • When I walk out in my garden I cannot see the beautiful flowers but I know that they are all around me; for is not the air sweet with their fragrance?
  • I am very sorry for them.
  • Give her many kisses for me.
  • I hope you will like your watch-case, for it made me very happy to make it for you.
  • If it is too warm in Tuscumbia for little sister to wear her pretty mittens, she can keep them because her sister made them for her.
  • I thank my dear kind father for sending me some money, to buy gifts for my friends.
  • Teacher and I are the only babies left for Mrs. Hopkins to care for.
  • Teacher has been sick in bed for many days.
  • I thank you very much for them.
  • With loving greeting to the little cousins, and Mrs. Hale and a sweet kiss for yourself, From your little friend, HELEN A. KELLER.
  • They do not make honey for us, like the bees, but many of them are as beautiful as the flowers they light upon, and they always delight the hearts of little children.
  • They live a gay life, flitting from flower to flower, sipping the drops of honeydew, without a thought for the morrow.
  • Now I must tell my gentle poet good-bye, for I have a letter to write home before I go to bed.
  • I can hardly wait for June to come I am so eager to speak to her and to my precious little sister.
  • I will tell you all about it, for I remember my thoughts perfectly.
  • I did not know then what she was doing, for I was quite ignorant of all things.
  • This good and happy news delighted me exceedingly, for then I was sure that I should learn also.
  • When the Perkins Institution closed for the summer, Helen and Miss Sullivan went to Tuscumbia.
  • I was very, very sad to part with all of my friends in Boston, but I was so eager to see my baby sister I could hardly wait for the train to take me home.
  • But I tried very hard to be patient for teacher's sake.
  • Why does the dear Father in heaven think it best for us to have very great sorrow sometimes?
  • I should like very much to see you to-day Is the sun very hot in Boston now? this afternoon if it is cool enough I shall take Mildred for a ride on my donkey.
  • It has followed me across the ocean and found me in this magnificent great city which I should like to tell you all about if I could take time for it and make my letter long enough.
  • We like to think that the sunshine and the winds and the trees are able to love in some way of their own, for it would make us know that they were happy if we knew that they could love.
  • And so He loved men Himself and though they were very cruel to Him and at last killed Him, He was willing to die for them because He loved them so.
  • The tongue is so serviceable a member (taking all sorts of shapes, just as is wanted),--the teeth, the lips, the roof of the mouth, all ready to help, and so heap up the sound of the voice into the solid bits which we call consonants, and make room for the curiously shaped breathings which we call vowels!
  • Perhaps people would be better in a great many ways, for they could not fight as they do now.
  • Everybody will feel an interest in dear little Helen; everybody will want to do something for her; and, if she becomes an ancient, gray-haired woman, she is still sure of being thoughtfully cared for.
  • My Dear, Kind Friends:--I thank you very, very much for naming your beautiful new ship for me.
  • We surprised our dear friends, however, for they did not expect us Saturday; but when the bell rung Miss Marrett guessed who was at the door, and Mrs. Hopkins jumped up from the breakfast table and ran to the door to meet us; she was indeed much astonished to see us.
  • Tell Mildred she must be kind to them for my sake.
  • If I were with you to-day I would give you eighty-three kisses, one for each year you have lived.
  • I received the letter which you wrote to me last summer, and I thank you for it.
  • I can hardly wait for the fun to begin!
  • I hope your Christmas Day will be a very happy one and that the New Year will be full of brightness and joy for you and every one.
  • I thank thee for all thy good wishes, and wish thee as many.
  • For a while he was kept in the general hospital at Allegheny.
  • From here he was to be sent to an almshouse, for at that time there was no other place for him in Pennsylvania.
  • My Dear Friend, Mr. Krehl:--I have just heard, through Mr. Wade, of your kind offer to buy me a gentle dog, and I want to thank you for the kind thought.
  • I am eager to cross the ocean, for I want to see my English friends and their good and wise queen.
  • They are going to send me some money for a poor little deaf and dumb and blind child.
  • I am not blind any longer, for I see with your eyes and hear with your ears.
  • It is very beautiful to think that people far away in England feel sorry for a little helpless child in America.
  • I can hardly wait patiently for the time to come when I shall see my dear English friends, and their beautiful island home.
  • It is very beautiful to think that you can tell so many people of the heavenly Father's tender love for all His children even when they are not gentle and noble as He wishes them to be.
  • Before a teacher was found for Tommy and while he was still in the care of Helen and Miss Sullivan, a reception was held for him at the kindergarten.
  • I hope that good people will continue to work for Tommy until his fund is completed, and education has brought light and music into his little life.
  • Then I knew that you had not forgotten the dear little child, for the gift brought with it the thought of tender sympathy.
  • When I came home teacher read to me "The School-boy," for it is not in our print.
  • Yesterday I thought for the first time what a beautiful thing motion was, and it seemed to me that everything was trying to get near to God, does it seem that way to you?
  • Sometime they may visit a school for the blind.
  • In May, 1892, Helen gave a tea in aid of the kindergarten for the blind.
  • The tea brought more than two thousand dollars for the blind children.
  • I shall be so disappointed if my little plans fail, because I have wanted for a long time to do something for the poor little ones who are waiting to enter the kindergarten.
  • Please let me know what you think about the house, and try to forgive me for troubling you so much.
  • The preparations for my tea are nearly completed, and I am looking forward joyfully to the event.
  • Kind people will not disappoint me, when they know that I plead for helpless little children who live in darkness and ignorance.
  • I thank you very much for your photograph.
  • You could not read Braille; for it is written in dots, not at all like ordinary letters.
  • What was the book you sent me for my birthday?
  • It was a lovely cape crocheted, for me, by an old gentleman, seventy-five years of age.
  • And every stitch, he writes, represents a kind wish for my health and happiness.
  • I have loved you for a long time, but I did not think you had ever heard of me until your sweet message came.
  • Please kiss your dear little baby for me, and tell her I have a little brother nearly sixteen months old.
  • Before I left Boston, I was asked to write a sketch of my life for the Youth's Companion.
  • TO MRS. KATE ADAMS KELLER South Boston, April 13, 1893. ...Teacher, Mrs. Pratt and I very unexpectedly decided to take a journey with dear Dr. Bell Mr. Westervelt, a gentleman whom father met in Washington, has a school for the deaf in Rochester.
  • But of course, it is not alone for their bright colors that we love the flowers....
  • When the reception was over we went back to the hotel and teacher slept quite unconscious of the surprise which was in store for her.
  • The next morning the sun rose bright and warm, and we got up quickly for our hearts were full of pleasant expectation....
  • In a prefatory note which Miss Sullivan wrote for St. Nicholas, she says that people frequently said to her, "Helen sees more with her fingers than we do with our eyes."
  • Japan must indeed be a paradise for children to judge from the great number of playthings which are manufactured there.
  • My mother and several of my friends said they would help me with the establishment of a public library.
  • I did not like to trouble them while I was trying to get money for poor little Tommy, for of course it was more important that he should be educated than that my people should have books to read. 4.
  • TO MISS CAROLINE DERBY Hulton, Penn., December 28, 1893. ...Please thank dear Miss Derby for me for the pretty shield which she sent me.
  • I shall prize the little book always, not only for its own value; but because of its associations with you.
  • I had known about them for a long time; but I had never thought that I should see them, and talk to them; and I can scarcely realize now that this great pleasure has been mine!
  • When the Wright-Humason School closed for the summer, Miss Sullivan and Helen went South.
  • He said no, it would not be called for about fifteen minutes; so we sat down to wait; but in a moment the man came back and asked Teacher if we would like to go to the train at once.
  • He has lately had several books printed in England for me, "Old Mortality," "The Castle of Otranto" and "King of No-land."...
  • Teacher seems to feel benefitted by the change too; for she is already beginning to look like her dear old self.
  • But, however this may be, I cannot now write the letter which has lain in my thought for you so long.
  • On the first of October Miss Keller entered the Cambridge School for Young Ladies, of which Mr. Arthur Gilman is Principal.
  • The "examinations" mentioned in this letter were merely tests given in the school, but as they were old Harvard papers, it is evident that in some subjects Miss Keller was already fairly well prepared for Radcliffe.
  • I do wish you could come and see for yourself what a beautiful school it is!
  • They were the entrance examinations for Harvard College; so I feel pleased to think I could pass them.
  • This year is going to be a very busy one for Teacher and myself.
  • But it is harder for Teacher than it is for me because the strain on her poor eyes is so great, and I cannot help worrying about them.
  • All the time I was preparing for the great ordeal, I could not suppress an inward fear and trembling lest I should fail, and now it is an unspeakable relief to know that I have passed the examinations with credit.
  • Indeed, I feel that the success is hers more than mine; for she is my constant inspiration....
  • Every morning, before lesson-time, we all go out to the steep hill on the northern shore of the lake near the house, and coast for an hour or so.
  • I ride with a divided skirt, and so does my teacher; but it would be easier for her to mount a man's wheel than for me; so, if it could be arranged to have the ladies' seat behind, I think it would be better....
  • It is almost no effort for me to row around the lake, no matter how heavy the load may be.
  • He says he prefers to come here for the present.
  • It is like a beautiful maiden, who always lived in a palace, surrounded by a magnificent court; while the "Iliad" is like a splendid youth, who has had the earth for his playground.
  • Do you know, I cannot help feeling sorry for these trees with all their fashionable airs?
  • Oh my! if they only realized their limitations, they would flee for their lives to the woods and fields.
  • You will think I'm pining away for my beloved Wrentham, which is true in one sense and not in another.
  • I think Mr. Keith is a wonderful teacher, and I feel very grateful to him for having made me see the beauty of Mathematics.
  • She had previously obtained permission from General Loring, Supt. of the Museum, for me to touch the statues, especially those which represented my old friends in the "Iliad" and "Aeneid."
  • It gives me great pleasure to hear how much is being done for the deaf-blind.
  • As to the two-handed alphabet, I think it is much easier for those who have sight than the manual alphabet; for most of the letters look like the large capitals in books; but I think when it comes to teaching a deaf-blind person to spell, the manual alphabet is much more convenient, and less conspicuous....
  • I feel as if I ought to give up the idea of going to college altogether: for not all the knowledge in the world could make me happy, if obtained at such a cost.
  • I would like so much to show him in some way how deeply I appreciate all that he is doing for me, and I cannot think of anything better to do.
  • She has not had a vacation for twelve years, think of it, and all that time she has been the sunshine of my life.
  • Now her eyes are troubling her a great deal, and we all think she ought to be relieved, for a while, of every care and responsibility.
  • They would not allow Teacher to read any of the papers to me; so the papers were copied for me in braille.
  • Of course they did not realize how difficult and perplexing they were making the examinations for me.
  • TO MRS. SAMUEL RICHARD FULLER Wrentham, October 20, 1899. ...I suppose it is time for me to tell you something about our plans for the winter.
  • She showed me how very foolish it would be for me to pursue a four years' course of study at Radcliffe, simply to be like other girls, when I might better be cultivating whatever ability I had for writing.
  • But, while we were discussing plans for the winter, a suggestion which Dr. Hale had made long ago flashed across Teacher's mind--that I might take courses somewhat like those offered at Radcliffe, under the instruction of the professors in these courses.
  • How I passed my Entrance Examinations for Radcliffe College.
  • On the 29th and 30th of June, 1899, I took my examinations for Radcliffe College.
  • The college authorities would not permit Miss Sullivan to read the examination papers to me; so Mr. Eugene C. Vining, one of the instructors at the Perkins Institution for the Blind, was employed to copy the papers for me in braille.
  • Dear Frau Grote learned the manual alphabet, and used to teach me herself; but this was in private lessons, which were paid for by my friends.
  • TO MISS MILDRED KELLER 138 Brattle Street, Cambridge, November 26, 1899. ...At last we are settled for the winter, and our work is going smoothly.
  • After the service he asked Mr. Warren, the organist to play for me.
  • Is it possible for the College to accommodate itself to these unprecedented conditions, so as to enable me to pursue my studies at Radcliffe?
  • TO MR. JOHN HITZ 14 Coolidge Ave., Cambridge, Nov. 26, 1900. ...--has already communicated with you in regard to her and my plan of establishing an institution for deaf and blind children.
  • I considered this suggestion carefully, then I told Mr. Rhoades that I should be proud and glad to have wise friends to whom I could always turn for advice in all important matters.
  • Mrs. Hutton had already written to mother, asking her to telegraph if she was willing for me to have other advisers besides herself and Teacher.
  • Funds were to be raised for the teachers' lodgings and also for their salaries.
  • We clapped our hands and shouted;--went away beaming with pleasure, and Teacher and I felt more light of heart than we had for sometime.
  • If you doubt it, you'd better come and see for yourself.
  • Yes, I am taking the regular college course for a degree.
  • Her parents are very anxious indeed to find a teacher for her.
  • I also know a child at the Institution for the Deaf in Mississippi.
  • I was much surprised to hear all this; for I judged from your letters that Katie was a very precocious girl....
  • He is a great, strong boy now, and he will soon need a man to take care of him; he is really too big for a lady to manage.
  • I have had a letter from Mrs. Thaw with regard to the possibility of doing something for these children.
  • TO MR. WILLIAM WADE Cambridge, February 2, 1901. ...By the way, have you any specimens of English braille especially printed for those who have lost their sight late in life or have fingers hardened by long toil, so that their touch is less sensitive than that of other blind people?
  • It is evident that the blind should have a good magazine, not a special magazine for the blind, but one of our best monthlies, printed in embossed letters.
  • To be able to read for one's self what is being willed, thought and done in the world--the world in whose joys and sorrows, failures and successes one feels the keenest interest--that would indeed be a happiness too deep for words.
  • Surely there are hearts and hands ever ready to make it possible for generous intentions to be wrought into noble deeds.
  • When the Indiana visited Halifax, we were invited to go on board, and she sent her own launch for us.
  • I will ask Dr. Hale to lend me the letter, so that I can make a copy of it for you.
  • But it is to be remembered that Miss Keller has written many things in her autobiography for the fun of writing them, and the disillusion, which the writer of the editorial took seriously, is in great part humorous.
  • I ought to apologize to the reader and to Miss Keller for presuming to say what her subject matter is worth, but one more explanation is necessary.
  • Her good friend, Mr. William Wade, had a complete braille copy made for her from the magazine proofs.
  • Then for the first time she had her whole manuscript under her finger at once.
  • Indeed, at one time it was believed that the best way for them to communicate was through systematized gestures, the sign language invented by the Abbe de l'Epee.
  • Her success has been complete, for in trying to be like other people she has come most fully to be herself.
  • Her whimsical and adventuresome spirit puts her so much on her mettle that she makes rather a poor subject for the psychological experimenter.
  • In the same way her response to music is in part sympathetic, although she enjoys it for its own sake.
  • Her enjoyment of music, however, is very genuine, for she has a tactile recognition of sound when the waves of air beat against her.
  • When the organ was played for her in St. Bartholomew's, the whole building shook with the great pedal notes, but that does not altogether account for what she felt and enjoyed.
  • She has practised no single constructive craft which would call for the use of her hands.
  • The most convenient print for the blind is braille, which has several variations, too many, indeed--English, American, New York Point.
  • Books for the blind are very limited in number.
  • They cost a great deal to publish and they have not a large enough sale to make them profitable to the publisher; but there are several institutions with special funds to pay for embossed books.
  • When a passage interests her, or she needs to remember it for some future use, she flutters it off swiftly on the fingers of her right hand.
  • For Miss Keller to spell a sentence in the manual alphabet impresses it on her mind just as we learn a thing from having heard it many times and can call back the memory of its sound.
  • If she had any conception, there is no way of discovering it now; for she cannot remember, and obviously there was no record at the time.
  • Her sense of time is excellent, but whether it would have developed as a special faculty cannot be known, for she has had a watch since she was seven years old.
  • It should be said that any double-case watch with the crystal removed serves well enough for a blind person whose touch is sufficiently delicate to feel the position of the hands and not disturb or injure them.
  • Some time ago, when a policeman shot dead her dog, a dearly loved daily companion, she found in her forgiving heart no condemnation for the man; she only said, 'If he had only known what a good dog she was, he wouldn't have shot her.'
  • Once when some one asked her to define "love," she replied, "Why, bless you, that is easy; it is what everybody feels for everybody else."
  • Often, however, her sober ideas are not to be laughed at, for her earnestness carries her listeners with her.
  • Both Mr. Gilman and Mr. Keith, the teachers who prepared her for college, were struck by her power of constructive reasoning; and she was excellent in pure mathematics, though she seems never to have enjoyed it much.
  • The names of Laura Bridgman and Helen Keller will always be linked together, and it is necessary to understand what Dr. Howe did for his pupil before one comes to an account of Miss Sullivan's work.
  • For Dr. Howe is the great pioneer on whose work that of Miss Sullivan and other teachers of the deaf-blind immediately depends.
  • As head of the Perkins Institution for the Blind in Boston, he heard of Laura Bridgman and had her brought to the Institution on October 4, 1837.
  • His success convinced him that language can be conveyed through type to the mind of the blind-deaf child, who, before education, is in the state of the baby who has not learned to prattle; indeed, is in a much worse state, for the brain has grown in years without natural nourishment.
  • After Laura's education had progressed for two months with the use only of raised letters, Dr. Howe sent one of his teachers to learn the manual alphabet from a deaf-mute.
  • Then it is amusing to read of the elaborate preparation I underwent to fit me for the great task my friends entrusted to me.
  • For this report Miss Sullivan prepared, in reluctant compliance with the request of Mr. Anagnos, an account of her work.
  • Have you seen the paper I wrote for the 'report'?
  • Then the educators all over the world said their say and for the most part did not help matters.
  • For this report Miss Sullivan wrote the fullest and largest account she has ever written; and in this report appeared the "Frost King," which is discussed fully in a later chapter.
  • She has finally reached the goal for which she strove so bravely.
  • When Captain Keller applied to the director for a teacher, Mr. Anagnos recommended her.
  • The only time she had to prepare herself for the work with her pupil was from August, 1886, when Captain Keller wrote, to February, 1887.
  • We gladly allowed her to use freely our library of embossed books, our collection of stuffed animals, sea-shells, models of flowers and plants, and the rest of our apparatus for instructing the blind through the sense of touch.
  • That remains for her to do at another time.
  • I found Mrs. Keller and Mr. James Keller waiting for me.
  • They said somebody had met every train for two days.
  • I made her understand, by pointing to a trunk in the hall and to myself and nodding my head, that I had a trunk, and then made the sign that she had used for eating, and nodded again.
  • Her hands are in everything; but nothing holds her attention for long.
  • She made the "c-a," then stopped and thought, and making the sign for eating and pointing downward she pushed me toward the door, meaning that I must go downstairs for some cake.
  • She follows with her hands every motion you make, and she knew that I was looking for the doll.
  • I made the signs that she had used when she wished me to go for the cake, and pushed her toward the door.
  • She amused herself with the beads until dinner-time, bringing the strings to me now and then for my approval.
  • She kept this up for half an hour, then she got up to see what I was doing.
  • Every thwarted desire was the signal for a passionate outburst, and as she grew older and stronger, these tempests became more violent.
  • So they were all willing to give in for the sake of peace.
  • She accepted everything I did for her as a matter of course, and refused to be caressed, and there was no way of appealing to her affection or sympathy or childish love of approbation.
  • I told her that in my opinion the child ought to be separated from the family for a few weeks at least--that she must learn to depend on and obey me before I could make any headway.
  • I hurried the preparations for our departure as much as possible, and here we are.
  • The struggle lasted for nearly two hours.
  • But fortunately for us both, I am a little stronger, and quite as obstinate when I set out.
  • She kept going to the door, as if she expected some one, and every now and then she would touch her cheek, which is her sign for her mother, and shake her head sadly.
  • I don't think she has any special tenderness for them--I have never seen her caress them; but she dresses and undresses them many times during the day and handles them exactly as she has seen her mother and the nurse handle her baby sister.
  • This lasted for several minutes; then this mood passed, and Nancy was thrown ruthlessly on the floor and pushed to one side, while a large, pink-cheeked, fuzzy-haired member of the family received the little mother's undivided attention.
  • No doubt they were signs for the different members of the family at Ivy Green.
  • Mr. Wilson, a teacher at Florence, and a friend of the Kellers', studied at Harvard the summer before and went to the Perkins Institution to learn if anything could be done for his friend's child.
  • My heart is singing for joy this morning.
  • She lets me kiss her now, and when she is in a particularly gentle mood, she will sit in my lap for a minute or two; but she does not return my caresses.
  • When she spells "milk," she points to the mug, and when she spells "mug," she makes the sign for pouring or drinking, which shows that she has confused the words.
  • It was evident that she recognized the dog; for she put her arms round her neck and squeezed her.
  • Of course, it is hard for them.
  • She noticed this at once and made the sign for it.
  • I think she understood perfectly well; for she slapped her hand two or three times and shook her head.
  • After spelling half the words, she stopped suddenly, as if a thought had flashed into her mind, and felt for the napkin.
  • I took this for a promise that if I gave her some cake she would be a good girl.
  • At ten we come in and string beads for a few minutes.
  • She learned to knit very quickly, and is making a wash-cloth for her mother.
  • But I am always glad when this work is over for the day.
  • We visit the horses and mules in their stalls and hunt for eggs and feed the turkeys.
  • Mrs. Keller wanted to get a nurse for her, but I concluded I'd rather be her nurse than look after a stupid, lazy negress.
  • This morning, while she was washing, she wanted to know the name for "water."
  • Then she dropped on the ground and asked for its name and pointed to the pump and the trellis, and suddenly turning round she asked for my name.
  • She has flitted from object to object, asking the name of everything and kissing me for very gladness.
  • Last night when I got in bed, she stole into my arms of her own accord and kissed me for the first time, and I thought my heart would burst, so full was it of joy.
  • Wherever we go, she asks eagerly for the names of things she has not learned at home.
  • She is anxious for her friends to spell, and eager to teach the letters to every one she meets.
  • I HAVE DECIDED NOT TO TRY TO HAVE REGULAR LESSONS FOR THE PRESENT.
  • I shall do all I can to interest and stimulate it, and wait for results.
  • I hide something, a ball or a spool, and we hunt for it.
  • Again, when I hid the spool, she looked for it in a little box not more than an inch long; and she very soon gave up the search.
  • I used my little stock of beads, cards and straws at first because I didn't know what else to do; but the need for them is past, for the present at any rate.
  • Let him go and come freely, let him touch real things and combine his impressions for himself, instead of sitting indoors at a little round table, while a sweet-voiced teacher suggests that he build a stone wall with his wooden blocks, or make a rainbow out of strips of coloured paper, or plant straw trees in bead flower-pots.
  • She had signs for SMALL and LARGE long before I came to her.
  • The other day I substituted the words SMALL and LARGE for these signs, and she at once adopted the words and discarded the signs.
  • This morning she used the conjunction AND for the first time.
  • After she had played with them a little while, the thought occurred to her that the puppies must have special names, like people, and she asked for the name of each pup.
  • She evidently understood that VERY was the name of the new thing that had come into her head; for all the way back to the house she used the word VERY correctly.
  • Every new word Helen learns seems to carry with it necessity for many more.
  • If only I were better fitted for the great task!
  • When her fingers light upon words she knows, she fairly screams with pleasure and hugs and kisses me for joy, especially if she thinks she has me beaten.
  • She is always ready for a lesson, and the eagerness with which she absorbs ideas is very delightful.
  • She went through these motions several times, mimicking every movement, then she stood very still for a moment with a troubled look on her face, which suddenly cleared, and she spelled, "Good Helen," and wreathed her face in a very large, artificial smile.
  • And right here I want to say something which is for your ears alone.
  • She has a perfect mania for counting.
  • This suggestion didn't please her, however; for she replied, "No. Nancy is very sick."
  • Helen held some worsted for me last night while I wound it.
  • Her every waking moment is spent in the endeavour to satisfy her innate desire for knowledge, and her mind works so incessantly that we have feared for her health.
  • She kept this up for nearly an hour.
  • She is always ready to share whatever she has with those about her, often keeping but very little for herself.
  • She stood very still for a moment, and it was evident from her face, which was flushed and troubled, that a struggle was going on in her mind.
  • She knew that I was much troubled, and would have liked to stay near me; but I thought it best for her to sit by herself.
  • At the dinner-table she was greatly disturbed because I didn't eat, and suggested that "Cook make tea for teacher."
  • Helen's pencil-writing is excellent, as you will see from the enclosed letter, which she wrote for her own amusement.
  • We had Helen's picture taken with a fuzzy, red-eyed little poodle, who got himself into my lady's good graces by tricks and cunning devices known only to dogs with an instinct for getting what they want.
  • If it was natural for Helen to ask such questions, it was my duty to answer them.
  • There isn't a living soul in this part of the world to whom I can go for advice in this, or indeed, in any other educational difficulty.
  • The only thing for me to do in a perplexity is to go ahead, and learn by making mistakes.
  • "Tuscumbia" is the Indian for "Great Spring."
  • Then she got up and stood very still, as if listening with her feet for Mildred's "thump, thump."
  • This was too much for Helen.
  • I do not wonder you were surprised to hear that I was going to write something for the report.
  • We sat in the hammock; but there was no rest for the weary there.
  • I couldn't help laughing, for at that very moment Viney was shouting at the top of her voice:
  • My account for the report is finished and sent off.
  • Her passion for writing letters and putting her thoughts upon paper grows more intense.
  • "Lesson" is too formal for the continuous daily work.
  • For the first lesson I had two balls, one made of worsted, large and soft, the other a bullet.
  • Taking the bullet she made her habitual sign for SMALL--that is, by pinching a little bit of the skin of one hand.
  • Then she took the other ball and made her sign for LARGE by spreading both hands over it.
  • I substituted the adjectives LARGE and SMALL for those signs.
  • Just then I had no sentences in raised letters which she could understand; but she would sit for hours feeling each word in her book.
  • About this time I sent a list of the words she knew to Mr. Anagnos, and he very kindly had them printed for her.
  • Day after day she moved her pencil in the same tracks along the grooved paper, never for a moment expressing the least impatience or sense of fatigue.
  • For a whole evening she will sit at the table writing whatever comes into her busy brain; and I seldom find any difficulty in reading what she has written.
  • Helen has learned to tell the time at last, and her father is going to give her a watch for Christmas.
  • If I did, there would be no opportunity for the play of fancy.
  • I do not think anyone can read, or talk for that matter, until he forgets words and sentences in the technical sense.
  • Helen's dependence on me for almost everything makes me strong and glad.
  • One little chap, about seven, was persuaded to learn the letters, and he spelled his name for Helen.
  • She objected to its miscellaneous fruits and began to remove them, evidently thinking they were all meant for her.
  • It was not difficult, however, to make her understand that there was a present for each child, and to her great delight she was permitted to hand the gifts to the children.
  • There were several presents for herself.
  • For weeks we did nothing but talk and read and tell each other stories about Christmas.
  • I SEE NO SENSE IN "FAKING" CONVERSATION FOR THE SAKE OF TEACHING LANGUAGE.
  • TALK SHOULD BE NATURAL AND HAVE FOR ITS OBJECT AN EXCHANGE OF IDEAS.
  • I HAVE TRIED FROM THE BEGINNING TO TALK NATURALLY TO HELEN AND TO TEACH HER TO TELL ME ONLY THINGS THAT INTEREST HER AND ASK QUESTIONS ONLY FOR THE SAKE OF FINDING OUT WHAT SHE WANTS TO KNOW.
  • Of course, she hung her stocking--two of them lest Santa Claus should forget one, and she lay awake for a long time and got up two or three times to see if anything had happened.
  • The ring you sent her was in the toe of the stocking, and when I told her you gave it to Santa Claus for her, she said, "I do love Mrs. Hopkins."
  • She had a trunk and clothes for Nancy, and her comment was, "Now Nancy will go to party."
  • Helen asked, and added, "I will eat grandfather for dinner."
  • This morning she asked me the meaning of "carpenter," and the question furnished the text for the day's lesson.
  • Why, for instance, does he take the trouble to ascribe motives to me that I never dreamed of?
  • When we reached the shop, I asked her how much she would pay for Nancy's hat.
  • I got up, washed my face and hands, combed my hair, picked three dew violets for Teacher and ate my breakfast.
  • Mrs. Graves is making short dresses for Natalie.
  • When it was time for the church service to begin, she was in such a state of excitement that I thought it best to take her away; but Captain Keller said, "No, she will be all right."
  • Do you realize that this is the last letter I shall write to you for a long, long time?
  • But I haven't time to write all the pleasant things people said--they would make a very large book, and the kind things they did for us would fill another volume.
  • We visited a little school for the deaf.
  • I was incredulous when he first told me the secret.
  • It seemed all so mechanical and difficult, my heart ached for the poor little children.
  • Indeed, her whole body is so finely organized that she seems to use it as a medium for bringing herself into closer relations with her fellow creatures.
  • It is impossible for any one with whom Helen is conversing to be particularly happy or sad, and withhold the knowledge of this fact from her.
  • She smelt of the flowers, but showed no desire to pluck them; and, when I gathered a few for her, she refused to have them pinned on her dress.
  • When her attention was drawn to a marble slab inscribed with the name FLORENCE in relief, she dropped upon the ground as though looking for something, then turned to me with a face full of trouble, and asked, "Were is poor little Florence?"
  • Turning to my friend, she asked, "Did you cry loud for poor little Florence?"
  • Helen had been given a bed and carriage for her dolls, which she had received and used like any other gift.
  • It is pleasant, too, to note her thoughtfulness for little children, and her readiness to yield to their whims.
  • She has a very sociable disposition, and delights in the companionship of those who can follow the rapid motions of her fingers; but if left alone she will amuse herself for hours at a time with her knitting or sewing.
  • In these early lessons I encouraged her in the use of different forms of expression for conveying the same idea.
  • But PERHAPS his mother sent him to a store to buy something for dinner.
  • I will make pretty clothes for Nancy and Adeline and Allie.
  • James killed snipes for breakfast.
  • I ate very small fish for supper.
  • She likes to skip and play, for she is happy when the sun is bright and warm.
  • I watched her for some time as she moved about, trying to take long strides in order to carry out the idea I had given her of a camel's gait.
  • During the next two years neither Mr. Anagnos, who was in Europe for a year, nor Miss Sullivan wrote anything about Helen Keller for publication.
  • In 1892 appeared the Perkins Institution report for 1891, containing a full account of Helen Keller, including many of her letters, exercises, and compositions.
  • This morning Helen was reading for the first time Bryant's poem, "Oh, mother of a mighty race!"
  • She even enters into the spirit of battle; she says, "I think it is right for men to fight against wrongs and tyrants."
  • She was quiet for a moment, and then asked, with spirit: How do you know that I cannot understand?
  • After a time I became discouraged, and told her I was afraid she could not make it stand, but that I would build it for her; but she did not approve of this plan.
  • In selecting books for Helen to read, I have never chosen them with reference to her deafness and blindness.
  • She had learned the printed letters, and for some time had amused herself by making simple sentences, using slips on which the words were printed in raised letters; but these sentences had no special relation to one another.
  • She often reads for two or three hours in succession, and then lays aside her book reluctantly.
  • I have found it a convenient medium of communicating with Helen when she is at some distance from me, for it enables me to talk with her by tapping upon the floor with my foot.
  • Finally she one day demanded a name for the power, the existence of which she had already conceived in her own mind.
  • It made me laugh quite hard, for I know my father is Arthur Keller.
  • She had met with the expression Mother Nature in the course of her reading, and for a long time she was in the habit of ascribing to Mother Nature whatever she felt to be beyond the power of man to accomplish.
  • Throughout Helen's education I have invariably assumed that she can understand whatever it is desirable for her to know.
  • She was very still for a few minutes, evidently thinking earnestly.
  • I was compelled to evade her question, for I could not explain to her the mystery of a self-existent being.
  • I said, "No; because, if there were no death, our world would soon be so crowded with living creatures that it would be impossible for any of them to live comfortably."
  • Is it blind? she asked; for in her mind the idea of being led was associated with blindness.
  • I always tried to find out what interested her most, and made that the starting-point for the new lesson, whether it had any bearing on the lesson I had planned to teach or not.
  • Children should be encouraged to read for the pure delight of it.
  • Her mind is so filled with the beautiful thoughts and ideals of the great poets that nothing seems commonplace to her; for her imagination colours all life with its own rich hues.
  • It is true rather that she has a special aptitude for thinking, and her leaning toward language is due to the fact that language to her meant life.
  • Of grammar she knew nothing and she cared nothing for it.
  • She got the language from the language itself, and this is, next to hearing the language spoken, the way for any one to get a foreign tongue, more vital and, in the end, easier than our schoolroom method of beginning with the grammar.
  • Often I found her, when she had a little leisure, sitting in her favourite corner, in a chair whose arms supported the big volume prepared for the blind, and passing her finger slowly over the lines of Moliere's 'Le Medecin Malgre Lui,' chuckling to herself at the comical situations and humorous lines.
  • So Helen Keller's aptitude for language is her whole mental aptitude, turned to language because of its extraordinary value to her.
  • There is, then, a good deal that Miss Sullivan has done for Miss Keller which no other teacher can do in just the same way for any one else.
  • I know that this idea will be vigorously combated by those who conduct schools for the deaf.
  • To be sure, the deaf school is the only thing possible for children educated by the State.
  • Mrs. Keller writes me that before her illness Helen made signs for everything, and her mother thought this habit the cause of her slowness in learning to speak.
  • And finally all the conditions were good for that first nature school, in which the teacher and pupil played together, exploring together and educating themselves, pupil and teacher inseparable.
  • Her voice has an aspirate quality; there seems always to be too much breath for the amount of tone.
  • For no system of marks in a lexicon can tell one how to pronounce a word.
  • The wavering is caused by the absence of accent on FUL, for she pronounces FULL correctly.
  • I thought, however, that the advantage she would derive would not repay her for the time and labour that such an experiment would cost.
  • At the time when I became her teacher, she had made for herself upward of sixty signs, all of which were imitative and were readily understood by those who knew her.
  • The only signs which I think she may have invented were her signs for SMALL and LARGE.
  • It will be seen that they contain three vowel and six consonant elements, and these formed the foundation for her first real lesson in speaking.
  • Hard consonants were, and indeed still are, very difficult for her to pronounce in connection with one another in the same word; she often suppresses the one and changes the other, and sometimes she replaces both by an analogous sound with soft aspiration.
  • She would repeatedly use one for the other.
  • She got every word, for the President's speech is notably distinct.
  • But she knows better than any one else what value speech has had for her.
  • It brings me into closer and tenderer relationship with those I love, and makes it possible for me to enjoy the sweet companionship of a great many persons from whom I should be entirely cut off if I could not talk.
  • For it was Dr. Bell who first saw the principles that underlie Miss Sullivan's method, and explained the process by which Helen Keller absorbed language from books.
  • On the other hand, the peculiar value to her of language, which ordinary people take for granted as a necessary part of them like their right hand, made her think about language and love it.
  • My heart sang for very joy.
  • Her admiration for the impressive explanations which Bishop Brooks has given her of the Fatherhood of God is well known.
  • She closes this letter with, "I must go to bed, for Morpheus has touched my eyelids with his golden wand."
  • As we had never seen or heard of any such story as this before, we inquired of her where she read it; she replied, "I did not read it; it is my story for Mr. Anagnos's birthday."
  • Helen wrote a little letter, and, enclosing the manuscript, forwarded both by mail to Mr. Anagnos for his birthday.
  • But as she was not able to find her copy, and applications for the volume at bookstores in Boston, New York, Philadelphia, Albany, and other places resulted only in failure, search was instituted for the author herself.
  • Thank you very much for the Report, Gazette, and Helen's Journal.
  • I clapped my chubby hands for joy when I saw that the rose-bushes were covered with lovely buds.
  • If you do, perhaps I will dream again for you some time.
  • I shall be so glad when you come home, for I greatly miss you.
  • But his most wonderful work is the painting of the trees, which look, after his task is done, as if they were covered with the brightest layers of gold and rubies; and are beautiful enough to comfort us for the flight of summer.
  • I will tell you how King Frost first thought of this kind work, for it is a strange story.
  • Well, one day King Frost was trying to think of some good that he could do with his treasure; and suddenly he concluded to send some of it to his kind neighbour, Santa Claus, to buy presents of food and clothing for the poor, that they might not suffer so much when King Winter went near their homes.
  • The fairies promised obedience and soon started on their journey, dragging the great glass jars and vases along, as well as they could, and now and then grumbling a little at having such hard work to do, for they were idle fairies, and liked play better than work.
  • At last they reached a great forest, and, being quite tired, they decided to rest awhile and look for nuts before going any further.
  • Still, for awhile, the frost fairies did not notice this strange occurrence, for they were down on the grass, so far below the tree-tops that the wonderful shower of treasure was a long time in reaching them; but at last one of them said, Hark!
  • Their fears were well founded, for their long absence had alarmed the king, and he had started out to look for his tardy servants, and just as they were all hidden, he came along slowly, looking on all sides for the fairies.
  • Then the fairies thanked him for his forgiveness, and promised to work very hard to please him; and the good-natured king took them all up in his arms, and carried them safely home to his palace.
  • At a little distance from the palace we might easily mistake it for a mountain whose peaks were mounting heavenward to receive the last kiss of the departing day.
  • But, children, you must make King Frost a visit the very first opportunity you have, and see for yourselves this wonderful palace.
  • The old King will welcome you kindly, for he loves children, and it is his chief delight to give them pleasure.
  • I will tell you how King Frost happened to think of painting the leaves, for it is a strange story.
  • The fairies promised obedience, and were off in a twinkling, dragging the heavy jars and vases along after them as well as they could, now and then grumbling a little at having such a hard task, for they were idle fairies and loved to play better than to work.
  • After awhile they came to a great forest and, being tired and hungry, they thought they would rest a little and look for nuts before continuing their journey.
  • Then they began to wander merrily about searching for nuts, climbing trees, peeping curiously into the empty birds' nests, and playing hide and seek from behind the trees.
  • Then looking around more closely, they saw that much of the treasure was already melted, for the oaks and maples were arrayed in gorgeous dresses of gold and crimson and emerald.
  • So they hid themselves among the bushes and waited silently for something to happen.
  • Their fears were well founded, for their long absence had alarmed the King, and he mounted North Wind and went out in search of his tardy couriers.
  • When the children saw the trees all aglow with brilliant colors they clapped their hands and shouted for joy, and immediately began to pick great bunches to take home.
  • (The following entry made by Helen in her diary speaks for itself.)
  • My heart was full of tears, for I love the beautiful truth with my whole heart and mind.
  • PERKINS INSTITUTION AND MASSACHUSETTS SCHOOL FOR THE BLIND SO.
  • Helen told me that for a long time she had thought of Jack Frost as a king, because of the many treasures which he possessed.
  • On Miss Sullivan's return to Brewster, she read to Helen the story of "Little Lord Fauntleroy," which she had purchased in Boston for the purpose.
  • Director of the Perkins Institution and Massachusetts School for the Blind.
  • Of the sources of his vocabulary he is, for the most part, as unaware as he is of the moment when he ate the food which makes a bit of his thumbnail.
  • From the early sketch I take a few passages which seem to me, without making very much allowance for difference in time, almost as good as anything she has written since:
  • But the fever grew and flamed in my eyes, and for several days my kind physician thought I would die.
  • They did not know for some time after my recovery that the cruel fever had taken my sight and hearing; taken all the light and music and gladness out of my little life.
  • I knew, too, it was immense! awful! and for a moment some of the sunshine seemed to have gone out of the day.
  • Writing for other people, she should in many cases be true to outer fact rather than to her own experience.
  • She has an excellent 'ear' for the flow of sentences.
  • To be sure, I take the keenest interest in everything that concerns those who surround me; it is this very interest which makes it so difficult for me to carry on a conversation with some people who will not talk or say what they think, but I should not be sorry to find more friends ready to talk with me now and then about the wonderful things I read.
  • For the first time since my entrance into Radcliffe I had the opportunity to make friends with all my classmates...
  • For me no thrifty spinners weave purple garments.
  • I am too grateful for all these blessings to wish for more from princes, or from the gods.
  • My little Sabine farm is dear to me; for here I spend my happiest days, far from the noise and strife of the world.
  • You forget that death comes to the rich and the poor alike, and comes once for all; but remember, Acheron could not be bribed by gold to ferry the crafty Prometheus back to the sunlit world.
  • Would the heart, overweighted with sudden joy, stop beating for very excess of happiness?
  • Could a greater miracle take place than for us to look through each other's eyes for an instant?
  • Let us consider for a moment what most of the trouble and anxiety which I have referred to is about, and how much it is necessary that we be troubled, or at least careful.
  • Of course the vital heat is not to be confounded with fire; but so much for analogy.
  • The grand necessity, then, for our bodies, is to keep warm, to keep the vital heat in us.
  • The soil, it appears, is suited to the seed, for it has sent its radicle downward, and it may now send its shoot upward also with confidence.
  • No doubt, many of my townsmen have met me returning from this enterprise, farmers starting for Boston in the twilight, or woodchoppers going to their work.
  • I have thought that Walden Pond would be a good place for business, not solely on account of the railroad and the ice trade; it offers advantages which it may not be good policy to divulge; it is a good port and a good foundation.
  • Most behave as if they believed that their prospects for life would be ruined if they should do it.
  • It would be easier for them to hobble to town with a broken leg than with a broken pantaloon.
  • A man who has at length found something to do will not need to get a new suit to do it in; for him the old will do, that has lain dusty in the garret for an indeterminate period.
  • We may imagine a time when, in the infancy of the human race, some enterprising mortal crept into a hollow in a rock for shelter.
  • It plays house, as well as horse, having an instinct for it.
  • You could sit up as late as you pleased, and, whenever you got up, go abroad without any landlord or house-lord dogging you for rent.
  • A comfortable house for a rude and hardy race, that lived mostly out of doors, was once made here almost entirely of such materials as Nature furnished ready to their hands.
  • In the savage state every family owns a shelter as good as the best, and sufficient for its coarser and simpler wants; but I think that I speak within bounds when I say that, though the birds of the air have their nests, and the foxes their holes, and the savages their wigwams, in modern civilized society not more than one half the families own a shelter.
  • The rest pay an annual tax for this outside garment of all, become indispensable summer and winter, which would buy a village of Indian wigwams, but now helps to keep them poor as long as they live.
  • The man who has actually paid for his farm with labor on it is so rare that every neighbor can point to him.
  • This is the reason he is poor; and for a similar reason we are all poor in respect to a thousand savage comforts, though surrounded by luxuries.
  • And when the farmer has got his house, he may not be the richer but the poorer for it, and it be the house that has got him.
  • I would rather sit in the open air, for no dust gathers on the grass, unless where man has broken ground.
  • The man who independently plucked the fruits when he was hungry is become a farmer; and he who stood under a tree for shelter, a housekeeper.
  • We now no longer camp as for a night, but have settled down on earth and forgotten heaven.
  • We have built for this world a family mansion, and for the next a family tomb.
  • There is actually no place in this village for a work of fine art, if any had come down to us, to stand, for our lives, our houses and streets, furnish no proper pedestal for it.
  • I speak understandingly on this subject, for I have made myself acquainted with it both theoretically and practically.
  • Each stick was carefully mortised or tenoned by its stump, for I had borrowed other tools by this time.
  • By the middle of April, for I made no haste in my work, but rather made the most of it, my house was framed and ready for the raising.
  • I had already bought the shanty of James Collins, an Irishman who worked on the Fitchburg Railroad, for boards.
  • Doorsill there was none, but a perennial passage for the hens under the door board.
  • It was dark, and had a dirt floor for the most part, dank, clammy, and aguish, only here a board and there a board which would not bear removal.
  • One large bundle held their all--bed, coffee-mill, looking-glass, hens--all but the cat; she took to the woods and became a wild cat, and, as I learned afterward, trod in a trap set for woodchucks, and so became a dead cat at last.
  • I took particular pleasure in this breaking of ground, for in almost all latitudes men dig into the earth for an equable temperature.
  • At length, in the beginning of May, with the help of some of my acquaintances, rather to improve so good an occasion for neighborliness than from any necessity, I set up the frame of my house.
  • Who knows but if men constructed their dwellings with their own hands, and provided food for themselves and families simply and honestly enough, the poetic faculty would be universally developed, as birds universally sing when they are so engaged?
  • It would signify somewhat, if, in any earnest sense, he slanted them and daubed it; but the spirit having departed out of the tenant, it is of a piece with constructing his own coffin--the architecture of the grave--and "carpenter" is but another name for "coffin-maker."
  • Toss up a copper for it as well.
  • Better paint your house your own complexion; let it turn pale or blush for you.
  • If I seem to boast more than is becoming, my excuse is that I brag for humanity rather than for myself; and my shortcomings and inconsistencies do not affect the truth of my statement.
  • I will endeavor to speak a good word for the truth.
  • Those things for which the most money is demanded are never the things which the student most wants.
  • Tuition, for instance, is an important item in the term bill, while for the far more valuable education which he gets by associating with the most cultivated of his contemporaries no charge is made.
  • I think that it would be better than this, for the students, or those who desire to be benefited by it, even to lay the foundation themselves.
  • I remember when wages were sixty cents a day for laborers on this very road.
  • And so, if the railroad reached round the world, I think that I should keep ahead of you; and as for seeing the country and getting experience of that kind, I should have to cut your acquaintance altogether.
  • The whole lot contains eleven acres, mostly growing up to pines and hickories, and was sold the preceding season for eight dollars and eight cents an acre.
  • One farmer said that it was "good for nothing but to raise cheeping squirrels on."
  • I got out several cords of stumps in plowing, which supplied me with fuel for a long time, and left small circles of virgin mould, easily distinguishable through the summer by the greater luxuriance of the beans there.
  • The dead and for the most part unmerchantable wood behind my house, and the driftwood from the pond, have supplied the remainder of my fuel.
  • I was obliged to hire a team and a man for the plowing, though I held the plow myself.
  • I was more independent than any farmer in Concord, for I was not anchored to a house or farm, but could follow the bent of my genius, which is a very crooked one, every moment.
  • However, I should never have broken a horse or bull and taken him to board for any work he might do for me, for fear I should become a horseman or a herdsman merely; and if society seems to be the gainer by so doing, are we certain that what is one man's gain is not another's loss, and that the stable-boy has equal cause with his master to be satisfied?
  • Man thus not only works for the animal within him, but, for a symbol of this, he works for the animal without him.
  • This town is said to have the largest houses for oxen, cows, and horses hereabouts, and it is not behindhand in its public buildings; but there are very few halls for free worship or free speech in this county.
  • I might possibly invent some excuse for them and him, but I have no time for it.
  • As for the religion and love of art of the builders, it is much the same all the world over, whether the building be an Egyptian temple or the United States Bank.
  • For my part, I should like to know who in those days did not build them--who were above such trifling.
  • It was, for nearly two years after this, rye and Indian meal without yeast, potatoes, rice, a very little salt pork, molasses, and salt; and my drink, water.
  • Every New Englander might easily raise all his own breadstuffs in this land of rye and Indian corn, and not depend on distant and fluctuating markets for them.
  • For the most part the farmer gives to his cattle and hogs the grain of his own producing, and buys flour, which is at least no more wholesome, at a greater cost, at the store.
  • Finally, as for salt, that grossest of groceries, to obtain this might be a fit occasion for a visit to the seashore, or, if I did without it altogether, I should probably drink the less water.
  • As for a habitat, if I were not permitted still to squat, I might purchase one acre at the same price for which the land I cultivated was sold--namely, eight dollars and eight cents.
  • The human race is interested in these experiments, though a few old women who are incapacitated for them, or who own their thirds in mills, may be alarmed.
  • My furniture, part of which I made myself--and the rest cost me nothing of which I have not rendered an account--consisted of a bed, a table, a desk, three chairs, a looking-glass three inches in diameter, a pair of tongs and andirons, a kettle, a skillet, and a frying-pan, a dipper, a wash-bowl, two knives and forks, three plates, one cup, one spoon, a jug for oil, a jug for molasses, and a japanned lamp.
  • There is a plenty of such chairs as I like best in the village garrets to be had for taking them away.
  • Pray, for what do we move ever but to get rid of our furniture, our exuviæ: at last to go from this world to another newly furnished, and leave this to be burned?
  • Even those who seem for a long while not to have any, if you inquire more narrowly you will find have some stored in somebody's barn.
  • After having taken medicine, and fasted for three days, all the fire in the town is extinguished.
  • The Mexicans also practised a similar purification at the end of every fifty-two years, in the belief that it was time for the world to come to an end.
  • For more than five years I maintained myself thus solely by the labor of my hands, and I found that, by working about six weeks in a year, I could meet all the expenses of living.
  • The whole of my winters, as well as most of my summers, I had free and clear for study.
  • As I did not teach for the good of my fellow-men, but simply for a livelihood, this was a failure.
  • It is by a mathematical point only that we are wise, as the sailor or the fugitive slave keeps the polestar in his eye; but that is sufficient guidance for all our life.
  • Undoubtedly, in this case, what is true for one is truer still for a thousand, as a large house is not proportionally more expensive than a small one, since one roof may cover, one cellar underlie, and one wall separate several apartments.
  • But for my part, I preferred the solitary dwelling.
  • You must have a genius for charity as well as for anything else.
  • As for Doing-good, that is one of the professions which are full.
  • Philanthropy is not love for one's fellow-man in the broadest sense.
  • Being superior to physical suffering, it sometimes chanced that they were superior to any consolation which the missionaries could offer; and the law to do as you would be done by fell with less persuasiveness on the ears of those who, for their part, did not care how they were done by, who loved their enemies after a new fashion, and came very near freely forgiving them all they did.
  • Those plants of whose greenness withered we make herb tea for the sick serve but a humble use, and are most employed by quacks.
  • If anything ail a man, so that he does not perform his functions, if he have a pain in his bowels even--for that is the seat of sympathy--he forthwith sets about reforming--the world.
  • If you should ever be betrayed into any of these philanthropies, do not let your left hand know what your right hand does, for it is not worth knowing.
  • In imagination I have bought all the farms in succession, for all were to be bought, and I knew their price.
  • I discovered many a site for a house not likely to be soon improved, which some might have thought too far from the village, but to my eyes the village was too far from it.
  • Well, there I might live, I said; and there I did live, for an hour, a summer and a winter life; saw how I could let the years run off, buffet the winter through, and see the spring come in.
  • But I would say to my fellows, once for all, As long as possible live free and uncommitted.
  • The present was my next experiment of this kind, which I purpose to describe more at length, for convenience putting the experience of two years into one.
  • I did not need to go outdoors to take the air, for the atmosphere within had lost none of its freshness.
  • Such was not my abode, for I found myself suddenly neighbor to the birds; not by having imprisoned one, but having caged myself near them.
  • There was pasture enough for my imagination.
  • The low shrub oak plateau to which the opposite shore arose stretched away toward the prairies of the West and the steppes of Tartary, affording ample room for all the roving families of men.
  • Then there is least somnolence in us; and for an hour, at least, some part of us awakes which slumbers all the rest of the day and night.
  • The millions are awake enough for physical labor; but only one in a million is awake enough for effective intellectual exertion, only one in a hundred millions to a poetic or divine life.
  • Still we live meanly, like ants; though the fable tells us that we were long ago changed into men; like pygmies we fight with cranes; it is error upon error, and clout upon clout, and our best virtue has for its occasion a superfluous and evitable wretchedness.
  • As for work, we haven't any of any consequence.
  • Some give directions to be waked every half-hour, doubtless for no other purpose; and then, to pay for it, they tell what they have dreamed.
  • For my part, I could easily do without the post-office.
  • The penny-post is, commonly, an institution through which you seriously offer a man that penny for his thoughts which is so often safely offered in jest.
  • Shams and delusions are esteemed for soundest truths, while reality is fabulous.
  • The universe constantly and obediently answers to our conceptions; whether we travel fast or slow, the track is laid for us.
  • Weather this danger and you are safe, for the rest of the way is down hill.
  • If the engine whistles, let it whistle till it is hoarse for its pains.
  • My instinct tells me that my head is an organ for burrowing, as some creatures use their snout and fore paws, and with it I would mine and burrow my way through these hills.
  • In accumulating property for ourselves or our posterity, in founding a family or a state, or acquiring fame even, we are mortal; but in dealing with truth we are immortal, and need fear no change nor accident.
  • Incessant labor with my hands, at first, for I had my house to finish and my beans to hoe at the same time, made more study impossible.
  • The student may read Homer or Æschylus in the Greek without danger of dissipation or luxuriousness, for it implies that he in some measure emulate their heroes, and consecrate morning hours to their pages.
  • For what are the classics but the noblest recorded thoughts of man?
  • It is not enough even to be able to speak the language of that nation by which they are written, for there is a memorable interval between the spoken and the written language, the language heard and the language read.
  • The crowds of men who merely spoke the Greek and Latin tongues in the Middle Ages were not entitled by the accident of birth to read the works of genius written in those languages; for these were not written in that Greek or Latin which they knew, but in the select language of literature.
  • But when the several nations of Europe had acquired distinct though rude written languages of their own, sufficient for the purposes of their rising literatures, then first learning revived, and scholars were enabled to discern from that remoteness the treasures of antiquity.
  • There are those who, like cormorants and ostriches, can digest all sorts of this, even after the fullest dinner of meats and vegetables, for they suffer nothing to be wasted.
  • There is in this town, with a very few exceptions, no taste for the best or for very good books even in English literature, whose words all can read and spell.
  • I know a woodchopper, of middle age, who takes a French paper, not for news as he says, for he is above that, but to "keep himself in practice," he being a Canadian by birth; and when I ask him what he considers the best thing he can do in this world, he says, beside this, to keep up and add to his English.
  • This is about as much as the college-bred generally do or aspire to do, and they take an English paper for the purpose.
  • We are underbred and low-lived and illiterate; and in this respect I confess I do not make any very broad distinction between the illiterateness of my townsman who cannot read at all and the illiterateness of him who has learned to read only what is for children and feeble intellects.
  • The book exists for us, perchance, which will explain our miracles and reveal new ones.
  • But consider how little this village does for its own culture.
  • I do not wish to flatter my townsmen, nor to be flattered by them, for that will not advance either of us.
  • We have a comparatively decent system of common schools, schools for infants only; but excepting the half-starved Lyceum in the winter, and latterly the puny beginning of a library suggested by the State, no school for ourselves.
  • It can spend money enough on such things as farmers and traders value, but it is thought Utopian to propose spending money for things which more intelligent men know to be of far more worth.
  • The one hundred and twenty-five dollars annually subscribed for a Lyceum in the winter is better spent than any other equal sum raised in the town.
  • For the most part, I minded not how the hours went.
  • My days were not days of the week, bearing the stamp of any heathen deity, nor were they minced into hours and fretted by the ticking of a clock; for I lived like the Puri Indians, of whom it is said that "for yesterday, today, and tomorrow they have only one word, and they express the variety of meaning by pointing backward for yesterday forward for tomorrow, and overhead for the passing day."
  • I had this advantage, at least, in my mode of life, over those who were obliged to look abroad for amusement, to society and the theatre, that my life itself was become my amusement and never ceased to be novel.
  • And here's your pay for them! screams the countryman's whistle; timber like long battering-rams going twenty miles an hour against the city's walls, and chairs enough to seat all the weary and heavy-laden that dwell within them.
  • If all were as it seems, and men made the elements their servants for noble ends!
  • If the snow lies deep, they strap on his snowshoes, and, with the giant plow, plow a furrow from the mountains to the seaboard, in which the cars, like a following drill-barrow, sprinkle all the restless men and floating merchandise in the country for seed.
  • Or perchance, at evening, I hear him in his stable blowing off the superfluous energy of the day, that he may calm his nerves and cool his liver and brain for a few hours of iron slumber.
  • We live the steadier for it.
  • I confess, that practically speaking, when I have learned a man's real disposition, I have no hopes of changing it for the better or worse in this state of existence.
  • Here is a hogshead of molasses or of brandy directed to John Smith, Cuttingsville, Vermont, some trader among the Green Mountains, who imports for the farmers near his clearing, and now perchance stands over his bulkhead and thinks of the last arrivals on the coast, how they may affect the price for him, telling his customers this moment, as he has told them twenty times before this morning, that he expects some by the next train of prime quality.
  • For the rest of the long afternoon, perhaps, my meditations are interrupted only by the faint rattle of a carriage or team along the distant highway.
  • At evening, the distant lowing of some cow in the horizon beyond the woods sounded sweet and melodious, and at first I would mistake it for the voices of certain minstrels by whom I was sometimes serenaded, who might be straying over hill and dale; but soon I was not unpleasantly disappointed when it was prolonged into the cheap and natural music of the cow.
  • Regularly at half-past seven, in one part of the summer, after the evening train had gone by, the whip-poor-wills chanted their vespers for half an hour, sitting on a stump by my door, or upon the ridge-pole of the house.
  • But now one answers from far woods in a strain made really melodious by distance--Hoo hoo hoo, hoorer hoo; and indeed for the most part it suggested only pleasing associations, whether heard by day or night, summer or winter.
  • Let them do the idiotic and maniacal hooting for men.
  • To walk in a winter morning in a wood where these birds abounded, their native woods, and hear the wild cockerels crow on the trees, clear and shrill for miles over the resounding earth, drowning the feebler notes of other birds--think of it!
  • A young forest growing up under your meadows, and wild sumachs and blackberry vines breaking through into your cellar; sturdy pitch pines rubbing and creaking against the shingles for want of room, their roots reaching quite under the house.
  • But for the most part it is as solitary where I live as on the prairies.
  • If it should continue so long as to cause the seeds to rot in the ground and destroy the potatoes in the low lands, it would still be good for the grass on the uplands, and, being good for the grass, it would be good for me.
  • I have never felt lonesome, or in the least oppressed by a sense of solitude, but once, and that was a few weeks after I came to the woods, when, for an hour, I doubted if the near neighborhood of man was not essential to a serene and healthy life.
  • For the most part we allow only outlying and transient circumstances to make our occasions.
  • We are for the most part more lonely when we go abroad among men than when we stay in our chambers.
  • We meet at very short intervals, not having had time to acquire any new value for each other.
  • An elderly dame, too, dwells in my neighborhood, invisible to most persons, in whose odorous herb garden I love to stroll sometimes, gathering simples and listening to her fables; for she has a genius of unequalled fertility, and her memory runs back farther than mythology, and she can tell me the original of every fable, and on what fact every one is founded, for the incidents occurred when she was young.
  • When visitors came in larger and unexpected numbers there was but the third chair for them all, but they generally economized the room by standing up.
  • Many of our houses, both public and private, with their almost innumerable apartments, their huge halls and their cellars for the storage of wines and other munitions of peace, appear to be extravagantly large for their inhabitants.
  • You want room for your thoughts to get into sailing trim and run a course or two before they make their port.
  • My "best" room, however, my withdrawing room, always ready for company, on whose carpet the sun rarely fell, was the pine wood behind my house.
  • These being boiled, there were at least forty looked for a share in them; the most eat of them.
  • Fearing that they would be light-headed for want of food and also sleep, owing to "the savages' barbarous singing, (for they use to sing themselves asleep,)" and that they might get home while they had strength to travel, they departed.
  • As for lodging, it is true they were but poorly entertained, though what they found an inconvenience was no doubt intended for an honor; but as far as eating was concerned, I do not see how the Indians could have done better.
  • As for men, they will hardly fail one anywhere.
  • I had withdrawn so far within the great ocean of solitude, into which the rivers of society empty, that for the most part, so far as my needs were concerned, only the finest sediment was deposited around me.
  • He, too, has heard of Homer, and, "if it were not for books," would "not know what to do rainy days," though perhaps he has not read one wholly through for many rainy seasons.
  • He has a great bundle of white oak bark under his arm for a sick man, gathered this Sunday morning.
  • Vice and disease, which cast such a sombre moral hue over the world, seemed to have hardly any existence for him.
  • Frequently he would leave his dinner in the bushes, when his dog had caught a woodchuck by the way, and go back a mile and a half to dress it and leave it in the cellar of the house where he boarded, after deliberating first for half an hour whether he could not sink it in the pond safely till nightfall--loving to dwell long upon these themes.
  • I could get all I should want for a week in one day.
  • He could defend many institutions better than any philosopher, because, in describing them as they concerned him, he gave the true reason for their prevalence, and speculation had not suggested to him any other.
  • I asked him once, when I had not seen him for many months, if he had got a new idea this summer.
  • Many a traveller came out of his way to see me and the inside of my house, and, as an excuse for calling, asked for a glass of water.
  • The Lord had made him so, yet he supposed the Lord cared as much for him as for another.
  • Children come a-berrying, railroad men taking a Sunday morning walk in clean shirts, fishermen and hunters, poets and philosophers; in short, all honest pilgrims, who came out to the woods for freedom's sake, and really left the village behind, I was ready to greet with--"Welcome, Englishmen! welcome, Englishmen!" for I had had communication with that race.
  • My auxiliaries are the dews and rains which water this dry soil, and what fertility is in the soil itself, which for the most part is lean and effete.
  • The last have nibbled for me a quarter of an acre clean.
  • Soon, however, the remaining beans will be too tough for them, and go forward to meet new foes.
  • It was the only open and cultivated field for a great distance on either side of the road, so they made the most of it; and sometimes the man in the field heard more of travellers' gossip and comment than was meant for his ear: "Beans so late! peas so late!"--for I continued to plant when others had begun to hoe--the ministerial husbandman had not suspected it.
  • Corn, my boy, for fodder; corn for fodder.
  • They were beans cheerfully returning to their wild and primitive state that I cultivated, and my hoe played the Ranz des Vaches for them.
  • But sometimes it was a really noble and inspiring strain that reached these woods, and the trumpet that sings of fame, and I felt as if I could spit a Mexican with a good relish--for why should we always stand for trifles?--and looked round for a woodchuck or a skunk to exercise my chivalry upon.
  • It was a singular experience that long acquaintance which I cultivated with beans, what with planting, and hoeing, and harvesting, and threshing, and picking over and selling them--the last was the hardest of all--I might add eating, for I did taste.
  • First look out for worms, and supply vacancies by planting anew.
  • I saw an old man the other day, to my astonishment, making the holes with a hoe for the seventieth time at least, and not for himself to lie down in!
  • Why concern ourselves so much about our beans for seed, and not be concerned at all about a new generation of men?
  • We should really be fed and cheered if when we met a man we were sure to see that some of the qualities which I have named, which we all prize more than those other productions, but which are for the most part broadcast and floating in the air, had taken root and grown in him.
  • Do they not grow for woodchucks partly?
  • After hoeing, or perhaps reading and writing, in the forenoon, I usually bathed again in the pond, swimming across one of its coves for a stint, and washed the dust of labor from my person, or smoothed out the last wrinkle which study had made, and for the afternoon was absolutely free.
  • For the most part I escaped wonderfully from these dangers, either by proceeding at once boldly and without deliberation to the goal, as is recommended to those who run the gauntlet, or by keeping my thoughts on high things, like Orpheus, who, "loudly singing the praises of the gods to his lyre, drowned the voices of the Sirens, and kept out of danger."
  • Sometimes I bolted suddenly, and nobody could tell my whereabouts, for I did not stand much about gracefulness, and never hesitated at a gap in a fence.
  • It was very pleasant, when I stayed late in town, to launch myself into the night, especially if it was dark and tempestuous, and set sail from some bright village parlor or lecture room, with a bag of rye or Indian meal upon my shoulder, for my snug harbor in the woods, having made all tight without and withdrawn under hatches with a merry crew of thoughts, leaving only my outer man at the helm, or even tying up the helm when it was plain sailing.
  • In our most trivial walks, we are constantly, though unconsciously, steering like pilots by certain well-known beacons and headlands, and if we go beyond our usual course we still carry in our minds the bearing of some neighboring cape; and not till we are completely lost, or turned round--for a man needs only to be turned round once with his eyes shut in this world to be lost--do we appreciate the vastness and strangeness of nature.
  • I had gone down to the woods for other purposes.
  • The fruits do not yield their true flavor to the purchaser of them, nor to him who raises them for the market.
  • Once in a while we sat together on the pond, he at one end of the boat, and I at the other; but not many words passed between us, for he had grown deaf in his later years, but he occasionally hummed a psalm, which harmonized well enough with my philosophy.
  • The shore is composed of a belt of smooth rounded white stones like paving-stones, excepting one or two short sand beaches, and is so steep that in many places a single leap will carry you into water over your head; and were it not for its remarkable transparency, that would be the last to be seen of its bottom till it rose on the opposite side.
  • Flint's Pond, a mile eastward, allowing for the disturbance occasioned by its inlets and outlets, and the smaller intermediate ponds also, sympathize with Walden, and recently attained their greatest height at the same time with the latter.
  • If the name was not derived from that of some English locality--Saffron Walden, for instance--one might suppose that it was called originally Walled-in Pond.
  • For four months in the year its water is as cold as it is pure at all times; and I think that it is then as good as any, if not the best, in the town.
  • Whoever camps for a week in summer by the shore of a pond, needs only bury a pail of water a few feet deep in the shade of his camp to be independent of the luxury of ice.
  • The forest has never so good a setting, nor is so distinctly beautiful, as when seen from the middle of a small lake amid hills which rise from the water's edge; for the water in which it is reflected not only makes the best foreground in such a case, but, with its winding shore, the most natural and agreeable boundary to it.
  • From a hilltop you can see a fish leap in almost any part; for not a pickerel or shiner picks an insect from this smooth surface but it manifestly disturbs the equilibrium of the whole lake.
  • But suddenly the dimples ceased, for they were produced by the perch, which the noise of my oars had seared into the depths, and I saw their schools dimly disappearing; so I spent a dry afternoon after all.
  • He used to make a cable for his anchor of strips of hickory bark tied together.
  • The hills which form its shores are so steep, and the woods on them were then so high, that, as you looked down from the west end, it had the appearance of an amphitheatre for some land of sylvan spectacle.
  • They preserve their form when dry for an indefinite period.
  • It was about a foot in diameter at the big end, and he had expected to get a good saw-log, but it was so rotten as to be fit only for fuel, if for that.
  • It was a lake of rainbow light, in which, for a short while, I lived like a dolphin.
  • For I purposely talked to him as if he were a philosopher, or desired to be one.
  • A man will not need to study history to find out what is best for his own culture.
  • If he and his family would live simply, they might all go a-huckleberrying in the summer for their amusement.
  • We are most interested when science reports what those men already know practically or instinctively, for that alone is a true humanity, or account of human experience.
  • But already a change is taking place, owing, not to an increased humanity, but to an increased scarcity of game, for perhaps the hunter is the greatest friend of the animals hunted, not excepting the Humane Society.
  • Moreover, when at the pond, I wished sometimes to add fish to my fare for variety.
  • I speak of fishing only now, for I had long felt differently about fowling, and sold my gun before I went to the woods.
  • Commonly they did not think that they were lucky, or well paid for their time, unless they got a long string of fish, though they had the opportunity of seeing the pond all the while.
  • Most men would feel shame if caught preparing with their own hands precisely such a dinner, whether of animal or vegetable food, as is every day prepared for them by others.
  • Yet, for my part, I was never unusually squeamish; I could sometimes eat a fried rat with a good relish, if it were necessary.
  • I believe that water is the only drink for a wise man; wine is not so noble a liquor; and think of dashing the hopes of a morning with a cup of warm coffee, or of an evening with a dish of tea!
  • The harp is the travelling patterer for the Universe's Insurance Company, recommending its laws, and our little goodness is all the assessment that we pay.
  • Listen to every zephyr for some reproof, for it is surely there, and he is unfortunate who does not hear it.
  • Nothing was too trivial for the Hindoo lawgiver, however offensive it may be to modern taste.
  • But the notes of the flute came home to his ears out of a different sphere from that he worked in, and suggested work for certain faculties which slumbered in him.
  • Say, some hollow tree; and then for morning calls and dinner-parties!
  • Oh, they swarm; the sun is too warm there; they are born too far into life for me.
  • Leave me alone, then, for a while.
  • Or, if you choose to go farther, it will not be unwise, for I have found the increase of fair bait to be very nearly as the squares of the distances.
  • If it would do any good, I would whistle for them.
  • Why has man just these species of animals for his neighbors; as if nothing but a mouse could have filled this crevice?
  • A phÅ“be soon built in my shed, and a robin for protection in a pine which grew against the house.
  • The parent will sometimes roll and spin round before you in such a dishabille, that you cannot, for a few moments, detect what kind of creature it is.
  • You may even tread on them, or have your eyes on them for a minute, without discovering them.
  • It is said that when hatched by a hen they will directly disperse on some alarm, and so are lost, for they never hear the mother's call which gathers them again.
  • I had dug out the spring and made a well of clear gray water, where I could dip up a pailful without roiling it, and thither I went for this purpose almost every day in midsummer, when the pond was warmest.
  • For numbers and for carnage it was an Austerlitz or Dresden.
  • For numbers and for carnage it was an Austerlitz or Dresden.
  • Once I was surprised to see a cat walking along the stony shore of the pond, for they rarely wander so far from home.
  • Some station themselves on this side of the pond, some on that, for the poor bird cannot be omnipresent; if he dive here he must come up there.
  • But I was more than a match for him on the surface.
  • He dived again, but I miscalculated the direction he would take, and we were fifty rods apart when he came to the surface this time, for I had helped to widen the interval; and again he laughed long and loud, and with more reason than before.
  • I found that it was as well for me to rest on my oars and wait his reappearing as to endeavor to calculate where he would rise; for again and again, when I was straining my eyes over the surface one way, I would suddenly be startled by his unearthly laugh behind me.
  • In October I went a-graping to the river meadows, and loaded myself with clusters more precious for their beauty and fragrance than for food.
  • The barberry's brilliant fruit was likewise food for my eyes merely; but I collected a small store of wild apples for coddling, which the proprietor and travellers had overlooked.
  • When chestnuts were ripe I laid up half a bushel for winter.
  • It was very exciting at that season to roam the then boundless chestnut woods of Lincoln--they now sleep their long sleep under the railroad--with a bag on my shoulder, and a stick to open burs with in my hand, for I did not always wait for the frost, amid the rustling of leaves and the loud reproofs of the red squirrels and the jays, whose half-consumed nuts I sometimes stole, for the burs which they had selected were sure to contain sound ones.
  • These nuts, as far as they went, were a good substitute for bread.
  • I now first began to inhabit my house, I may say, when I began to use it for warmth as well as shelter.
  • My dwelling was small, and I could hardly entertain an echo in it; but it seemed larger for being a single apartment and remote from neighbors.
  • Cato says, the master of a family (patremfamilias) must have in his rustic villa "cellam oleariam, vinariam, dolia multa, uti lubeat caritatem expectare, et rei, et virtuti, et gloriae erit," that is, "an oil and wine cellar, many casks, so that it may be pleasant to expect hard times; it will be for his advantage, and virtue, and glory."
  • Nowadays the host does not admit you to his hearth, but has got the mason to build one for yourself somewhere in his alley, and hospitality is the art of keeping you at the greatest distance.
  • I brought over some whiter and cleaner sand for this purpose from the opposite shore of the pond in a boat, a sort of conveyance which would have tempted me to go much farther if necessary.
  • I had the previous winter made a small quantity of lime by burning the shells of the Unio fluviatilis, which our river affords, for the sake of the experiment; so that I knew where my materials came from.
  • There are many furrows in the sand where some creature has travelled about and doubled on its tracks; and, for wrecks, it is strewn with the cases of caddis-worms made of minute grains of white quartz.
  • An old forest fence which had seen its best days was a great haul for me.
  • I sacrificed it to Vulcan, for it was past serving the god Terminus.
  • Though completely waterlogged and almost as heavy as lead, they not only burned long, but made a very hot fire; nay, I thought that they burned better for the soaking, as if the pitch, being confined by the water, burned longer, as in a lamp.
  • Michaux, more than thirty years ago, says that the price of wood for fuel in New York and Philadelphia "nearly equals, and sometimes exceeds, that of the best wood in Paris, though this immense capital annually requires more than three hundred thousand cords, and is surrounded to the distance of three hundred miles by cultivated plains."
  • Mechanics and tradesmen who come in person to the forest on no other errand, are sure to attend the wood auction, and even pay a high price for the privilege of gleaning after the woodchopper.
  • It is now many years that men have resorted to the forest for fuel and the materials of the arts: the New Englander and the New Hollander, the Parisian and the Celt, the farmer and Robin Hood, Goody Blake and Harry Gill; in most parts of the world the prince and the peasant, the scholar and the savage, equally require still a few sticks from the forest to warm them and cook their food.
  • As for the axe, I was advised to get the village blacksmith to "jump" it; but I jumped him, and, putting a hickory helve from the woods into it, made it do.
  • It is interesting to remember how much of this food for fire is still concealed in the bowels of the earth.
  • The next winter I used a small cooking-stove for economy, since I did not own the forest; but it did not keep fire so well as the open fireplace.
  • Cooking was then, for the most part, no longer a poetic, but merely a chemic process.
  • For many weeks I met no one in my walks but those who came occasionally to cut wood and sled it to the village.
  • Though mainly but a humble route to neighboring villages, or for the woodman's team, it once amused the traveller more than now by its variety, and lingered longer in his memory.
  • Here, by the very corner of my field, still nearer to town, Zilpha, a colored woman, had her little house, where she spun linen for the townsfolk, making the Walden Woods ring with her shrill singing, for she had a loud and notable voice.
  • I had just sunk my head on this when the bells rung fire, and in hot haste the engines rolled that way, led by a straggling troop of men and boys, and I among the foremost, for I had leaped the brook.
  • I felt it, and still remark it almost daily in my walks, for by it hangs the history of a family.
  • Again, perhaps, Nature will try, with me for a first settler, and my house raised last spring to be the oldest in the hamlet.
  • But no friendly Indian concerned himself about me; nor needed he, for the master of the house was at home.
  • For I came to town still, like a friendly Indian, when the contents of the broad open fields were all piled up between the walls of the Walden road, and half an hour sufficed to obliterate the tracks of the last traveller.
  • We talked of rude and simple times, when men sat about large fires in cold, bracing weather, with clear heads; and when other dessert failed, we tried our teeth on many a nut which wise squirrels have long since abandoned, for those which have the thickest shells are commonly empty.
  • These he peddles still, prompting God and disgracing man, bearing for fruit his brain only, like the nut its kernel.
  • But though comparatively disregarded now, when his day comes, laws unsuspected by most will take effect, and masters of families and rulers will come to him for advice.
  • There we worked, revising mythology, rounding a fable here and there, and building castles in the air for which earth offered no worthy foundation.
  • There was one other with whom I had "solid seasons," long to be remembered, at his house in the village, and who looked in upon me from time to time; but I had no more for society there.
  • Usually the red squirrel (Sciurus Hudsonius) waked me in the dawn, coursing over the roof and up and down the sides of the house, as if sent out of the woods for this purpose.
  • They were manifestly thieves, and I had not much respect for them; but the squirrels, though at first shy, went to work as if they were taking what was their own.
  • Whichever side you walk in the woods the partridge bursts away on whirring wings, jarring the snow from the dry leaves and twigs on high, which comes sifting down in the sunbeams like golden dust, for this brave bird is not to be scared by winter.
  • It is frequently covered up by drifts, and, it is said, "sometimes plunges from on wing into the soft snow, where it remains concealed for a day or two."
  • They will come regularly every evening to particular trees, where the cunning sportsman lies in wait for them, and the distant orchards next the woods suffer thus not a little.
  • And perhaps at evening I see the hunters returning with a single brush trailing from their sleigh for a trophy, seeking their inn.
  • Thus they circle until they fall upon the recent trail of a fox, for a wise hound will forsake everything else for this.
  • But I fear that he was not the wiser for all I told him, for every time I attempted to answer his questions he interrupted me by asking, "What do you do here?"
  • The hunter who told me this could remember one Sam Nutting, who used to hunt bears on Fair Haven Ledges, and exchange their skins for rum in Concord village; who told him, even, that he had seen a moose there.
  • Credit is given for deerskins also, and they were daily sold.
  • Squirrels and wild mice disputed for my store of nuts.
  • This is a remarkable depth for so small an area; yet not an inch of it can be spared by the imagination.
  • I am thankful that this pond was made deep and pure for a symbol.
  • A factory-owner, hearing what depth I had found, thought that it could not be true, for, judging from his acquaintance with dams, sand would not lie at so steep an angle.
  • They are not like cups between the hills; for this one, which is so unusually deep for its area, appears in a vertical section through its centre not deeper than a shallow plate.
  • So much for the increased horrors of the chasm of Loch Fyne when emptied.
  • Is not this the rule also for the height of mountains, regarded as the opposite of valleys?
  • Also there is a bar across the entrance of our every cove, or particular inclination; each is our harbor for a season, in which we are detained and partially land-locked.
  • It is true, we are such poor navigators that our thoughts, for the most part, stand off and on upon a harborless coast, are conversant only with the bights of the bays of poesy, or steer for the public ports of entry, and go into the dry docks of science, where they merely refit for this world, and no natural currents concur to individualize them.
  • Sometimes one of those great cakes slips from the ice-man's sled into the village street, and lies there for a week like a great emerald, an object of interest to all passers.
  • Ice is an interesting subject for contemplation.
  • I meet his servant come to draw water for his master, and our buckets as it were grate together in the same well.
  • The opening of large tracts by the ice-cutters commonly causes a pond to break up earlier; for the water, agitated by the wind, even in cold weather, wears away the surrounding ice.
  • But such was not the effect on Walden that year, for she had soon got a thick new garment to take the place of the old.
  • One pleasant morning after a cold night, February 24th, 1850, having gone to Flint's Pond to spend the day, I noticed with surprise, that when I struck the ice with the head of my axe, it resounded like a gong for many rods around, or as if I had struck on a tight drum-head.
  • Fogs and rains and warmer suns are gradually melting the snow; the days have grown sensibly longer; and I see how I shall get through the winter without adding to my wood-pile, for large fires are no longer necessary.
  • The whole bank, which is from twenty to forty feet high, is sometimes overlaid with a mass of this kind of foliage, or sandy rupture, for a quarter of a mile on one or both sides, the produce of one spring day.
  • I feel as if I were nearer to the vitals of the globe, for this sandy overflow is something such a foliaceous mass as the vitals of the animal body.
  • What Champollion will decipher this hieroglyphic for us, that we may turn over a new leaf at last?
  • It is almost identical with that, for in the growing days of June, when the rills are dry, the grass-blades are their channels, and from year to year the herds drink at this perennial green stream, and the mower draws from it betimes their winter supply.
  • I heard a robin in the distance, the first I had heard for many a thousand years, methought, whose note I shall not forget for many a thousand more--the same sweet and powerful song as of yore.
  • For a week I heard the circling, groping clangor of some solitary goose in the foggy mornings, seeking its companion, and still peopling the woods with the sound of a larger life than they could sustain.
  • The Merlin it seemed to me it might be called: but I care not for its name.
  • Our village life would stagnate if it were not for the unexplored forests and meadows which surround it.
  • The phÅ“be had already come once more and looked in at my door and window, to see if my house was cavern-like enough for her, sustaining herself on humming wings with clinched talons, as if she held by the air, while she surveyed the premises.
  • The wild goose is more of a cosmopolite than we; he breaks his fast in Canada, takes a luncheon in the Ohio, and plumes himself for the night in a southern bayou.
  • Our voyaging is only great-circle sailing, and the doctors prescribe for diseases of the skin merely.
  • I left the woods for as good a reason as I went there.
  • Perhaps it seemed to me that I had several more lives to live, and could not spare any more time for that one.
  • It is remarkable how easily and insensibly we fall into a particular route, and make a beaten track for ourselves.
  • "They pretend," as I hear, "that the verses of Kabir have four different senses; illusion, spirit, intellect, and the exoteric doctrine of the Vedas"; but in this part of the world it is considered a ground for complaint if a man's writings admit of more than one interpretation.
  • If the condition of things which we were made for is not yet, what were any reality which we can substitute?
  • He proceeded instantly to the forest for wood, being resolved that it should not be made of unsuitable material; and as he searched for and rejected stick after stick, his friends gradually deserted him, for they grew old in their works and died, but he grew not older by a moment.
  • For the most part, we are not where we are, but in a false position.
  • Give me a hammer, and let me feel for the furring.
  • The style, the house and grounds and "entertainment" pass for nothing with me.
  • I called on the king, but he made me wait in his hall, and conducted like a man incapacitated for hospitality.
  • Carried out, it finally amounts to this, which also I believe,--"That government is best which governs not at all"; and when men are prepared for it, that will be the kind of government which they will have.
  • Witness the present Mexican war, the work of comparatively a few individuals using the standing government as their tool; for, in the outset, the people would not have consented to this measure.
  • It has not the vitality and force of a single living man; for a single man can bend it to his will.
  • But it is not the less necessary for this; for the people must have some complicated machinery or other, and hear its din, to satisfy that idea of government which they have.
  • After all, the practical reason why, when the power is once in the hands of the people, a majority are permitted, and for a long period continue, to rule, is not because they are most likely to be in the right, nor because this seems fairest to the minority, but because they are physically the strongest.
  • It is not desirable to cultivate a respect for the law, so much as for the right.
  • Law never made men a whit more just; and, by means of their respect for it, even the well-disposed are daily made the agents of injustice.
  • A very few, as heroes, patriots, martyrs, reformers in the great sense, and men, serve the state with their consciences also, and so necessarily resist it for the most part; and they are commonly treated as enemies by it.
  • I cannot for an instant recognize that political organization as my government which is the slave's government also.
  • Of this, he says, every man shall judge for himself.
  • It is not so important that many should be as good as you, as that there be some absolute goodness somewhere; for that will leaven the whole lump.
  • They will wait, well disposed, for others to remedy the evil, that they may no longer have it to regret.
  • Even voting for the right is doing nothing for it.
  • When the majority shall at length vote for the abolition of slavery, it will be because they are indifferent to slavery, or because there is but little slavery left to be abolished by their vote.
  • Oh for a man who is a man, and, as my neighbor says, has a bone in his back which you cannot pass your hand through!
  • As for adopting the ways which the State has provided for remedying the evil, I know not of such ways.
  • I think that it is enough if they have God on their side, without waiting for that other one.
  • For it matters not how small the beginning may seem to be: what is once well done is done forever.
  • Under a government which imprisons any unjustly, the true place for a just man is also a prison.
  • Absolutely speaking, the more money, the less virtue; for money comes between a man and his objects, and obtains them for him; and it was certainly no great virtue to obtain it.
  • The best thing a man can do for his culture when he is rich is to endeavor to carry out those schemes which he entertained when he was poor.
  • For my own part, I should not like to think that I ever rely on the protection of the State.
  • This makes it impossible for a man to live honestly, and at the same time comfortably in outward respects.
  • You must live within yourself, and depend upon yourself always tucked up and ready for a start, and not have many affairs.
  • I did not see why the schoolmaster should be taxed to support the priest, and not the priest the schoolmaster: for I was not the State's schoolmaster, but I supported myself by voluntary subscription.
  • I did not for a moment feel confined, and the walls seemed a great waste of stone and mortar.
  • I saw that the State was half-witted, that it was timid as a lone woman with her silver spoons, and that it did not know its friends from its foes, and I lost all my remaining respect for it, and pitied it.
  • I am not responsible for the successful working of the machinery of society.
  • I pumped my fellow-prisoner as dry as I could, for fear I should never see him again; but at length he showed me which was my bed, and left me to blow out the lamp.
  • It was like travelling into a far country, such as I had never expected to behold, to lie there for one night.
  • It seemed to me that I never had heard the town-clock strike before, nor the evening sounds of the village; for we slept with the windows open, which were inside the grating.
  • When they called for the vessels again, I was green enough to return what bread I had left; but my comrade seized it, and said that I should lay that up for lunch or dinner.
  • It was formerly the custom in our village, when a poor debtor came out of jail, for his acquaintances to salute him, looking through their fingers, which were crossed to represent the grating of a jail window, "How do ye do?"
  • It is for no particular item in the tax-bill that I refuse to pay it.
  • I seek rather, I may say, even an excuse for conforming to the laws of the land.
  • If a man is thought-free, fancy-free, imagination-free, that which is not never for a long time appearing to be to him, unwise rulers or reformers cannot fatally interrupt him.
  • His words are wisdom to those legislators who contemplate no essential reform in the existing government; but for thinkers, and those who legislate for all time, he never once glances at the subject.
  • We love eloquence for its own sake, and not for any truth which it may utter, or any heroism it may inspire.
  • They have no genius or talent for comparatively humble questions of taxation and finance, commerce and manufacturers and agriculture.
  • If we were left solely to the wordy wit of legislators in Congress for our guidance, uncorrected by the seasonable experience and the effectual complaints of the people, America would not long retain her rank among the nations.
  • Perhaps I don't understand things, but Austria never has wished, and does not wish, for war.
  • Here the conversation seemed interesting and he stood waiting for an opportunity to express his own views, as young people are fond of doing.
  • It is only necessary for one powerful nation like Russia--barbaric as she is said to be--to place herself disinterestedly at the head of an alliance having for its object the maintenance of the balance of power of Europe, and it would save the world!
  • In passing Prince Vasili seized Pierre's hand and said to Anna Pavlovna: Educate this bear for me!
  • Nothing is so necessary for a young man as the society of clever women.
  • She had now come to Petersburg to procure an appointment in the Guards for her only son.
  • Prince Vasili knew this, and having once realized that if he asked on behalf of all who begged of him, he would soon be unable to ask for himself, he became chary of using his influence.
  • What have they done for Louis XVII, for the Queen, or for Madame Elizabeth?
  • Pierre wished to make a remark, for the conversation interested him, but Anna Pavlovna, who had him under observation, interrupted:
  • The vicomte who was meeting him for the first time saw clearly that this young Jacobin was not so terrible as his words suggested.
  • Having thanked Anna Pavlovna for her charming soiree, the guests began to take their leave.
  • Prince Hippolyte laughed spasmodically as he stood in the porch waiting for the vicomte whom he had promised to take home.
  • "Do you know, you are a terrible chap for all your innocent airs," continued the vicomte.
  • If it were a war for freedom I could understand it and should be the first to enter the army; but to help England and Austria against the greatest man in the world is not right.
  • She had changed her gown for a house dress as fresh and elegant as the other.
  • Prince Andrew rose and politely placed a chair for her.
  • Excuse me for saying so, but you have no sense about women.
  • Just for a whim of his own, goodness only knows why, he leaves me and locks me up alone in the country.
  • You are going to the war and have no pity for me.
  • Marry when you are old and good for nothing--or all that is good and noble in you will be lost.
  • Pierre was always astonished at Prince Andrew's calm manner of treating everybody, his extraordinary memory, his extensive reading (he had read everything, knew everything, and had an opinion about everything), but above all at his capacity for work and study.
  • And if Pierre was often struck by Andrew's lack of capacity for philosophical meditation (to which he himself was particularly addicted), he regarded even this not as a defect but as a sign of strength.
  • For the present I am free and am all right.
  • He asked me for tonight, but I won't go.
  • There's a bet for you!...
  • The Guards had already left Petersburg on the tenth of August, and her son, who had remained in Moscow for his equipment, was to join them on the march to Radzivilov.
  • "I am so sorry for the poor count," said the visitor.
  • And they have had to suffer for it.
  • This is all that his foreign education has done for him!
  • I know it all very well for Prince Vasili told me himself.
  • "Ma chere, there is a time for everything," said the countess with feigned severity.
  • Natasha, raising her face for a moment from her mother's mantilla, glanced up at her through tears of laughter, and again hid her face.
  • "Ah yes, my dear," said the count, addressing the visitor and pointing to Nicholas, "his friend Boris has become an officer, and so for friendship's sake he is leaving the university and me, his old father, and entering the military service, my dear.
  • And there was a place and everything waiting for him in the Archives Department!
  • He waited for the first pause in the conversation, and then with a distressed face left the room to find Sonya.
  • Especially just at this age, so dangerous both for girls and boys.
  • There she paused and stood listening to the conversation in the drawing room, waiting for Boris to come out.
  • "Let him look for me," thought she.
  • How can you torture me and yourself like that, for a mere fancy? said Nicholas taking her hand.
  • In another four years... then I will ask for your hand.
  • Sonya was sitting close to Nicholas who was copying out some verses for her, the first he had ever written.
  • Though what she said was quite just, perhaps for that very reason no one replied, and the four simply looked at one another.
  • There's no one to interest himself for him.
  • He said to me, 'I am sorry I can do so little for you, dear Princess.
  • But, Nataly, you know my love for my son: I would do anything for his happiness!
  • But I have promised and will do it for your sake.
  • Believe me, Prince, a mother's heart will never forget what you have done for us.
  • And I should so like to thank Uncle once for all his kindness to me and Boris.
  • I absolutely must see him, however painful it may be for me.
  • "Would not such a meeting be too trying for him, dear Anna Mikhaylovna?" said he.
  • Here he is, and the count has not once asked for him.
  • He had now been for some days in Moscow and was staying as usual at his father's house.
  • He sent for Pierre and said to him: My dear fellow, if you are going to behave here as you did in Petersburg, you will end very badly; that is all I have to say to you.
  • "England is done for," said he, scowling and pointing his finger at someone unseen.
  • Pierre smiled in his good-natured way as if afraid for his companion's sake that the latter might say something he would afterwards regret.
  • For a long time Pierre could not understand, but when he did, he jumped up from the sofa, seized Boris under the elbow in his quick, clumsy way, and, blushing far more than Boris, began to speak with a feeling of mingled shame and vexation.
  • We have not met for such a long time... not since we were children.
  • He has not sent for me....
  • I am sorry for him as a man, but what can one do?
  • After he had gone Pierre continued pacing up and down the room for a long time, no longer piercing an imaginary foe with his imaginary sword, but smiling at the remembrance of that pleasant, intelligent, and resolute young man.
  • As often happens in early youth, especially to one who leads a lonely life, he felt an unaccountable tenderness for this young man and made up his mind that they would be friends.
  • After Anna Mikhaylovna had driven off with her son to visit Count Cyril Vladimirovich Bezukhov, Countess Rostova sat for a long time all alone applying her handkerchief to her eyes.
  • The thousand rubles I paid for Taras were not ill- spent.
  • But mind, don't bring me such tattered and dirty notes as last time, but nice clean ones for the countess.
  • "Annette, for heaven's sake don't refuse me," the countess began, with a blush that looked very strange on her thin, dignified, elderly face, and she took the money from under the handkerchief.
  • This is for Boris from me, for his outfit.
  • It was just the moment before a big dinner when the assembled guests, expecting the summons to zakuska, * avoid engaging in any long conversation but think it necessary to move about and talk, in order to show that they are not at all impatient for their food.
  • Pierre had come just at dinnertime and was sitting awkwardly in the middle of the drawing room on the first chair he had come across, blocking the way for everyone.
  • You must look for husbands for them whether you like it or not....
  • All were silent, expectant of what was to follow, for this was clearly only a prelude.
  • Natasha, who sat opposite, was looking at Boris as girls of thirteen look at the boy they are in love with and have just kissed for the first time.
  • "What are you thumping the table for?" she demanded of the hussar, "and why are you exciting yourself?
  • The card tables were drawn out, sets made up for boston, and the count's visitors settled themselves, some in the two drawing rooms, some in the sitting room, some in the library.
  • After she had played a little air with variations on the harp, she joined the other young ladies in begging Natasha and Nicholas, who were noted for their musical talent, to sing something.
  • The chest in the passage was the place of mourning for the younger female generation in the Rostov household.
  • It's all very well for you...
  • Nicholas will tell her himself, and he doesn't care at all for Julie.
  • Outside the house, beyond the gates, a group of undertakers, who hid whenever a carriage drove up, waited in expectation of an important order for an expensive funeral.
  • "And I?" he said; "do you think it is easier for me?
  • I know, I know how hard it is for you to talk or think of such matters.
  • Do you know I have sent for Pierre?
  • "And this is gratitude--this is recognition for those who have sacrificed everything for his sake!" she cried.
  • "Who sacrificed everything for him," chimed in the princess, who would again have risen had not the prince still held her fast, "though he never could appreciate it.
  • You understand that my sole desire is conscientiously to carry out his wishes; that is my only reason for being here.
  • It's that protege of yours, that sweet Princess Drubetskaya, that Anna Mikhaylovna whom I would not take for a housemaid... the infamous, vile woman!
  • Last winter she wheedled herself in here and told the count such vile, disgraceful things about us, especially about Sophie--I can't repeat them--that it made the count quite ill and he would not see us for a whole fortnight.
  • Pausing for a moment, Pierre noticed several other men of the same kind hiding in the shadow of the house on both sides.
  • "Perhaps the count did not ask for me," said Pierre when he reached the landing.
  • Anna Mikhaylovna paused and waited for him to come up.
  • She smiled, hid her face in her handkerchief, and remained with it hidden for awhile; then looking up and seeing Pierre she again began to laugh.
  • Pierre paid no more attention to this occurrence than to the rest of what went on, having made up his mind once for all that what he saw happening around him that evening was in some way essential.
  • The sick man was so surrounded by doctors, princesses, and servants that Pierre could no longer see the reddish-yellow face with its gray mane-- which, though he saw other faces as well, he had not lost sight of for a single moment during the whole service.
  • Here! exclaimed different voices; and the heavy breathing of the bearers and the shuffling of their feet grew more hurried, as if the weight they were carrying were too much for them.
  • "But, my dear princess," answered Anna Mikhaylovna blandly but impressively, blocking the way to the bedroom and preventing the other from passing, "won't this be too much for poor Uncle at a moment when he needs repose?
  • Their efforts in the struggle for the portfolio were the only sounds audible, but it was evident that if the princess did speak, her words would not be flattering to Anna Mikhaylovna.
  • "Remember that you will answer for the consequences," said Prince Vasili severely.
  • Yes, my dear, this is a great loss for us all, not to speak of you.
  • On the morning of the day that the young couple were to arrive, Princess Mary entered the antechamber as usual at the time appointed for the morning greeting.
  • The large table covered with books and plans, the tall glass-fronted bookcases with keys in the locks, the high desk for writing while standing up, on which lay an open exercise book, and the lathe with tools laid ready to hand and shavings scattered around--all indicated continuous, varied, and orderly activity.
  • "For tomorrow!" said he, quickly finding the page and making a scratch from one paragraph to another with his hard nail.
  • "Wait a bit, here's a letter for you," said the old man suddenly, taking a letter addressed in a woman's hand from a bag hanging above the table, onto which he threw it.
  • I will confess to you, dear Mary, that in spite of his extreme youth his departure for the army was a great grief to me.
  • You are fortunate, for the latter are generally the stronger!
  • As for the past two years people have amused themselves by finding husbands for me (most of whom I don't even know), the matchmaking chronicles of Moscow now speak of me as the future Countess Bezukhova.
  • But you will understand that I have no desire for the post.
  • Though there are things in it difficult for the feeble human mind to grasp, it is an admirable book which calms and elevates the soul.
  • Why do you suppose that I should look severely on your affection for that young man?
  • As to his inheritance and the part played by Prince Vasili, it is very sad for both.
  • I pity Prince Vasili but am still more sorry for Pierre.
  • I never could understand the fondness some people have for confusing their minds by dwelling on mystical books that merely awaken their doubts and excite their imagination, giving them a bent for exaggeration quite contrary to Christian simplicity.
  • Let us not seek to penetrate what mysteries they contain; for how can we, miserable sinners that we are, know the terrible and holy secrets of Providence while we remain in this flesh which forms an impenetrable veil between us and the Eternal?
  • In regard to this project of marriage for me, I will tell you, dear sweet friend, that I look on marriage as a divine institution to which we must conform.
  • However painful it may be to me, should the Almighty lay the duties of wife and mother upon me I shall try to perform them as faithfully as I can, without disquieting myself by examining my feelings toward him whom He may give me for husband.
  • "Ah! what joy for the princess!" exclaimed she: "At last!
  • When Prince Andrew went in the two princesses, who had only met once before for a short time at his wedding, were in each other's arms warmly pressing their lips to whatever place they happened to touch.
  • When the twenty minutes had elapsed and the time had come for the old prince to get up, Tikhon came to call the young prince to his father.
  • The old man made a departure from his usual routine in honor of his son's arrival: he gave orders to admit him to his apartments while he dressed for dinner.
  • You at least must tackle him properly, or else if he goes on like this he'll soon have us, too, for his subjects!
  • The house for your wife is ready.
  • Prince Andrew, seeing that his father insisted, began--at first reluctantly, but gradually with more and more animation, and from habit changing unconsciously from Russian to French as he went on--to explain the plan of operation for the coming campaign.
  • In the dining room, which like all the rooms in the house was exceedingly lofty, the members of the household and the footmen--one behind each chair--stood waiting for the prince to enter.
  • A footman moved the chair for her.
  • He listened, refraining from a reply, and involuntarily wondered how this old man, living alone in the country for so many years, could know and discuss so minutely and acutely all the recent European military and political events.
  • At such moments one reviews the past and plans for the future.
  • You are not angry with me for coming?
  • I don't want any other life, and can't, for I know no other.
  • But think, Andrew: for a young society woman to be buried in the country during the best years of her life, all alone--for Papa is always busy, and I... well, you know what poor resources I have for entertaining a woman used to the best society.
  • As Sterne says: 'We don't love people so much for the good they have done us, as for the good we have done them.'
  • To be quite frank, Mary, I expect Father's character sometimes makes things trying for you, doesn't it?
  • Trying for me!... said she.
  • The only thing that is hard for me...
  • Think as you please, but do this for my sake!
  • Please, Andrew, for my sake!...
  • There was a look of tenderness, for he was touched, but also a gleam of irony on his face.
  • They were silent for a while.
  • And I am sorry for that, he went on.
  • Prince Andrew felt sorry for his sister.
  • I thought you were in your room, she said, for some reason blushing and dropping her eyes.
  • She was speaking as usual in French, and as if after long self-restraint she wished to make up for lost time.
  • All were waiting for them to come out.
  • For not dilly-dallying and not hanging to a woman's apron strings.
  • When her confinement is due, send to Moscow for an accoucheur....
  • Now here is a Lombard bond and a letter; it is a premium for the man who writes a history of Suvorov's wars.
  • Here are some jottings for you to read when I am gone.
  • What? asked both princesses when they saw for a moment at the door Prince Andrew and the figure of the old man in a white dressing gown, spectacled and wigless, shouting in an angry voice.
  • A member of the Hofkriegsrath from Vienna had come to Kutuzov the day before with proposals and demands for him to join up with the army of the Archduke Ferdinand and Mack, and Kutuzov, not considering this junction advisable, meant, among other arguments in support of his view, to show the Austrian general the wretched state in which the troops arrived from Russia.
  • The words passed along the lines and an adjutant ran to look for the missing officer.
  • I'll teach you to dress the men in fancy coats for a parade....
  • Having snapped at an officer for an unpolished badge, at another because his line was not straight, he reached the third company.
  • "Att-ention!" shouted the regimental commander in a soul-shaking voice which expressed joy for himself, severity for the regiment, and welcome for the approaching chief.
  • He used to have a predilection for Bacchus.
  • The regimental commander was afraid he might be blamed for this and did not answer.
  • I ask an opportunity to atone for my fault and prove my devotion to His Majesty the Emperor and to Russia!
  • "A cup of vodka for the men from me," he added so that the soldiers could hear.
  • On returning from the review, Kutuzov took the Austrian general into his private room and, calling his adjutant, asked for some papers relating to the condition of the troops on their arrival, and the letters that had come from the Archduke Ferdinand, who was in command of the advanced army.
  • And Kutuzov smiled in a way that seemed to say, You are quite at liberty not to believe me and I don't even care whether you do or not, but you have no grounds for telling me so.
  • Kutuzov's face as he stood in the open doorway remained perfectly immobile for a few moments.
  • Don't you understand that either we are officers serving our Tsar and our country, rejoicing in the successes and grieving at the misfortunes of our common cause, or we are merely lackeys who care nothing for their master's business.
  • * "Forty thousand men massacred and the army of our allies destroyed, and you find that a cause for jesting!"
  • * (2) "It is all very well for that good-for-nothing fellow of whom you have made a friend, but not for you, not for you."
  • Rostov patted the horse's neck and then his flank, and lingered for a moment.
  • * (2) Hurrah for the Austrians!
  • Hurrah for the Russians!
  • Hurrah for Emperor Alexander!
  • * "And hurrah for the whole world!"
  • "What about your master?" he asked Lavrushka, Denisov's orderly, whom all the regiment knew for a rogue.
  • Then he remained silent for a while, and all at once looked cheerfully with his glittering, black eyes at Rostov.
  • "Oh, he's all right, a good horse," answered Rostov, though the horse for which he had paid seven hundred rubbles was not worth half that sum.
  • It's the quartermaster for the money.
  • Well, what are you standing there for, you sca'cwow?
  • "Now then, you devil's puppet, look alive and hunt for it!" shouted Denisov, suddenly, turning purple and rushing at the man with a threatening gesture.
  • But these words came like a piteous, despairing cry and an entreaty for pardon.
  • Ask Denisov whether it is not out of the question for a cadet to demand satisfaction of his regimental commander?
  • I... for me... for the honor of the regiment I'd...
  • Ah well, I'll show that in action, and for me the honor of the flag...
  • It'll be worse for you.
  • Bogdanich is vindictive and you'll pay for your obstinacy, said Kirsten.
  • Bring him a bottle for such news!
  • On my word I'd give five years of my life for it!
  • Only fit for a fair! said one.
  • They're led about just for show! remarked another.
  • "Take a stick between your legs, that'll suit you for a horse!" the hussar shouted back.
  • Rostov did not think what this call for stretchers meant; he ran on, trying only to be ahead of the others; but just at the bridge, not looking at the ground, he came on some sticky, trodden mud, stumbled, and fell on his hands.
  • But now, even if they do get peppered, the squadron may be recommended for honors and he may get a ribbon.
  • For Christ's sake let me alone! cried the wounded man, but still he was lifted and laid on the stretcher.
  • Nicholas Rostov turned away and, as if searching for something, gazed into the distance, at the waters of the Danube, at the sky, and at the sun.
  • "I should wish for nothing else, nothing, if only I were there," thought Rostov.
  • No one had taken any notice, for everyone knew the sensation which the cadet under fire for the first time had experienced.
  • "Here's something for you to report," said Zherkov.
  • On the twenty-eighth of October Kutuzov with his army crossed to the left bank of the Danube and took up a position for the first time with the river between himself and the main body of the French.
  • In this action for the first time trophies were taken: banners, cannon, and two enemy generals.
  • For the first time, after a fortnight's retreat, the Russian troops had halted and after a fight had not only held the field but had repulsed the French.
  • "That's for them all," he said to the officer who came up.
  • After washing and dressing, Prince Andrew came into the diplomat's luxurious study and sat down to the dinner prepared for him.
  • Besides it was pleasant, after his reception by the Austrians, to speak if not in Russian (for they were speaking French) at least with a Russian who would, he supposed, share the general Russian antipathy to the Austrians which was then particularly strong.
  • It was not the question "What for?" but the question "How?" that interested him.
  • Bilibin's services were valued not only for what he wrote, but also for his skill in dealing and conversing with those in the highest spheres.
  • * "But my dear fellow, with all my respect for the Orthodox Russian army, I must say that your victory was not particularly victorious."
  • Why didn't you capture one, just one, marshal for us?
  • All that is beautiful, but what do we, I mean the Austrian court, care for your victories?
  • Not only occupied, but Bonaparte is at Schonbrunn, and the count, our dear Count Vrbna, goes to him for orders.
  • You see that your victory is not a matter for great rejoicing and that you can't be received as a savior.
  • When Prince Andrew reached the room prepared for him and lay down in a clean shirt on the feather bed with its warmed and fragrant pillows, he felt that the battle of which he had brought tidings was far, far away from him.
  • Having dressed for his attendance at court in full parade uniform, which he had not worn for a long time, he went into Bilibin's study fresh, animated, and handsome, with his hand bandaged.
  • "I shall scarcely be able to avail myself of your hospitality, gentlemen, it is already time for me to go," replied Prince Andrew looking at his watch.
  • He has a passion for giving audiences, but he does not like talking himself and can't do it, as you will see.
  • Yesterday's adjutant reproached him for not having stayed at the palace, and offered him his own house.
  • He did not know whom to answer, and for a few seconds collected his thoughts.
  • Before returning to Bilibin's Prince Andrew had gone to a bookshop to provide himself with some books for the campaign, and had spent some time in the shop.
  • Leave it to those who are no longer fit for anything else....
  • All along the sides of the road fallen horses were to be seen, some flayed, some not, and broken-down carts beside which solitary soldiers sat waiting for something, and again soldiers straggling from their companies, crowds of whom set off to the neighboring villages, or returned from them dragging sheep, fowls, hay, and bulging sacks.
  • On reaching the village he dismounted and went to the nearest house, intending to rest if but for a moment, eat something, and try to sort out the stinging and tormenting thoughts that confused his mind.
  • "Well, I have got all I need into packs for two horses," said Nesvitski.
  • They've made up splendid packs for me--fit to cross the Bohemian mountains with.
  • Orders are issued for a battle.
  • They got into the carriage and drove for a few minutes in silence.
  • Kutuzov with his transport had still to march for some days before he could reach Znaim.
  • Bonaparte himself, not trusting to his generals, moved with all the Guards to the field of battle, afraid of letting a ready victim escape, and Bagration's four thousand men merrily lighted campfires, dried and warmed themselves, cooked their porridge for the first time for three days, and not one of them knew or imagined what was in store for him.
  • Another company, a lucky one for not all the companies had vodka, crowded round a pockmarked, broad-shouldered sergeant major who, tilting a keg, filled one after another the canteen lids held out to him.
  • It's a shame for a soldier to steal; a soldier must be honest, honorable, and brave, but if he robs his fellows there is no honor in him, he's a scoundrel.
  • Behind our position was a steep and deep dip, making it difficult for artillery and cavalry to retire.
  • Prince Andrew stopped, waiting for him to come up; Prince Bagration reined in his horse and recognizing Prince Andrew nodded to him.
  • No one had given Tushin orders where and at what to fire, but after consulting his sergeant major, Zakharchenko, for whom he had great respect, he had decided that it would be a good thing to set fire to the village.
  • It can't be an attack, for they are not moving; it can't be a square--for they are not drawn up for that.
  • "Please, your excellency, for God's sake!" he kept saying, glancing for support at an officer of the suite who turned away from him.
  • The staff officer joined in the colonel's appeals, but Bagration did not reply; he only gave an order to cease firing and re-form, so as to give room for the two approaching battalions.
  • Having reached the left flank, instead of going to the front where the firing was, he began to look for the general and his staff where they could not possibly be, and so did not deliver the order.
  • But the regiments, both cavalry and infantry, were by no means ready for the impending action.
  • I beg of you, I beg of you," he repeated, "to occupy the position and prepare for an attack."
  • I don't vish to destroy my men for your pleasure!
  • The general and colonel looked sternly and significantly at one another like two fighting cocks preparing for battle, each vainly trying to detect signs of cowardice in the other.
  • It was no longer possible for the hussars to retreat with the infantry.
  • However inconvenient the position, it was now necessary to attack in order to cut a way through for themselves.
  • He remembered his mother's love for him, and his family's, and his friends', and the enemy's intention to kill him seemed impossible.
  • For more than ten seconds he stood not moving from the spot or realizing the situation.
  • One sentiment, fear for his life, possessed his whole being.
  • Our fugitives returned, the battalions re-formed, and the French who had nearly cut our left flank in half were for the moment repulsed.
  • All the guns, without waiting for orders, were being fired in the direction of the conflagration.
  • The French columns that had advanced beyond the village went back; but as though in revenge for this failure, the enemy placed ten guns to the right of the village and began firing them at Tushin's battery.
  • Little Tushin, moving feebly and awkwardly, kept telling his orderly to "refill my pipe for that one!" and then, scattering sparks from it, ran forward shading his eyes with his small hand to look at the French.
  • The soldiers, for the most part handsome fellows and, as is always the case in an artillery company, a head and shoulders taller and twice as broad as their officer--all looked at their commander like children in an embarrassing situation, and the expression on his face was invariably reflected on theirs.
  • Owing to the terrible uproar and the necessity for concentration and activity, Tushin did not experience the slightest unpleasant sense of fear, and the thought that he might be killed or badly wounded never occurred to him.
  • Now look out for the ball... we'll throw it back.
  • Good-bye, my dear fellow! and for some unknown reason tears suddenly filled his eyes.
  • Though the orders were to abandon the wounded, many of them dragged themselves after troops and begged for seats on the gun carriages.
  • At the foot of the hill, a pale hussar cadet, supporting one hand with the other, came up to Tushin and asked for a seat.
  • Captain, for God's sake!
  • Tell them to give me a seat, for God's sake!
  • "Lay a cloak for him to sit on, lad," he said, addressing his favorite soldier.
  • "It was the officer, your honor, stained it," answered the artilleryman, wiping away the blood with his coat sleeve, as if apologizing for the state of his gun.
  • Captain Tushin, having given orders to his company, sent a soldier to find a dressing station or a doctor for the cadet, and sat down by a bonfire the soldiers had kindled on the road.
  • Drowsiness was irresistibly mastering him, but he kept awake by an excruciating pain in his arm, for which he could find no satisfactory position.
  • Then a thin, pale soldier, his neck bandaged with a bloodstained leg band, came up and in angry tones asked the artillerymen for water.
  • Then a cheerful soldier ran up, begging a little fire for the infantry.
  • A nice little hot torch for the infantry!
  • Thanks for the fire--we'll return it with interest, said he, carrying away into the darkness a glowing stick.
  • How was it that two guns were abandoned in the center? he inquired, searching with his eyes for someone.
  • For a moment he dozed, but in that short interval innumerable things appeared to him in a dream: his mother and her large white hand, Sonya's thin little shoulders, Natasha's eyes and laughter, Denisov with his voice and mustache, and Telyanin and all that affair with Telyanin and Bogdanich.
  • He tried to get away from them, but they would not for an instant let his shoulder move a hair's breadth.
  • He was alone now, except for a soldier who was sitting naked at the other side of the fire, warming his thin yellow body.
  • Still less did he think of injuring anyone for his own advantage.
  • Schemes and devices for which he never rightly accounted to himself, but which formed the whole interest of his life, were constantly shaping themselves in his mind, arising from the circumstances and persons he met.
  • He had Pierre at hand in Moscow and procured for him an appointment as Gentleman of the Bedchamber, which at that time conferred the status of Councilor of State, and insisted on the young man accompanying him to Petersburg and staying at his house.
  • Something always drew him toward those richer and more powerful than himself and he had rare skill in seizing the most opportune moment for making use of people.
  • From that day the eldest princess quite changed toward Pierre and began knitting a striped scarf for him.
  • Prince Vasili had come to the conclusion that it was necessary to throw this bone--a bill for thirty thousand rubles--to the poor princess that it might not occur to her to speak of his share in the affair of the inlaid portfolio.
  • But you will see everything for yourself when you get to Petersburg.
  • It is high time for you to get away from these terrible recollections.
  • By "what was due from the Ryazan estate" Prince Vasili meant several thousand rubles quitrent received from Pierre's peasants, which the prince had retained for himself.
  • Even if Anna Pavlovna did not say so, he could see that she wished to and only refrained out of regard for his modesty.
  • When he read that sentence, Pierre felt for the first time that some link which other people recognized had grown up between himself and Helene, and that thought both alarmed him, as if some obligation were being imposed on him which he could not fulfill, and pleased him as an entertaining supposition.
  • Wait a bit, I have something in view for you this evening.
  • Go and keep her company for ten minutes.
  • For so young a girl, such tact, such masterly perfection of manner!
  • The old aunt received the two young people in her corner, but seemed desirous of hiding her adoration for Helene and inclined rather to show her fear of Anna Pavlovna.
  • Pierre was so used to that smile, and it had so little meaning for him, that he paid no attention to it.
  • Don't be angry with me for exercising an old woman's privilege.
  • When he got home he could not sleep for a long time for thinking of what had happened.
  • He had arranged this for himself so as to visit his neglected estates at the same time and pick up his son Anatole where his regiment was stationed, and take him to visit Prince Nicholas Bolkonski in order to arrange a match for him with the daughter of that rich old man.
  • And though Prince Vasili, when he stayed in (as he said) for Pierre's sake, hardly exchanged a couple of words with him, Pierre felt unable to disappoint him.
  • Pierre knew that everyone was waiting for him to say a word and cross a certain line, and he knew that sooner or later he would step across it, but an incomprehensible terror seized him at the thought of that dreadful step.
  • On Helene's name day, a small party of just their own people--as his wife said--met for supper at Prince Vasili's.
  • Anna Pavlovna threatened him on behalf of "our dear Vyazmitinov," and in her eyes, which, for an instant, glanced at Pierre, Prince Vasili read a congratulation on his future son-in-law and on his daughter's happiness.
  • The old princess sighed sadly as she offered some wine to the old lady next to her and glanced angrily at her daughter, and her sigh seemed to say: "Yes, there's nothing left for you and me but to sip sweet wine, my dear, now that the time has come for these young ones to be thus boldly, provocatively happy."
  • Into the insignificant, trifling, and artificial interests uniting that society had entered the simple feeling of the attraction of a healthy and handsome young man and woman for one another.
  • Some, as if unwilling to distract her from an important occupation, came up to her for a moment and made haste to go away, refusing to let her see them off.
  • While the guests were taking their leave Pierre remained for a long time alone with Helene in the little drawing room where they were sitting.
  • "This happiness is not for you," some inner voice whispered to him.
  • This happiness is for those who have not in them what there is in you.
  • However, at nine o'clock the prince, in his velvet coat with a sable collar and cap, went out for his usual walk.
  • The road is not swept for the princess my daughter, but for a minister!
  • For me, there are no ministers!
  • The prince reciprocated this antipathy, but it was overpowered by his contempt for her.
  • Forgive me for heaven's sake...
  • "All right, all right," interrupted the prince, and laughing his unnatural way, he stretched out his hand for Alpatych to kiss, and then proceeded to his study.
  • He regarded his whole life as a continual round of amusement which someone for some reason had to provide for him.
  • Remember, for you everything depends on this.
  • To tell them that she felt ashamed for herself and for them would be to betray her agitation, while to decline their offers to dress her would prolong their banter and insistence.
  • Now please, do it for my sake.
  • Could the joy of love, of earthly love for a man, be for her?
  • In her thoughts of marriage Princess Mary dreamed of happiness and of children, but her strongest, most deeply hidden longing was for earthly love.
  • Desire nothing for thyself, seek nothing, be not anxious or envious.
  • She saw Prince Vasili's face, serious for an instant at the sight of her, but immediately smiling again, and the little princess curiously noting the impression "Marie" produced on the visitors.
  • It was evident that he could be silent in this way for a very long time.
  • Perhaps he did not really think this when he met women--even probably he did not, for in general he thought very little--but his looks and manner gave that impression.
  • "And didn't Hippolyte tell you?" asked Prince Vasili, turning to his son and seizing the little princess' arm as if she would have run away and he had just managed to catch her, "didn't he tell you how he himself was pining for the dear princess, and how she showed him the door?
  • When Paris was mentioned, Mademoiselle Bourienne for her part seized the opportunity of joining in the general current of recollections.
  • And who would marry Marie for love?
  • They'll take her for her connections and wealth.
  • Are there no women living unmarried, and even the happier for it?
  • Prince Vasili had brought his son with the evident intention of proposing, and today or tomorrow he would probably ask for an answer.
  • Anatole kissed the old man, and looked at him with curiosity and perfect composure, waiting for a display of the eccentricities his father had told him to expect.
  • Prince Bolkonski sat down in his usual place in the corner of the sofa and, drawing up an armchair for Prince Vasili, pointed to it and began questioning him about political affairs and news.
  • "Is it for visitors you've got yourself up like that, eh?" said he.
  • You have done up your hair in this new way for the visitors, and before the visitors I tell you that in future you are never to dare to change your way of dress without my consent.
  • I'm ready for it tomorrow!
  • The little princess, like an old war horse that hears the trumpet, unconsciously and quite forgetting her condition, prepared for the familiar gallop of coquetry, without any ulterior motive or any struggle, but with naive and lighthearted gaiety.
  • She rang for her maid and asked her to sleep in her room.
  • She sat in an armchair in her dressing jacket and nightcap and Katie, sleepy and disheveled, beat and turned the heavy feather bed for the third time, muttering to herself.
  • And don't I see that that idiot had eyes only for Bourienne--I shall have to get rid of her.
  • If she has no pride for herself she might at least have some for my sake!
  • "I expect you have guessed that Prince Vasili has not come and brought his pupil with him" (for some reason Prince Bolkonski referred to Anatole as a "pupil") "for the sake of my beautiful eyes.
  • I love you more than ever," said Princess Mary, "and I will try to do all I can for your happiness."
  • I thank you for the honor, but I shall never be your son's wife.
  • But for God's sake, be careful, you know how it may affect your mamma.
  • Natasha, seeing the impression the news of her brother's wound produced on Sonya, felt for the first time the sorrowful side of the news.
  • Petya paced the room in silence for a time.
  • After a brief description of the campaign and the two battles in which he had taken part, and his promotion, Nicholas said that he kissed his father's and mother's hands asking for their blessing, and that he kissed Vera, Natasha, and Petya.
  • Nicholas' letter was read over hundreds of times, and those who were considered worthy to hear it had to come to the countess, for she did not let it out of her hands.
  • The universal experience of ages, showing that children do grow imperceptibly from the cradle to manhood, did not exist for the countess.
  • For more than a week preparations were being made, rough drafts of letters to Nicholas from all the household were written and copied out, while under the supervision of the countess and the solicitude of the count, money and all things necessary for the uniform and equipment of the newly commissioned officer were collected.
  • For more than a week preparations were being made, rough drafts of letters to Nicholas from all the household were written and copied out, while under the supervision of the countess and the solicitude of the count, money and all things necessary for the uniform and equipment of the newly commissioned officer were collected.
  • Anna Mikhaylovna, practical woman that she was, had even managed by favor with army authorities to secure advantageous means of communication for herself and her son.
  • That day Nicholas Rostov received a letter from Boris, telling him that the Ismaylov regiment was quartered for the night ten miles from Olmutz and that he wanted to see him as he had a letter and money for him.
  • They had come by easy stages, their knapsacks conveyed on carts, and the Austrian authorities had provided excellent dinners for the officers at every halting place.
  • They had not met for nearly half a year and, being at the age when young men take their first steps on life's road, each saw immense changes in the other, quite a new reflection of the society in which they had taken those first steps.
  • I say, send for some wine.
  • He went to his bed, drew a purse from under the clean pillow, and sent for wine.
  • As for us, Count, we get along on our pay.
  • I can tell you for myself...
  • Well, have you sent Gabriel for some wine?
  • "Shouldn't we now send for Berg?" asked Boris.
  • Prince Andrew, who liked to help young men, was flattered by being asked for his assistance and being well disposed toward Boris, who had managed to please him the day before, he wished to do what the young man wanted.
  • Seeing that smile, Rostov involuntarily smiled himself and felt a still stronger flow of love for his sovereign.
  • How gladly would he have died at once for his Tsar!
  • "Oh, to die, to die for him," thought Rostov.
  • The day after the review, Boris, in his best uniform and with his comrade Berg's best wishes for success, rode to Olmutz to see Bolkonski, wishing to profit by his friendliness and obtain for himself the best post he could--preferably that of adjutant to some important personage, a position in the army which seemed to him most attractive.
  • In spite of this, or rather because of it, next day, November 15, after dinner he again went to Olmutz and, entering the house occupied by Kutuzov, asked for Bolkonski.
  • Prince Andrew was in and Boris was shown into a large hall probably formerly used for dancing, but in which five beds now stood, and furniture of various kinds: a table, chairs, and a clavichord.
  • When he entered, Prince Andrew, his eyes drooping contemptuously (with that peculiar expression of polite weariness which plainly says, "If it were not my duty I would not talk to you for a moment"), was listening to an old Russian general with decorations, who stood very erect, almost on tiptoe, with a soldier's obsequious expression on his purple face, reporting something.
  • "Yes, I was thinking"--for some reason Boris could not help blushing-- "of asking the commander-in-chief.
  • He turned away and waited impatiently for Prince Andrew's return from the commander-in- chief's room.
  • But this is what we'll do: I have a good friend, an adjutant general and an excellent fellow, Prince Dolgorukov; and though you may not know it, the fact is that now Kutuzov with his staff and all of us count for nothing.
  • We shall see whether he cannot attach you to himself or find a place for you somewhere nearer the sun.
  • Under cover of obtaining help of this kind for another, which from pride he would never accept for himself, he kept in touch with the circle which confers success and which attracted him.
  • Our enormous forces, undoubtedly superior to Napoleon's, were concentrated in one place, the troops inspired by the Emperors' presence were eager for action.
  • And do you know, my dear fellow, it seems to me that Bonaparte has decidedly lost bearings, you know that a letter was received from him today for the Emperor.
  • All the same, it was Bilibin who found a suitable form for the address.
  • And the talkative Dolgorukov, turning now to Boris, now to Prince Andrew, told how Bonaparte wishing to test Markov, our ambassador, purposely dropped a handkerchief in front of him and stood looking at Markov, probably expecting Markov to pick it up for him, and how Markov immediately dropped his own beside it and picked it up without touching Bonaparte's.
  • You know I should be very glad to do all in my power both for you and for this dear young man.
  • Next day, the army began its campaign, and up to the very battle of Austerlitz, Boris was unable to see either Prince Andrew or Dolgorukov again and remained for a while with the Ismaylov regiment.
  • At dawn on the sixteenth of November, Denisov's squadron, in which Nicholas Rostov served and which was in Prince Bagration's detachment, moved from the place where it had spent the night, advancing into action as arranged, and after going behind other columns for about two thirds of a mile was stopped on the highroad.
  • The Cossacks sold the horse for two gold pieces, and Rostov, being the richest of the officers now that he had received his money, bought it.
  • He felt that this nearness by itself made up to him for the day he had lost.
  • He was happy as a lover when the longed-for moment of meeting arrives.
  • Casually, while surveying the squadron, the Emperor's eyes met Rostov's and rested on them for not more than two seconds.
  • We will all die for him gladly!
  • To the joy and pride of the whole army, a personal interview was refused, and instead of the Sovereign, Prince Dolgorukov, the victor at Wischau, was sent with Savary to negotiate with Napoleon if, contrary to expectations, these negotiations were actuated by a real desire for peace.
  • Toward evening Dolgorukov came back, went straight to the Tsar, and remained alone with him for a long time.
  • Wheels creak on their axles as the cogs engage one another and the revolving pulleys whirr with the rapidity of their movement, but a neighboring wheel is as quiet and motionless as though it were prepared to remain so for a hundred years; but the moment comes when the lever catches it and obeying the impulse that wheel begins to creak and joins in the common motion the result and aim of which are beyond its ken.
  • The fete is for tomorrow.
  • But they heard him at the council of war and will hear him when he talks sense, but to temporize and wait for something now when Bonaparte fears nothing so much as a general battle is impossible.
  • If he weren't afraid of a battle why did he ask for that interview?
  • "Despite my great respect for old Kutuzov," he continued, "we should be a nice set of fellows if we were to wait about and so give him a chance to escape, or to trick us, now that we certainly have him in our hands!
  • If at first the members of the council thought that Kutuzov was pretending to sleep, the sounds his nose emitted during the reading that followed proved that the commander-in-chief at that moment was absorbed by a far more serious matter than a desire to show his contempt for the dispositions or anything else--he was engaged in satisfying the irresistible human need for sleep.
  • Weyrother, with the gesture of a man too busy to lose a moment, glanced at Kutuzov and, having convinced himself that he was asleep, took up a paper and in a loud, monotonous voice began to read out the dispositions for the impending battle, under a heading which he also read out:
  • Dispositions for an attack on the enemy position behind Kobelnitz and Sokolnitz, November 30, 1805.
  • For this object it is necessary that...
  • "Gentlemen, the dispositions for tomorrow--or rather for today, for it is past midnight--cannot now be altered," said he.
  • But was it really not possible for Kutuzov to state his views plainly to the Emperor?
  • He thought of her pregnancy and felt sorry for her and for himself, and in a nervously emotional and softened mood he went out of the hut in which he was billeted with Nesvitski and began to walk up and down before it.
  • Tomorrow everything may be over for me!
  • All these memories will be no more, none of them will have any meaning for me.
  • Tomorrow perhaps, even certainly, I have a presentiment that for the first time I shall have to show all I can do.
  • And then that happy moment, that Toulon for which he had so long waited, presents itself to him at last.
  • The dispositions for the next battle are planned by him alone.
  • Yes, for that alone!
  • Rostov asked again, after waiting for a reply.
  • Bagration called to him from the hill not to go beyond the stream, but Rostov pretended not to hear him and did not stop but rode on and on, continually mistaking bushes for trees and gullies for men and continually discovering his mistakes.
  • In this way the action began for the first, second, and third columns, which had gone down into the valley.
  • Today was a great day for him--the anniversary of his coronation.
  • In front, far off on the farther shore of that sea of mist, some wooded hills were discernible, and it was there the enemy probably was, for something could be descried.
  • The silence lasted for about a minute.
  • Prince Andrew, who was a little behind looking at them, turned to an adjutant to ask him for a field glass.
  • Yes, see it is!... for certain....
  • "Stop those wretches!" gasped Kutuzov to the regimental commander, pointing to the flying soldiers; but at that instant, as if to punish him for those words, bullets flew hissing across the regiment and across Kutuzov's suite like a flock of little birds.
  • "How quiet, peaceful, and solemn; not at all as I ran," thought Prince Andrew--"not as we ran, shouting and fighting, not at all as the gunner and the Frenchman with frightened and angry faces struggled for the mop: how differently do those clouds glide across that lofty infinite sky!
  • He could see nothing more, for immediately afterwards cannon began firing from somewhere and smoke enveloped everything.
  • And suddenly he was seized by a panic of fear for himself and for the issue of the whole battle.
  • I must look for the commander in chief here, and if all is lost it is for me to perish with the rest.
  • They've all bolted long ago! said the soldier, laughing for some reason and shaking himself free.
  • The sensation of those terrible whistling sounds and of the corpses around him merged in Rostov's mind into a single feeling of terror and pity for himself.
  • Those speeches were intended for quite other conditions, they were for the most part to be spoken at a moment of victory and triumph, generally when he was dying of wounds and the sovereign had thanked him for heroic deeds, and while dying he expressed the love his actions had proved.
  • "The ammunition for the guns in position is exhausted, Your Majesty," said an adjutant who had come from the batteries that were firing at Augesd.
  • The Emperor without waiting for an answer turned away and said to one of the officers as he went: Have these gentlemen attended to and taken to my bivouac; let my doctor, Larrey, examine their wounds.
  • How good it would be to know where to seek for help in this life, and what to expect after it beyond the grave!
  • You shall have three rubles for vodka--get on!
  • Is everyone all right? he thought, stopping for a moment with a sinking heart, and then immediately starting to run along the hall and up the warped steps of the familiar staircase.
  • Sonya too, all rosy red, clung to his arm and, radiant with bliss, looked eagerly toward his eyes, waiting for the look for which she longed.
  • He gave her a grateful look, but was still expectant and looking for someone.
  • Denisov was shown to the room prepared for him, and the Rostovs all gathered round Nicholas in the sitting room.
  • His brother and sisters struggled for the places nearest to him and disputed with one another who should bring him his tea, handkerchief, and pipe.
  • The servants were bringing in jugs and basins, hot water for shaving, and their well- brushed clothes.
  • Denisov hid his hairy legs under the blanket, looking with a scared face at his comrade for help.
  • Such a friend that I burned my arm for her sake.
  • I burned this to prove my love for her.
  • Sitting on the sofa with the little cushions on its arms, in what used to be his old schoolroom, and looking into Natasha's wildly bright eyes, Rostov re-entered that world of home and childhood which had no meaning for anyone else, but gave him some of the best joys of his life; and the burning of an arm with a ruler as a proof of love did not seem to him senseless, he understood and was not surprised at it.
  • She, if she loves anyone, does it for life, but I don't understand that, I forget quickly.
  • Her looks asked him to forgive her for having dared, by Natasha's intermediacy, to remind him of his promise, and then thanked him for his love.
  • His looks thanked her for offering him his freedom and told her that one way or another he would never cease to love her, for that would be impossible.
  • His passion for the Emperor had cooled somewhat in Moscow.
  • The races, the English Club, sprees with Denisov, and visits to a certain house--that was another matter and quite the thing for a dashing young hussar!
  • To him the club entrusted the arrangement of the festival in honor of Bagration, for few men knew so well how to arrange a feast on an open-handed, hospitable scale, and still fewer men would be so well able and willing to make up out of their own resources what might be needed for the success of the fete.
  • "That's it, that's it!" exclaimed the count, and gaily seizing his son by both hands, he cried, "Now I've got you, so take the sleigh and pair at once, and go to Bezukhov's, and tell him 'Count Ilya has sent you to ask for strawberries and fresh pineapples.'
  • The count was delighted at Anna Mikhaylovna's taking upon herself one of his commissions and ordered the small closed carriage for her.
  • The men who set the tone in conversation--Count Rostopchin, Prince Yuri Dolgorukov, Valuev, Count Markov, and Prince Vyazemski--did not show themselves at the club, but met in private houses in intimate circles, and the Moscovites who took their opinions from others--Ilya Rostov among them--remained for a while without any definite opinion on the subject of the war and without leaders.
  • Reasons were found for the incredible, unheard- of, and impossible event of a Russian defeat, everything became clear, and in all corners of Moscow the same things began to be said.
  • All Moscow repeated Prince Dolgorukov's saying: "If you go on modeling and modeling you must get smeared with clay," suggesting consolation for our defeat by the memory of former victories; and the words of Rostopchin, that French soldiers have to be incited to battle by highfalutin words, and Germans by logical arguments to show them that it is more dangerous to run away than to advance, but that Russian soldiers only need to be restrained and held back!
  • Evidently just before coming to the dinner he had had his hair and whiskers trimmed, which changed his appearance for the worse.
  • The committeemen met him at the first door and, expressing their delight at seeing such a highly honored guest, took possession of him as it were, without waiting for his reply, surrounded him, and led him to the drawing room.
  • It was at first impossible to enter the drawing-room door for the crowd of members and guests jostling one another and trying to get a good look at Bagration over each other's shoulders, as if he were some rare animal.
  • All were silent, waiting for what he would say.
  • Many followed his example, and the loud shouting continued for a long time.
  • Pierre recalled how Helene had smilingly expressed disapproval of Dolokhov's living at their house, and how cynically Dolokhov had praised his wife's beauty to him and from that time till they came to Moscow had not left them for a day.
  • Despite Denisov's request that he would take no part in the matter, Rostov agreed to be Dolokhov's second, and after dinner he discussed the arrangements for the duel with Nesvitski, Bezukhov's second.
  • If you are going to fight a duel, and you make a will and write affectionate letters to your parents, and if you think you may be killed, you are a fool and are lost for certain.
  • "I should not be doing my duty, Count," he said in timid tones, "and should not justify your confidence and the honor you have done me in choosing me for your second, if at this grave, this very grave, moment I did not tell you the whole truth.
  • The smoke, rendered denser by the mist, prevented him from seeing anything for an instant, but there was no second report as he had expected.
  • A misfortune for life?
  • "Louis XVI was executed because they said he was dishonorable and a criminal," came into Pierre's head, "and from their point of view they were right, as were those too who canonized him and died a martyr's death for his sake.
  • Then Robespierre was beheaded for being a despot.
  • But at the moment when he imagined himself calmed by such reflections, she suddenly came into his mind as she was at the moments when he had most strongly expressed his insincere love for her, and he felt the blood rush to his heart and had again to get up and move about and break and tear whatever came to his hand.
  • He woke up and looked round for a while with a startled expression, unable to realize where he was.
  • She did not sit down but looked at him with a contemptuous smile, waiting for the valet to go.
  • A week later Pierre gave his wife full power to control all his estates in Great Russia, which formed the larger part of his property, and left for Petersburg alone.
  • She looked at Princess Mary, then sat thinking for a while with that expression of attention to something within her that is only seen in pregnant women, and suddenly began to cry.
  • No, you know it's too soon for news.
  • She prayed for her brother as living and was always awaiting news of his return.
  • "Your excellency, should not Mary Bogdanovna be sent for?" said one of the maids who was present.
  • (In accordance with Lise's and Prince Andrew's wishes they had sent in good time to Moscow for a doctor and were expecting him at any moment.)
  • "You did not get my letter?" he asked, and not waiting for a reply-- which he would not have received, for the princess was unable to speak-- he turned back, rapidly mounted the stairs again with the doctor who had entered the hall after him (they had met at the last post station), and again embraced his sister.
  • He covered his face with his hands and remained so for some minutes.
  • "What have they taken a baby in there for?" thought Prince Andrew in the first second.
  • "Yes, Count," she would say, "he is too noble and pure-souled for our present, depraved world.
  • Why, if he was so jealous, as I see things he should have shown it sooner, but he lets it go on for months.
  • I don't care a straw about anyone but those I love; but those I love, I love so that I would give my life for them, and the others I'd throttle if they stood in my way.
  • I have an adored, a priceless mother, and two or three friends--you among them--and as for the rest I only care about them in so far as they are harmful or useful.
  • I have not yet met that divine purity and devotion I look for in women.
  • If I found such a one I'd give my life for her!
  • The first half of the winter of 1806, which Nicholas Rostov spent in Moscow, was one of the happiest, merriest times for him and the whole family.
  • "There's nothing for me to understand," she cried out with resolute self-will, "he is wicked and heartless.
  • Dolokhov, who did not usually care for the society of ladies, began to come often to the house, and the question for whose sake he came (though no one spoke of it) was soon settled.
  • Dolokhov often dined at the Rostovs', never missed a performance at which they were present, and went to Iogel's balls for young people which the Rostovs always attended.
  • Orders were given to raise recruits, ten men in every thousand for the regular army, and besides this, nine men in every thousand for the militia.
  • For the Rostov family the whole interest of these preparations for war lay in the fact that Nicholas would not hear of remaining in Moscow, and only awaited the termination of Denisov's furlough after Christmas to return with him to their regiment.
  • For the Rostov family the whole interest of these preparations for war lay in the fact that Nicholas would not hear of remaining in Moscow, and only awaited the termination of Denisov's furlough after Christmas to return with him to their regiment.
  • "And I was looking for you," said Natasha running out to him.
  • Dolokhov was a suitable and in some respects a brilliant match for the dowerless, orphan girl.
  • From the point of view of the old countess and of society it was out of the question for her to refuse him.
  • I know, heaven knows how, but I know for certain that you won't marry her.
  • "That is enough for me," said Sonya, blushing.
  • There was the fact that only those came who wished to dance and amuse themselves as girls of thirteen and fourteen do who are wearing long dresses for the first time.
  • Whatever person she happened to look at she was in love with for that moment.
  • Knowing that Denisov had a reputation even in Poland for the masterly way in which he danced the mazurka, Nicholas ran up to Natasha:
  • "I'll sing for you a whole evening," said Natasha.
  • He came out from behind the chairs, clasped his partner's hand firmly, threw back his head, and advanced his foot, waiting for the beat.
  • Denisov, flushed after the mazurka and mopping himself with his handkerchief, sat down by Natasha and did not leave her for the rest of the evening.
  • For two days after that Rostov did not see Dolokhov at his own or at Dolokhov's home: on the third day he received a note from him:
  • He was at once shown to the best room, which Dolokhov had taken for that evening.
  • "Gentlemen," said Dolokhov after he had dealt for some time.
  • He laid down the seven of hearts, on which with a broken bit of chalk he had written "800 rubles" in clear upright figures; he emptied the glass of warm champagne that was handed him, smiled at Dolokhov's words, and with a sinking heart, waiting for a seven to turn up, gazed at Dolokhov's hands which held the pack.
  • Nicholas had replied that it would be more than enough for him and that he gave his word of honor not to take anything more till the spring.
  • Now only twelve hundred rubles was left of that money, so that this seven of hearts meant for him not only the loss of sixteen hundred rubles, but the necessity of going back on his word.
  • Such a little while ago I came to this table with the thought of winning a hundred rubles to buy that casket for Mamma's name day and then going home.
  • Supper, it's time for supper!
  • Dolokhov cut him short, as if to remind him that it was not for him to jest.
  • To say "tomorrow" and keep up a dignified tone was not difficult, but to go home alone, see his sisters, brother, mother, and father, confess and ask for money he had no right to after giving his word of honor, was terrible.
  • The old countess, waiting for the return of her husband and son, sat playing patience with the old gentlewoman who lived in their house.
  • Vasili Dmitrich is staying a day longer for my sake!
  • At that moment she was oblivious of her surroundings, and from her smiling lips flowed sounds which anyone may produce at the same intervals and hold for the same time, but which leave you cold a thousand times and the thousand and first time thrill you and make you weep.
  • Natasha, that winter, had for the first time begun to sing seriously, mainly because Denisov so delighted in her singing.
  • And suddenly the whole world centered for him on anticipation of the next note, the next phrase, and everything in the world was divided into three beats: "Oh mio crudele affetto."...
  • "Ah, it can't be avoided!" thought Nicholas, for the first and last time.
  • "It can't be helped It happens to everyone!" said the son, with a bold, free, and easy tone, while in his soul he regarded himself as a worthless scoundrel whose whole life could not atone for his crime.
  • The old count cast down his eyes on hearing his son's words and began bustlingly searching for something.
  • It's all very well for you, said Natasha, with a responsive smile.
  • I am so sorry for him!
  • It's high time for you to be married, answered the countess sharply and sarcastically.
  • No, Mamma, but I'm so sorry for him.
  • And there's nothing for you to say.
  • Vasili Dmitrich, I'm so sorry for you!...
  • "Vasili Dmitrich, I thank you for the honor," she said, with an embarrassed voice, though it sounded severe to Denisov--"but my daughter is so young, and I thought that, as my son's friend, you would have addressed yourself first to me.
  • After Denisov's departure, Rostov spent another fortnight in Moscow, without going out of the house, waiting for the money his father could not at once raise, and he spent most of his time in the girls' room.
  • After his interview with his wife Pierre left for Petersburg.
  • Pierre gave no answer, for he neither heard nor saw anything.
  • It is good for me, bad for another traveler, and for himself it's unavoidable, because he needs money for food; the man said an officer had once given him a thrashing for letting a private traveler have the courier horses.
  • And I," continued Pierre, "shot Dolokhov because I considered myself injured, and Louis XVI was executed because they considered him a criminal, and a year later they executed those who executed him--also for some reason.
  • "I make bold to ask your excellency to move a little for this gentleman," said the postmaster, entering the room followed by another traveler, also detained for lack of horses.
  • When everything was ready, the stranger opened his eyes, moved to the table, filled a tumbler with tea for himself and one for the beardless old man to whom he passed it.
  • "But if for reason you don't feel inclined to talk to me," said the old man, "say so, my dear sir."
  • He stopped and remained silent for a long time.
  • What have you done for your neighbor?
  • But it is I, above all, who am to blame for everything.
  • The Mason remained silent for a long time, evidently considering.
  • A person of very high standing in our Brotherhood has made application for you to be received into our Order before the usual term and has proposed to me to be your sponsor.
  • "For what have you come hither?" asked the newcomer, turning in Pierre's direction at a slight rustle made by the latter.
  • With bated breath and beating heart he moved toward the Rhetor (by which name the brother who prepared a seeker for entrance into the Brotherhood was known).
  • For a long time he could not utter a word, so that the Rhetor had to repeat his question.
  • Have you sought for means of attaining your aim in religion?
  • The important mystery mentioned by the Rhetor, though it aroused his curiosity, did not seem to him essential, and the second aim, that of purifying and regenerating himself, did not much interest him because at that moment he felt with delight that he was already perfectly cured of his former faults and was ready for all that was good.
  • "I am ready for everything," said Pierre.
  • Pierre quickly took out his purse and watch, but could not manage for some time to get the wedding ring off his fat finger.
  • Pierre hurriedly began taking off his right boot also and was going to tuck up the other trouser leg to save this stranger the trouble, but the Mason told him that was not necessary and gave him a slipper for his left foot.
  • The Mason did not move and for a long time said nothing after this answer.
  • The second pair of man's gloves he was to wear at the meetings, and finally of the third, a pair of women's gloves, he said: Dear brother, these woman's gloves are intended for you too.
  • On the previous evening at the Lodge, he had heard that a rumor of his duel had reached the Emperor and that it would be wiser for him to leave Petersburg.
  • Let us write her a letter at once, and she'll come here and all will be explained, or else, my dear boy, let me tell you it's quite likely you'll have to suffer for it.
  • He blinked, went red, got up and sat down again, struggling with himself to do what was for him the most difficult thing in life--to say an unpleasant thing to a man's face, to say what the other, whoever he might be, did not expect.
  • And he jumped up and opened the door for him.
  • A week later, Pierre, having taken leave of his new friends, the Masons, and leaving large sums of money with them for alms, went away to his estates.
  • The duel between Pierre and Dolokhov was hushed up and, in spite of the Emperor's severity regarding duels at that time, neither the principals nor their seconds suffered for it.
  • We shall not cease to express our sincere views on that subject, and can only say to the King of Prussia and others: 'So much the worse for you.
  • In consequence of this discovery his whole manner of life, all his relations with old friends, all his plans for his future, were completely altered.
  • For some time he engrossed the general attention, and Anna Pavlovna felt that the novelty she had served up was received with pleasure by all her visitors.
  • "You absolutely must come and see me," she said in a tone that implied that, for certain considerations he could not know of, this was absolutely necessary.
  • It is too painful for her!
  • Anna Pavlovna waited for him to go on, but as he seemed quite decided to say no more she began to tell of how at Potsdam the impious Bonaparte had stolen the sword of Frederick the Great.
  • We are not fighting pour le Roi de Prusse, but for right principles.
  • Little Nicholas had been unwell for four days.
  • The coachman who had driven the old prince to town returned bringing papers and letters for Prince Andrew.
  • He threw the mixture onto the floor and asked for some more water.
  • Wait, for heaven's sake.
  • I have certainly acquired a taste for war, and it is just as well for me; what I have seen during these last three months is incredible.
  • The mails are taken to the field marshal's room, for he likes to do everything himself.
  • I am called in to help sort the letters and take those meant for us.
  • The field marshal looks on and waits for letters addressed to him.
  • 'Grant leave to retire to his country seat to an old man who is already in any case dishonored by being unable to fulfill the great and glorious task for which he was chosen.
  • In short, we retreat after the battle but send a courier to Petersburg with news of a victory, and General Bennigsen, hoping to receive from Petersburg the post of commander in chief as a reward for his victory, does not give up the command of the army to General Buxhowden.
  • Twice the marauders even attack our headquarters, and the commander-in-chief has to ask for a battalion to disperse them.
  • He drew the curtain aside and for some time his frightened, restless eyes could not find the baby.
  • When he reached Kiev he sent for all his stewards to the head office and explained to them his intentions and wishes.
  • About 80,000 went in payments on all the estates to the Land Bank, about 30,000 went for the upkeep of the estate near Moscow, the town house, and the allowance to the three princesses; about 15,000 was given in pensions and the same amount for asylums; 150,000 alimony was sent to the countess; about 70,000 went for interest on debts.
  • So the first task Pierre had to face was one for which he had very little aptitude or inclination--practical business.
  • Continuing to represent the liberation of the serfs as impracticable, he arranged for the erection of large buildings--schools, hospitals, and asylums--on all the estates before the master arrived.
  • Everywhere preparations were made not for ceremonious welcomes (which he knew Pierre would not like), but for just such gratefully religious ones, with offerings of icons and the bread and salt of hospitality, as, according to his understanding of his master, would touch and delude him.
  • The estates he had not before visited were each more picturesque than the other; the serfs everywhere seemed thriving and touchingly grateful for the benefits conferred on them.
  • In another place the women with infants in arms met him to thank him for releasing them from hard work.
  • On all his estates Pierre saw with his own eyes brick buildings erected or in course of erection, all on one plan, for hospitals, schools, and almshouses, which were soon to be opened.
  • This gratitude reminded him of how much more he might do for these simple, kindly people.
  • Returning from his journey through South Russia in the happiest state of mind, Pierre carried out an intention he had long had of visiting his friend Bolkonski, whom he had not seen for two years.
  • At last the conversation gradually settled on some of the topics at first lightly touched on: their past life, plans for the future, Pierre's journeys and occupations, the war, and so on.
  • "One thing I thank God for is that I did not kill that man," said Pierre.
  • "What does harm to another is wrong," said Pierre, feeling with pleasure that for the first time since his arrival Prince Andrew was roused, had begun to talk, and wanted to express what had brought him to his present state.
  • "And who has told you what is bad for another man?" he asked.
  • We all know what is bad for ourselves.
  • To live for myself avoiding those two evils is my whole philosophy now.
  • I lived like that, I lived for myself and ruined my life.
  • "Perhaps you are right for yourself," he added after a short pause, "but everyone lives in his own way.
  • You lived for yourself and say you nearly ruined your life and only found happiness when you began living for others.
  • I lived for glory.-- And after all what is glory?
  • The same love of others, a desire to do something for them, a desire for their approval.--So I lived for others, and not almost, but quite, ruined my life.
  • And I have become calmer since I began to live only for myself.
  • "But what do you mean by living only for yourself?" asked Pierre, growing excited.
  • What evil and error are there in it, if people were dying of disease without help while material assistance could so easily be rendered, and I supplied them with a doctor, a hospital, and an asylum for the aged?
  • And the main thing is," he continued, "that I know, and know for certain, that the enjoyment of doing this good is the only sure happiness in life."
  • He will drag about as a cripple, a burden to everybody, for another ten years.
  • It would be far easier and simpler for him to die.
  • Prince Andrew expressed his ideas so clearly and distinctly that it was evident he had reflected on this subject more than once, and he spoke readily and rapidly like a man who has not talked for a long time.
  • They could not understand that I have not the necessary qualifications for it--the kind of good-natured, fussy shallowness necessary for the position.
  • Why, for this reason!
  • But it is a good thing for proprietors who perish morally, bring remorse upon themselves, stifle this remorse and grow callous, as a result of being able to inflict punishments justly and unjustly.
  • It is those people I pity, and for their sake I should like to liberate the serfs.
  • So that's what I'm sorry for--human dignity, peace of mind, purity, and not the serfs' backs and foreheads, which, beat and shave as you may, always remain the same backs and foreheads.
  • They have mistaken us for my father.
  • Prince Andrew led Pierre to his own apartments, which were always kept in perfect order and readiness for him in his father's house; he himself went to the nursery.
  • Come, and you'll see for yourself.
  • * (2) "For heaven's sake."
  • "Really?" said Pierre, gazing over his spectacles with curiosity and seriousness (for which Princess Mary was specially grateful to him) into Ivanushka's face, who, seeing that she was being spoken about, looked round at them all with crafty eyes.
  • "Oh, master, what are you saying?" exclaimed the horrified Pelageya, turning to Princess Mary for support.
  • His health was better in the winter, but last spring his wound reopened and the doctor said he ought to go away for a cure.
  • And I am also very much afraid for him spiritually.
  • He needs activity, and this quiet regular life is very bad for him.
  • When returning from his leave, Rostov felt, for the first time, how close was the bond that united him to Denisov and the whole regiment.
  • In April the Pavlograds were stationed immovably for some weeks near a totally ruined and deserted German village.
  • As no transports could arrive, the men dispersed about the abandoned and deserted villages, searching for potatoes, but found few even of these.
  • When spring came on, the soldiers found a plant just showing out of the ground that looked like asparagus, which, for some reason, they called "Mashka's sweet root."
  • Despite their pale swollen faces and tattered uniforms, the hussars formed line for roll call, kept things in order, groomed their horses, polished their arms, brought in straw from the thatched roofs in place of fodder, and sat down to dine round the caldrons from which they rose up hungry, joking about their nasty food and their hunger.
  • The seniors tried to collect straw and potatoes and, in general, food for the men.
  • Rostov brought them to his quarters, placed them in his own lodging, and kept them for some weeks while the old man was recovering.
  • She is like a sister to me, and I can't tell you how it offended me... because... well, for that reason....
  • Denisov and Rostov were living in an earth hut, dug out for them by the soldiers and roofed with branches and turf.
  • On each side of the trench, the earth was cut out to a breadth of about two and a half feet, and this did duty for bedsteads and couches.
  • Denisov, who was living luxuriously because the soldiers of his squadron liked him, had also a board in the roof at the farther end, with a piece of (broken but mended) glass in it for a window.
  • One morning, between seven and eight, returning after a sleepless night, he sent for embers, changed his rain-soaked underclothes, said his prayers, drank tea, got warm, then tidied up the things on the table and in his own corner, and, his face glowing from exposure to the wind and with nothing on but his shirt, lay down on his back, putting his arms under his head.
  • He was pleasantly considering the probability of being promoted in a few days for his last reconnoitering expedition, and was awaiting Denisov, who had gone out somewhere and with whom he wanted a talk.
  • Lavrushka was saying something about loaded wagons, biscuits, and oxen he had seen when he had gone out for provisions.
  • You will answer for it, Captain.
  • Our men have had nothing to eat for two days.
  • "And mine have had nothing for two weeks," said Denisov.
  • "Now, what are you pestewing me for?" cried Denisov, suddenly losing his temper.
  • I shall answer for it and not you, and you'd better not buzz about here till you get hurt.
  • The next day the regimental commander sent for Denisov, and holding his fingers spread out before his eyes said:
  • Denisov could not speak and gasped for breath.
  • Alarmed at Denisov's condition, Rostov suggested that he should undress, drink some water, and send for the doctor.
  • Twy me for wobbewy... oh!
  • Perhaps at another time Denisov would not have left the regiment for so slight a wound, but now he took advantage of it to excuse himself from appearing at the staff and went into hospital.
  • When a new one comes he is done for in a week, said the doctor with evident satisfaction.
  • He was evidently vexed and impatient for the talkative doctor to go.
  • "But if you'll step into the officers' wards you'll see for yourself," he added, turning to Rostov.
  • Rostov glanced round, looking for someone who would put this man back in his place and bring him water.
  • "Good day, your honor!" he shouted, rolling his eyes at Rostov and evidently mistaking him for one of the hospital authorities.
  • Looking for Vasili Dmitrich Denisov?
  • "The auditor wrote out a petition for you," continued Tushin, "and you ought to sign it and ask this gentleman to take it.
  • Late in the evening, when Rostov was about to leave, he asked Denisov whether he had no commission for him.
  • In it was the petition to the Emperor drawn up by the auditor, in which Denisov, without alluding to the offenses of the commissariat officials, simply asked for pardon.
  • Boris Drubetskoy had asked the important personage on whom he was in attendance, to include him in the suite appointed for the stay at Tilsit.
  • On the evening of the twenty-fourth of June, Count Zhilinski arranged a supper for his French friends.
  • An expression of annoyance showed itself for a moment on his face on first recognizing Rostov.
  • He really was in their way, for he alone took no part in the conversation which again became general.
  • When he and Boris were alone, Rostov felt for the first time that he could not look Boris in the face without a sense of awkwardness.
  • "Well then, go, go, go..." said Rostov, and refusing supper and remaining alone in the little room, he walked up and down for a long time, hearing the lighthearted French conversation from the next room.
  • Rostov had come to Tilsit the day least suitable for a petition on Denisov's behalf.
  • All is over between us, but I won't leave here without having done all I can for Denisov and certainly not without getting his letter to the Emperor.
  • Saddled horses were standing before the house and the suite were assembling, evidently preparing for the Emperor to come out.
  • If only I were to hand the letter direct to him and tell him all... could they really arrest me for my civilian clothes?
  • And even if they did arrest me for being here, what would it matter? thought he, looking at an officer who was entering the house the Emperor occupied.
  • I'll go in and hand the letter to the Emperor myself so much the worse for Drubetskoy who drives me to it!
  • And suddenly with a determination he himself did not expect, Rostov felt for the letter in his pocket and went straight to the house.
  • Rostov, in dismay, began justifying himself, but seeing the kindly, jocular face of the general, he took him aside and in an excited voice told him the whole affair, asking him to intercede for Denisov, whom the general knew.
  • I'm sorry, sorry for that fine fellow.
  • All the suite drew back and Rostov saw the general talking for some time to the Emperor.
  • But receiving no orders, he remained for some time in that rigid position.
  • The Preobrazhensk battalion, breaking rank, mingled with the French Guards and sat down at the tables prepared for them.
  • Yes, but what luck for Lazarev!
  • Twelve hundred francs' pension for life.
  • Rostov stood at that corner for a long time, watching the feast from a distance.
  • If we're punished, it means that we have deserved it, it's not for us to judge.
  • On other estates the serfs' compulsory labor was commuted for a quitrent.
  • A trained midwife was engaged for Bogucharovo at his expense, and a priest was paid to teach reading and writing to the children of the peasants and household serfs.
  • But apparently the coachman's sympathy was not enough for Peter, and he turned on the box toward his master.
  • During this journey he, as it were, considered his life afresh and arrived at his old conclusion, restful in its hopelessness: that it was not for him to begin anything anew--but that he must live out his life, content to do no harm, and not disturbing himself or desiring anything.
  • Prince Andrew had to see the Marshal of the Nobility for the district in connection with the affairs of the Ryazan estate of which he was trustee.
  • Come now for the last time.
  • She was evidently leaning right out, for the rustle of her dress and even her breathing could be heard.
  • Prince Andrew, too, dared not stir, for fear of betraying his unintentional presence.
  • Oh, you only spoil things for me.
  • Next morning, having taken leave of no one but the count, and not waiting for the ladies to appear, Prince Andrew set off for home.
  • On reaching home Prince Andrew decided to go to Petersburg that autumn and found all sorts of reasons for this decision.
  • A whole series of sensible and logical considerations showing it to be essential for him to go to Petersburg, and even to re-enter the service, kept springing up in his mind.
  • "If it were hot," Prince Andrew would reply at such times very dryly to his sister, "he could go out in his smock, but as it is cold he must wear warm clothes, which were designed for that purpose.
  • He did not know Arakcheev personally, had never seen him, and all he had heard of him inspired him with but little respect for the man.
  • Prince Andrew for the second time asked the adjutant on duty to take in his name, but received an ironical look and was told that his turn would come in due course.
  • Is he to go up for examination?
  • Having talked for a little while in the general circle, Speranski rose and coming up to Prince Andrew took him along to the other end of the room.
  • Certain rights and privileges for the aristocracy appear to me a means of maintaining that sentiment.
  • On returning home in the evening he would jot down in his notebook four or five necessary calls or appointments for certain hours.
  • But he was so busy for whole days together that he had no time to notice that he was thinking of nothing.
  • He was unpleasantly struck, too, by the excessive contempt for others that he observed in Speranski, and by the diversity of lines of argument he used to support his opinions.
  • During the first period of their acquaintance Bolkonski felt a passionate admiration for him similar to that which he had once felt for Bonaparte.
  • "And that is all the state has for the millions it has spent," said he.
  • That is why it is a sin for men like you, Prince, not to serve in these times!
  • Prince Andrew said that for that work an education in jurisprudence was needed which he did not possess.
  • Often after collecting alms, and reckoning up twenty to thirty rubles received for the most part in promises from a dozen members, of whom half were as well able to pay as himself, Pierre remembered the masonic vow in which each Brother promised to devote all his belongings to his neighbor, and doubts on which he tried not to dwell arose in his soul.
  • The Petersburg Freemasons all came to see him, tried to ingratiate themselves with him, and it seemed to them all that he was preparing something for them and concealing it.
  • It taught men to be wise and good and for their own benefit to follow the example and instruction of the best and wisest men.
  • As soon as we have a certain number of worthy men in every state, each of them again training two others and all being closely united, everything will be possible for our order, which has already in secret accomplished much for the welfare of mankind.
  • At that meeting he was struck for the first time by the endless variety of men's minds, which prevents a truth from ever presenting itself identically to two persons.
  • * The Illuminati sought to substitute republican for monarchical institutions.
  • He was told that it would not, and without waiting for the usual formalities he left the lodge and went home.
  • For three days after the delivery of his speech at the lodge he lay on a sofa at home receiving no one and going nowhere.
  • At the same time his mother-in-law, Prince Vasili's wife, sent to him imploring him to come if only for a few minutes to discuss a most important matter.
  • Without replying either to his wife or his mother-in-law, Pierre late one night prepared for a journey and started for Moscow to see Joseph Alexeevich.
  • Joseph Alexeevich, having remained silent and thoughtful for a good while, told me his view of the matter, which at once lit up for me my whole past and the future path I should follow.
  • (2) The purification and reformation of oneself for its reception, and (3) The improvement of the human race by striving for such purification.
  • But if I forgive her for the sake of doing right, then let union with her have only a spiritual aim.
  • She need not know how hard it was for me to see her again.
  • She was visited by the members of the French embassy and by many belonging to that circle and noted for their intellect and polished manners.
  • Pierre was just the husband needed for a brilliant society woman.
  • Her smile for him was the same as for everybody, but sometimes that smile made Pierre uncomfortable.
  • Returned home for dinner and dined alone--the countess had many visitors I do not like.
  • I ate and drank moderately and after dinner copied out some passages for the Brothers.
  • He narrated that episode so persistently and with so important an air that everyone believed in the merit and usefulness of his deed, and he had obtained two decorations for Austerlitz.
  • But on the contrary, my papa and mamma are now provided for--I have arranged that rent for them in the Baltic Provinces--and I can live in Petersburg on my pay, and with her fortune and my good management we can get along nicely.
  • But Berg, smiling pleasantly, explained that if he did not know for certain how much Vera would have and did not receive at least part of the dowry in advance, he would have to break matters off.
  • Berg smiled meekly, kissed the count on the shoulder, and said that he was very grateful, but that it was impossible for him to arrange his new life without receiving thirty thousand in ready money.
  • "Or at least twenty thousand, Count," he added, "and then a note of hand for only sixty thousand."
  • Only excuse me, my dear fellow, I'll give you twenty thousand and a note of hand for eighty thousand as well.
  • He had a brilliant position in society thanks to his intimacy with Countess Bezukhova, a brilliant position in the service thanks to the patronage of an important personage whose complete confidence he enjoyed, and he was beginning to make plans for marrying one of the richest heiresses in Petersburg, plans which might very easily be realized.
  • There's no need for me to marry him.
  • From the carriages emerged men wearing uniforms, stars, and ribbons, while ladies in satin and ermine cautiously descended the carriage steps which were let down for them with a clatter, and then walked hurriedly and noiselessly over the baize at the entrance.
  • In spite of her age and plainness she had gone through the same process as the Rostovs, but with less flurry – for to her it was a matter of routine.
  • Only then did she remember how she must behave at a ball, and tried to assume the majestic air she considered indispensable for a girl on such an occasion.
  • But, fortunately for her, she felt her eyes growing misty, she saw nothing clearly, her pulse beat a hundred to the minute, and the blood throbbed at her heart.
  • He pushed through, evidently looking for someone.
  • Il fait a present la pluie et le beau temps. * He's too proud for anything.
  • The Emperor passed on to the drawing room, the crowd made a rush for the doors, and several persons with excited faces hurried there and back again.
  • The men began to choose partners and take their places for the polonaise.
  • More than half the ladies already had partners and were taking up, or preparing to take up, their positions for the polonaise.
  • She stood with her slender arms hanging down, her scarcely defined bosom rising and falling regularly, and with bated breath and glittering, frightened eyes gazed straight before her, evidently prepared for the height of joy or misery.
  • The strains of the polonaise, which had continued for a considerable time, had begun to sound like a sad reminiscence to Natasha's ears.
  • This family gathering seemed humiliating to Natasha--as if there were nowhere else for the family to talk but here at the ball.
  • That tremulous expression on Natasha's face, prepared either for despair or rapture, suddenly brightened into a happy, grateful, childlike smile.
  • For one of the merry cotillions before supper Prince Andrew was again her partner.
  • When her partner left her Natasha ran across the room to choose two ladies for the figure.
  • At that ball Pierre for the first time felt humiliated by the position his wife occupied in court circles.
  • But either from fatigue or want of sleep he was ill-disposed for work and could get nothing done.
  • The visitor was Bitski, who served on various committees, frequented all the societies in Petersburg, and a passionate devotee of the new ideas and of Speranski, and a diligent Petersburg newsmonger--one of those men who choose their opinions like their clothes according to the fashion, but who for that very reason appear to be the warmest partisans.
  • At dinner the conversation did not cease for a moment and seemed to consist of the contents of a book of funny anecdotes.
  • For a few moments all were silent.
  • His hopes for the future?...
  • And for the first time for a very long while he began making happy plans for the future.
  • Berg explained so clearly why he wanted to collect at his house a small but select company, and why this would give him pleasure, and why though he grudged spending money on cards or anything harmful, he was prepared to run into some expense for the sake of good society--that Pierre could not refuse, and promised to come.
  • Having prepared everything necessary for the party, the Bergs were ready for their guests' arrival.
  • Berg rose and embraced his wife carefully, so as not to crush her lace fichu for which he had paid a good price, kissing her straight on the lips.
  • We must live for society.
  • Pierre disturbed the symmetry by moving a chair for himself, and Berg and Vera immediately began their evening party, interrupting each other in their efforts to entertain their guest.
  • Could she, like other women" (Vera meant herself), "love a man once for all and remain true to him forever?
  • I expect he has told you of his childish love for Natasha?
  • Everyone in the house realized for whose sake Prince Andrew came, and without concealing it he tried to be with Natasha all day.
  • Natasha grew pale, in a panic of expectation, when she remained alone with him for a moment.
  • For heaven's sake don't ask me anything now!
  • At that very time Prince Andrew was sitting with Pierre and telling him of his love for Natasha and his firm resolve to make her his wife.
  • He tried equally to avoid thinking about his wife, and about Natasha and Prince Andrew; and again everything seemed to him insignificant in comparison with eternity; again the question: for what? presented itself; and he forced himself to work day and night at masonic labors, hoping to drive away the evil spirit that threatened him.
  • Where was his spleen, his contempt for life, his disillusionment?
  • I know you are glad for my sake.
  • Prince Andrew needed his father's consent to his marriage, and to obtain this he started for the country next day.
  • With his son, however, he employed the diplomacy he reserved for important occasions and, adopting a quiet tone, discussed the whole matter.
  • Having finished her morning tea she went to the ballroom, which she particularly liked for its loud resonance, and began singing her solfeggio.
  • She knew this for certain, though she hardly heard his voice through the closed doors.
  • "I have come, Countess, to ask for your daughter's hand," said Prince Andrew.
  • My father, to whom I have told my plans, has made it an express condition of his consent that the wedding is not to take place for a year.
  • He is asking for your hand, said the countess, coldly it seemed to Natasha.
  • "Did your mother tell you that it cannot be for a year?" asked Prince Andrew, still looking into her eyes.
  • Natasha repeated suddenly, only now realizing that the marriage was to be postponed for a year.
  • Prince Andrew began to explain to her the reasons for this delay.
  • At first the family felt some constraint in intercourse with Prince Andrew; he seemed a man from another world, and for a long time Natasha trained the family to get used to him, proudly assuring them all that he only appeared to be different, but was really just like all of them, and that she was not afraid of him and no one else ought to be.
  • She asked herself in perplexity: What does he look for in me?
  • "Whatever trouble may come," Prince Andrew continued, "I beg you, Mademoiselle Sophie, whatever may happen, to turn to him alone for advice and help!
  • She did not even cry when, on taking leave, he kissed her hand for the last time.
  • Nor did she cry when he was gone; but for several days she sat in her room dry-eyed, taking no interest in anything and only saying now and then, "Oh, why did he go away?"
  • All the complex laws of man centered for her in one clear and simple law--the law of love and self-sacrifice taught us by Him who lovingly suffered for mankind though He Himself was God.
  • Soon after Prince Andrew had gone, Princess Mary wrote to her friend Julie Karagina in Petersburg, whom she had dreamed (as all girls dream) of marrying to her brother, and who was at that time in mourning for her own brother, killed in Turkey.
  • Religion alone can explain to us what without its help man cannot comprehend: why, for what cause, kind and noble beings able to find happiness in life--not merely harming no one but necessary to the happiness of others--are called away to God, while cruel, useless, harmful persons, or such as are a burden to themselves and to others, are left living.
  • Five years have passed since then, and already I, with my petty understanding, begin to see clearly why she had to die, and in what way that death was but an expression of the infinite goodness of the Creator, whose every action, though generally incomprehensible to us, is but a manifestation of His infinite love for His creatures.
  • As it is, not only has she left us, and particularly Prince Andrew, with the purest regrets and memories, but probably she will there receive a place I dare not hope for myself.
  • And His will is governed only by infinite love for us, and so whatever befalls us is for our good.
  • You will be surprised to hear that the reason for this is Buonaparte!
  • Our family life goes on in the old way except for my brother Andrew's absence.
  • He has realized, it seems to me, that life is not over for him.
  • I do not think my brother will ever marry again, and certainly not her; and this is why: first, I know that though he rarely speaks about the wife he has lost, the grief of that loss has gone too deep in his heart for him ever to decide to give her a successor and our little angel a stepmother.
  • I do not think he would choose her for a wife, and frankly I do not wish it.
  • He asked his sister to forgive him for not having told her of his resolve when he had last visited Bald Hills, though he had spoken of it to his father.
  • If the doctors did not keep me here at the spas I should be back in Russia, but as it is I have to postpone my return for three months.
  • Her father objected to this because he wanted a more distinguished and wealthier match for Andrew.
  • And they all struggled and suffered and tormented one another and injured their souls, their eternal souls, for the attainment of benefits which endure but for an instant.
  • There was one pilgrim, a quiet pockmarked little woman of fifty called Theodosia, who for over thirty years had gone about barefoot and worn heavy chains.
  • When Theodosia had gone to sleep Princess Mary thought about this for a long time, and at last made up her mind that, strange as it might seem, she must go on a pilgrimage.
  • Under guise of a present for the pilgrims, Princess Mary prepared a pilgrim's complete costume for herself: a coarse smock, bast shoes, a rough coat, and a black kerchief.
  • As for Natasha, for a long while Nicholas wondered and laughed whenever he looked at her.
  • He was worried by the impending necessity of interfering in the stupid business matters for which his mother had called him home.
  • (This shrubbery was a well-known haven of refuge for culprits at Otradnoe.
  • But once the countess called her son and informed him that she had a promissory note from Anna Mikhaylovna for two thousand rubles, and asked him what he thought of doing with it.
  • It was the best time of the year for the chase.
  • On the fifteenth, when young Rostov, in his dressing gown, looked out of the window, he saw it was an unsurpassable morning for hunting: it was as if the sky were melting and sinking to the earth without any wind.
  • For a hunt and a gallop, eh? asked Nicholas, scratching Milka behind the ears.
  • Daniel himself felt this, and as usual stood just inside the door, trying to speak softly and not move, for fear of breaking something in the master's apartment, and he hastened to say all that was necessary so as to get from under that ceiling, out into the open under the sky once more.
  • "Yes, we are going," replied Nicholas reluctantly, for today, as he intended to hunt seriously, he did not want to take Natasha and Petya.
  • We are going, but only wolf hunting: it would be dull for you.
  • "Daniel, tell them to saddle for us, and Michael must come with my dogs," she added to the huntsman.
  • Nicholas, with a stern and serious air which showed that now was no time for attending to trifles, went past Natasha and Petya who were trying to tell him something.
  • Take the covert at once, for my Girchik says the Ilagins are at Korniki with their hounds.
  • "Well, nephew, you're going for a big wolf," said "Uncle."
  • Karay was a shaggy old dog with a hanging jowl, famous for having tackled a big wolf unaided.
  • His eyes were rather moist and glittered more than usual, and as he sat in his saddle, wrapped up in his fur coat, he looked like a child taken out for an outing.
  • The thin, hollow-cheeked Chekmar, having got everything ready, kept glancing at his master with whom he had lived on the best of terms for thirty years, and understanding the mood he was in expected a pleasant chat.
  • Simon did not finish, for on the still air he had distinctly caught the music of the hunt with only two or three hounds giving tongue.
  • Nicholas Rostov meanwhile remained at his post, waiting for the wolf.
  • "What would it be to Thee to do this for me?" he said to God.
  • The height of happiness was reached--and so simply, without warning, or noise, or display, that Rostov could not believe his eyes and remained in doubt for over a second.
  • Old Karay had turned his head and was angrily searching for fleas, baring his yellow teeth and snapping at his hind legs.
  • "Karay, ulyulyu!..." he shouted, looking round for the old borzoi who was now his only hope.
  • But when he saw that the horsemen did not dismount and that the wolf shook herself and ran for safety, Daniel set his chestnut galloping, not at the wolf but straight toward the wood, just as Karay had run to cut the animal off.
  • For sole reply Daniel gave him a shy, childlike, meek, and amiable smile.
  • Nicholas, not stopping to talk to the man, asked his sister and Petya to wait for him and rode to the spot where the enemy's, Ilagin's, hunting party was.
  • To expiate his huntsman's offense, Ilagin pressed the Rostovs to come to an upland of his about a mile away which he usually kept for himself and which, he said, swarmed with hares.
  • "Uncle," Rostov, and Ilagin kept stealthily glancing at one another's dogs, trying not to be observed by their companions and searching uneasily for rivals to their own borzois.
  • Yes, she's a good dog, gets what she's after, answered Ilagin indifferently, of the red-spotted bitch Erza, for which, a year before, he had given a neighbor three families of house serfs.
  • For myself, I can tell you, Count, I enjoy riding in company such as this... what could be better?
  • (he again raised his cap to Natasha) "but as for counting skins and what one takes, I don't care about that."
  • Why, you've given a village for each of your borzois!
  • Only the delighted "Uncle" dismounted, and cut off a pad, shaking the hare for the blood to drip off, and anxiously glancing round with restless eyes while his arms and legs twitched.
  • "Rugay, here's a pad for you!" he said, throwing down the hare's muddy pad.
  • For a long time they continued to look at red Rugay who, his arched back spattered with mud and clanking the ring of his leash, walked along just behind "Uncle's" horse with the serene air of a conqueror.
  • A huntsman was sent to Otradnoe for a trap, while Nicholas rode with Natasha and Petya to "Uncle's" house.
  • Natasha felt so lighthearted and happy in these novel surroundings that she only feared the trap would come for her too soon.
  • After a casual pause, such as often occurs when receiving friends for the first time in one's own house, "Uncle," answering a thought that was in his visitors' minds, said:
  • I am not fit for it.
  • That's for you--I haven't brains enough.
  • The door at the end of the passage led to the huntsmen's room, as they called the room for the hunt servants.
  • It was the custom for Mitka to play the balalayka in the huntsmen's room when "Uncle" returned from the chase.
  • I haven't touched it for a long time.
  • Now a fine young fellow must be found as husband for you.
  • She asked "Uncle" for his guitar and at once found the chords of the song.
  • Well, you see, first I thought that Rugay, the red hound, was like Uncle, and that if he were a man he would always keep Uncle near him, if not for his riding, then for his manner.
  • From her feminine point of view she could see only one solution, namely, for Nicholas to marry a rich heiress.
  • She felt this to be their last hope and that if Nicholas refused the match she had found for him, she would have to abandon the hope of ever getting matters right.
  • Karagina had replied that for her part she was agreeable, and everything depend on her daughter's inclination.
  • It is your happiness I wish for, she added, feeling that she was telling an untruth and was becoming entangled.
  • I would sacrifice anything for you--even my feelings.
  • Am I to sacrifice my feelings and my honor for money?
  • I can always sacrifice my feelings for my family's welfare," he said to himself, "but I can't coerce my feelings.
  • If I love Sonya, that feeling is for me stronger and higher than all else.
  • Though she blamed herself for it, she could not refrain from grumbling at and worrying Sonya, often pulling her up without reason, addressing her stiffly as "my dear," and using the formal "you" instead of the intimate "thou" in speaking to her.
  • She felt sorry for herself: sorry that she was being wasted all this time and of no use to anyone-- while she felt herself so capable of loving and being loved.
  • Sonya sat in the drawing room at the round table, copying a design for embroidery.
  • "Stop playing--there's a time for everything," said the old woman.
  • On her way past the butler's pantry she told them to set a samovar, though it was not at all the time for tea.
  • What she drew from the guitar would have had no meaning for other listeners, but in her imagination a whole series of reminiscences arose from those sounds.
  • She was in a mood for brooding on the past.
  • But Natasha stayed by her mother and glanced round as if looking for something.
  • The same faces, the same talk, Papa holding his cup and blowing in the same way! thought Natasha, feeling with horror a sense of repulsion rising up in her for the whole household, because they were always the same.
  • I shall never forget it: I felt sad and sorry for everyone, for myself, and for everyone.
  • "Yes, we're philosophizing," said Natasha, glancing round for a moment and then continuing the conversation.
  • The soul is immortal--well then, if I shall always live I must have lived before, lived for a whole eternity.
  • Sonya, as she listened, thought of the immense difference there was between herself and her friend, and how impossible it was for her to be anything like as bewitching as her cousin.
  • "Idiot!" she screamed at her brother and, running to a chair, threw herself on it, sobbing so violently that she could not stop for a long time.
  • Nicholas, who, as the roads were in splendid condition, wanted to take them all for a drive in his troyka, proposed to take with them about a dozen of the serf mummers and drive to "Uncle's."
  • "You go ahead, Zakhar!" shouted Nicholas to his father's coachman, wishing for a chance to race past him.
  • Sometimes, as she looked at the strange but amusing capers cut by the dancers, who--having decided once for all that being disguised, no one would recognize them--were not at all shy, Pelageya Danilovna hid her face in her handkerchief, and her whole stout body shook with irrepressible, kindly, elderly laughter.
  • Pelageya Danilovna began to recognize the mummers, admired their cleverly contrived costumes, and particularly how they suited the young ladies, and she thanked them all for having entertained her so well.
  • On the way back Nicholas drove at a steady pace instead of racing and kept peering by that fantastic all-transforming light into Sonya's face and searching beneath the eyebrows and mustache for his former and his present Sonya from whom he had resolved never to be parted again.
  • Mamma said she was angling for you.
  • I will never let anyone say anything bad of Sonya, for there is nothing but good in her.
  • But ready as she was to take the smallest speck for the image of a man or of a coffin, she saw nothing.
  • Do it for me....
  • For about three minutes all were silent.
  • Soon after the Christmas holidays Nicholas told his mother of his love for Sonya and of his firm resolve to marry her.
  • Nicholas, for the first time, felt that his mother was displeased with him and that, despite her love for him, she would not give way.
  • Coldly, without looking at her son, she sent for her husband and, when he came, tried briefly and coldly to inform him of the facts, in her son's presence, but unable to restrain herself she burst into tears of vexation and left the room.
  • The father and mother did not speak of the matter to their son again, but a few days later the countess sent for Sonya and, with a cruelty neither of them expected, reproached her niece for trying to catch Nicholas and for ingratitude.
  • She was ready to sacrifice everything for her benefactors.
  • Self- sacrifice was her most cherished idea but in this case she could not see what she ought to sacrifice, or for whom.
  • Exploding at the word intriguer, Nicholas, raising his voice, told his mother he had never expected her to try to force him to sell his feelings, but if that were so, he would say for the last time....
  • The count was more perturbed than ever by the condition of his affairs, which called for some decisive action.
  • His letters for the most part irritated her.
  • For Moscow society Pierre was the nicest, kindest, most intellectual, merriest, and most magnanimous of cranks, a heedless, genial nobleman of the old Russian type.
  • For a long time he could not reconcile himself to the idea that he was one of those same retired Moscow gentlemen-in-waiting he had so despised seven years before.
  • Pierre no longer suffered moments of despair, hypochondria, and disgust with life, but the malady that had formerly found expression in such acute attacks was driven inwards and never left him for a moment.
  • "Helene, who has never cared for anything but her own body and is one of the stupidest women in the world," thought Pierre, "is regarded by people as the acme of intelligence and refinement, and they pay homage to her.
  • The Spaniards, through the Catholic clergy, offer praise to God for their victory over the French on the fourteenth of June, and the French, also through the Catholic clergy, offer praise because on that same fourteenth of June they defeated the Spaniards.
  • Though the doctors warned him that with his corpulence wine was dangerous for him, he drank a great deal.
  • Latterly that private life had become very trying for Princess Mary.
  • Julie, with whom she had corresponded for the last five years, was in Moscow, but proved to be quite alien to her when they met.
  • Like the old emigre who declined to marry the lady with whom he had spent his evenings for years, she regretted Julie's presence and having no one to write to.
  • After dinner, when the footman handed coffee and from habit began with the princess, the prince suddenly grew furious, threw his stick at Philip, and instantly gave instructions to have him conscripted for the army.
  • "And if you allow yourself," he screamed in a fury, addressing Princess Mary for the first time, "to forget yourself again before her as you dared to do yesterday, I will show you who is master in this house.
  • Princess Mary asked Mademoiselle Bourienne's pardon, and also her father's pardon for herself and for Philip the footman, who had begged for her intervention.
  • I have thought it over, and it will be carried out--we must part; so find some place for yourself....
  • Then he slammed the door, sent for Mademoiselle Bourienne, and subsided into his study.
  • At two o'clock the six chosen guests assembled for dinner.
  • The guests were reluctant to address her, feeling that she was in no mood for their conversation.
  • We ought not to fight either for or against Austria.
  • I went to a party last night, and there out of five ladies three were Roman Catholics and had the Pope's indulgence for doing woolwork on Sundays.
  • She did not even notice the special attentions and amiabilities shown her during dinner by Boris Drubetskoy, who was visiting them for the third time already.
  • "Ah, how bitter it is to love someone near to you and to feel that..." she went on in a trembling voice, "that you can do nothing for him but grieve him, and to know that you cannot alter this.
  • I am so fond of Julie that I should be sorry for her.
  • You know my feelings for you!
  • She knew that for the Penza estates and Nizhegorod forests she could demand this, and she received what she demanded.
  • The countess was still unwell and unable to travel but it was impossible to wait for her recovery.
  • She held herself as erect, told everyone her opinion as candidly, loudly, and bluntly as ever, and her whole bearing seemed a reproach to others for any weakness, passion, or temptation--the possibility of which she did not admit.
  • Now what are you dawdling for? she cried to the maids.
  • Bring some rum for tea!...
  • As for them"--and she pointed to the girls--"tomorrow I'll take them first to the Iberian shrine of the Mother of God, and then we'll drive to the Super-Rogue's.
  • One thing has come on top of another: her rags to buy, and now a purchaser has turned up for the Moscow estate and for the house.
  • If you will be so kind, I'll fix a time and go down to the estate just for a day, and leave my lassies with you.
  • I am glad for your sake and I've known him since he was so high.
  • He well remembered the last interview he had had with the old prince at the time of the enrollment, when in reply to an invitation to dinner he had had to listen to an angry reprimand for not having provided his full quota of men.
  • If you'll allow me to leave my Natasha in your hands for a quarter of an hour, Princess, I'll drive round to see Anna Semenovna, it's quite near in the Dogs' Square, and then I'll come back for her.
  • They waited a long time for Natasha to come to dinner that day.
  • That evening the Rostovs went to the Opera, for which Marya Dmitrievna had taken a box.
  • Natasha did not want to go, but could not refuse Marya Dmitrievna's kind offer which was intended expressly for her.
  • No, I had better not think of him; not think of him but forget him, quite forget him for the present.
  • While Natasha was fixing her gaze on her for the second time the lady looked round and, meeting the count's eyes, nodded to him and smiled.
  • She knew what it was all meant to represent, but it was so pretentiously false and unnatural that she first felt ashamed for the actors and then amused at them.
  • And feeling the bright light that flooded the whole place and the warm air heated by the crowd, Natasha little by little began to pass into a state of intoxication she had not experienced for a long while.
  • When he got there he leaned on his elbows and, smiling, talked to her for a long time.
  • They did not drag her away at once, but sang with her for a long time and then at last dragged her off, and behind the scenes something metallic was struck three times and everyone knelt down and sang a prayer.
  • To get better acquainted she asked that one of the young ladies should come into her box for the rest of the performance, and Natasha moved over to it.
  • (He was Duport, who received sixty thousand rubles a year for this art.)
  • Natasha knew for certain that he was enraptured by her.
  • His father announced to him that he would now pay half his debts for the last time, but only on condition that he went to Moscow as adjutant to the commander-in-chief--a post his father had procured for him--and would at last try to make a good match there.
  • There was a special reason for this, as he had got married two years before--a fact known only to his most intimate friends.
  • Anatole had very soon abandoned his wife and, for a payment which he agreed to send to his father-in-law, had arranged to be free to pass himself off as a bachelor.
  • He was instinctively and thoroughly convinced that it was impossible for him to live otherwise than as he did and that he had never in his life done anything base.
  • All will be forgiven her, for she loved much; and all will be forgiven him, for he enjoyed much.
  • Dolokhov, who had reappeared that year in Moscow after his exile and his Persian adventures, and was leading a life of luxury, gambling, and dissipation, associated with his old Petersburg comrade Kuragin and made use of him for his own ends.
  • Anatole was sincerely fond of Dolokhov for his cleverness and audacity.
  • "She's first-rate, my dear fellow, but not for us," replied Dolokhov.
  • To her impatience and pining for him were now added the unpleasant recollection of her interview with Princess Mary and the old prince, and a fear and anxiety of which she did not understand the cause.
  • Helene for her part was sincerely delighted with Natasha and wished to give her a good time.
  • Anatole had asked her to bring him and Natasha together, and she was calling on the Rostovs for that purpose.
  • My brother dined with me yesterday--we nearly died of laughter--he ate nothing and kept sighing for you, my charmer!
  • On hearing of Countess Bezukhova's visit and the invitation for that evening, Marya Dmitrievna remarked:
  • Count Rostov was displeased to see that the company consisted almost entirely of men and women known for the freedom of their conduct.
  • Anatole was at the door, evidently on the lookout for the Rostovs.
  • Anatole moved a chair for Natasha and was about to sit down beside her, but the count, who never lost sight of her, took the seat himself.
  • "Come, come, Natasha!" said the count, as he turned back for his daughter.
  • Anatole asked Natasha for a valse and as they danced he pressed her waist and hand and told her she was bewitching and that he loved her.
  • "One word, just one, for God's sake!" cried Anatole.
  • The Rostovs went away without staying for supper.
  • But if he won't--that's his affair, said Marya Dmitrievna, looking for something in her reticule.
  • Having found what she was looking for in the reticule she handed it to Natasha.
  • Whatever her father's feelings might be, she begged Natasha to believe that she could not help loving her as the one chosen by her brother, for whose happiness she was ready to sacrifice everything.
  • She recalled her love for Prince Andrew in all its former strength, and at the same time felt that she loved Kuragin.
  • With trembling hands Natasha held that passionate love letter which Dolokhov had composed for Anatole, and as she read it she found in it an echo of all that she herself imagined she was feeling.
  • There is no other way for me, the letter began.
  • Then he went on to say that he knew her parents would not give her to him--for this there were secret reasons he could reveal only to her--but that if she loved him she need only say the word yes, and no human power could hinder their bliss.
  • I love him! thought Natasha, reading the letter for the twentieth time and finding some peculiarly deep meaning in each word of it.
  • How is it you have loved a man for a whole year and suddenly...
  • When she saw Natasha's fright, Sonya shed tears of shame and pity for her friend.
  • Why doesn't he openly ask for your hand?
  • Evidently this question presented itself to her mind for the first time and she did not know how to answer it.
  • I don't want to quarrel with you, but go, for God's sake go!
  • Natasha, I am afraid for you!
  • Hard as it was for Sonya, she watched her friend and did not let her out of her sight.
  • Then suddenly it became clear to Sonya that Natasha had some dreadful plan for that evening.
  • If I don't sleep for three nights I'll not leave this passage and will hold her back by force and will and not let the family be disgraced, thought she.
  • Anatole had a passport, an order for post horses, ten thousand rubles he had taken from his sister and another ten thousand borrowed with Dolokhov's help.
  • Two witnesses for the mock marriage--Khvostikov, a retired petty official whom Dolokhov made use of in his gambling transactions, and Makarin, a retired hussar, a kindly, weak fellow who had an unbounded affection for Kuragin--were sitting at tea in Dolokhov's front room.
  • "Makarka" (their name for Makarin) "will go through fire and water for you for nothing.
  • "Really it's no time for your stupid jokes," and he left the room.
  • I'm telling you this for the last time.
  • Who arranged everything for you?
  • Well, thank you for it.
  • Anatole and Dolokhov liked Balaga too for his masterly driving and because he liked the things they liked.
  • With others Balaga bargained, charging twenty-five rubles for a two hours' drive, and rarely drove himself, generally letting his young men do so.
  • But with "his gentlemen" he always drove himself and never demanded anything for his work.
  • "I say, Balaga," said Anatole, putting his hands on the man's shoulders, "do you care for me or not?
  • Have a drink! said Anatole, and filled a large glass of Madeira for him.
  • After refusing it for manners' sake, he drank it and wiped his mouth with a red silk handkerchief he took out of his cap.
  • Thank you for everything and farewell! said Anatole.
  • "Well, comrades and friends..." he considered for a moment "...of my youth, farewell!" he said, turning to Makarin and the others.
  • Go to Matrena Matrevna and ask her for the sable cloak.
  • "You shameless good-for-nothing!" said she.
  • "Marya Dmitrievna, for God's sake let me in to her!" she pleaded, but Marya Dmitrievna unlocked the door and went in without giving her an answer....
  • I'm only sorry for her father! thought she, trying to restrain her wrath.
  • I'd treat you differently, but I'm sorry for your father, so I will conceal it.
  • "It's lucky for him that he escaped me; but I'll find him!" she said in her rough voice.
  • I wish for your good.
  • Marya Dmitrievna went on admonishing her for some time, enjoining on her that it must all be kept from her father and assuring her that nobody would know anything about it if only Natasha herself would undertake to forget it all and not let anyone see that something had happened.
  • Next day Count Rostov returned from his estate near Moscow in time for lunch as he had promised.
  • From the pretense of illness, from his daughter's distress, and by the embarrassed faces of Sonya and Marya Dmitrievna, the count saw clearly that something had gone wrong during his absence, but it was so terrible for him to think that anything disgraceful had happened to his beloved daughter, and he so prized his own cheerful tranquillity, that he avoided inquiries and tried to assure himself that nothing particularly had happened; and he was only dissatisfied that her indisposition delayed their return to the country.
  • For fifty-eight years have I lived in this world and never known anything so disgraceful!
  • That Prince Andrew's deeply loved affianced wife--the same Natasha Rostova who used to be so charming--should give up Bolkonski for that fool Anatole who was already secretly married (as Pierre knew), and should be so in love with him as to agree to run away with him, was something Pierre could not conceive and could not imagine.
  • After hearing the details of Anatole's marriage from Pierre, and giving vent to her anger against Anatole in words of abuse, Marya Dmitrievna told Pierre why she had sent for him.
  • As for Pierre, he evidently did not exist for her.
  • "Natalya Ilynichna," Pierre began, dropping his eyes with a feeling of pity for her and loathing for the thing he had to do, "whether it is true or not should make no difference to you, because..."
  • Pierre did not stay for dinner, but left the room and went away at once.
  • The members who were assembling for dinner were sitting about in groups; they greeted Pierre and spoke of the town news.
  • Pierre laughed and said it was nonsense for he had just come from the Rostovs'.
  • He paced through the ballroom, waited till everyone had come, and as Anatole had not turned up did not stay for dinner but drove home.
  • Anatole, for whom Pierre was looking, dined that day with Dolokhov, consulting him as to how to remedy this unfortunate affair.
  • After all, you must understand that besides your pleasure there is such a thing as other people's happiness and peace, and that you are ruining a whole life for the sake of amusing yourself!
  • Amuse yourself with women like my wife--with them you are within your rights, for they know what you want of them.
  • And if you require money for your journey...
  • Next day Anatole left for Petersburg.
  • He was awaiting Prince Andrew's return with dread and went every day to the old prince's for news of him.
  • Forgive me for troubling you...
  • "He could not marry, for he was married already," said Pierre.
  • Till then he had reproached her in his heart and tried to despise her, but he now felt so sorry for her that there was no room in his soul for reproach.
  • He is here now: tell him... to for... forgive me!
  • Tell him only that I beg him to forgive, forgive, forgive me for everything....
  • All is over for me, she replied with shame and self- abasement.
  • If I were not myself, but the handsomest, cleverest, and best man in the world, and were free, I would this moment ask on my knees for your hand and your love!
  • For the first time for many days Natasha wept tears of gratitude and tenderness, and glancing at Pierre she went out of the room.
  • For the first time for many days Natasha wept tears of gratitude and tenderness, and glancing at Pierre she went out of the room.
  • Man lives consciously for himself, but is an unconscious instrument in the attainment of the historic, universal, aims of humanity.
  • History, that is, the unconscious, general, hive life of mankind, uses every moment of the life of kings as a tool for its own purposes.
  • On the tenth of June, * coming up with the army, he spent the night in apartments prepared for him on the estate of a Polish count in the Vilkavisski forest.
  • Au revoir, Beauche; I'll keep the best palace in Moscow for you!
  • He rode across one of the swaying pontoon bridges to the farther side, turned sharply to the left, and galloped in the direction of Kovno, preceded by enraptured, mounted chasseurs of the Guard who, breathless with delight, galloped ahead to clear a path for him through the troops.
  • In evident fear of refusal, like a boy asking for permission to get on a horse, he begged to be allowed to swim across the river before the Emperor's eyes.
  • He gave an angry thrust to his horse, which had grown restive under him, and plunged into the water, heading for the deepest part where the current was swift.
  • For him it was no new conviction that his presence in any part of the world, from Africa to the steppes of Muscovy alike, was enough to dumfound people and impel them to insane self-oblivion.
  • He called for his horse and rode to his quarters.
  • Nothing was ready for the war that everyone expected and to prepare for which the Emperor had come from Petersburg.
  • The longer the Emperor remained in Vilna the less did everybody--tired of waiting--prepare for the war.
  • He was meeting Helene in Vilna after not having seen her for a long time and did not recall the past, but as Helene was enjoying the favors of a very important personage and Boris had only recently married, they met as good friends of long standing.
  • Boris, coolly looking at Helene's dazzling bare shoulders which emerged from a dark, gold-embroidered, gauze gown, talked to her of old acquaintances and at the same time, unaware of it himself and unnoticed by others, never for an instant ceased to observe the Emperor who was in the same room.
  • Having finished speaking to her, the Emperor looked inquiringly at Balashev and, evidently understanding that he only acted thus because there were important reasons for so doing, nodded slightly to the lady and turned to him.
  • Boris understood that this was meant for him and, closing his eyes, slightly bowed his head.
  • Yesterday I learned that, despite the loyalty with which I have kept my engagements with Your Majesty, your troops have crossed the Russian frontier, and I have this moment received from Petersburg a note, in which Count Lauriston informs me, as a reason for this aggression, that Your Majesty has considered yourself to be in a state of war with me from the time Prince Kuragin asked for his passports.
  • The reasons on which the Duc de Bassano based his refusal to deliver them to him would never have led me to suppose that that could serve as a pretext for aggression.
  • At two in the morning of the fourteenth of June, the Emperor, having sent for Balashev and read him his letter to Napoleon, ordered him to take it and hand it personally to the French Emperor.
  • For the same reason they are always hard at work and in a hurry.
  • Four days before, sentinels of the Preobrazhensk regiment had stood in front of the house to which Balashev was conducted, and now two French grenadiers stood there in blue uniforms unfastened in front and with shaggy caps on their heads, and an escort of hussars and uhlans and a brilliant suite of aides-de-camp, pages, and generals, who were waiting for Napoleon to come out, were standing at the porch, round his saddle horse and his Mameluke, Rustan.
  • Duroc said that Napoleon would receive the Russian general before going for his ride.
  • He had just finished dressing for his ride, and wore a blue uniform, opening in front over a white waistcoat so long that it covered his rotund stomach, white leather breeches tightly fitting the fat thighs of his short legs, and Hessian boots.
  • Nothing outside himself had any significance for him, because everything in the world, it seemed to him, depended entirely on his will.
  • And he began clearly and concisely to explain his reasons for dissatisfaction with the Russian government.
  • Judging by the calmly moderate and amicable tone in which the French Emperor spoke, Balashev was firmly persuaded that he wished for peace and intended to enter into negotiations.
  • Have I not for eighteen months been doing everything to obtain it?
  • I have waited eighteen months for explanations.
  • They are neither fit for war nor peace!
  • They compromise him and throw on him the responsibility for all that happens.
  • Their king was insane and they changed him for another-- Bernadotte, who promptly went mad--for no Swede would ally himself with Russia unless he were mad.
  • "But a large number of monasteries and churches is always a sign of the backwardness of a people," said Napoleon, turning to Caulaincourt for appreciation of this remark.
  • Let him prepare an asylum for them in Russia!
  • "Are the horses ready for the general?" he added, with a slight inclination of his head in reply to Balashev's bow.
  • On reaching Petersburg he inquired for Kuragin but the latter had already left the city.
  • So Prince Andrew, having received an appointment on the headquarters staff, left for Turkey.
  • But he again failed to meet Kuragin in Turkey, for soon after Prince Andrew arrived, the latter returned to Russia.
  • The household was divided into two alien and hostile camps, who changed their habits for his sake and only met because he was there.
  • During his stay at Bald Hills all the family dined together, but they were ill at ease and Prince Andrew felt that he was a visitor for whose sake an exception was being made and that his presence made them all feel awkward.
  • In the evening, when Prince Andrew went to him and, trying to rouse him, began to tell him of the young Count Kamensky's campaign, the old prince began unexpectedly to talk about Princess Mary, blaming her for her superstitions and her dislike of Mademoiselle Bourienne, who, he said, was the only person really attached to him.
  • If there is any misunderstanding and discord between you and Mary, I can't blame her for it at all.
  • He sought in himself either remorse for having angered his father or regret at leaving home for the first time in his life on bad terms with him, and was horrified to find neither.
  • What meant still more to him was that he sought and did not find in himself the former tenderness for his son which he had hoped to reawaken by caressing the boy and taking him on his knee.
  • His mind was occupied by the interests of the center that was conducting a gigantic war, and he was glad to be free for a while from the distraction caused by the thought of Kuragin.
  • But the question whether the camp was advantageous or disadvantageous remained for him undecided.
  • To clear up this last point for himself, Prince Andrew, utilizing his position and acquaintances, tried to fathom the character of the control of the army and of the men and parties engaged in it, and he deduced for himself the following of the state of affairs.
  • This view was very general in the upper army circles and found support also in Petersburg and from the chancellor, Rumyantsev, who, for other reasons of state, was in favor of peace.
  • Give him real power, for war cannot be conducted successfully without unity of command, and he will show what he can do, as he did in Finland.
  • If Barclay is now to be superseded by Bennigsen all will be lost, for Bennigsen showed his incapacity already in 1807.
  • The eighth and largest group, which in its enormous numbers was to the others as ninety-nine to one, consisted of men who desired neither peace nor war, neither an advance nor a defensive camp at the Drissa or anywhere else, neither Barclay nor the Emperor, neither Pfuel nor Bennigsen, but only the one most essential thing--as much advantage and pleasure for themselves as possible.
  • Another who wished to gain some advantage would attract the Emperor's attention by loudly advocating the very thing the Emperor had hinted at the day before, and would dispute and shout at the council, beating his breast and challenging those who did not agree with him to duels, thereby proving that he was prepared to sacrifice himself for the common good.
  • A third, in the absence of opponents, between two councils would simply solicit a special gratuity for his faithful services, well knowing that at that moment people would be too busy to refuse him.
  • That arousing of the people by their sovereign and his call to them to defend their country--the very incitement which was the chief cause of Russia's triumph in so far as it was produced by the Tsar's personal presence in Moscow--was suggested to the Emperor, and accepted by him, as a pretext for quitting the army.
  • It was not a council of war, but, as it were, a council to elucidate certain questions for the Emperor personally.
  • Prince Andrew had an opportunity of getting a good look at him, for Pfuel arrived soon after himself and, in passing through to the drawing room, stopped a minute to speak to Chernyshev.
  • At first sight, Pfuel, in his ill-made uniform of a Russian general, which fitted him badly like a fancy costume, seemed familiar to Prince Andrew, though he saw him now for the first time.
  • Go in there where they are meeting, and wait for me.
  • Of all those present, evidently he alone was not seeking anything for himself, nursed no hatred against anyone, and only desired that the plan, formed on a theory arrived at by years of toil, should be carried out.
  • At the review next day the Emperor asked Prince Andrew where he would like to serve, and Prince Andrew lost his standing in court circles forever by not asking to remain attached to the sovereign's person, but for permission to serve in the army.
  • The troops retired from Vilna for various complicated reasons of state, political and strategic.
  • For the Pavlograd hussars, however, the whole of this retreat during the finest period of summer and with sufficient supplies was a very simple and agreeable business.
  • First they camped gaily before Vilna, making acquaintance with the Polish landowners, preparing for reviews and being reviewed by the Emperor and other high commanders.
  • On the thirteenth of July the Pavlograds took part in a serious action for the first time.
  • In general, the summer of 1812 was remarkable for its storms.
  • But he did not express his thoughts, for in such matters, too, he had gained experience.
  • I'll go and look for shelter.
  • Mary Hendrikhovna obliged them with the loan of a petticoat to be used as a curtain, and behind that screen Rostov and Ilyin, helped by Lavrushka who had brought their kits, changed their wet things for dry ones.
  • Mary Hendrikhovna assented and began looking for the spoon which someone meanwhile had pounced on.
  • At Rostov's suggestion it was agreed that whoever became "King" should have the right to kiss Mary Hendrikhovna's hand, and that the "Booby" should go to refill and reheat the samovar for the doctor when the latter awoke.
  • "No, gentlemen, you have had your sleep, but I have not slept for two nights," replied the doctor, and he sat down morosely beside his wife, waiting for the game to end.
  • Seeing his gloomy face as he frowned at his wife, the officers grew still merrier, and some of them could not refrain from laughter, for which they hurriedly sought plausible pretexts.
  • When he had gone, taking his wife with him, and had settled down with her in their covered cart, the officers lay down in the tavern, covering themselves with their wet cloaks, but they did not sleep for a long time; now they exchanged remarks, recalling the doctor's uneasiness and his wife's delight, now they ran out into the porch and reported what was taking place in the covered trap.
  • But Rostov went off to his squadron without waiting for tea.
  • Now he rode beside Ilyin under the birch trees, occasionally plucking leaves from a branch that met his hand, sometimes touching his horse's side with his foot, or, without turning round, handing a pipe he had finished to an hussar riding behind him, with as calm and careless an air as though he were merely out for a ride.
  • The hussars remained in the same place for about an hour.
  • The sounds, which he had not heard for so long, had an even more pleasurable and exhilarating effect on Rostov than the previous sounds of firing.
  • Something vague and confused, which he could not at all account for, had come over him with the capture of that officer and the blow he had dealt him.
  • When sent for by Count Ostermann, Rostov, remembering that he had charged without orders, felt sure his commander was sending for him to punish him for breach of discipline.
  • And did I do it for my country's sake?
  • Natasha's illness was so serious that, fortunately for her and for her parents, the consideration of all that had caused the illness, her conduct and the breaking off of her engagement, receded into the background.
  • She was so ill that it was impossible for them to consider in how far she was to blame for what had happened.
  • Doctors came to see her singly and in consultation, talked much in French, German, and Latin, blamed one another, and prescribed a great variety of medicines for all the diseases known to them, but the simple idea never occurred to any of them that they could not know the disease Natasha was suffering from, as no disease suffered by a live man can be known, for every living person has his own peculiarities and always has his own peculiar, personal, novel, complicated disease, unknown to medicine--not a disease of the lungs, liver, skin, heart, nerves, and so on mentioned in medical books, but a disease consisting of one of the innumerable combinations of the maladies of those organs.
  • This simple thought could not occur to the doctors (as it cannot occur to a wizard that he is unable to work his charms) because the business of their lives was to cure, and they received money for it and had spent the best years of their lives on that business.
  • The child cannot believe that the strongest and wisest of its people have no remedy for its pain, and the hope of relief and the expression of its mother's sympathy while she rubs the bump comforts it.
  • The doctors were of use to Natasha because they kissed and rubbed her bump, assuring her that it would soon pass if only the coachman went to the chemist's in the Arbat and got a powder and some pills in a pretty box for a ruble and seventy kopeks, and if she took those powders in boiled water at intervals of precisely two hours, neither more nor less.
  • Even to Natasha herself it was pleasant to see that so many sacrifices were being made for her sake, and to know that she had to take medicine at certain hours, though she declared that no medicine would cure her and that it was all nonsense.
  • Her presentiment at the time had not deceived her--that that state of freedom and readiness for any enjoyment would not return again.
  • But she was not even grateful to him for it; nothing good on Pierre's part seemed to her to be an effort, it seemed so natural for him to be kind to everyone that there was no merit in his kindness.
  • After those involuntary words--that if he were free he would have asked on his knees for her hand and her love--uttered at a moment when she was so strongly agitated, Pierre never spoke to Natasha of his feelings; and it seemed plain to her that those words, which had then so comforted her, were spoken as all sorts of meaningless words are spoken to comfort a crying child.
  • She suggested that Natasha should fast and prepare for Holy Communion, and Natasha gladly welcomed the idea.
  • She was afraid of being late for Matins.
  • The countess, with a cheerful expression on her face, looked down at her nails and spat a little for luck as she returned to the drawing room.
  • All the Moscow notabilities, all the Rostovs' acquaintances, were at the Razumovskis' chapel, for, as if expecting something to happen, many wealthy families who usually left town for their country estates had not gone away that summer.
  • As Natasha, at her mother's side, passed through the crowd behind a liveried footman who cleared the way for them, she heard a young man speaking about her in too loud a whisper.
  • She knew for certain that she was pretty, but this no longer gave her satisfaction as it used to.
  • "For the world of angels and all the spirits who dwell above us," prayed Natasha.
  • When they prayed for the warriors, she thought of her brother and Denisov.
  • When they prayed for all traveling by land and sea, she remembered Prince Andrew, prayed for him, and asked God to forgive her all the wrongs she had done him.
  • When they prayed for those who love us, she prayed for the members of her own family, her father and mother and Sonya, realizing for the first time how wrongly she had acted toward them, and feeling all the strength of her love for them.
  • When they prayed for those who hate us, she tried to think of her enemies and people who hated her, in order to pray for them.
  • She included among her enemies the creditors and all who had business dealings with her father, and always at the thought of enemies and those who hated her she remembered Anatole who had done her so much harm--and though he did not hate her she gladly prayed for him as for an enemy.
  • Only at prayer did she feel able to think clearly and calmly of Prince Andrew and Anatole, as men for whom her feelings were as nothing compared with her awe and devotion to God.
  • I want nothing, wish for nothing; teach me what to do and how to use my will!
  • Then came the prayer just received from the Synod--a prayer for the deliverance of Russia from hostile invasion.
  • She shared with all her heart in the prayer for the spirit of righteousness, for the strengthening of the heart by faith and hope, and its animation by love.
  • He felt that the condition he was in could not continue long, that a catastrophe was coming which would change his whole life, and he impatiently sought everywhere for signs of that approaching catastrophe.
  • Let him that hath understanding count the number of the beast: for it is the number of a man; and his number is Six hundred threescore and six.
  • How, or by what means, he was connected with the great event foretold in the Apocalypse he did not know, but he did not doubt that connection for a moment.
  • His love for Natasha, Antichrist, Napoleon, the invasion, the comet, 666, L'Empereur Napoleon, and L'russe Besuhof--all this had to mature and culminate, to lift him out of that spellbound, petty sphere of Moscow habits in which he felt himself held captive and lead him to a great achievement and great happiness.
  • "Do, please, for heaven's sake, relieve me of something!" said the courier.
  • Peter Kirilych, for heaven's sake!
  • Pierre began feeling in his pockets for the papers, but could not find them.
  • But you'll be late for dinner.
  • But Sonya, who had gone to look for the papers in the anteroom, had found them in Pierre's hat, where he had carefully tucked them under the lining.
  • It's not the time for it now.
  • I don't know, I am very far from having military tastes, but in these times no one can answer for himself.
  • We ourselves will not delay to appear among our people in that Capital and in other parts of our realm for consultation, and for the direction of all our levies, both those now barring the enemy's path and those freshly formed to defeat him wherever he may appear.
  • Here's a patriot for you! said Shinshin.
  • Because it is better for me to come less often... because...
  • After standing some time in the gateway, Petya tried to move forward in front of the others without waiting for all the carriages to pass, and he began resolutely working his way with his elbows, but the woman just in front of him, who was the first against whom he directed his efforts, angrily shouted at him:
  • What are you shoving for, young lordling?
  • For a while the crowd was less dense, but suddenly all heads were bared, and everyone rushed forward in one direction.
  • For a moment the crowd stood still, but then it made another rush forward.
  • Several people were sorry for Petya, and suddenly a crowd turned toward him and pressed round him.
  • All these conversations, especially the joking with the girls, were such as might have had a particular charm for Petya at his age, but they did not interest him now.
  • He sat on his elevation--the pedestal of the cannon--still agitated as before by the thought of the Emperor and by his love for him.
  • For the most part they sat quietly in their places and were silent, or, if they walked about and talked, attached themselves to someone younger.
  • Pierre was there too, buttoned up since early morning in a nobleman's uniform that had become too tight for him.
  • He paced up and down for a while and glanced at his notes.
  • Next, bolts for the doors of the new building were wanted and had to be of a special shape the prince had himself designed, and a leather case had to be ordered to keep the "will" in.
  • Only now in the stillness of the night, reading it by the faint light under the green shade, did he grasp its meaning for a moment.
  • Dessalles wrote this letter to the Governor for Princess Mary, she signed it, and it was given to Alpatych with instructions to hand it to the Governor and to come back as quickly as possible if there was danger.
  • His daughter placed chintz-covered down cushions for him to sit on and behind his back.
  • For Christ's sake think of us! cried his wife, referring to the rumors of war and the enemy.
  • And the peasants are asking three rubles for carting--it isn't Christian!
  • "A good day for harvesting," thought Alpatych.
  • From this you will see that you have a perfect right to reassure the inhabitants of Smolensk, for those defended by two such brave armies may feel assured of victory.
  • "What for?" asked Alpatych.
  • While the horses were being harnessed Alpatych and Ferapontov over their tea talked of the price of corn, the crops, and the good weather for harvesting.
  • The roar of guns, the whistling of projectiles, and the piteous moaning of the cook, which rose above the other sounds, did not cease for a moment.
  • "Russia is done for!" he cried.
  • We're done for!... and Ferapontov ran into the yard.
  • Seeing that his trap would not be able to move on for some time, Alpatych got down and turned into the side street to look at the fire.
  • The crowd was evidently watching for the roof to fall in, and Alpatych watched for it too.
  • Set off immediately for Moscow.
  • Having written this and given the paper to Alpatych, he told him how to arrange for departure of the prince, the princess, his son, and the boy's tutor, and how and where to let him know immediately.
  • The fire died down for a moment and wreaths of black smoke rolled from under the roof.
  • Heat and drought had continued for more than three weeks.
  • When they passed through a village they all rushed to the wells and fought for the water and drank it down to the mud.
  • He called for Taras the gardener, but no one replied.
  • "When did my father and sister leave?" meaning when did they leave for Moscow.
  • "We'll clear it out for you in a minute," said Timokhin, and, still undressed, ran off to clear the men out of the pond.
  • I, for my part, begged him personally most urgently and finally wrote him, but nothing would induce him to consent.
  • With fifteen thousand men I held the enemy at bay for thirty-five hours and beat him; but he would not hold out even for fourteen hours.
  • It is disgraceful, a stain on our army, and as for him, he ought, it seems to me, not to live.
  • What would it have cost him to hold out for another two days?
  • They would have had to retire of their own accord, for they had no water for men or horses.
  • For the Minister is leading these visitors after him to Moscow in a most masterly way.
  • Only I am sorry for the Emperor that he entrusts our fine army to such as he.
  • Tell me, for God's sake, what will Russia, our mother Russia, say to our being so frightened, and why are we abandoning our good and gallant Fatherland to such rabble and implanting feelings of hatred and shame in all our subjects?
  • In that circle they discountenanced those who advised hurried preparations for a removal to Kazan of the court and the girls' educational establishments under the patronage of the Dowager Empress.
  • He will get nothing for his pains!
  • A good reputation he made for himself at Bucharest!
  • The latter was very attentive to Anna Pavlovna because he wanted to be appointed director of one of the educational establishments for young ladies.
  • "No, that's impossible," said he, "for our sovereign appreciated him so highly before."
  • He is as right as other historians who look for the explanation of historic events in the will of one man; he is as right as the Russian historians who maintain that Napoleon was drawn to Moscow by the skill of the Russian commanders.
  • A good chessplayer having lost a game is sincerely convinced that his loss resulted from a mistake he made and looks for that mistake in the opening, but forgets that at each stage of the game there were similar mistakes and that none of his moves were perfect.
  • He found the Cossacks, inquired for the regiment operating with Platov's detachment and by evening found his master, Nicholas Rostov, quartered at Yankovo.
  • Rostov was just mounting to go for a ride round the neighboring villages with Ilyin; he let Lavrushka have another horse and took him along with him.
  • He ordered the militiamen to be called up from the villages and armed, and wrote a letter to the commander-in- chief informing him that he had resolved to remain at Bald Hills to the last extremity and to defend it, leaving to the commander-in-chief's discretion to take measures or not for the defense of Bald Hills, where one of Russia's oldest generals would be captured or killed, and he announced to his household that he would remain at Bald Hills.
  • But while himself remaining, he gave instructions for the departure of the princess and Dessalles with the little prince to Bogucharovo and thence to Moscow.
  • Princess Mary, alarmed by her father's feverish and sleepless activity after his previous apathy, could not bring herself to leave him alone and for the first time in her life ventured to disobey him.
  • By the time they reached Bogucharovo, Dessalles and the little prince had already left for Moscow.
  • For three weeks the old prince lay stricken by paralysis in the new house Prince Andrew had built at Bogucharovo, ever in the same state, getting neither better nor worse.
  • It was impossible for him to travel, it would not do to let him die on the road.
  • Thoughts that had not entered her mind for years--thoughts of a life free from the fear of her father, and even the possibility of love and of family happiness--floated continually in her imagination like temptations of the devil.
  • The cares of preparation and giving orders, for which everyone came to her, occupied her all day.
  • But never had she felt so grieved for him or so much afraid of losing him.
  • I was looking for you.
  • Come in, he is asking for you...
  • When she changed her position so that his left eye could see her face he calmed down, not taking his eyes off her for some seconds.
  • "And I was wishing for his death!" thought Princess Mary.
  • "Thank you... daughter dear!... for all, for all... forgive!... thank you!... forgive!... thank you!..." and tears began to flow from his eyes.
  • Then he again opened his eyes and said something none of them could understand for a long time, till at last Tikhon understood and repeated it.
  • She could understand nothing, think of nothing and feel nothing, except passionate love for her father, love such as she thought she had never felt till that moment.
  • I wished for his death!
  • This was the Marshal of the Nobility of the district, who had come personally to point out to the princess the necessity for her prompt departure.
  • She rose and saw Dunyasha her maid, who was evidently looking for her, and who stopped suddenly as if in alarm on seeing her mistress.
  • You must be prepared for everything, said the Marshal, meeting her at the house door.
  • They all drew back from the bed, making way for her.
  • The old prince used to approve of them for their endurance at work when they came to Bald Hills to help with the harvest or to dig ponds, and ditches, but he disliked them for their boorishness.
  • Alpatych also knew that on the previous day another peasant had even brought from the village of Visloukhovo, which was occupied by the French, a proclamation by a French general that no harm would be done to the inhabitants, and if they remained they would be paid for anything taken from them.
  • As proof of this the peasant had brought from Visloukhovo a hundred rubles in notes (he did not know that they were false) paid to him in advance for hay.
  • He had told her that after the sixteenth he could not be responsible for what might happen.
  • On the evening of the day the old prince died the Marshal went away, promising to return next day for the funeral.
  • But this he was unable to do, for he received tidings that the French had unexpectedly advanced, and had barely time to remove his own family and valuables from his estate.
  • Alpatych, arriving from the devastated Bald Hills estate, sent for his Dron on the day of the prince's funeral and told him to have twelve horses got ready for the princess' carriages and eighteen carts for the things to be removed from Bogucharovo.
  • Though the peasants paid quitrent, Alpatych thought no difficulty would be made about complying with this order, for there were two hundred and thirty households at work in Bogucharovo and the peasants were well to do.
  • Alpatych named others, but they too, according to Dron, had no horses available: some horses were carting for the government, others were too weak, and others had died for want of fodder.
  • It seemed that no horses could be had even for the carriages, much less for the carting.
  • Just as Dron was a model village Elder, so Alpatych had not managed the prince's estates for twenty years in vain.
  • You drop this nonsense and tell the people to get ready to leave their homes and go to Moscow and to get carts ready for tomorrow morning for the princess' things.
  • Take the keys from me and discharge me, for Christ's sake!
  • He had managed people for a long time and knew that the chief way to make them obey is to show no suspicion that they can possibly disobey.
  • Without saying anything of this to the princess, Alpatych had his own belongings taken out of the carts which had arrived from Bald Hills and had those horses got ready for the princess' carriages.
  • A maid came to the door to say that Alpatych was asking for orders about their departure.
  • She lay for a long time in that position.
  • "Besides, is it for me, for me who desired his death, to condemn anyone?" she thought.
  • She felt sorry for her and held out her hand with a glance of gentle inquiry.
  • I understand that you could not, and cannot, think of yourself, but with my love for you I must do so....
  • That I, the daughter of Prince Nicholas Bolkonski, asked General Rameau for protection and accepted his favor!
  • Mademoiselle Bourienne would do the honors of Bogucharovo for him.
  • For herself she did not care where she remained or what happened to her, but she felt herself the representative of her dead father and of Prince Andrew.
  • Agitated and flushed she paced the room, sending now for Michael Ivanovich and now for Tikhon or Dron.
  • Neither could the architect Michael Ivanovich, who on being sent for came in with sleepy eyes, tell Princess Mary anything.
  • They were silent for a while.
  • Discharge me, little mother, for God's sake!
  • Discharge me, for God's sake!
  • She replied that she had never doubted his devotion and that she was ready to do anything for him and for the peasants.
  • Only, for God's sake, Princess dear, have them sent away and don't go out to them.
  • I know it is, only listen to me for God's sake!
  • "But I never sent for them," declared the princess.
  • On the contrary, I ask you to go with all your belongings to our estate near Moscow, and I promise you I will see to it that there you shall want for nothing.
  • "We are all very thankful for your bounty, but it won't do for us to take the landlord's grain," said a voice at the back of the crowd.
  • We are sorry for you, but we're not willing.
  • Having repeated her order to Dron to have horses ready for her departure next morning, she went to her room and remained alone with her own thoughts.
  • For a long time that night Princess Mary sat by the open window of her room hearing the sound of the peasants' voices that reached her from the village, but it was not of them she was thinking.
  • She thought only of one thing, her sorrow, which, after the break caused by cares for the present, seemed already to belong to the past.
  • Never will that moment return for him or for me when he might have said all he longed to say, and not Tikhon but I might have heard and understood him.
  • It was sad and painful for him to talk to Tikhon who did not understand him.
  • And not the face she had known ever since she could remember and had always seen at a distance, but the timid, feeble face she had seen for the first time quite closely, with all its wrinkles and details, when she stooped near to his mouth to catch what he said.
  • For the last three days Bogucharovo had lain between the two hostile armies, so that it was as easy for the Russian rearguard to get to it as for the French vanguard; Rostov, as a careful squadron commander, wished to take such provisions as remained at Bogucharovo before the French could get them.
  • For the last three days Bogucharovo had lain between the two hostile armies, so that it was as easy for the Russian rearguard to get to it as for the French vanguard; Rostov, as a careful squadron commander, wished to take such provisions as remained at Bogucharovo before the French could get them.
  • Rostov and Ilyin gave rein to their horses for a last race along the incline before reaching Bogucharovo, and Rostov, outstripping Ilyin, was the first to gallop into the village street.
  • "May I make bold to trouble your honor?" said he respectfully, but with a shade of contempt for the youthfulness of this officer and with a hand thrust into his bosom.
  • Forgive us for Christ's sake, eh? said the peasants, smiling joyfully at him.
  • At the moment when Rostov and Ilyin were galloping along the road, Princess Mary, despite the dissuasions of Alpatych, her nurse, and the maids, had given orders to harness and intended to start, but when the cavalrymen were espied they were taken for Frenchmen, the coachman ran away, and the women in the house began to wail.
  • He said the peasants were obdurate and that at the present moment it would be imprudent to "overresist" them without an armed force, and would it not be better first to send for the military?
  • You begrudged your lump of a son," a little old man suddenly began attacking Dron-- "and so they took my Vanka to be shaved for a soldier!
  • At the inn at Yankovo he respectfully took leave of her, for the first time permitting himself to kiss her hand.
  • When she had taken leave of him and remained alone she suddenly felt her eyes filling with tears, and then not for the first time the strange question presented itself to her: did she love him?
  • To remember her gave him pleasure, and when his comrades, hearing of his adventure at Bogucharovo, rallied him on having gone to look for hay and having picked up one of the wealthiest heiresses in Russia, he grew angry.
  • Prince Andrew arrived at Tsarevo-Zaymishche on the very day and at the very hour that Kutuzov was reviewing the troops for the first time.
  • Bolkonski made room for him on the bench and the lieutenant colonel sat down beside him.
  • "You're also waiting for the commander-in-chief?" said he.
  • It's all vewy well--only not for those who get it in the neck.
  • Of late he had received so many new and very serious impressions--such as the retreat from Smolensk, his visit to Bald Hills, and the recent news of his father's death--and had experienced so many emotions, that for a long time past those memories had not entered his mind, and now that they did, they did not act on him with nearly their former strength.
  • He smiled at the recollection of that time and of his love for Natasha, and passed at once to what now interested him passionately and exclusively.
  • He sighed deeply, his whole chest heaving, and was silent for a while.
  • He embraced Prince Andrew, pressing him to his fat breast, and for some time did not let him go.
  • Denisov, having given his name, announced that he had to communicate to his Serene Highness a matter of great importance for their country's welfare.
  • I tell you once for all, my dear fellow," said he, "into the fire with all such things!
  • He took some gold pieces from his trouser pocket and put them on the dish for her.
  • I am sorry, for I need you.
  • For that, not storming and attacking but patience and time are wanted.
  • It was said that Mamonov's regiment would cost him eight hundred thousand rubles, and that Bezukhov had spent even more on his, but that the best thing about Bezukhov's action was that he himself was going to don a uniform and ride at the head of his regiment without charging anything for the show.
  • "Another forfeit for a Gallicism," said a Russian writer who was present.
  • For Gallicisms I won't be responsible," she remarked, turning to the author: "I have neither the money nor the time, like Prince Galitsyn, to engage a master to teach me Russian!"
  • I should make too good a target for the French, besides I am afraid I should hardly be able to climb onto a horse.
  • They meant to leave for the country long ago.
  • "They are waiting for their younger son," Pierre replied.
  • These words showed Pierre clearly for the first time that the French would enter Moscow.
  • The second broadsheet stated that our headquarters were at Vyazma, that Count Wittgenstein had defeated the French, but that as many of the inhabitants of Moscow wished to be armed, weapons were ready for them at the arsenal: sabers, pistols, and muskets which could be had at a low price.
  • "Shall I join the army and enter the service, or wait?" he asked himself for the hundredth time.
  • He took a pack of cards that lay on the table and began to lay them out for a game of patience.
  • I ask just one thing of you, cousin," she went on, "arrange for me to be taken to Petersburg.
  • You take everything so to heart, said Pierre, and began laying out his cards for patience.
  • As soon as Leppich is ready, get together a crew of reliable and intelligent men for his car and send a courier to General Kutuzov to let him know.
  • Please impress upon Leppich to be very careful where he descends for the first time, that he may not make a mistake and fall into the enemy's hands.
  • It is essential for him to combine his movements with those of the commander-in-chief.
  • What is it for? he kept asking.
  • The stout man rose, frowned, shrugged his shoulders, and evidently trying to appear firm began to pull on his jacket without looking about him, but suddenly his lips trembled and he began to cry, in the way full-blooded grown-up men cry, though angry with himself for doing so.
  • On reaching home Pierre gave orders to Evstafey--his head coachman who knew everything, could do anything, and was known to all Moscow--that he would leave that night for the army at Mozhaysk, and that his saddle horses should be sent there.
  • Pierre could not say, and he did not try to determine for whom and for what he felt such particular delight in sacrificing everything.
  • He was not occupied with the question of what to sacrifice for; the fact of sacrificing in itself afforded him a new and joyous sensation.
  • There was not the least sense in it for either the French or the Russians.
  • The ancients have left us model heroic poems in which the heroes furnish the whole interest of the story, and we are still unable to accustom ourselves to the fact that for our epoch histories of that kind are meaningless.
  • The Russian army, they say, in its retreat from Smolensk sought out for itself the best position for a general engagement and found such a position at Borodino.
  • To anyone who looks at the field of Borodino without thinking of how the battle was actually fought, this position, protected by the river Kolocha, presents itself as obvious for an army whose object was to prevent an enemy from advancing along the Smolensk road to Moscow.
  • Napoleon, riding to Valuevo on the twenty-fourth, did not see (as the history books say he did) the position of the Russians from Utitsa to Borodino (he could not have seen that position because it did not exist), nor did he see an advanced post of the Russian army, but while pursuing the Russian rearguard he came upon the left flank of the Russian position--at the Shevardino Redoubt--and unexpectedly for the Russians moved his army across the Kolocha.
  • The battle of Borodino was not fought on a chosen and entrenched position with forces only slightly weaker than those of the enemy, but, as a result of the loss of the Shevardino Redoubt, the Russians fought the battle of Borodino on an open and almost unentrenched position, with forces only half as numerous as the French; that is to say, under conditions in which it was not merely unthinkable to fight for ten hours and secure an indecisive result, but unthinkable to keep an army even from complete disintegration and flight.
  • He kept looking to either side of the road for familiar faces, but only saw everywhere the unfamiliar faces of various military men of different branches of the service, who all looked with astonishment at his white hat and green tail coat.
  • Out of an army of a hundred thousand we must expect at least twenty thousand wounded, and we haven't stretchers, or bunks, or dressers, or doctors enough for six thousand.
  • The cavalry ride to battle and meet the wounded and do not for a moment think of what awaits them, but pass by, winking at the wounded.
  • When he had ascended the hill and reached the little village street, he saw for the first time peasant militiamen in their white shirts and with crosses on their caps, who, talking and laughing loudly, animated and perspiring, were at work on a huge knoll overgrown with grass to the right of the road.
  • The officer, evidently glad of an opportunity for a talk, moved up to Pierre.
  • An elderly sergeant who had approached the officer while he was giving these explanations had waited in silence for him to finish speaking, but at this point, evidently not liking the officer's remark, interrupted him.
  • "Gabions must be sent for," said he sternly.
  • Behind the priest and a chanter stood the notabilities on a spot reserved for them.
  • Someone, a very important personage judging by the haste with which way was made for him, was approaching the icon.
  • When the service was over, Kutuzov stepped up to the icon, sank heavily to his knees, bowed to the ground, and for a long time tried vainly to rise, but could not do so on account of his weakness and weight.
  • You see... but Boris did not finish, for at that moment Kaysarov, Kutuzov's adjutant, came up to Pierre.
  • In any case many great rewards would have to be given for tomorrow's action, and new men would come to the front.
  • But if I were right, I should be rendering a service to my Fatherland for which I am ready to die.
  • Those he wrote about Gerakov: 'Lectures for the corps inditing'...
  • Half an hour later Kutuzov left for Tatarinova, and Bennigsen and his suite, with Pierre among them, set out on their ride along the line.
  • In the middle of the wood a brown hare with white feet sprang out and, scared by the tramp of the many horses, grew so confused that it leaped along the road in front of them for some time, arousing general attention and laughter, and only when several voices shouted at it did it dart to one side and disappear in the thicket.
  • After going through the wood for about a mile and a half they came out on a glade where troops of Tuchkov's corps were stationed to defend the left flank.
  • He had received and given the orders for next day's battle and had nothing more to do.
  • And it is all so simple, pale, and crude in the cold white light of this morning which I feel is dawning for me.
  • The three great sorrows of his life held his attention in particular: his love for a woman, his father's death, and the French invasion which had overrun half Russia.
  • I believed in some ideal love which was to keep her faithful to me for the whole year of my absence!
  • What is the trial for, when he is not here and will never return?
  • For whom then is the trial intended?
  • It was unpleasant to Prince Andrew to meet people of his own set in general, and Pierre especially, for he reminded him of all the painful moments of his last visit to Moscow.
  • In our regiment two officers were court-martialed for that kind of thing.
  • He ordered us to retreat, and all our efforts and losses went for nothing.
  • And we said so because we had nothing to fight for there, we wanted to get away from the battlefield as soon as we could.
  • For me tomorrow means this: a Russian army of a hundred thousand and a French army of a hundred thousand have met to fight, and the thing is that these two hundred thousand men will fight and the side that fights more fiercely and spares itself least will win.
  • 'It's not the day for that!' they say.
  • All he had seen that day, all the significant and stern expressions on the faces he had seen in passing, were lit up for him by a new light.
  • He understood that latent heat (as they say in physics) of patriotism which was present in all these men he had seen, and this explained to him why they all prepared for death calmly, and as it were lightheartedly.
  • What is needed for success in warfare?
  • Ah, my friend, it has of late become hard for me to live.
  • Ah, well, it's not for long! he added.
  • For some time he stood in silence considering whether he should follow him or go away.
  • Natasha with animated and excited face was telling him how she had gone to look for mushrooms the previous summer and had lost her way in the big forest.
  • So much the worse for the Russian army....
  • "I must make up for that in Moscow," said Napoleon.
  • Well, what is Paris saying? he asked, suddenly changing his former stern expression for a most cordial tone.
  • It was a portrait, painted in bright colors by Gerard, of the son borne to Napoleon by the daughter of the Emperor of Austria, the boy whom for some reason everyone called "The King of Rome."
  • With the natural capacity of an Italian for changing the expression of his face at will, he drew nearer to the portrait and assumed a look of pensive tenderness.
  • Having sat still for a while he touched--himself not knowing why--the thick spot of paint representing the highest light in the portrait, rose, and recalled de Beausset and the officer on duty.
  • It is essential for us; it will give us all we need: comfortable quarters and a speedy return to our country.
  • It is too soon for him to see a field of battle.
  • After giving these and other commands he returned to his tent, and the dispositions for the battle were written down from his dictation.
  • General Campan's division did not seize the first fortification but was driven back, for on emerging from the wood it had to reform under grapeshot, of which Napoleon was unaware.
  • But this was not and could not be done, for during the whole battle Napoleon was so far away that, as appeared later, he could not know the course of the battle and not one of his orders during the fight could be executed.
  • There was nothing left for them to do but cry "Vive l'Empereur!" and go to fight, in order to get food and rest as conquerors in Moscow.
  • And it was not Napoleon who directed the course of the battle, for none of his orders were executed and during the battle he did not know what was going on before him.
  • The dispositions drawn up by Weyrother for the battle of Austerlitz were a model of perfection for that kind of composition, but still they were criticized--criticized for their very perfection, for their excessive minuteness.
  • Napoleon frowned and sat silent for a long time leaning his head on his hand.
  • Napoleon ordered another glass to be brought for Rapp, and silently sipped his own.
  • It is organized for that, it is its nature.
  • Our body is like a perfect watch that should go for a certain time.
  • Yes, our body is just a machine for living, that is all.
  • Do you remember at Braunau he commanded an army for three weeks and did not once mount a horse to inspect his entrenchments....
  • They all gazed with the same dissatisfied and inquiring expression at this stout man in a white hat, who for some unknown reason threatened to trample them under his horse's hoofs.
  • He did not notice the sound of the bullets whistling from every side, or the projectiles that flew over him, did not see the enemy on the other side of the river, and for a long time did not notice the killed and wounded, though many fell near him.
  • "Yes, I'll come with you," replied Pierre, looking round for his groom.
  • You'll see everything from there and it's less dangerous, and I'll come for you.
  • There's a gentleman for you!
  • If they've retired it's because there's work for them to do farther back.
  • Once or twice he was shouted at for being in the way.
  • The sergeant ran up to the officer and in a frightened whisper informed him (as a butler at dinner informs his master that there is no more of some wine asked for) that there were no more charges.
  • For some seconds they gazed with frightened eyes at one another's unfamiliar faces and both were perplexed at what they had done and what they were to do next.
  • There for several hours amid incessant cannon and musketry fire, now Russians were seen alone, now Frenchmen alone, now infantry, and now cavalry: they appeared, fired, fell, collided, not knowing what to do with one another, screamed, and ran back again.
  • For the most part things happened contrary to their orders.
  • "Asks for reinforcements?" said Napoleon with an angry gesture.
  • They all asked for reinforcements and all said that the Russians were holding their positions and maintaining a hellish fire under which the French army was melting away.
  • He could not stop what was going on before him and around him and was supposed to be directed by him and to depend on him, and from its lack of success this affair, for the first time, seemed to him unnecessary and horrible.
  • Soon after the duke's departure--before he could possibly have reached Semenovsk--his adjutant came back from him and told Kutuzov that the duke asked for more troops.
  • "All the points of our position are in the enemy's hands and we cannot dislodge them for lack of troops, the men are running away and it is impossible to stop them," he reported.
  • They are repulsed everywhere, for which I thank God and our brave army!
  • Sit down and write out the order of the day for tomorrow.
  • Kutuzov, without looking at Wolzogen, gave directions for the order to be written out which the former commander-in-chief, to avoid personal responsibility, very judiciously wished to receive.
  • There was nothing for him to do and no orders to be given.
  • The wounded men awaiting their turn outside the tents groaned, sighed, wept, screamed, swore, or asked for vodka.
  • Prince Andrew opened his eyes and for a long time could not make out what was going on around him.
  • After turning his head from right to left for some time, he sighed and looked down.
  • For a little while he was left alone and involuntarily witnessed what was taking place on the other two tables.
  • What are you waiting for? he cried angrily to the dressers.
  • He remembered everything, and ecstatic pity and love for that man overflowed his happy heart.
  • Prince Andrew could no longer restrain himself and wept tender loving tears for his fellow men, for himself, and for his own and their errors.
  • The heaviness of his head and chest reminded him of the possibility of suffering and death for himself.
  • At that moment he did not desire Moscow, or victory, or glory (what need had he for any more glory?).
  • The one thing he wished for was rest, tranquillity, and freedom.
  • Even before he gave that order the thing he did not desire, and for which he gave the order only because he thought it was expected of him, was being done.
  • And he fell back into that artificial realm of imaginary greatness, and again--as a horse walking a treadmill thinks it is doing something for itself--he submissively fulfilled the cruel, sad, gloomy, and inhuman role predestined for him.
  • Never to the end of his life could he understand goodness, beauty, or truth, or the significance of his actions which were too contrary to goodness and truth, too remote from everything human, for him ever to be able to grasp their meaning.
  • It was a war for a great cause, the end of uncertainties and the beginning of security.
  • A new horizon and new labors were opening out, full of well-being and prosperity for all.
  • I should have demanded the freedom of all navigable rivers for everybody, that the seas should be common to all, and that the great standing armies should be reduced henceforth to mere guards for the sovereigns.
  • At the dressing stations the grass and earth were soaked with blood for a space of some three acres around.
  • To the men of both sides alike, worn out by want of food and rest, it began equally to appear doubtful whether they should continue to slaughter one another; all the faces expressed hesitation, and the question arose in every soul: For what, for whom, must I kill and be killed?...
  • To the men of both sides alike, worn out by want of food and rest, it began equally to appear doubtful whether they should continue to slaughter one another; all the faces expressed hesitation, and the question arose in every soul: For what, for whom, must I kill and be killed?...
  • Men leave their customary pursuits, hasten from one side of Europe to the other, plunder and slaughter one another, triumph and are plunged in despair, and for some years the whole course of life is altered and presents an intensive movement which first increases and then slackens.
  • But though I do not know what causes the cold winds to blow when the oak buds unfold, I cannot agree with the peasants that the unfolding of the oak buds is the cause of the cold wind, for the force of the wind is beyond the influence of the buds.
  • For five weeks after that there was not a single battle.
  • He gave orders to prepare for a fresh conflict to finish the enemy and did this not to deceive anyone, but because he knew that the enemy was beaten, as everyone who had taken part in the battle knew it.
  • For people accustomed to think that plans of campaign and battles are made by generals--as any one of us sitting over a map in his study may imagine how he would have arranged things in this or that battle--the questions present themselves: Why did Kutuzov during the retreat not do this or that?
  • For instance, on the twenty-eighth it is suggested to him to cross to the Kaluga road, but just then an adjutant gallops up from Miloradovich asking whether he is to engage the French or retire.
  • If anyone gave or asked for personal news, it was done in a whisper and they immediately reverted to general matters.
  • The question for him now was: Have I really allowed Napoleon to reach Moscow, and when did I do so?
  • They waited for him from four till six o'clock and did not begin their deliberations all that time but talked in low tones of other matters.
  • Allow me to tell you, your excellency, that that question has no meaning for a Russian.
  • Opinions were divided, and arguments were advanced for and against that project.
  • "Well, gentlemen, I see that it is I who will have to pay for the broken crockery," said he, and rising slowly he moved to the table.
  • And who was to blame for it?
  • They went away because for Russians there could be no question as to whether things would go well or ill under French rule in Moscow.
  • They knew that it was for the army to fight, and that if it could not succeed it would not do to take young ladies and house serfs to the Three Hills quarter of Moscow to fight Napoleon, and that they must go away, sorry as they were to abandon their property to destruction.
  • A woman sacrifices herself for you, she suffers, and this is her reward!
  • "Well, yes," said she, "it may be that he has other sentiments for me than those of a father, but that is not a reason for me to shut my door on him.
  • But for heaven's sake listen to me!
  • All that was done around her and to her at this time, all the attention devoted to her by so many clever men and expressed in such pleasant, refined ways, and the state of dove-like purity she was now in (she wore only white dresses and white ribbons all that time) gave her pleasure, but her pleasure did not cause her for a moment to forget her aim.
  • And as it always happens in contests of cunning that a stupid person gets the better of cleverer ones, Helene--having realized that the main object of all these words and all this trouble was, after converting her to Catholicism, to obtain money from her for Jesuit institutions (as to which she received indications)-before parting with her money insisted that the various operations necessary to free her from her husband should be performed.
  • A venial sin, for you acted without evil intention.
  • I would give my life for the happiness of them both.
  • "Oh, he loves me so!" said Helene, who for some reason imagined that Pierre too loved her.
  • He will do anything for me.
  • Bilibin puckered his skin in preparation for something witty.
  • Pierre lay leaning on his elbow for a long time, gazing at the shadows that moved past him in the darkness.
  • For a moment as he was rearranging his cloak Pierre opened his eyes and saw the same penthouse roofs, posts, and yard, but now they were all bluish, lit up, and glittering with frost or dew.
  • If they're sent out and brought back again later on it will do no harm, but as things are now one can't answer for anything.
  • That's necessary for the people, said the first.
  • And so it was reported to the count, who sent for the man.
  • He was sent for trial and condemned to hard labor, I believe.
  • Now the father has come to intercede for him.
  • But he's a good-for-nothing lad!
  • He attended some lectures somewhere and imagines that the devil is no match for him.
  • Well, he took that icon home with him for a few days and what did he do?
  • It has now come to my knowledge that you lent him your carriage for his removal from town, and that you have even accepted papers from him for safe custody.
  • "That is for me to know, but not for you to ask," shouted Rostopchin.
  • After Petya had joined Obolenski's regiment of Cossacks and left for Belaya Tserkov where that regiment was forming, the countess was seized with terror.
  • The thought that both her sons were at the war, had both gone from under her wing, that today or tomorrow either or both of them might be killed like the three sons of one of her acquaintances, struck her that summer for the first time with cruel clearness.
  • Though Petya would remain in the service, this transfer would give the countess the consolation of seeing at least one of her sons under her wing, and she hoped to arrange matters for her Petya so as not to let him go again, but always get him appointed to places where he could not possibly take part in a battle.
  • The nearer the time came for Petya to return, the more uneasy grew the countess.
  • Though she concealed from him her intention of keeping him under her wing, Petya guessed her designs, and instinctively fearing that he might give way to emotion when with her--might "become womanish" as he termed it to himself--he treated her coldly, avoided her, and during his stay in Moscow attached himself exclusively to Natasha for whom he had always had a particularly brotherly tenderness, almost lover-like.
  • Owing to the count's customary carelessness nothing was ready for their departure by the twenty-eighth of August and the carts that were to come from their Ryazan and Moscow estates to remove their household belongings did not arrive till the thirtieth.
  • The head of the family, Count Ilya Rostov, continually drove about the city collecting the current rumors from all sides and gave superficial and hasty orders at home about the preparations for their departure.
  • It was very bitter for her.
  • But despite her grief, or perhaps just because of it, she took on herself all the difficult work of directing the storing and packing of their things and was busy for whole days.
  • They laughed and were gay not because there was any reason to laugh, but because gaiety and mirth were in their hearts and so everything that happened was a cause for gaiety and laughter to them.
  • For a while she had stood beside Sonya while the china was being packed and tried to help, but soon gave it up and went to her room to pack her own things.
  • You would be more comfortable somewhere in a house... in ours, for instance... the family are leaving.
  • For one day we can move into the drawing room.
  • The church bells everywhere were ringing for service, just as usual on Sundays.
  • Having waited there for Rostopchin who did not turn up, they became convinced that Moscow would be surrendered, and then dispersed all about the town to the public houses and cookshops.
  • The price of weapons, of gold, of carts and horses, kept rising, but the value of paper money and city articles kept falling, so that by midday there were instances of carters removing valuable goods, such as cloth, and receiving in payment a half of what they carted, while peasant horses were fetching five hundred rubles each, and furniture, mirrors, and bronzes were being given away for nothing.
  • As to the serfs the only indication was that three out of their huge retinue disappeared during the night, but nothing was stolen; and as to the value of their possessions, the thirty peasant carts that had come in from their estates and which many people envied proved to be extremely valuable and they were offered enormous sums of money for them.
  • Not only were huge sums offered for the horses and carts, but on the previous evening and early in the morning of the first of September, orderlies and servants sent by wounded officers came to the Rostovs' and wounded men dragged themselves there from the Rostovs' and from neighboring houses where they were accommodated, entreating the servants to try to get them a lift out of Moscow.
  • The major-domo to whom these entreaties were addressed, though he was sorry for the wounded, resolutely refused, saying that he dare not even mention the matter to the count.
  • Count, be so good as to allow me... for God's sake, to get into some corner of one of your carts!
  • The count went into the house with him, repeating his order not to refuse the wounded who asked for a lift.
  • The countess sent for her husband.
  • Countess dear... an officer came to me to ask for a few carts for the wounded.
  • If you have no pity on me, have some for the children.
  • "Papa, what are you doing that for?" asked Natasha, who had followed him into her mother's room.
  • He had nothing to do in Moscow, but he had noticed that everyone in the army was asking for leave to visit Moscow and had something to do there.
  • So he considered it necessary to ask for leave of absence for family and domestic reasons.
  • I tell you, Papa" (he smote himself on the breast as a general he had heard speaking had done, but Berg did it a trifle late for he should have struck his breast at the words "Russian army"), "I tell you frankly that we, the commanders, far from having to urge the men on or anything of that kind, could hardly restrain those... those... yes, those exploits of antique valor," he went on rapidly.
  • Yes, Mamma, I tell you sincerely that these are hard and sad times for every Russian.
  • Only I so wanted it, for dear Vera's sake.
  • The countess glanced at her daughter, saw her face full of shame for her mother, saw her agitation, and understood why her husband did not turn to look at her now, and she glanced round quite disconcerted.
  • The whole household, as if to atone for not having done it sooner, set eagerly to work at the new task of placing the wounded in the carts.
  • Natasha was in a state of rapturous excitement such as she had not known for a long time.
  • With the help of a maid she was arranging a seat for the countess in the huge high coach that stood at the entrance.
  • At that moment this news had only one significance for both of them.
  • They knew their Natasha, and alarm as to what would happen if she heard this news stifled all sympathy for the man they both liked.
  • Is it something very bad for me?
  • But the coachman could not stop, for from the Meshchanski Street came more carts and carriages, and the Rostovs were being shouted at to move on and not block the way.
  • Natasha continued to lean out of the window for a long time, beaming at him with her kindly, slightly quizzical, happy smile.
  • When he woke up on the morning after his return to Moscow and his interview with Count Rostopchin, he could not for some time make out where he was and what was expected of him.
  • His major-domo came in a second time to say that the Frenchman who had brought the letter from the countess was very anxious to see him if only for a minute, and that someone from Bazdeev's widow had called to ask Pierre to take charge of her husband's books, as she herself was leaving for the country.
  • "Yes, your excellency," said Gerasim after thinking for a moment.
  • And he spent the night on a bed made up for him there.
  • That same evening-- without even asking himself what they were wanted for--he procured a coachman's coat and cap for Pierre, and promised to get him the pistol next day.
  • It was when Pierre (wearing the coachman's coat which Gerasim had procured for him and had disinfected by steam) was on his way with the old man to buy the pistol at the Sukharev market that he met the Rostovs.
  • "Here she is, the reward for all those fainthearted men," he reflected, glancing at those near him and at the troops who were approaching and forming up.
  • In his imagination he appointed days for assemblies at the palace of the Tsars, at which Russian notables and his own would mingle.
  • I'll fetch a piece of cloth at once for such an honorable gentleman, or even two pieces with pleasure.
  • When one's head is gone one doesn't weep for one's hair!
  • "It's all very well for you, Ivan Sidorych, to talk," said the first tradesman angrily.
  • Go and get the samovar to boil for your grandfather.
  • "What did you want to see the count for?" she asked.
  • These men, who under the leadership of the tall lad were drinking in the dramshop that morning, had brought the publican some skins from the factory and for this had had drink served them.
  • What have you killed a man for, you thief?
  • They told you that for fun, and you believed it!
  • We too will take part..." the reader went on, and then paused ("Do you see," shouted the youth victoriously, "he's going to clear up the whole affair for you...."), "in destroying them, and will send these visitors to the devil.
  • All the horrors of the reign of terror were based only on solicitude for public tranquillity.
  • What reason was there for assuming any probability of an uprising in the city?
  • He was absorbed in the role he had created for himself.
  • Who is to blame for it?
  • All that night Count Rostopchin issued orders, for which people came to him from all parts of Moscow.
  • Your excellency, the Director of the Registrar's Department has sent for instructions...
  • From the Consistory, from the Senate, from the University, from the Foundling Hospital, the Suffragan has sent... asking for information....
  • Do you expect me to give you two battalions--which we have not got--for a convoy?
  • Toward nine o'clock in the morning, when the troops were already moving through Moscow, nobody came to the count any more for instructions.
  • Those who were able to get away were going of their own accord, those who remained behind decided for themselves what they must do.
  • Thank you for coming.
  • He'll show you what law is! the mob were saying as if reproving one another for their lack of confidence.
  • For several seconds while the young man was taking his place on the step the silence continued.
  • While waiting for the young man to take his place on the step Rostopchin stood frowning and rubbing his face with his hand.
  • Not only did his reason not reproach him for what he had done, but he even found cause for self-satisfaction in having so successfully contrived to avail himself of a convenient opportunity to punish a criminal and at the same time pacify the mob.
  • Count Rostopchin was mentally preparing the angry and stinging reproaches he meant to address to Kutuzov for his deception.
  • He would make that foxy old courtier feel that the responsibility for all the calamities that would follow the abandonment of the city and the ruin of Russia (as Rostopchin regarded it) would fall upon his doting old head.
  • The caleche flew over the ground as fast as the horses could draw it, but for a long time Count Rostopchin still heard the insane despairing screams growing fainter in the distance, while his eyes saw nothing but the astonished, frightened, bloodstained face of "the traitor" in the fur-lined coat.
  • But I did not do it for my own sake.
  • The bells in the Kremlin were ringing for vespers, and this sound troubled the French.
  • And all made ready for that battle.
  • Out of the windows of the Senate House the soldiers threw chairs into the Square for fuel and kindled fires there.
  • Order after order was issued by the French commanders that day forbidding the men to disperse about the town, sternly forbidding any violence to the inhabitants or any looting, and announcing a roll call for that very evening.
  • The other was that vague and quite Russian feeling of contempt for everything conventional, artificial, and human--for everything the majority of men regard as the greatest good in the world.
  • "Yes, alone, for the sake of all, I must do it or perish!" he thought.
  • You shall pay for this, said the Frenchman, letting go of him.
  • For a few seconds he looked at him in silence.
  • For a Frenchman that deduction was indubitable.
  • Lead that man away! said he quickly and energetically, and taking the arm of Pierre whom he had promoted to be a Frenchman for saving his life, he went with him into the room.
  • He was so very polite, amiable, good-natured, and genuinely grateful to Pierre for saving his life that Pierre had not the heart to refuse, and sat down with him in the parlor--the first room they entered.
  • That is enough for me.
  • He also brought a bottle of kvass, taken from the kitchen for them to try.
  • He wrapped the bottle up to its neck in a table napkin and poured out wine for himself and for Pierre.
  • Yes, my dear Monsieur Pierre, I owe you a fine votive candle for saving me from that maniac....
  • And you made us pay dear for it.
  • "Paris--the capital of the world," Pierre finished his remark for him.
  • Well, I don't esteem you the less for it.
  • When I understood what he wanted--when I saw that he was preparing a bed of laurels for us, you know, I said to myself: 'That is a monarch,' and I devoted myself to him!
  • The few glasses of wine he had drunk and the conversation with this good-natured man had destroyed the mood of concentrated gloom in which he had spent the last few days and which was essential for the execution of his design.
  • What is the German for 'shelter'?
  • The German for shelter is Unterkunft.
  • "Onterkoff," said the captain and looked at Pierre for some seconds with laughing eyes.
  • Can I do anything for you?
  • It is for life and death.
  • It was plain that l'amour which the Frenchman was so fond of was not that low and simple kind that Pierre had once felt for his wife, nor was it the romantic love stimulated by himself that he experienced for Natasha.
  • Thus the captain touchingly recounted the story of his love for a fascinating marquise of thirty-five and at the same time for a charming, innocent child of seventeen, daughter of the bewitching marquise.
  • While listening to these love stories his own love for Natasha unexpectedly rose to his mind, and going over the pictures of that love in his imagination he mentally compared them with Ramballe's tales.
  • He began to explain that he understood love for a women somewhat differently.
  • Speaking thickly and with a faraway look in his shining eyes, he told the whole story of his life: his marriage, Natasha's love for his best friend, her betrayal of him, and all his own simple relations with her.
  • No one replied to this remark and for some time they all gazed silently at the spreading flames of the second fire in the distance.
  • What are you staring at, you good-for-nothing?...
  • Daniel Terentich made no reply, and again for a long time they were all silent.
  • Petya was no longer with the family, he had gone on with his regiment which was making for Troitsa.
  • Sonya had cried and begged to be forgiven and now, as if trying to atone for her fault, paid unceasing attention to her cousin.
  • A bed had been made on a bedstead for the countess only.
  • When her toilet for the night was finished she sank gently onto the sheet spread over the hay on the side nearest the door.
  • For a long time Natasha listened attentively to the sounds that reached her from inside and outside the room and did not move.
  • When she saw an indistinct shape in the corner, and mistook his knees raised under the quilt for his shoulders, she imagined a horrible body there, and stood still in terror.
  • When he had been placed on his camp bed he lay for a long time motionless with closed eyes.
  • The doctor promised to procure it for him and began to ask how he was feeling.
  • Please get it for me and put it under for a moment, he pleaded in a piteous voice.
  • For just one moment I didn't look after you...
  • That was why he asked for a copy of them.
  • And he vividly pictured to himself Natasha, not as he had done in the past with nothing but her charms which gave him delight, but for the first time picturing to himself her soul.
  • He now understood for the first time all the cruelty of his rejection of her, the cruelty of his rupture with her.
  • If only it were possible for me to see her once more!
  • "Forgive me for what I ha-ve do-ne!" faltered Natasha in a scarcely audible, broken whisper, and began kissing his hand more rapidly, just touching it with her lips.
  • But it then occurred to him for the first time that he certainly could not carry the weapon in his hand through the streets.
  • He carried his resolution within himself in terror and haste, like something dreadful and alien to him, for, after the previous night's experience, he was afraid of losing it.
  • Was it for this I nursed you....
  • You have no heart, you don't feel for your own child!
  • He had for some seconds been intently watching what was going on a few steps away.
  • His face probably looked very terrible, for the officer said something in a whisper and four more uhlans left the ranks and placed themselves on both sides of Pierre.
  • The Empress Elisabeth, however, when asked what instructions she would be pleased to give--with her characteristic Russian patriotism had replied that she could give no directions about state institutions for that was the affair of the sovereign, but as far as she personally was concerned she would be the last to quit Petersburg.
  • Prince Vasili himself, famed for his elocution, was to read it.
  • I sent to ask for news, and hear that she is a little better.
  • What's that? asked Anna Pavlovna, securing silence for the mot, which she had heard before.
  • Animated by that address Anna Pavlovna's guests talked for a long time of the state of the fatherland and offered various conjectures as to the result of the battle to be fought in a few days.
  • And at once, without leaving the church, thanks were rendered to the Creator for His help and for the victory.
  • It is very difficult for events to be reflected in their real strength and completeness amid the conditions of court life and far from the scene of action.
  • What a position for the Emperor to be in!
  • He suddenly frowned, as if blaming himself for his weakness, and raising his head addressed Michaud in a firm voice:
  • Michaud had only waited for this to bring out the phrase he had prepared.
  • They are burning for the combat," declared this representative of the Russian nation, "and to prove to Your Majesty by the sacrifice of their lives how devoted they are...."
  • He bent his head and was silent for some time.
  • Those who tried to understand the general course of events and to take part in it by self-sacrifice and heroism were the most useless members of society, they saw everything upside down, and all they did for the common good turned out to be useless and foolish--like Pierre's and Mamonov's regiments which looted Russian villages, and the lint the young ladies prepared and that never reached the wounded, and so on.
  • In Petersburg and in the provinces at a distance from Moscow, ladies, and gentlemen in militia uniforms, wept for Russia and its ancient capital and talked of self-sacrifice and so on; but in the army which retired beyond Moscow there was little talk or thought of Moscow, and when they caught sight of its burned ruins no one swore to be avenged on the French, but they thought about their next pay, their next quarters, of Matreshka the vivandiere, and like matters.
  • A few days before the battle of Borodino, Nicholas received the necessary money and warrants, and having sent some hussars on in advance, he set out with post horses for Voronezh.
  • When--free from soldiers, wagons, and the filthy traces of a camp--he saw villages with peasants and peasant women, gentlemen's country houses, fields where cattle were grazing, posthouses with stationmasters asleep in them, he rejoiced as though seeing all this for the first time.
  • What for a long while specially surprised and delighted him were the women, young and healthy, without a dozen officers making up to each of them; women, too, who were pleased and flattered that a passing officer should joke with them.
  • In very few words Nicholas bought seventeen picked stallions for six thousand rubles--to serve, as he said, as samples of his remounts.
  • With the naive conviction of young men in a merry mood that other men's wives were created for them, Rostov did not leave the lady's side and treated her husband in a friendly and conspiratorial style, as if, without speaking of it, they knew how capitally Nicholas and the lady would get on together.
  • When Rostov approached her she was standing settling up for the game.
  • "Do you know, dear boy," began the governor's wife with a serious expression on her kind little face, "that really would be the match for you: would you like me to arrange it?"
  • I will make a match for you with the princess.
  • One is sorry for the husband, really....
  • You see, Aunt, Mamma has long wanted me to marry an heiress, but the very idea of marrying for money is repugnant to me.
  • And as long as my sister Natasha was engaged to her brother it was of course out of the question for me to think of marrying her.
  • And what sort of life would it be for Sonya--if she's a girl with a heart?
  • When Rostov entered the room, the princess dropped her eyes for an instant, as if to give the visitor time to greet her aunt, and then just as Nicholas turned to her she raised her head and met his look with shining eyes.
  • For the first time all that pure, spiritual, inward travail through which she had lived appeared on the surface.
  • For this purpose she arranged a meeting between the young people at the bishop's house before Mass.
  • After meeting Princess Mary, though the course of his life went on externally as before, all his former amusements lost their charm for him and he often thought about her.
  • But he never thought about her as he had thought of all the young ladies without exception whom he had met in society, nor as he had for a long time, and at one time rapturously, thought about Sonya.
  • A few days before his departure a special thanksgiving, at which Nicholas was present, was held in the cathedral for the Russian victory.
  • Princess Mary, evidently engrossed by her thoughts, was crossing herself for the last time before leaving the church.
  • When he had finished that business it was already too late to go anywhere but still too early to go to bed, and for a long time he paced up and down the room, reflecting on his life, a thing he rarely did.
  • But that day's encounter in church had, he felt, sunk deeper than was desirable for his peace of mind.
  • Why don't I pray for what I want? he suddenly thought.
  • Muddles, grief for Mamma... business difficulties... muddles, terrible muddles!
  • Softened by memories of Princess Mary he began to pray as he had not done for a long time.
  • A courier has arrived and there's a letter for you.
  • But a few days before they left Moscow, moved and excited by all that was going on, she called Sonya to her and, instead of reproaching and making demands on her, tearfully implored her to sacrifice herself and repay all that the family had done for her by breaking off her engagement with Nicholas.
  • Sonya burst into hysterical tears and replied through her sobs that she would do anything and was prepared for anything, but gave no actual promise and could not bring herself to decide to do what was demanded of her.
  • She must sacrifice herself for the family that had reared and brought her up.
  • To sacrifice herself for others was Sonya's habit.
  • But now they wanted her to sacrifice the very thing that constituted the whole reward for her self-sacrifice and the whole meaning of her life.
  • And for the first time Sonya felt that out of her pure, quiet love for Nicholas a passionate feeling was beginning to grow up which was stronger than principle, virtue, or religion.
  • But when she heard of Prince Andrew's presence in their house, despite her sincere pity for him and for Natasha, she was seized by a joyful and superstitious feeling that God did not intend her to be separated from Nicholas.
  • At the Troitsa monastery the Rostovs first broke their journey for a whole day.
  • You remember when I looked in the mirror for you... at Otradnoe at Christmas?
  • That evening he learned that all these prisoners (he, probably, among them) were to be tried for incendiarism.
  • They interrupted him, for this was not to the point.
  • Evidently for them "the marshal" represented a very high and rather mysterious power.
  • These first days, before the eighth of September when the prisoners were had up for a second examination, were the hardest of all for Pierre.
  • To him Davout was not merely a French general, but a man notorious for his cruelty.
  • Looking at his cold face, as he sat like a stern schoolmaster who was prepared to wait awhile for an answer, Pierre felt that every instant of delay might cost him his life; but he did not know what to say.
  • For some seconds they looked at one another, and that look saved Pierre.
  • He reflected for a moment.
  • Who? flashed for an instant through his mind.
  • Don't fret, friend--'suffer an hour, live for an age!' that's how it is, my dear fellow.
  • We had soup for dinner and the potatoes are grand!
  • My name is Platon, and the surname is Karataev, he added, evidently wishing to make it easier for Pierre to address him.
  • "A wife for counsel, a mother-in-law for welcome, but there's none as dear as one's own mother!" said he.
  • And indeed he only had to lie down, to fall asleep like a stone, and he only had to shake himself, to be ready without a moment's delay for some work, just as children are ready to play directly they awake.
  • He loved his dog, his comrades, the French, and Pierre who was his neighbor, but Pierre felt that in spite of Karataev's affectionate tenderness for him (by which he unconsciously gave Pierre's spiritual life its due) he would not have grieved for a moment at parting from him.
  • That she had not heard from Prince Andrew himself, Princess Mary attributed to his being too weak to write or to his considering the long journey too hard and too dangerous for her and his son.
  • Her love for Rostov no longer tormented or agitated her.
  • She knew that she loved for the first and only time in her life and felt that she was beloved, and was happy in regard to it.
  • But the very difficulties and preoccupations of the journey, which she took so actively in hand, saved her for a while from her grief and gave her strength.
  • There will be room for everybody, this is a big house.
  • In spite of her one desire to see her brother as soon as possible, and her vexation that at the moment when all she wanted was to see him they should be trying to entertain her and pretending to admire her nephew, the princess noticed all that was going on around her and felt the necessity of submitting, for a time, to this new order of things which she had entered.
  • She knew it to be necessary, and though it was hard for her she was not vexed with these people.
  • There was only one expression on her agitated face when she ran into the drawing room--that of love--boundless love for him, for her, and for all that was near to the man she loved; and of pity, suffering for others, and passionate desire to give herself entirely to helping them.
  • * "Thank you for coming, my dear."
  • "He wrote here that he took a great liking to you," he went on simply and calmly, evidently unable to understand all the complex significance his words had for living people.
  • Princess Mary heard his words but they had no meaning for her, except as a proof of how far away he now was from everything living.
  • He had felt it for the first time when the shell spun like a top before him, and he looked at the fallow field, the bushes, and the sky, and knew that he was face to face with death.
  • To love everything and everybody and always to sacrifice oneself for love meant not to love anyone, not to live this earthly life.
  • It was the unexpected realization of the fact that he still valued life as presented to him in the form of his love for Natasha, and a last, though ultimately vanquished, attack of terror before the unknown.
  • At the Troitsa monastery they had spoken of the past, and he had told her that if he lived he would always thank God for his wound which had brought them together again, but after that they never spoke of the future.
  • I want to weep for joy.
  • "And I!"--She turned away for an instant.
  • The countess and Sonya cried from pity for Natasha and because he was no more.
  • Lanskoy informed the commander-in-chief that the army supplies were for the most part stored along the Oka in the Tula and Ryazan provinces, and that if they retreated on Nizhni the army would be separated from its supplies by the broad river Oka, which cannot be crossed early in winter.
  • Having crossed over, by a forced march, to the Tula road beyond the Pakhra, the Russian commanders intended to remain at Podolsk and had no thought of the Tarutino position; but innumerable circumstances and the reappearance of French troops who had for a time lost touch with the Russians, and projects of giving battle, and above all the abundance of provisions in Kaluga province, obliged our army to turn still more to the south and to cross from the Tula to the Kaluga road and go to Tarutino, which was between the roads along which those supplies lay.
  • That movement from the Nizhni to the Ryazan, Tula, and Kaluga roads was so natural that even the Russian marauders moved in that direction, and demands were sent from Petersburg for Kutuzov to take his army that way.
  • At Tarutino Kutuzov received what was almost a reprimand from the Emperor for having moved his army along the Ryazan road, and the Emperor's letter indicated to him the very position he had already occupied near Kaluga.
  • The moan of that wounded beast (the French army) which betrayed its calamitous condition was the sending of Lauriston to Kutuzov's camp with overtures for peace.
  • I beg your Highness to credit what he says to you, especially when he expresses the sentiment of esteem and special regard I have long entertained for your person.
  • So fresh instructions were sent for the solution of difficulties that might be encountered, as well as fresh people who were to watch Kutuzov's actions and report upon them.
  • Remember that you have still to answer to our offended country for the loss of Moscow.
  • The Cossack was sent for and questioned.
  • Bennigsen's note and the Cossack's information that the left flank of the French was unguarded were merely final indications that it was necessary to order an attack, and it was fixed for the fifth of October.
  • If only they don't make me responsible for this delay!
  • These sounds made his spirits rise, but at the same time he was afraid that he would be blamed for not having executed sooner the important order entrusted to him.
  • He sat in the caleche, dozing and waking up by turns, and listening for any sound of firing on the right as an indication that the action had begun.
  • He sent for an officer.
  • Kutuzov began, but checked himself immediately and sent for a senior officer.
  • Orlov-Denisov, still waiting for the other columns to arrive, advanced no further.
  • Excited and vexed by the failure and supposing that someone must be responsible for it, Toll galloped up to the commander of the corps and began upbraiding him severely, saying that he ought to be shot.
  • And his division remained under fire for some time quite uselessly.
  • He understood that for him the storm had blown over, and that Kutuzov would content himself with that hint.
  • Kutuzov did not reply, but when they reported to him that Murat's troops were in retreat he ordered an advance, though at every hundred paces he halted for three quarters of an hour.
  • Napoleon enters Moscow after the brilliant victory de la Moskowa; there can be no doubt about the victory for the battlefield remains in the hands of the French.
  • The Russian army, only half the strength of the French, does not make a single attempt to attack for a whole month.
  • He employed all his ability and strength to do the best he could for himself and his army, as he had done previously and as he did subsequently in 1813.
  • We have paid for the right to look at the matter plainly and simply, and we will not abandon that right.
  • Then he gave careful directions about the fortification of the Kremlin, and drew up a brilliant plan for a future campaign over the whole map of Russia.
  • With regard to supplies for the army, Napoleon decreed that all the troops in turn should enter Moscow a la maraude * to obtain provisions for themselves, so that the army might have its future provided for.
  • You shall receive proper pay for your work.
  • But as food was too precious to be given to foreigners, who were for the most part enemies, Napoleon preferred to supply them with money with which to purchase food from outside, and had paper rubles distributed to them.
  • As to the theaters for the entertainment of the people and the troops, these did not meet with success either.
  • The French, collecting booty, cared only for gold.
  • The news of that battle of Tarutino, unexpectedly received by Napoleon at a review, evoked in him a desire to punish the Russians (Thiers says), and he issued the order for departure which the whole army was demanding.
  • The former slackness which had shown itself even in his eyes was now replaced by an energetic readiness for action and resistance.
  • (Their name for Pierre.)
  • Speak to the captain when he makes his round, he will do anything for you.
  • It is for your sake I mention it, Monsieur Kiril.
  • The other day if it had not been for you that affair would have ended ill.
  • Karataev thanked the Frenchman for the money and went on admiring his own work.
  • "What does he want the bits for?" said Karataev.
  • They'd make fine leg bands for us.
  • The Frenchman looked at the linen, considered for a moment, then looked inquiringly at Pierre and, as if Pierre's look had told him something, suddenly blushed and shouted in a squeaky voice:
  • Here and now for the first time he fully appreciated the enjoyment of eating when he wanted to eat, drinking when he wanted to drink, sleeping when he wanted to sleep, of warmth when he was cold, of talking to a fellow man when he wished to talk and to hear a human voice.
  • Pierre, girt with a rope round his waist and wearing shoes Karataev had made for him from some leather a French soldier had torn off a tea chest and brought to have his boots mended with, went up to the sick man and squatted down beside him.
  • At the bridge they all halted, waiting for those in front to get across.
  • They advanced the few hundred paces that separated the bridge from the Kaluga road, taking more than an hour to do so, and came out upon the square where the streets of the Transmoskva ward and the Kaluga road converge, and the prisoners jammed close together had to stand for some hours at that crossway.
  • From the moment Pierre had recognized the appearance of the mysterious force nothing had seemed to him strange or dreadful: neither the corpse smeared with soot for fun nor these women hurrying away nor the burned ruins of Moscow.
  • All that he now witnessed scarcely made an impression on him--as if his soul, making ready for a hard struggle, refused to receive impressions that might weaken it.
  • The baggage carts drew up close together and the men began to prepare for their night's rest.
  • For a long time, oaths, angry shouts, and fighting could be heard from all sides.
  • It was here that the prisoners for the first time received horseflesh for their meat ration.
  • It is natural for a man who does not understand the workings of a machine to imagine that a shaving that has fallen into it by chance and is interfering with its action and tossing about in it is its most important part.
  • For this purpose a capable officer, Bolkhovitinov, was chosen, who was to explain the whole affair by word of mouth, besides delivering a written report.
  • It had been raining for four days.
  • "I don't like waking him," he said, fumbling for something.
  • The orderly was striking a light and Shcherbinin was fumbling for something on the candlestick.
  • On Konovnitsyn's handsome, resolute face with cheeks flushed by fever, there still remained for an instant a faraway dreamy expression remote from present affairs, but then he suddenly started and his face assumed its habitual calm and firm appearance.
  • In battle he was always under fire, so that Kutuzov reproved him for it and feared to send him to the front, and like Dokhturov he was one of those unnoticed cogwheels that, without clatter or noise, constitute the most essential part of the machine.
  • The undecided question as to whether the wound inflicted at Borodino was mortal or not had hung over Kutuzov's head for a whole month.
  • But in any case proofs were needed; he had waited a whole month for them and grew more impatient the longer he waited.
  • Lying on his bed during those sleepless nights he did just what he reproached those younger generals for doing.
  • Dorokhov's report about Broussier's division, the guerrillas' reports of distress in Napoleon's army, rumors of preparations for leaving Moscow, all confirmed the supposition that the French army was beaten and preparing for flight.
  • Dokhturov went to Malo- Yaroslavets, but Kutuzov lingered with the main army and gave orders for the evacuation of Kaluga--a retreat beyond which town seemed to him quite possible.
  • Everywhere Kutuzov retreated, but the enemy without waiting for his retreat fled in the opposite direction.
  • Some Cossacks on the prowl for booty fell in with the Emperor and very nearly captured him.
  • A man in motion always devises an aim for that motion.
  • The promised land for the French during their advance had been Moscow, during their retreat it was their native land.
  • But that native land was too far off, and for a man going a thousand miles it is absolutely necessary to set aside his final goal and to say to himself: "Today I shall get to a place twenty-five miles off where I shall rest and spend the night," and during the first day's journey that resting place eclipses his ultimate goal and attracts all his hopes and desires.
  • For the French retreating along the old Smolensk road, the final goal-- their native land--was too remote, and their immediate goal was Smolensk, toward which all their desires and hopes, enormously intensified in the mass, urged them on.
  • Their very numbers and their crowded and swift movement deprived them of that possibility and rendered it not only difficult but impossible for the Russians to stop this movement, to which the French were directing all their energies.
  • The superior officers all wanted to distinguish themselves, to cut off, to seize, to capture, and to overthrow the French, and all clamored for action.
  • That was a misfortune no one could remedy, for the peasants of the district burned their hay rather than let the French have it.
  • Men who want to fight will always put themselves in the most advantageous conditions for fighting.
  • "Will there be any orders, your honor?" he asked Denisov, holding his hand at the salute and resuming the game of adjutant and general for which he had prepared himself, "or shall I remain with your honor?"
  • For a moment Denisov and the esaul drew back.
  • The man whom they called Tikhon, having run to the stream, plunged in so that the water splashed in the air, and, having disappeared for an instant, scrambled out on all fours, all black with the wet, and ran on.
  • Denisov had Tikhon called and, having praised him for his activity, said a few words in the elder's presence about loyalty to the Tsar and the country and the hatred of the French that all sons of the fatherland should cherish.
  • We only fooled about with the lads for fun, you know!
  • Tikhon, who at first did rough work, laying campfires, fetching water, flaying dead horses, and so on, soon showed a great liking and aptitude for partisan warfare.
  • At night he would go out for booty and always brought back French clothing and weapons, and when told to would bring in French captives also.
  • No one found more opportunities for attacking, no one captured or killed more Frenchmen, and consequently he was made the buffoon of all the Cossacks and hussars and willingly accepted that role.
  • After talking for some time with the esaul about next day's attack, which now, seeing how near they were to the French, he seemed to have definitely decided on, Denisov turned his horse and rode back.
  • "I went for another one," Tikhon continued, "and I crept like this through the wood and lay down."
  • So I went for them with my ax, this way: 'What are you up to?' says I.
  • "Oh, but he was a regular good-for-nothing," said Tikhon.
  • It's capital for us here, but what of him?
  • "Oh, what can I do for him?" he thought, and opening the door he let the boy pass in first.
  • We can't start the affair without knowing for certain how many there are.
  • "There's no need for you to go at all," said Denisov, addressing Dolokhov, "and as for him, I won't let him go on any account."
  • I send them away and take a weceipt for them, shouted Denisov, suddenly flushing.
  • "But for you and me, old fellow, it's time to drop these amenities," continued Dolokhov, as if he found particular pleasure in speaking of this subject which irritated Denisov.
  • Because you are sorry for him!
  • For you'll admit that if we don't know for sure how many of them there are... hundreds of lives may depend on it, while there are only two of us.
  • For you'll admit that if we don't know for sure how many of them there are... hundreds of lives may depend on it, while there are only two of us.
  • * When an officer is making his round, sentinels don't ask him for the password....
  • And without waiting for an answer from the sentinel, who had stepped aside, Dolokhov rode up the incline at a walk.
  • But, noticing his mistake, he broke off short and, with a frown, greeted Dolokhov as a stranger, asking what he could do for him.
  • For some seconds all were silent.
  • He was awaiting Petya's return in a state of agitation, anxiety, and self-reproach for having let him go.
  • Some fellows do things just anyhow, without preparation, and then they're sorry for it afterwards.
  • Please, my dear fellow, will you sharpen my saber for me?
  • After that Petya remained silent for a long time, listening to the sounds.
  • Perhaps he was really sitting on a wagon, but it might very well be that he was not sitting on a wagon but on a terribly high tower from which, if he fell, he would have to fall for a whole day or a whole month, or go on falling and never reach the bottom.
  • Please... for God's sake...! said he.
  • Wait for the infantry! he exclaimed as Petya rode up to him.
  • "Done for!" he said with a frown, and went to the gate to meet Denisov who was riding toward him.
  • "Done for!" repeated Dolokhov as if the utterance of these words afforded him pleasure, and he went quickly up to the prisoners, who were surrounded by Cossacks who had hurried up.
  • All who could walk went together, and after the third stage Pierre had rejoined Karataev and the gray-blue bandy-legged dog that had chosen Karataev for its master.
  • While imprisoned in the shed Pierre had learned not with his intellect but with his whole being, by life itself, that man is created for happiness, that happiness is within him, in the satisfaction of simple human needs, and that all unhappiness arises not from privation but from superfluity.
  • His feeling of pity for this man frightened him and he wished to go away, but there was no other fire, and Pierre sat down, trying not to look at Platon.
  • Only he prayed to God for death.
  • And they began telling what each was suffering for, and how they had sinned against God.
  • So they asked the old man: 'What are you being punished for, Daddy?'--'I, my dear brothers,' said he, 'am being punished for my own and other men's sins.
  • 'I don't grieve for myself,' he says, 'God, it seems, has chastened me.
  • I suffer for my own sins,' and he wept bitter tears.
  • The paper arrived and they began to look for the old man.
  • A paper has come from the Tsar!' so they began looking for him," here Karataev's lower jaw trembled, "but God had already forgiven him--he was dead!
  • Karataev concluded and sat for a long time silent, gazing before him with a smile.
  • For a long time he could not understand what was happening to him.
  • Still less did that genius, Napoleon, know it, for no one issued any orders to him.
  • But these orders and reports were only on paper, nothing in them was acted upon for they could not be carried out, and though they entitled one another Majesties, Highnesses, or Cousins, they all felt that they were miserable wretches who had done much evil for which they had now to pay.
  • Beyond Smolensk there were several different roads available for the French, and one would have thought that during their stay of four days they might have learned where the enemy was, might have arranged some more advantageous plan and undertaken something new.
  • The Russian army, expecting Napoleon to take the road to the right beyond the Dnieper--which was the only reasonable thing for him to do-- themselves turned to the right and came out onto the highroad at Krasnoe.
  • Similarly profound considerations are given for his retreat from Smolensk to Orsha.
  • For the "great" man nothing is wrong, there is no atrocity for which a "great" man can be blamed.
  • For the "great" man nothing is wrong, there is no atrocity for which a "great" man can be blamed.
  • And the whole world for fifty years has been repeating: Sublime!
  • For us with the standard of good and evil given us by Christ, no human actions are incommensurable.
  • The explanation of this strange fact given by Russian military historians (to the effect that Kutuzov hindered an attack) is unfounded, for we know that he could not restrain the troops from attacking at Vyazma and Tarutino.
  • The Russian military historians in so far as they submit to claims of logic must admit that conclusion, and in spite of their lyrical rhapsodies about valor, devotion, and so forth, must reluctantly admit that the French retreat from Moscow was a series of victories for Napoleon and defeats for Kutuzov.
  • There never was or could have been such an aim, for it would have been senseless and its attainment quite impossible.
  • But not even that could be said for those who drew up this project, for it was not they who had suffered from the trampled beds.
  • To them the words of Miloradovich seem very interesting, and so do their surmises and the rewards this or that general received; but the question of those fifty thousand men who were left in hospitals and in graves does not even interest them, for it does not come within the range of their investigation.
  • She went through the accounts with Alpatych, conferred with Dessalles about her nephew, and gave orders and made preparations for the journey to Moscow.
  • Natasha remained alone and, from the time Princess Mary began making preparations for departure, held aloof from her too.
  • Princess Mary asked the countess to let Natasha go with her to Moscow, and both parents gladly accepted this offer, for they saw their daughter losing strength every day and thought that a change of scene and the advice of Moscow doctors would be good for her.
  • As soon as anyone entered she got up quickly, changed her position and expression, and picked up a book or some sewing, evidently waiting impatiently for the intruder to go.
  • She felt all the time as if she might at any moment penetrate that on which--with a terrible questioning too great for her strength--her spiritual gaze was fixed.
  • I said it then only because it would have been dreadful for him, but he understood it differently.
  • He thought it would be dreadful for me.
  • She stopped him and said: Terrible for you, but not for me!
  • You know that for me there is nothing in life but you, and to suffer with you is the greatest happiness for me, and he took her hand and pressed it as he had pressed it that terrible evening four days before his death.
  • Dunyasha, her maid, entered the room quickly and abruptly with a frightened look on her face and showing no concern for her mistress.
  • She went in with rapid steps, pausing at the door for an instant as if struggling with herself, and then ran to her mother.
  • The countess pressed her daughter's hand, closed her eyes, and became quiet for a moment.
  • Natasha looked at her with eyes full of tears and in her look there was nothing but love and an entreaty for forgiveness.
  • During the third night the countess kept very quiet for a few minutes, and Natasha rested her head on the arm of her chair and closed her eyes, but opened them again on hearing the bedstead creak.
  • And embracing her daughter, the countess began to weep for the first time.
  • She thought her life was ended, but her love for her mother unexpectedly showed her that the essence of life--love--was still active within her.
  • Princess Mary put off her departure, and for three weeks looked after Natasha as if she had been a sick child.
  • She will be asking for me.
  • Sometimes they were silent for hours; sometimes after they were already in bed they would begin talking and go on till morning.
  • She did not think of applying submission and self-abnegation to her own life, for she was accustomed to seek other joys, but she understood and loved in another those previously incomprehensible virtues.
  • For Princess Mary, listening to Natasha's tales of childhood and early youth, there also opened out a new and hitherto uncomprehended side of life: belief in life and its enjoyment.
  • Unconsciously she immediately invented a reason for going down, and then, testing her strength, ran upstairs again, observing the result.
  • At the end of January Princess Mary left for Moscow, and the count insisted on Natasha's going with her to consult the doctors.
  • But besides this, since the exhaustion and enormous diminution of the army caused by the rapidity of the advance had become evident, another reason for slackening the pace and delaying presented itself to Kutuzov.
  • But to the generals, especially the foreign ones in the Russian army, who wished to distinguish themselves, to astonish somebody, and for some reason to capture a king or a duke--it seemed that now--when any battle must be horrible and senseless--was the very time to fight and conquer somebody.
  • Despite all Kutuzov's efforts to avoid that ruinous encounter and to preserve his troops, the massacre of the broken mob of French soldiers by worn-out Russians continued at Krasnoe for three days.
  • The hatred and contempt of the crowd punish such men for discerning the higher laws.
  • Kutuzov never talked of "forty centuries looking down from the Pyramids," of the sacrifices he offered for the fatherland, or of what he intended to accomplish or had accomplished; in general he said nothing about himself, adopted no pose, always appeared to be the simplest and most ordinary of men, and said the simplest and most ordinary things.
  • In reply to Lauriston's proposal of peace, he said: There can be no peace, for such is the people's will.
  • His actions--without the smallest deviation--were all directed to one and the same threefold end: (1) to brace all his strength for conflict with the French, (2) to defeat them, and (3) to drive them out of Russia, minimizing as far as possible the sufferings of our people and of our army.
  • This procrastinator Kutuzov, whose motto was "Patience and Time," this enemy of decisive action, gave battle at Borodino, investing the preparations for it with unparalleled solemnity.
  • To a lackey no man can be great, for a lackey has his own conception of greatness.
  • Kutuzov was silent for a few seconds and then, submitting with evident reluctance to the duty imposed by his position, raised his head and began to speak.
  • I thank you all for your hard and faithful service.
  • You see, brothers, I know it's hard for you, but it can't be helped!
  • Bear up; it won't be for long now!
  • It is hard for you, but still you are at home while they--you see what they have come to, said he, pointing to the prisoners.
  • And flourishing his whip he rode off at a gallop for the first time during the whole campaign, and left the broken ranks of the soldiers laughing joyfully and shouting "Hurrah!"
  • Afterwards when one of the generals addressed Kutuzov asking whether he wished his caleche to be sent for, Kutuzov in answering unexpectedly gave a sob, being evidently greatly moved.
  • There was only one hut available for the regimental commander.
  • A third section scattered through the village arranging quarters for the staff officers, carrying out the French corpses that were in the huts, and dragging away boards, dry wood, and thatch from the roofs, for the campfires, or wattle fences to serve for shelter.
  • In the hut which the men had passed, the chief officers had gathered and were in animated talk over their tea about the events of the day and the maneuvers suggested for tomorrow.
  • They beat the tattoo, called the roll, had supper, and settled down round the fires for the night--some repairing their footgear, some smoking pipes, and some stripping themselves naked to steam the lice out of their shirts.
  • For leave to sit by their wattle they demanded contributions of fuel.
  • What a fellow you are for dancing!
  • "Well, you know," said the sharp-nosed man they called Jackdaw in a squeaky and unsteady voice, raising himself at the other side of the fire, "a plump man gets thin, but for a thin one it's death.
  • They were clearing the hut for the colonel and carried them out.
  • That peasant near Mozhaysk where the battle was said the men were all called up from ten villages around and they carted for twenty days and still didn't finish carting the dead away.
  • And as for the wolves, he says...
  • Is the fire only for you?
  • The soldiers surrounded the Frenchmen, spread a greatcoat on the ground for the sick man, and brought some buckwheat porridge and vodka for both of them.
  • * Who had a triple talent For drinking, for fighting, And for being a gallant old boy...
  • * Who had a triple talent For drinking, for fighting, And for being a gallant old boy...
  • The sole importance of the crossing of the Berezina lies in the fact that it plainly and indubitably proved the fallacy of all the plans for cutting off the enemy's retreat and the soundness of the only possible line of action--the one Kutuzov and the general mass of the army demanded--namely, simply to follow the enemy up.
  • This was shown not so much by the arrangements it made for crossing as by what took place at the bridges.
  • As long as they remained with their own people each might hope for help from his fellows and the definite place he held among them.
  • The Emperor with a rapid glance scanned Kutuzov from head to foot, frowned for an instant, but immediately mastering himself went up to the old man, extended his arms and embraced him.
  • When alone with the field marshal the Emperor expressed his dissatisfaction at the slowness of the pursuit and at the mistakes made at Krasnoe and the Berezina, and informed him of his intentions for a future campaign abroad.
  • Kutuzov raised his head and looked for a long while into the eyes of Count Tolstoy, who stood before him holding a silver salver on which lay a small object.
  • His health had to be bad for his place to be taken away and given to another.
  • The movement of peoples from west to east was to be succeeded by a movement of peoples from east to west, and for this fresh war another leader was necessary, having qualities and views differing from Kutuzov's and animated by different motives.
  • After his liberation he reached Orel, and on the third day there, when preparing to go to Kiev, he fell ill and was laid up for three months.
  • That same day he had learned that Prince Andrew, after surviving the battle of Borodino for more than a month had recently died in the Rostovs' house at Yaroslavl, and Denisov who told him this news also mentioned Helene's death, supposing that Pierre had heard of it long before.
  • But for a long time in his dreams he still saw himself in the conditions of captivity.
  • How splendid! said he to himself when a cleanly laid table was moved up to him with savory beef tea, or when he lay down for the night on a soft clean bed, or when he remembered that the French had gone and that his wife was no more.
  • The very question that had formerly tormented him, the thing he had continually sought to find--the aim of life--no longer existed for him now.
  • That search for the aim of life had not merely disappeared temporarily--he felt that it no longer existed for him and could not present itself again.
  • He could not see an aim, for he now had faith--not faith in any kind of rule, or words, or ideas, but faith in an ever-living, ever-manifest God.
  • That dreadful question, "What for?" which had formerly destroyed all his mental edifices, no longer existed for him.
  • To that question, "What for?" a simple answer was now always ready in his soul: "Because there is a God, that God without whose will not one hair falls from a man's head."
  • The doctor who attended Pierre and visited him every day, though he considered it his duty as a doctor to pose as a man whose every moment was of value to suffering humanity, would sit for hours with Pierre telling him his favorite anecdotes and his observations on the characters of his patients in general, and especially of the ladies.
  • Why this was necessary he did not know, but he knew for certain that it was necessary.
  • There were bazaars, shops, warehouses, market stalls, granaries--for the most part still stocked with goods-- and there were factories and workshops, palaces and wealthy houses filled with luxuries, hospitals, prisons, government offices, churches, and cathedrals.
  • Gangs of carpenters hoping for high pay arrived in Moscow every day, and on all sides logs were being hewn, new houses built, and old, charred ones repaired.
  • They abused the police and bribed them, made out estimates at ten times their value for government stores that had perished in the fire, and demanded relief.
  • He called on Count Rostopchin and on some acquaintances who were back in Moscow, and he intended to leave for Petersburg two days later.
  • Pierre felt particularly well disposed toward them all, but was now instinctively on his guard for fear of binding himself in any way.
  • When was he going to Petersburg and would he mind taking a parcel for someone?--he replied: "Yes, perhaps," or, "I think so," and so on.
  • He spoke of you even at the very last, she went on, turning her eyes from Pierre to her companion with a shyness that surprised him for an instant.
  • It was the first piece of good news we had received for a long time.
  • The countess is in a dreadful state; but it was necessary for Natasha herself to see a doctor.
  • Natasha without waiting for Princess Mary to finish again looked inquiringly at Pierre.
  • But Pierre's face quivering with emotion, his questions and his eager restless expression, gradually compelled her to go into details which she feared to recall for her own sake.
  • She frowned and lowered her eyes for a moment.
  • She hesitated for an instant whether to speak or not.
  • For me it certainly was happiness.
  • And he... he... he said he was wishing for it at the very moment I entered the room....
  • He listened to her and felt only pity for her, for what she was suffering now while she was speaking.
  • Princess Mary, frowning in her effort to hold back her tears, sat beside Natasha, and heard for the first time the story of those last days of her brother's and Natasha's love.
  • Pierre suddenly flushed crimson and for a long time tried not to look at Natasha.
  • "People speak of misfortunes and sufferings," remarked Pierre, "but if at this moment I were asked: 'Would you rather be what you were before you were taken prisoner, or go through all this again?' then for heaven's sake let me again have captivity and horseflesh!
  • I am not to blame for being alive and wishing to live--nor you either.
  • It is time for bed.
  • And the same mischievous smile lingered for a long time on her face as if it had been forgotten there.
  • He was thinking of Prince Andrew, of Natasha, and of their love, at one moment jealous of her past, then reproaching himself for that feeling.
  • When he awoke on the Thursday, Savelich came to ask him about packing for the journey.
  • "Oh, yes, long ago before this happened I did for some reason mean to go to Petersburg," he reflected.
  • No, I'll put it off for a bit.
  • I heard that they were arranging a match for her with young Rostov.
  • It would be a very good thing for the Rostovs, they are said to be utterly ruined.
  • The princess too had prepared provisions for Pierre's journey.
  • And all for me!
  • The cabmen he met and their passengers, the carpenters cutting the timber for new houses with axes, the women hawkers, and the shopkeepers, all looked at him with cheerful beaming eyes that seemed to say: Ah, there he is!
  • I will call round in case you have any commissions for me, said he, standing before Princess Mary and turning red, but not taking his departure.
  • With a deep and long- drawn sigh she seemed to be prepared for a lengthy talk.
  • The whole meaning of life--not for him alone but for the whole world--seemed to him centered in his love and the possibility of being loved by her.
  • All the views he formed of men and circumstances at this time remained true for him always.
  • She no longer complained of her position, did not say a word about the past, and no longer feared to make happy plans for the future.
  • I am happy for your sake, said Princess Mary, who because of those tears quite forgave Natasha's joy.
  • Even if they do not know for what purpose they are fattened, they will at least know that all that happened to the ram did not happen accidentally, and will no longer need the conceptions of chance or genius.
  • His childishly rash, uncalled-for, and ignoble departure from Africa, leaving his comrades in distress, is set down to his credit, and again the enemy's fleet twice lets him slip past.
  • As if measuring themselves and preparing for the coming movement, the western forces push toward the east several times in 1805, 1806, 1807, and 1809, gaining strength and growing.
  • It is not Napoleon who prepares himself for the accomplishment of his role, so much as all those round him who prepare him to take on himself the whole responsibility for what is happening and has to happen.
  • Everything is done to deprive him of the remains of his reason and to prepare him for his terrible part.
  • The invaders flee, turn back, flee again, and all the chances are now not for Napoleon but always against him.
  • The man who ten years before and a year later was considered an outlawed brigand is sent to an island two days' sail from France, which for some reason is presented to him as his dominion, and guards are given to him and millions of money are paid him.
  • And some years pass during which he plays a pitiful comedy to himself in solitude on his island, justifying his actions by intrigues and lies when the justification is no longer needed, and displaying to the whole world what it was that people had mistaken for strength as long as an unseen hand directed his actions.
  • What was needed for him who, overshadowing others, stood at the head of that movement from east to west?
  • But as soon as the necessity for a general European war presented itself he appeared in his place at the given moment and, uniting the nations of Europe, led them to the goal.
  • The arrangements for Natasha's marriage occupied him for a while.
  • On his last day, sobbing, he asked her and his absent son to forgive him for having dissipated their property--that being the chief fault of which he was conscious.
  • He at once resigned his commission, and without waiting for it to be accepted took leave of absence and went to Moscow.
  • Not one of the plans Nicholas tried succeeded; the estate was sold by auction for half its value, and half the debts still remained unpaid.
  • Nicholas accepted thirty thousand rubles offered him by his brother-in- law Bezukhov to pay off debts he regarded as genuinely due for value received.
  • And to avoid being imprisoned for the remainder, as the creditors threatened, he re-entered the government service.
  • He seemed in his heart to reproach her for being too perfect, and because there was nothing to reproach her with.
  • She had all that people are valued for, but little that could have made him love her.
  • He wished for nothing and hoped for nothing, and deep in his heart experienced a gloomy and stern satisfaction in an uncomplaining endurance of his position.
  • From reports current in town she learned how the Rostovs were situated, and how "the son has sacrificed himself for his mother," as people were saying.
  • He inquired about her health, led the way to his mother, and having sat there for five minutes left the room.
  • You would at least be seeing somebody, and I think it must be dull for you only seeing us.
  • I only wish it for your sake.
  • Nicholas sighed, bit his mustache, and laid out the cards for a patience, trying to divert his mother's attention to another topic.
  • He suddenly felt sorry for her and was vaguely conscious that he might be the cause of the sadness her face expressed.
  • She seemed to be trying to fathom the hidden meaning of his words which would explain his feeling for her.
  • Yes, were it not for that...
  • "I don't understand your why, Count," she continued, "but it's hard for me...
  • For some reason you wish to deprive me of our former friendship.
  • I have had so little happiness in life that every loss is hard for me to bear....
  • "Princess, for God's sake!" he exclaimed, trying to stop her.
  • For a few seconds they gazed silently into one another's eyes--and what had seemed impossible and remote suddenly became possible, inevitable, and very near.
  • He did not allow himself either to be hard on or punish a man, or to make things easy for or reward anyone, merely because he felt inclined to do so.
  • Sometimes when, trying to understand him, she spoke of the good work he was doing for his serfs, he would be vexed and reply: Not in the least; it never entered my head and I wouldn't do that for their good!
  • "And fairness, of course," he added, "for if the peasant is naked and hungry and has only one miserable horse, he can do no good either for himself or for me."
  • And all Nicholas did was fruitful--probably just because he refused to allow himself to think that he was doing good to others for virtue's sake.
  • Once in summer he had sent for the village elder from Bogucharovo, a man who had succeeded to the post when Dron died and who was accused of dishonesty and various irregularities.
  • Never, he repeated in a trembling voice like a boy asking for forgiveness.
  • In autumn he gave himself up to hunting with the same business-like seriousness--leaving home for a month, or even two, with his hunt.
  • Sometimes I am dreadfully sorry for her.
  • She waited on the old countess, petted and spoiled the children, was always ready to render the small services for which she had a gift, and all this was unconsciously accepted from her with insufficient gratitude.
  • The house was spacious and had rooms for the house serfs and apartments for visitors.
  • Whole families of the Rostovs' and Bolkonskis' relations sometimes came to Bald Hills with sixteen horses and dozens of servants and stayed for months.
  • Besides that, four times a year, on the name days and birthdays of the hosts, as many as a hundred visitors would gather there for a day or two.
  • Pierre had gone to Petersburg on business of his own for three weeks as he said, but had remained there nearly seven weeks and was expected back every minute.
  • Having taken precautions against the general drunkenness to be expected on the morrow because it was a great saint's day, he returned to dinner, and without having time for a private talk with his wife sat down at the long table laid for twenty persons, at which the whole household had assembled.
  • Sonya was always the first excuse Countess Mary found for feeling irritated.
  • Countess Mary looked round, saw little Andrew following her, felt that Sonya was right, and for that very reason flushed and with evident difficulty refrained from saying something harsh.
  • He grew silent, and quiet ensued for a moment, terrible to Countess Mary.
  • It is only Malvinas and women of that kind who are loved for their beauty.
  • You should have seen her ecstasy, and how he caught it for having stayed away so long.
  • Natasha had married in the early spring of 1813, and in 1820 already had three daughters besides a son for whom she had longed and whom she was now nursing.
  • The chief reason for devoting no time either to singing, to dress, or to choosing her words was that she really had no time to spare for these things.
  • These questions, then as now, existed only for those who see nothing in marriage but the pleasure married people get from one another, that is, only the beginnings of marriage and not its whole significance, which lies in the family.
  • Discussions and questions of that kind, which are like the question of how to get the greatest gratification from one's dinner, did not then and do not now exist for those for whom the purpose of a dinner is the nourishment it affords; and the purpose of marriage is the family.
  • If the purpose of food is nourishment and the purpose of marriage is the family, the whole question resolves itself into not eating more than one can digest, and not having more wives or husbands than are needed for the family--that is, one wife or one husband.
  • Natasha did not care for society in general, but prized the more the society of her relatives--Countess Mary, and her brother, her mother, and Sonya.
  • To make up for this, at home Pierre had the right to regulate his life and that of the whole family exactly as he chose.
  • Pierre had but to show a partiality for anything to get just what he liked done always.
  • To Pierre's timid look of inquiry after reading the letter she replied by asking him to go, but to fix a definite date for his return.
  • Natasha was sad and irritable all that time, especially when her mother, her brother, Sonya, or Countess Mary in their efforts to console her tried to excuse Pierre and suggested reasons for his delay in returning.
  • During that fortnight of anxiety Natasha resorted to the baby for comfort so often, and fussed over him so much, that she overfed him and he fell ill.
  • But at the door she stopped as if her conscience reproached her for having in her joy left the child too soon, and she glanced round.
  • Denisov, who had come out of the study into the dancing room with his pipe, now for the first time recognized the old Natasha.
  • "He's come!" she exclaimed as she ran past, and Denisov felt that he too was delighted that Pierre, whom he did not much care for, had returned.
  • Yes, it's all very well for you.
  • When Nicholas and his wife came to look for Pierre he was in the nursery holding his baby son, who was again awake, on his huge right palm and dandling him.
  • He says his hand is just made for a baby's seat.
  • Only not for this...
  • For instance, Pierre's return was a joyful and important event and they all felt it to be so.
  • He alone could play on the clavichord that ecossaise (his only piece) to which, as he said, all possible dances could be danced, and they felt sure he had brought presents for them all.
  • Knowing that Natasha asked nothing for herself, and gave him commissions for others only when he himself had offered to undertake them, he now found an unexpected and childlike pleasure in this purchase of presents for everyone in the house, and never forgot anything.
  • If he now incurred Natasha's censure it was only for buying too many and too expensive things.
  • He felt that his way of life had now been settled once for all till death and that to change it was not in his power, and so that way of life proved economical.
  • After the deaths of her son and husband in such rapid succession, she felt herself a being accidentally forgotten in this world and left without aim or object for her existence.
  • Just as she needed to work off her spleen so she had sometimes to exercise her still-existing faculty of thinking--and the pretext for that was a game of patience.
  • But those glances expressed something more: they said that she had played her part in life, that what they now saw was not her whole self, that we must all become like her, and that they were glad to yield to her, to restrain themselves for this once precious being formerly as full of life as themselves, but now so much to be pitied.
  • We were all weary of waiting for you.
  • They consisted of a box for cards, of splendid workmanship, a bright- blue Sevres tea cup with shepherdesses depicted on it and with a lid, and a gold snuffbox with the count's portrait on the lid which Pierre had had done by a miniaturist in Petersburg.
  • The countess had long wished for such a box, but as she did not want to cry just then she glanced indifferently at the portrait and gave her attention chiefly to the box for cards.
  • But best of all you have brought yourself back--for I never saw anything like it, you ought to give your wife a scolding!
  • "Look, Anna Timofeevna," she added to her companion, "see what a box for cards my son has brought us!"
  • "What is that, mon cher ami?" asked the countess, who had finished her tea and evidently needed a pretext for being angry after her meal.
  • But I mustn't go there-- those stockings are to be a surprise for me.
  • Nicholas and Denisov rose, asked for their pipes, smoked, went to fetch more tea from Sonya--who sat weary but resolute at the samovar--and questioned Pierre.
  • He seeks only for peace, and only these people sans foi ni loi * can give it him--people who recklessly hack at and strangle everything--Magnitski, Arakcheev, and tutti quanti....
  • The Tugendbund is all vewy well for the sausage eaters, but I don't understand it and can't even pwonounce it, interposed Denisov in a loud and resolute voice.
  • The lad looked down and seemed now for the first time to notice what he had done to the things on the table.
  • For a long time he was silent, as if astonished, then he jumped out of bed, ran to me in his shirt, and sobbed so that I could not calm him for a long time.
  • They were for the most part quite insignificant trifles, but did not seem so to the mother or to the father either, now that he read this diary about his children for the first time.
  • There could be no doubt not only of his approval but also of his admiration for his wife.
  • All that the fondest mother could do for her son you have done and are doing for him, and of course I am glad of it.
  • A wonderful boy, but I am dreadfully afraid for him.
  • It would be good for him to have companions.
  • Well it won't be for long.
  • Is it for my own pleasure that I am at the farm or in the office from morning to night?
  • "You know, Mary, today Elias Mitrofanych" (this was his overseer) "came back from the Tambov estate and told me they are already offering eighty thousand rubles for the forest."
  • But she had to force herself to attend, for what he was saying did not interest her at all.
  • She did not compare them with him, but compared her feeling for them with her feeling for him, and felt with regret that there was something lacking in her feeling for young Nicholas.
  • Natasha was so used to this kind of talk with her husband that for her it was the surest sign of something being wrong between them if Pierre followed a line of logical reasoning.
  • Yesterday, for instance, Mitya was naughty...
  • "For instance, he is collecting a library and has made it a rule not to buy a new book till he has read what he had already bought--Sismondi and Rousseau and Montesquieu," he added with a smile.
  • Yes, and for me nothing else is serious.
  • They were silent for a while.
  • They were silent for a few seconds.
  • For the ancients these questions were solved by a belief in the direct participation of the Deity in human affairs.
  • For a reply to these questions the common sense of mankind turns to the science of history, whose aim is to enable nations and humanity to know themselves.
  • And for some reason he went to kill Africans, and killed them so well and was so cunning and wise that when he returned to France he ordered everybody to obey him, and they all obeyed him.
  • If instead of a divine power some other force has appeared, it should be explained in what this new force consists, for the whole interest of history lies precisely in that force.
  • As soon as historians of different nationalities and tendencies begin to describe the same event, the replies they give immediately lose all meaning, for this force is understood by them all not only differently but often in quite contradictory ways.
  • In describing a war or the subjugation of a people, a general historian looks for the cause of the event not in the power of one man, but in the interaction of many persons connected with the event.
  • That Chateaubriand, Madame de Stael, and others spoke certain words to one another only affected their mutual relations but does not account for the submission of millions.
  • The historians of culture are quite consistent in regard to their progenitors, the writers of universal histories, for if historical events may be explained by the fact that certain persons treated one another in such and such ways, why not explain them by the fact that such and such people wrote such and such books?
  • But not to speak of the intrinsic quality of histories of this kind (which may possibly even be of use to someone for something) the histories of culture, to which all general histories tend more and more to approximate, are significant from the fact that after seriously and minutely examining various religious, philosophic, and political doctrines as causes of events, as soon as they have to describe an actual historic event such as the campaign of 1812 for instance, they involuntarily describe it as resulting from an exercise of power--and say plainly that that was the result of Napoleon's will.
  • As gold is gold only if it is serviceable not merely for exchange but also for use, so universal historians will be valuable only when they can reply to history's essential question: what is power?
  • If the source of power lies neither in the physical nor in the moral qualities of him who possesses it, it must evidently be looked for elsewhere--in the relation to the people of the man who wields the power.
  • And that is how power is understood by the science of jurisprudence, that exchange bank of history which offers to exchange history's understanding of power for true gold.
  • In the domain of jurisprudence, which consists of discussions of how a state and power might be arranged were it possible for all that to be arranged, it is all very clear; but when applied to history that definition of power needs explanation.
  • And what is the time limit for such reactions?
  • For us that movement of the peoples from west to east, without leaders, with a crowd of vagrants, and with Peter the Hermit, remains incomprehensible.
  • The theory of the transference of the collective will of the people to historic persons may perhaps explain much in the domain of jurisprudence and be essential for its purposes, but in its application to history, as soon as revolutions, conquests, or civil wars occur--that is, as soon as history begins--that theory explains nothing.
  • The theory seems irrefutable just because the act of transference of the people's will cannot be verified, for it never occurred.
  • If the Deity issues a command, expresses His will, as ancient history tells us, the expression of that will is independent of time and is not caused by anything, for the Divinity is not controlled by an event.
  • When, for instance, we say that Napoleon ordered armies to go to war, we combine in one simultaneous expression a whole series of consecutive commands dependent one on another.
  • For an order to be certainly executed, it is necessary that a man should order what can be executed.
  • But to know what can and what cannot be executed is impossible, not only in the case of Napoleon's invasion of Russia in which millions participated, but even in the simplest event, for in either case millions of obstacles may arise to prevent its execution.
  • Apart from that, the chief source of our error in this matter is due to the fact that in the historical accounts a whole series of innumerable, diverse, and petty events, such for instance as all those which led the French armies to Russia, is generalized into one event in accord with the result produced by that series of events.
  • Amid a long series of unexecuted orders of Napoleon's one series, for the campaign of 1812, was carried out--not because those orders differed in any way from the other, unexecuted orders but because they coincided with the course of events that led the French army into Russia; just as in stencil work this or that figure comes out not because the color was laid on from this side or in that way, but because it was laid on from all sides over the figure cut in the stencil.
  • For common action people always unite in certain combinations, in which regardless of the difference of the aims set for the common action, the relation between those taking part in it is always the same.
  • For common action people always unite in certain combinations, in which regardless of the difference of the aims set for the common action, the relation between those taking part in it is always the same.
  • Men uniting in these combinations always assume such relations toward one another that the larger number take a more direct share, and the smaller number a less direct share, in the collective action for which they have combined.
  • Of all the combinations in which men unite for collective action one of the most striking and definite examples is an army.
  • The soldier himself does the stabbing, hacking, burning, and pillaging, and always receives orders for these actions from men above him; he himself never gives an order.
  • For reasons known or unknown to us the French began to drown and kill one another.
  • And corresponding to the event its justification appears in people's belief that this was necessary for the welfare of France, for liberty, and for equality.
  • People ceased to kill one another, and this event was accompanied by its justification in the necessity for a centralization of power, resistance to Europe, and so on.
  • History shows us that these justifications of the events have no common sense and are all contradictory, as in the case of killing a man as the result of recognizing his rights, and the killing of millions in Russia for the humiliation of England.
  • If in a thousand years even one man in a million could act freely, that is, as he chose, it is evident that one single free act of that man's in violation of the laws governing human action would destroy the possibility of the existence of any laws for the whole of humanity.
  • If there be a single law governing the actions of men, free will cannot exist, for then man's will is subject to that law.
  • He feels that however impossible it may be, it is so, for without this conception of freedom not only would he be unable to understand life, but he would be unable to live for a single moment.
  • That is a question for theology.
  • That is a question for jurisprudence.
  • That is a question for ethics.
  • That is a question for history.
  • In our time the majority of so-called advanced people--that is, the crowd of ignoramuses--have taken the work of the naturalists who deal with one side of the question for a solution of the whole problem.
  • They do not see that the role of the natural sciences in this matter is merely to serve as an instrument for the illumination of one side of it.
  • The subject for history is not man's will itself but our presentation of it.
  • The degree of freedom and inevitability governing the actions of these people is clearly defined for us.
  • In the case of a crime we most urgently demand the punishment for such an act; in the case of a virtuous act we rate its merit most highly.
  • The founder of a sect or party, or an inventor, impresses us less when we know how or by what the way was prepared for his activity.
  • On these three considerations alone is based the conception of irresponsibility for crimes and the extenuating circumstances admitted by all legislative codes.
  • For my action to be free it was necessary that it should encounter no obstacles.
  • For if I examine an action committed a second ago I must still recognize it as not being free, for it is irrevocably linked to the moment at which it was committed.
  • For if I examine an action committed a second ago I must still recognize it as not being free, for it is irrevocably linked to the moment at which it was committed.
  • However inaccessible to us may be the cause of the expression of will in any action, our own or another's, the first demand of reason is the assumption of and search for a cause, for without a cause no phenomenon is conceivable.
  • But even if--imagining a man quite exempt from all influences, examining only his momentary action in the present, unevoked by any cause--we were to admit so infinitely small a remainder of inevitability as equaled zero, we should even then not have arrived at the conception of complete freedom in man, for a being uninfluenced by the external world, standing outside of time and independent of cause, is no longer a man.
  • But besides this, even if, admitting the remaining minimum of freedom to equal zero, we assumed in some given case--as for instance in that of a dying man, an unborn babe, or an idiot--complete absence of freedom, by so doing we should destroy the very conception of man in the case we are examining, for as soon as there is no freedom there is also no man.
  • Vital force is only an expression for the unknown remainder over and above what we know of the essence of life.
  • Free will is for history only an expression for the unknown remainder of what we know about the laws of human life.
  • The recognition of man's free will as something capable of influencing historical events, that is, as not subject to laws, is the same for history as the recognition of a free force moving the heavenly bodies would be for astronomy.
  • From the standpoint from which the science of history now regards its subject on the path it now follows, seeking the causes of events in man's freewill, a scientific enunciation of those laws is impossible, for however man's free will may be restricted, as soon as we recognize it as a force not subject to law, the existence of law becomes impossible.
  • The same is done by the natural sciences: leaving aside the question of cause, they seek for laws.
  • But even after the discovery of the law of Copernicus the Ptolemaic worlds were still studied for a long time.
  • Theology stood on guard for the old views and accused the new of violating revelation.
  • Just as prolonged and stubborn is the struggle now proceeding between the old and the new conception of history, and theology in the same way stands on guard for the old view, and accuses the new view of subverting revelation.
  • On the one hand there is fear and regret for the loss of the whole edifice constructed through the ages, on the other is the passion for destruction.
  • Gluten-free soy alternatives available for those with wheat allergies, and absolutely no MSG additives in any dishes.
  • With these perks, Blazer Pub is a definite must-see and must-eat for anyone who ventures into Purdys.
  • Rarely will one encounter a serving of french fries big enough for two people, and it even comes with a blue cheese and ketchup dip.
  • Set against the idyllic backdrop of a small, 275-year-old town, Purdys' restaurants are perfect for weekend getaways or impromptu vacations.
  • The restaurants in the area grant a sumptuous respite for weary tourists and travelers.
  • Purdys, New York, is the ideal destination not only for sight-seeing but also for restaurant-hopping.
  • Purdys, New York, is the ideal destination not only for sight-seeing but also for restaurant-hopping.
  • Go for lunch or dinner (entree prices in 2009 go up to about $20), or watch the game with your favorite beer.
  • Louis---cook up some of the best wings in town with a secret sauce that brings many patrons back for more.
  • Louis, MO 63139(314) 781-1135www.cunetto.com Hodak's Restaurant & Bar After a meal at Hodak's, sign up for a Benton Park walking tour to burn off the calories you've just consumed.
  • So if you're going for dinner, it's best to get there when doors reopen at 5 p.m.
  • Cunetto's, which is closed on Sundays, only takes reservations for lunch.
  • Since the 1970s, locals and out-of-towners have packed Cunetto's, hungry for favorites such as toasted ravioli and Cunetto's famous salad.
  • Blueberry Hill serves food daily from 11 a.m. to midnight; prices for most dishes are under $10, as of 2009.
  • Sonoma Grill5745 Sunrise Highway Holbrook, NY 11741(631) 218-3888sonoma-grill.com Joe's Restaurant & Pizzeria Looking for some pizza.
  • Open for lunch and dinner, Sonoma will run you from $15 to $25, as of 2009, on average per person, including drinks and appetizers.
  • Great for kids and people who just can't keep still, T F Brown's Restaurant has bowling, darts, LAN multi-player games and pool tables.
  • Batavia, NY‎ 14020(585) 344-1543‎ T F Brown's Restaurant When everyone in your group is in the mood for something different, go to T F Brown's Restaurant.
  • Perfect for those on an Atkins diet, this restaurant does not have much in the way of vegetarian options.
  • The dinner menu has big and delicious steaks so you can re-up on your protein for tomorrow's adventure.
  • Big eaters will enjoy the fajita combo for two and the bottomless basket of chips and salsa.
  • This bustling tourist and local spot is open for lunch and dinner.
  • Batavia is directly off the I-90 New York State Thruway, which makes it easy to stop in for a bite to eat if you are enjoying adventures in and around this area.
  • You can choose from dine-in and take-out for lunch and dinner.
  • Head here for traditional Chinese dishes, including fried rice, spring rolls, steamed dumplings and vegetarian dishes.
  • Head here for affordable lunch and dinner items in a no-frills setting.
  • Settle in for buffet dining or a sit-down meal for your fill of noodles, rice bowls, sushi, spring rolls and other Asian specialties available throughout the Brick township.
  • Settle in for buffet dining or a sit-down meal for your fill of noodles, rice bowls, sushi, spring rolls and other Asian specialties available throughout the Brick township.
  • Whether you're in the mood for dim sum after a long day of hiking and exploring area parks or want to fuel up between activities with some Chinese or Japanese food, you'll find a number of Asian restaurants in Brick, New Jersey.
  • If you're up early for a hike or trekking adventure, choose breakfast items from the Power Breakfast menu served at 7 a.m.
  • Head here for fresh coffee, breakfast sandwiches, classic American brunch favorites and outdoor seating options.
  • The restaurant also stands by a "green" philosophy, making it a choice destination for eco-friendly travelers.
  • Whether you're looking for a hearty pancake and eggs platter or a light and healthy meal before a hiking trip in Atlanta, you'll find a number of breakfast spots to satisfy your appetite while keeping you within your budget.
  • Philadelphia, PA 19104(215) 823-6222 The Italian Trattoria at The Restaurant School For an experience a bit out of the ordinary, and a bargain to boot, pay a visit to the Restaurant School at Walnut Hill College in the heart of University City.
  • Set the price you're comfortable with, let him know what the table has chosen for dinner, and allow him to find you the perfect wine to accompany your meal.
  • Despite the fancy ingredients, prices for the handmade pastas are reasonable, all hovering around $20.
  • If you've come for the wood-fired pizza, you'll have plenty of choices there as well including a couple served "a la Cocca"--with a fresh egg baked in the center.
  • A test of any Italian restaurant is whether its offerings will serve as just reward for hiking the hillside towns of Tuscany.
  • During warmer months, head for the garden terrace.
  • Poughkeepsie, NY 12601(845) 483-8074theartistspalate.biz Flames Steakhouse For a big, juicy, melt-in-your-mouth hunk of choice meat get yourself and your appetite to this top-ranked steakhouse in Briarcliff Manor.
  • Known for its rolling farmlands and leafy parks, the Hudson Valley is dotted with great places to dine.
  • The dining room is absolutely gorgeous, and the restaurant has a spacious outdoor patio for fair weather.
  • For something less salty, the vitello al porto is a rich delight.
  • Piatti Restaurant2695 NE Village Lane (in University Village)Seattle, WA 98105(206) 524-9088www.piatti.com Marcello Ristorante Located on Roosevelt and run by the Magaletti family, Marcello's is open nightly for dinner.
  • Try the rigatoni for Piatti's take on an old classic.
  • Business hours for the Big Easy Creole Cafe start at 11 a.m. and last until the last customer standing is finished all week except Sundays.
  • For non-Italian lovers, Little City has burgers and paninis as well as flat-bread roll-ups.
  • Stop by the bakery to take home some muffins, coffeecake or other baked goods to enjoy for the next day.
  • Expect omelets, scrambles and crepes for the early day hours, and plenty of sandwiches, burgers and soups for lunchtime.
  • Expect omelets, scrambles and crepes for the early day hours, and plenty of sandwiches, burgers and soups for lunchtime.
  • Fogo de Chao stands out for its above-and-beyond standards of service.
  • Phoenix, AZ 85048(480) 783-6060www.brazilianbullsteakhouse.com Fogo de Chao North Scottsdale's Fogo de Chao is another mecca for meat eaters.
  • Diners at the Brazilian Bull use a painted cylinder to control how much meat arrives at the table: green means more meat, please; red means enough for now; and the cylinder on the side means done for the night.
  • Diners at the Brazilian Bull use a painted cylinder to control how much meat arrives at the table: green means more meat, please; red means enough for now; and the cylinder on the side means done for the night.
  • Considering Phoenix's reputation for having an endless summer, it should come as no surprise that there are a handful of quality South American restaurants in the area.
  • From the desert botanical gardens to the world's largest city park, Phoenix, Arizona, is paradise for outdoor aficionados who crave the sun.
  • A Piccolo Menu for children is available---mention any dietary or allergy concerns to your waiter before you order.
  • Lexington, MA 02420(781) 674-2400 Lexx A self-proclaimed Tavern for the 21st century nestled in the heart of a 17th century town, Lexx provides American cuisine in a comfortably sophisticated atmosphere.
  • If you need accommodations for a large group, call head to make your arrangements.
  • If you are looking for something quick, Eddy's Place offer honey ginger wings, chicken tenders or pizza.
  • When you visit for lunch or dinner, try the veal parmesan, fresh haddock or New York strip.
  • The neighborhood knows Eddy's Place for the juicy and tender prime rib dinners and scrumptious homemade soups.
  • The RiverHouse can cater up to 40 guests for your next big event.
  • Consider Pulaski's local restaurants for your dining needs.
  • The serene environment around the Sedona area provides for a very restful stay while you enjoy guest rooms with arts and crafts furnishings, French doors, flagstone flooring and fireplaces as well as granite counters in the bathrooms.
  • When you are in Northern Arizona and looking for a place to relax, there are several hotels available that can provide you with a comfortable location to call home.
  • Look for such specials like Twin Tail Tuesday and Steak & Shrimp Nights on Wednesdays.
  • For sustenance and nightlife, look half a mile down to the village of Ocean Beach, where you will find windsurfing, boats, night clubs, bars and restaurants.
  • Surrounded by nearby villages and communities less than half a mile away, Seaview offers numerous cabins, condos, bed and breakfasts, luxury suites and apartments for lodging.
  • For those who love dancing, come on Saturday nights in which invites bands ranging from reggae to country.
  • Plummer, a rum-runner during Prohibition and the Great Depression, Plummer's Tavern calls itself "the place where friends meet." Perfect for meeting friends and family, Plummer features casual dining in a relaxed atmosphere.
  • Therefore, this restaurant is a convenient roadside stop for people driving through Kapaa or adventurers who are driving around the island and exploring.
  • Since the restaurant is located at a beach resort, it is a good choice for hungry people who have just finished exploring the beach.
  • For example, freshly caught local Hawaiian fish might be used in fish tacos or cooked in an Asian style.
  • Kapaa also has plenty of good restaurant choices for visitors to the islands, including amazing restaurants at the resorts and elsewhere.
  • Visit the restaurant website for pizza and submarine sandwich coupons.
  • Prices are mid-range with dishes under $10; expect to pay anywhere from $16 to $25 for some entrees.
  • The Windham Rail Trail is a paved and wooded 4-mile stretch that is ideal for walking, running, biking, rollerblading and horseback riding.
  • Wooded and serene, Windham boasts many spots for camping, hiking, biking and water sports, including Canobie Lake Park.
  • For those who aren't looking for a heavy meal, the restaurant also serves sandwiches, hamburgers and salads.
  • For those who aren't looking for a heavy meal, the restaurant also serves sandwiches, hamburgers and salads.
  • A parking garage, which provides discounted rates for patrons, is located across the street provides a solution for an otherwise busy downtown location.
  • A parking garage, which provides discounted rates for patrons, is located across the street provides a solution for an otherwise busy downtown location.
  • Five large seating areas provide ample spots for large groups.
  • Many entrees, which feature many burgers and sandwiches, ribs, chicken and pub-style foods, can be purchased with a $10 game card for $15.99 with an Eat and Play combo.
  • With a full arcade gaming floor with video games, skee ball and racing games, dining packages for large groups may be paired with game cards for a full evening of fun.
  • With a full arcade gaming floor with video games, skee ball and racing games, dining packages for large groups may be paired with game cards for a full evening of fun.
  • The restaurant boasts a large party room, used for bigger groups on the main floor and a recently-renovated River Club room upstairs, which can seat up to 180 guests.
  • Located on the banks of the Schuylkill River with a large area for outdoor dining on a multi-leveled deck, this dining locale is a part of a trendy, posh and business-laden neighborhood of Philadelphia.
  • The restaurant has a banquet menu, and can set a budget for most price ranges.
  • For private parties, meetings, birthdays or family events, the restaurant suggests on its Web site making a banquet reservation.
  • The Spaghetti Warehouse Restaurant With its vast size and variety of tables, The Spaghetti Warehouse Restaurant is one option for large groups seeking to dine in Philadelphia.
  • Whatever your reason for it, there are a number of choices for dining out with a large group in Philadelphia, Pa.
  • Whatever your reason for it, there are a number of choices for dining out with a large group in Philadelphia, Pa.
  • The Avon Old Farms Inn also provides catering for banquets, bar mitzvahs, corporate events, private parties and kosher affairs.
  • They also provide catering services and provide dining facilities for private parties, as well as delivery and take-out services.
  • Grilled over mesquite, the way the Apache Indians have cooked for thousands of years, the steak, poultry and seafood are cooked to order and the fresh meats are combined with vegetables and produce from local growers.
  • Some of the tables have built in grills, for those who enjoy cooking their barbecue at table.
  • It's a good choice for people who want to try Korean food for the first time, as well as for those more familiar with the cuisine.
  • It's a good choice for people who want to try Korean food for the first time, as well as for those more familiar with the cuisine.
  • It's a good choice for people who want to try Korean food for the first time, as well as for those more familiar with the cuisine.
  • Bar Pitti268 Avenue of the AmericasNew York, NY 10014(212) 982-3300 Cafe Loup This friendly, classic French bistro has been a fixture in the West Village fixture for over 30 years.
  • New York City's West Village is known for its historic low-rise architecture, laid-back vibe and bohemian, if somewhat gentrified, charm, which makes it stand out from the grid of Manhattan.
  • Perfect for those dining on a budget, Yesterdays serves everything from buffalo wings to escargot at a reasonable price.
  • Established in 1984, this quaint little pub is open for both lunch and dinner.
  • The quaint feel of the restaurant and the mouth-watering meals makes Chateau Hathorn a phenomenal place to enjoy a romantic dinner for two.
  • For the someone devoted to outdoor recreation, visiting Warwick means horseback riding, golfing, hiking, sailing and cross-country skiing.
  • The Okinawa Japanese Grill & Sushi Bar can also accommodate large groups for business gatherings and family functions.
  • The Sushi Café is open for lunch and dinner and includes an extensive sushi and sashimi menu, chef's creations and hibachi-style cooked foods.
  • Crazy Sushi also offers chef's choice sushi selections for one, two and three people.
  • Jacksonville, Florida has many different sushi restaurants that offer their own spins on traditional sushi rolls and offer cooked foods for those who enjoy fork-and-knife dishes.
  • The best deal in the house is the filling and outrageously tasty "Brian's Bowl," almost too much to eat for just under $7.
  • Autentica is located at 5507 NE 30th Ave.www.autenticaportland.com Nuestra Cocina Eat at Nuestra Cocina for a tasty Mexican meal full of juicy meats and sauces, with service from some of the friendliest waitstaffers in town.
  • Order the chicken mole for a true Autentica experience--with more than 30 ingredients this is a rich, layered and memorable dish.
  • Autentica Autentica is a good option for Mexican food in Portland.
  • Luckily enough for those who find themselves in Portland with a craving for Mexican food, Portland's vast and diverse cuisine has found space to nurture a respected selection of Mexican restaurants.
  • Luckily enough for those who find themselves in Portland with a craving for Mexican food, Portland's vast and diverse cuisine has found space to nurture a respected selection of Mexican restaurants.
  • Portland, Oregon is known for many things--a good music scene, laid back lifestyle, outdoor sports, environmentally friendly people, brew pubs and a variety of restaurants--but seemingly not for Mexican food.
  • Portland, Oregon is known for many things--a good music scene, laid back lifestyle, outdoor sports, environmentally friendly people, brew pubs and a variety of restaurants--but seemingly not for Mexican food.
  • The steaks are seasoned to perfection using ingredients like, BrewHouse root beer and stone ground mustard for a taste unlike any other steakhouse.
  • Anchorage, Alaska 99501(907) 277-6332clubparisrestaurant.com Glacier BrewHouse For a more relaxed atmosphere, check out Glacier BrewHouse where diners can enjoy a mouth-watering steak and a wide range of handcrafted beer.
  • For those who can't decide between a mouth-watering steak and some of Alaska's delectable seafood, Club Paris has combination dishes that serve portions of each.
  • With a wide variety of steak choices available, including New York Strip Steak, Filet Mignon, Top Sirloin and Rib-eye, there is a steak large enough for those with big appetites and those that will fulfill someone with a smaller appetite.
  • After a delectable appetizer like, the seafood sampler for two or fried calamari, guests can choose from various types of steak.
  • For an outdoor enthusiast, visiting Anchorage, Alaska is bound to be a dream come true.
  • Cincinnati, OH 45226(513) 321-5454 jeffruby.com/precinct.html Maury's Tiny Cove For a relaxed atmosphere, people can visit Maury's Tiny Cove.
  • Steaks can be topped with roasted garlic butter, sauteed onions and mushrooms or Bearnaise sauce for the ultimate melt-in-your-mouth meal.
  • The building is designed in Romanesque style, providing an alluring setting for the old-world steakhouse.
  • After a salad or appetizer, guests can enjoy steak, ribs or lamb chops grilled over an open fire, cut thin in Brazilian tradition and served to diners on skewers for a unique steakhouse experience.
  • Stop in for Sunday brunch, which boasts a buffet of delicious Indian fare.
  • Burlington, VT 05401(802) 864-9900www.buenoysano.com/ Shalimar of India For those vegan diners who crave more ethnically diverse cuisine, Shalimar of India provides a flavorful twist on the vegan dining experience.
  • Delivery and pick-up are available, so for those on the go, south-of-the-border vegan dining is made easy.
  • Portions are plentiful and are sure to fuel you up for your next mountain hiking adventure.
  • Whether you're visiting the scenic Lake Champlain for hiking, fishing or kayaking, or climbing the beautiful Green Mountains, Burlington is one of the best places in the United States for outdoor enthusiasts to visit.
  • Whether you're visiting the scenic Lake Champlain for hiking, fishing or kayaking, or climbing the beautiful Green Mountains, Burlington is one of the best places in the United States for outdoor enthusiasts to visit.
  • It is the perfect place to go for a nice dinner after a day spent in the sun, surf and sand of the gulf coast.
  • Surrounded by surf, sun and sand, Tampa offers excellent opportunities for cycling, swimming, surfing, inline skating and much more.
  • With more than 2,000 acres of beach and 150-plus parks, Tampa is the perfect city vacation for those who don't really want a city vacation.
  • For those who can't get enough sushi, there is an all-you-can-eat sushi bar complete with Nigiri sushi, Tamaki sushi, and Maki sushi.
  • Tourists and residents of Boise, Idaho, who are looking for an all-you-can-eat sushi dinner, can find plenty of satisfying tastes to delight their pallets.
  • The delectable tasty BBQ sauces explain why this restaurant has received so many Silver Platter Awards for the infamous ribs.
  • Not only is the area infamous for blues music, but tasty BBQ cooking is a south-side specialty.
  • If you have been trekking through the Palos Hills Forest Reserve, cycling the Old Plank Trail in Frankfort or driving en route to Starved Rock in southern Illinois, you might be hungry for some barbecue restaurants in the southwest suburbs of Chicago.
  • Prices are quite reasonable with a base price for the salad and side dishes and an additional fee for carved meats.
  • Prices are quite reasonable with a base price for the salad and side dishes and an additional fee for carved meats.
  • Weighing each plate calculates the total price for each pound of food.
  • The natural beauty of this area is perfect for many outdoor activities, including hiking, biking, boating, fishing and skiing.
  • Peabody Hotel This luxurious four-star hotel, known for its century-old parade of live Mallard ducks through the grand lobby, is located downtown.
  • All these factors make Memphis a perfect place for a family reunion.
  • Pair with soda, chips and cookies for a complete meal.
  • Papaw's Old Fashioned BBQ3641 Highway 49 EastCharlotte, TN 37036(615) 789-6666‎ Subway For a quick meal, this national chain offers subs (both cold and toasted), wraps, soups, salads--all made to order.
  • Pair with sides like cornbread and beans for a hearty taste of Tennessee in a casual, welcoming setting.
  • Everything is available for carryout or delivery but can also be enjoyed in the cozy eating area.
  • Dozier's Boat Dock and Resaurant Set on the banks of the Harpeth River, Dozier's is known for its catfish, simple seafood and all-American food like gourmet burgers and meal-size salads.
  • Travelers may run across it driving through the state and up into Kentucky for hiking or whitewater rafting adventures, or on their way to Big South Fork National Park for climbing and exploring.
  • Travelers may run across it driving through the state and up into Kentucky for hiking or whitewater rafting adventures, or on their way to Big South Fork National Park for climbing and exploring.
  • Bubby's Serving up breakfast, lunch and dinner since 1990, Bubby's is arguably most well known for owner Ron Silver's world-famous banana and walnut pancakes, as well as its pie socials.
  • TriBeCa, an acronym for Triangle Below Canal Street, runs from Canal Street south to Vesey Street and from Broadway to west of the Hudson River.
  • Chanterelle, part of the TriBeCa neighborhood in New York City, is a very walkable area that is known not only for its picturesque cobblestone streets, but also for its numerous restaurants, many of which enjoy world-class reputations.
  • Chanterelle, part of the TriBeCa neighborhood in New York City, is a very walkable area that is known not only for its picturesque cobblestone streets, but also for its numerous restaurants, many of which enjoy world-class reputations.
  • Chicago, IL 60657(773) 327-7800harrycaraystavern.com Ed Debevic's At this '50s-style diner, while families dine on malts, burgers and fries, be prepared for a different kind of service.
  • Harry Caray's plans to open a second tavern at Navy Pier in December 2009 with the same menu and outdoor patio for guests to enjoy the sights while they eat.
  • Guests may wish to shop for Chicago White Sox or Chicago Cubs merchandise in the gift shop museum.
  • Finish your visit to Bubba Gump with one of the homemade desserts, like Mama's Cinnamon Bread Pudding, then browse the restaurant's gift store for the perfect souvenir.
  • For dessert, guests can choose from a list of sugary confections, like chocolate lava cake and apple bread pudding.
  • Whether you come to Columbus for business or pleasure, be sure to try out one of the city's top steak houses.
  • For outdoor enthusiasts, the city offers jogging paths throughout its public gardens and bird-watching at the downtown Metro Park.
  • It is famous for its tender, delicious roast pork and cube steak; meat lovers are particularly satified with its menu.
  • The restaurant has been serving original Cuban cuisine for 30 years.
  • From its beautiful, inviting waters to its tropical palm trees, Tampa, Florida is well known as a winter haven with welcomed sunshine, especially for those who live in bitterly cold climates.
  • There are no minimum requirements for food and beverage purchase, and wireless internet is free throughout the club.
  • It offers social opportunities for members, including dining, holiday events and childrens' functions.
  • The club is always looking for volunteers, especially for coaches to assist with basketball, softball, football and baseball.
  • The club is always looking for volunteers, especially for coaches to assist with basketball, softball, football and baseball.
  • Friday and Saturday nights present happy hour from 9 to 11 p.m. with two for one drafts and $2.50 mixed drinks, plus dance music until 2 a.m. 113 N.
  • After a day of hiking and exercise, the city offers many options for entertainment and experience with the local culture through its varied clubs, bars, exercise groups and service organizations.
  • The restaurant has a heated patio for outdoor dining.
  • Hell's Kitchen Hell's Kitchen is open for breakfast seven days a week.
  • It also hosts a comic search and has a rentable venue for corporate parties.
  • Enjoy mojitos for $4 and margaritas for $2 on Thursdays.
  • Enjoy mojitos for $4 and margaritas for $2 on Thursdays.
  • Q Bar and Nightclub The Q Bar and Nightclub is a gay and lesbian friendly night spot with different parties going on each evening and theme events for holidays.
  • After a day of hiking, the city offers many options for entertainment, including music, drinks, dancing and a welcoming community for gays and lesbians.
  • After a day of hiking, the city offers many options for entertainment, including music, drinks, dancing and a welcoming community for gays and lesbians.
  • Some of the menu specialties include lean ground beef Koobideh kebabs, tender chicken thighs simmered in pomegranate sauce, golden fried eggplant with a touch of mint, and baghlava or Persian ice cream for dessert.
  • A five-course dinner can be had for under $30 and features generous portions.
  • Visitors can then wrap up a long day by visiting one of the many popular Middle Eastern restaurants that the city is quickly becoming known for.
  • Seattle sits on an isthmus between Puget Sound and Lake Washington in the western part of Washington state and is known for its bustling music scene, mountainous topography, mild oceanic climate and frequent rainfall.
  • He had always had a passion for New York-style pizza and decided to open his own place commemorating New York's emergency services with authentic decorations.
  • Semi-private and private dining is also available for large parties.
  • It has kept its casual dining atmosphere within its five locations although this is a place for fine dining.
  • At the mouth of the Ybor Channel is Channelside Bay Plaza, a destination for shopping, entertainment and dining galore.
  • This restaurant is captivating for birthday parties, bar and bat mitzvahs and holiday parties.
  • The entire family can be entertained for hours during classes offered by Myrna's Bistro, including belly dance, Arabic class and cooking class.
  • The "Mini-Vinnies" menu for children 10 and under includes chicken tenders with fries or spaghetti with meatballs, butter or marinara sauce at an incredibly low price.
  • Kids are always welcome, including specially-priced menus for the little ones.
  • Stamford, CT 06903(203) 322-8870culinarymenus.com/restaurants/giordanos.php Vinny's Backyard and Bar If the family just cycled around town in Trek hybrids, Vinny's is the place for you.
  • Giordano's Italian Steakhouse A family-run restaurant since it was established in 1977, this steakhouse serves up the finest cut meats and hearty traditional Italian dishes for the parents and an extensive junior entree selection for the kids.
  • Giordano's Italian Steakhouse A family-run restaurant since it was established in 1977, this steakhouse serves up the finest cut meats and hearty traditional Italian dishes for the parents and an extensive junior entree selection for the kids.
  • It is open for lunch and dinner Tuesday through Sunday.
  • Eric's Office Restaurant & Taproom2574 Macedon RoadCanandaigua, NY 14424(585) 394-8787ericsofficerestaurant.com Koozinas Koozinas is open for lunch and dinner seven days a week.
  • Eric's is open Monday through Saturday for both lunch and dinner.
  • Arirang Hibachi Steakhouse & Sushi Barpartyonthegrill.com Gasho Hibachi Steakhouse For an experience beyond the food, this hibachi restaurant brings the history of Japanese Gasho buildings to life.
  • Benihana benihana.com/ Arirang Hibachi Steakhouse & Sushi Bar Known for its flaming volcano, this restaurant chain provides entertainment and delicious food at 12 hibachi tables.
  • Once you've built up your appetite, head for a hibachi restaurant.
  • A myriad of forests, lakes, and rivers in the state of New York offer great opportunities for kayaking, canoeing, skiing, hiking and exploring.
  • As of November 2009, a lunch buffet is offered for $7 per adult.
  • Clarksville, Tennessee Indian restaurants provide casual dining and carry-out service for patrons.
  • For adventure travelers seeking accommodations with in-room Jacuzzi hot tubs, Raleigh has several choices.
  • Raleigh offers opportunities for golfing, canoeing, boating, scuba diving, swimming, hiking, mountain biking and rock climbing.
  • Visit the Web site for images, or call for reservations and pricing.
  • Visit the Web site for images, or call for reservations and pricing.
  • Cobtree(315) 789.1144www.cobtree.com Mirbeau Inn and Spa Although this tranquil spot only offers four cottages, what it lacks in quantity it makes up for in quality.
  • Visit the Web site to take a virtual tour of available homes, find pricing for each season, and make a reservation.
  • Visit this firm's Web site, or call the customer service number for complete cottage options; here you can input all relevant information and request amenities, such as on-site washer/dryer, Internet access, and air conditioning--just to name a few.
  • Find something cozy for a small group or plan a reunion for extended family.
  • Find something cozy for a small group or plan a reunion for extended family.
  • Located in central upstate New York, the Finger Lakes region is a popular vacation destination for outdoor enthusiasts, families, and anyone looking to escape and relax.
  • Eric's Office Restaurant2574 County Road 28Canandaigua, NY 14424(585) 394-8787ericsofficerestaurant.com Casa De Pasta Casa De Pasta is an Italian restaurant that has been in Canandaigua for many years and in more than one location.
  • The clubhouse, located at the intersection of East Main Street and Church Street, features a pool table and full-service bar along with a dance floor and facilities for a DJ.
  • Wild West Bar and Grill350 Ronnell RoadCanton, GA 30114(770) 345-9663 Lake Arrowhead Lake Arrowhead is an association club for the local population of Canton.
  • The Wild West does not take reservations but can be reached via telephone for information on the menu, special events, and hours of operation.
  • In addition to being a restaurant, the Wild West Bar and Grill also is a night spot for adults with a DJ, pool tables and a full-service bar.
  • None of the options for nightlife in Canton have direct websites, but they can all easily be reached via telephone.
  • Despite its proximity to Atlanta, there are very few options for locals seeking a nightclub environment.
  • The restaurant is only open for lunch during the warmer months.
  • The bakery and pantry also cater special events and are available for special orders.
  • The inn has been open for business since 1810, and its stately architecture adds to the charm of Essex's main street.
  • The restaurant opened in 2008, providing competition for The Dock House, and is situated a few blocks from the Essex ferry dock.
  • The Old Dock House and MarinaLake Shore RoadEssex, NY 12936(518) 963-4232 Noels on the Water Noels on the Water sits on Lake Champlain and is known for its finely prepared seafood.
  • Seafood and steaks are on the menu for dinnertime, along with a variety of appetizers.
  • Old Dock House The Old Dock House and Marina has been an Essex tradition for more than a hundred years.
  • Essex and other towns in Essex County offer a variety of dining options for the active tourist.
  • Anoka, MN 55303(763) 421-3570billysbargrill.com Anthony's Parkway Grille The building that houses Anthony's Parkway Grille was once home to another long-standing restaurant, Benchwarmer Bob's; paranormal activity here was reported for years.
  • If you are more adventurous, be sure not to miss dining at one of the area's haunted restaurants for a meal you may never forget.
  • Paul, is a good place for travelers, offering unique and distinctive restaurants, hotels and activities.
  • The Ethiopian Restaurant has a gift shop area as well for those who would like to purchase keepsakes of their visit.
  • The restaurant also provides a separate bar area for a more relaxed dining experience and includes several varieties of martinis, a large selection of coffees and Ethiopian wines that are made from fermented honey.
  • Hanni's is an ideal location for meat lovers, but there is a large vegetarian menu as well.
  • Heddy's100 Water LnMacclesfieldSK9 5BBUnited Kingdom011 (+44) 1625 526 855heddys.com Hanni's Hanni's, located in Greater Manchester, has been around for 20 years serving Middle Eastern cuisine.
  • Heddy's even offers takeaway if you do not want to wait for a table or want to dine in.
  • Dishes include couscous, marinated black seas bass stuffed with garlic as well as Baklava for dessert.
  • This Blauvelt eatery is also known for its wraps, made with ingredients like sun-dried tomatoes and soppressata.
  • All of the sauces for its popular pastas and pizzas are homemade with local ingredients.
  • Lighter fare, like salads and pizza, are available for those not brave enough to order stacks of meat.
  • All the meats are treated with the restaurant's signature blend of spices before being roasted over local cherry logs for 12 long hours.
  • Khan's Mongolian Restaurant588 Route 30Blauvelt, NY 10913-1123(845) 359-8004‎ Bailey's Smokehouse Bailey's Smokehouse is a family-owned tavern known for its massive barbecue platters.
  • Khan's Mongolian Restaurant Located just a few blocks from Tackamark Park, the budget-friendly Khan's Mongolian Restaurant serves up large meals for an average price of $15.
  • Tourists on a New York vacation often visit Blauvelt for its historical landmarks.
  • Over time, it transformed into a trendy restaurant receiving rave reviews for décor as well as food.
  • Coco Loco Cuban & Caribbean Cafe This family-owned restaurant has been in Buckhead for more than 15 years.
  • They are perfect for dining, especially after spending the day in one of Buckhead's many parks.
  • For many years, dining in Atlanta equaled eating in the Buckhead section of town, and for the most part, this is still true today.
  • For many years, dining in Atlanta equaled eating in the Buckhead section of town, and for the most part, this is still true today.
  • With only 10 tables, an excellent wine list and white table cloths, Newmans is a nice place to go when you want to escape the rustic Oregon coast for an evening and dine in the atmosphere of an Italian seaside village.
  • With its outdoor patio and central location, the Driftwood Inn is perfect for a lunchtime stopover or for a relaxing dinner after a day spent bicycling along the beach.
  • With its outdoor patio and central location, the Driftwood Inn is perfect for a lunchtime stopover or for a relaxing dinner after a day spent bicycling along the beach.
  • The restaurant is best known locally, however, for their tender-to-perfection filet mignon.
  • Hemlock Cannon Beach, Oregon 97110(503) 436-1111www.moschowder.com The Driftwood Inn The Driftwood Inn and Lounge has been a Cannon Beach institution for more than 60 years.
  • Also well known for their fish & chips, oyster stew and warm, friendly atmosphere, Mo's is a must for seafood lovers and those who want to soak up authentic local history and flavor.
  • Also well known for their fish & chips, oyster stew and warm, friendly atmosphere, Mo's is a must for seafood lovers and those who want to soak up authentic local history and flavor.
  • Mo's Restaurant Housed in a ramshackle little building on Hemlock Street, Mo's Restaurant has been a local institution for more than 50 years.
  • Opportunities for bicycling, hiking and all manners of on-the-water activity are abundant.
  • Famous for its sandy beaches, nearby mountains and coastal rain forest, Cannon Beach has much to offer.
  • Claddagh serves lunch and dinner daily for the whole family and offers a "Pub Bites" menu in the bar.
  • Enjoy Guiness Stew or its Big Irish Breakfast for dinner, and choose traditional Fish and Chips on the kid's menu.
  • Carmel, IN 46032(317) 573-9746mickeysirishpub.com Fionn MacCool's Irish Pub Fionn MacCool's, in the next town east of Carmel in Fishers, Indiana welcomes the entire family for lunch and dinner.
  • Irish restaurants and pubs draw visitors to Carmel looking for authentic Irish food and entertainment.
  • Boasting fresh ingredients, a 1950s-era décor and prompt service, Sassy's is a great option for those on the move seeking affordable prices.
  • Known in the area for offering tasty, bite-sized burgers and deliciously seasoned french fries, Sassy's Sliders was created after owner Michael Ronis surveyed restaurants around the country to create his concept.
  • New York, NY 10019(212) 765-2929http://www.meenoodleshopnyc.com Sassy's Sliders NYC At Sassy's Sliders NYC discover for yourself that the Upper East Side is not all about money.
  • Located in the Hell's Kitchen section of midtown, the Mee Noodle Shop is well-known in the neighborhood for its inexpensive meals, especially during lunch.
  • El Malecon Restaurant Take the A train uptown to Washington Heights for some of the city's best Dominican Food.
  • For those who are on a slim budget, however, there are multiple options.
  • Located in the heart of Boston's Back Bay neighborhood, 29 Newbury gives diners a taste of upscale dining mixed with relaxed comfort by featuring intimate booths and dim lighting indoors, and umbrella-covered tables for outdoor, sidewalk dining.
  • Legal Sea Foods Located only steps from the famous Quincy Market, Legal Sea Foods offers a wide selection of fresh seafood, an elegant atmosphere and impeccable service for an unforgettable first-class dining experience.
  • Lin's China Jade (4050 SW Cedar Hills Blvd, Beaverton) is a magnet for Chinese-food lovers from across the city, pulling them west to its comfy booths.
  • For those who want to eat out later than 9 p.m., Powells Seafood Restaurant (6633 SE Powell Boulevard) is a great option.
  • Szechuan outpost Lucky Strike (12306 SE Powell Blvd) brings spicy flavors (the chiles are imported from China) that are sure to impress and have you begging for water.
  • Portland has had a green reputation for a long time, but only recently, it's gotten a new one--foodie.
  • Victor's was the location used in the Sylvester Stallone movie "Rocky Balboa," depicting a restaurant the title character named for his beloved wife Adrian.
  • Couples can choose small plates or full entrees for their main course.
  • The draped fabric ceiling, soft lighting and 80-gallon tropical fish aquarium in the Tank Bar set the mood for amore.
  • They can also take a self-guided walking tour along the Delaware River, by Independence Hall and the Liberty Bell; linger at Love Park in Center City, or head to the northern suburbs for a swift hike or mountain bike ride through Pennypack Park.
  • Philadelphia, known as the City of Brotherly Love, adopted the tag line "The City That Loves You Back"---an appropriate sentiment for romantic adventures in the metropolitan area.
  • Order the fresh escarole and cannellini beans sautéed with garlic in extra virgin olive oil, and for dinner feast on the Gnocchi Gorgonzola, potato dumplings tossed with sun-dried tomatoes and spinach in a creamy Gorgonzola cheese sauce.
  • On Pasta Night (Mon. and Tues.) for a low price, enjoy your choice of pasta with coffee, tea, soda or a glass of house wine, salad or soup and cannoli, cheesecake or zeppole.
  • The restaurant offers a three-course family-style dinner (Sun. to Fri.), and a Wine Watch on Wednesday when, for a few extra bucks, you can enjoy unlimited wine tasting after dinner.
  • La Dolce Vita is open for lunch and dinner daily except for Sundays and Mondays.
  • La Dolce Vita is open for lunch and dinner daily except for Sundays and Mondays.
  • After a day of outdoor adventure, visitors that are hungry for a solid meal may go for Italian.
  • After a day of outdoor adventure, visitors that are hungry for a solid meal may go for Italian.
  • In addition to the famous falls, the Niagara Falls/Buffalo area also boasts a variety of golf courses and plenty of opportunities for hiking.
  • For the adventurous traveler, nothing beats a ride up the Niagara River into the heart of the Whirlpool.
  • Fares, which in November 2009 ranged from $29 to $42 for lunch and $58 for dinner, include the train ride, meal, tax and service charges.
  • Fares, which in November 2009 ranged from $29 to $42 for lunch and $58 for dinner, include the train ride, meal, tax and service charges.
  • In November 2009, entrees ranged in price from $12 to $14 for lighter fare and $19 to $29 for entrees and the buffet.
  • In November 2009, entrees ranged in price from $12 to $14 for lighter fare and $19 to $29 for entrees and the buffet.
  • For guests staying at the inn, lodging packages are offered and include skiing, canoeing and mountain biking.
  • In November 2009, entrees cost between $11 and $13 for pizzas and $18 to $29 for entrees with all major credit cards accepted.
  • In November 2009, entrees cost between $11 and $13 for pizzas and $18 to $29 for entrees with all major credit cards accepted.
  • For vegetarians, pizzas and pasta selections are offered.
  • Known for its scenic views ideal for photographs, the inn features a candlelight dining area, monthly recipe specials and superior hospitality.
  • Known for its scenic views ideal for photographs, the inn features a candlelight dining area, monthly recipe specials and superior hospitality.
  • Loring has unique architecture which divides the dining areas into sections, creating cozy private spaces for groups.
  • Don't be fooled by the location, it's not just for college students.
  • If you want the gourmet experience at a family-dining price, try the plate of the day for around $10.
  • Try the Uptown or Downtown location for some Gourmet Italian dishes.
  • Whether you are seeking salsa dancing, a family atmosphere or downtown elegance, Minneapolis has something for you.
  • Open for lunch and dinner, seven days a week, Rangoon also offers lunch deals and weekly chef specials.
  • From a variety of soups and entrees to the famous chili shrimp and layered bread dishes, Rangoon offers a unique dining experience for patrons who are familiar with Burmese food as well as those who may be trying it for the first time.
  • From a variety of soups and entrees to the famous chili shrimp and layered bread dishes, Rangoon offers a unique dining experience for patrons who are familiar with Burmese food as well as those who may be trying it for the first time.
  • Open seven days a week until 2 a.m., Jade Harbor is the ideal place to go for great food at almost any hour.
  • Featuring more than 100 items on the menu (including the chef special which changes daily), Jade Harbor also offers a family meal menu, where groups from four to 10 people can be accommodated with a selection of customer favorites for one set price.
  • This spot is perfect for the adventurous tourist looking to go off the beaten path.
  • For dessert indulge in the coconut cupcake with Thai pudding.
  • For the main course, enjoy the massaman curry with tamarind juice, peanuts, onions and potatoes.
  • Try Phoebe's New England clam chowder, or ask for the catch of the day, created from the freshest fish available.
  • Located on Route 11, just east of Canton, Phoebe's features a full bar and dining area open for dinner seven days a week.
  • Stop in for breakfast, lunch and dinner Monday through Saturday.
  • Save room for the homemade desserts or get some baked goods to take with you on the trail.
  • For dinner, choices include chicken, chops or pasta dishes.
  • Choose from salads or panini sandwiches for lunch.
  • Located in downtown Canton, the Blackbird Cafe offers a tapas menu for those who want to simply enjoy an after-work plate of appetizers over a nice glass of wine.
  • Known as a canoeing and kayaking destination, the area also boasts plenty of back roads and forested trails perfect for biking, hiking and cross-country skiing adventures.
  • Canton, New York, wedged between the beautiful Adirondack Mountains and the Grasse River, makes a great base for day trips into the surrounding area.
  • Casual sandwiches and subs are also available, perfect for taking on an Elmira hike or fishing adventure.
  • Elmira, NY 14901(607) 734-1535morettisrestaurant.net Pietro & Son The Pietro & Son eatery is renowned for its pastas and pizzas, crafted with authentic recipes imported from Italy.
  • Reservations are recommended for this popular restaurant, which opens nightly at 5 p.m.
  • The restaurant is popular for its steaks, though standard Italian and American cuisine like pasta and pizza are also available.
  • Moretti's Restaurant Conveniently located near Elmira's downtown and business districts, the family owned and operated Moretti's Restaurant has been serving Elmira residents for over 90 years.
  • The menu consists of creative egg, omelet and waffle dishes for breakfast, and a large variety of soups, salads and sandwiches for lunch.
  • The menu consists of creative egg, omelet and waffle dishes for breakfast, and a large variety of soups, salads and sandwiches for lunch.
  • Cornwall-on-Hudson, New York 12520(845) 534-2109painters-restaurant.com Fiddlestix Cafe Fiddlestix Cafe is a casual family-friendly restaurant known for its breakfast and lunch.
  • Cornwall, New York 12518(845) 534-3446leospizzeria.com Painter's Restaurant Painter's Restaurant is located in a quaint, historic inn that has seven rooms available for nightly rent.
  • The restaurant is open daily for lunch and dinner.
  • The restaurant is open for lunch and dinner Wednesday through Sunday.
  • Canterbury Brook Inn is open for dinner Tuesday through Saturday and lunch during the summer.
  • If you're in the area and are looking for a good place to eat, try one of these restaurants.
  • Though not far from America's biggest city, the town has many activities for outdoor lovers.
  • The seafood is fresh and delicious, but if looking for one of the restaurant's signature dishes, order the oven roasted duck with honey orange gastrique.
  • Old Library Restaurant & Inn If looking for a meal with a touch of history, the Old Library Restaurant will surpass your expectations.
  • Known for their signature crab cakes to juicy burgers, this restaurant is perfect for a comfortable dinner with the kids.
  • Known for their signature crab cakes to juicy burgers, this restaurant is perfect for a comfortable dinner with the kids.
  • Dutchess County is home to numerous lakes that are popular for sailing, canoeing, kayaking and snorkeling.
  • Reservations are encouraged at Fogo De Chao Churrascaria and prices are typically around $38.50 for dinner.
  • When guests are ready for the main entrees, a card is used to signal waiters to begin waiting on guests for their selection of 15 roasted meats.
  • When guests are ready for the main entrees, a card is used to signal waiters to begin waiting on guests for their selection of 15 roasted meats.
  • Upon arrival, patrons order drinks, and then visit the salad and sides bar for vegetables, meats and cheeses.
  • The restaurant is open seven days a week and is open for both lunch and dinner.
  • Reservations for Boi Na Braza are available through opentable.com.
  • The state has restaurants on every corner, some of them with authentic foreign offerings that keep guests coming back for more.
  • EDiets.com chose Blimpie subs as the Healthy Dining Restaurant of the month for August 2009.
  • They also have a children's menu and they're open for lunch and dinner, seven days a week.
  • In some areas, this sub shop hasn't spread, however, so visitors from a town without a Blimpie will probably want to stop in for their favorite super-stacked subs or grilled panini.
  • Bradenton, Florida 34205(941) 752-6433 Rotten Ralph's Rotten Ralph's is a casual restaurant, which is open for lunch and dinner.
  • For the non-raw fish lovers, Kumo also has a large cooked Japanese menu, which includes dishes such as beef teriyaki and chicken tempura.
  • Quinta has a prime rib special every Monday and Tuesday for $15.95.
  • Y., a historic town located less than 20 miles from Manhattan, you are in for a treat.
  • Located half a mile from downtown, it offers a traditional menu for eating inside or taking out.
  • Readers of the "Denver Post" and "Westword," an alternative weekly, have voted Imperial one of the "best of Denver" every year for more than a decade.
  • It is open for lunch and dinner, and you can order takeout.
  • You can choose the chef's selection and allow Garces to craft a special tasting for you, featuring either a wine or beer pairing.
  • Its desserts are known throughout the world for their stunning appearance and unmatchable taste, and Le Bar Lyonnais on the lower level is open for a before-dinner cocktail or simply for an elegant happy hour.
  • Its desserts are known throughout the world for their stunning appearance and unmatchable taste, and Le Bar Lyonnais on the lower level is open for a before-dinner cocktail or simply for an elegant happy hour.
  • Its desserts are known throughout the world for their stunning appearance and unmatchable taste, and Le Bar Lyonnais on the lower level is open for a before-dinner cocktail or simply for an elegant happy hour.
  • Le Bec-Fin's commitment to excellence begins with its classical Louis XVI interior, which sets the scene for its famed French cuisine.
  • Chicago, IL 60614(773) 477-1500 Ben Pao Ben Pao is known for its elegant decoration with pillars, gold sculpted walls and waterfalls.
  • If you are in the mood for some authentic Chinese restaurants, find them in the areas of Lincoln Park, River North, Chinatown and in the famous Wrigleyville.
  • Dress runs the gamut from professional to cocktail attire, and the price (2009) starts at about $30 for the entrees, served ala carte.
  • Elmo Steakhouse and expect to pay up to $50 per person (2009) for dinner, including steak served with your choice of navy bean soup or tomato juice, potato and the separate salad and side dishes.
  • Elmo Steakhouse the perfect stop for a group supper or romantic martini.
  • Local newspaper readers have voted Aja Noodle as the best Asian food for four years.
  • Its menu is priced for the budget-conscious visitor, with many lunch specials running between $4 and $7 each, as of 2009.
  • A good sampling of cocktails and Indian beers such as Flying Horse Lager leave patrons wanting for nothing.
  • Indian Garden "Sensory overload" is the order of the day at Indian Garden, a safe bet for those who seldom stray from basic fare like tikka masala and vindaloo, and also for those who do.
  • Indian Garden "Sensory overload" is the order of the day at Indian Garden, a safe bet for those who seldom stray from basic fare like tikka masala and vindaloo, and also for those who do.
  • The restaurant is open for lunch and dinner, with dinner entree prices starting at $12 in 2009.
  • The restaurant is open daily for dinner and entree prices start at $12.
  • And if you are in the mood for a sizzling steak after a fun-packed day, you are in luck.
  • Open seven days a week for breakfast, lunch and dinner, the fresh food and baked goods are popular with the local Spanish crowd and South Howard residents.
  • Lascas's has had the same chef preparing your food for the last 20 years.
  • Auburn, New York 13021(315) 252-5224curleysauburn.com Hollywood Restaurant Family-owned and operated, Hollywood Restaurant has been serving American and Italian cuisine for over 70 years.
  • Curley's is open for lunch, dinner and private banquets.
  • Rochester, New York(585) 271-2433cheeburger.com Pelican's Nest Restaurant Located on the Genesee River, guests to Pelican's Nest can arrive by car or boat with free boat slips available for diners.
  • Rochester, New York(585) 271-8920californiarollin.com Cheeseburger Cheeseburger For some good American fare, nothing beats a cheeseburger at Cheeseburger Cheeseburger.
  • Dominic's has been pleasing the palates of residents and visitors for over 25 years.
  • Famous for their homemade sauces, pastas and veal dishes, Mr.
  • A popular destination during the hot summer days, the Charlotte Beach area offers visitors many great and flavorful choices for lunch and dinner.
  • The restaurant offers daily specials and also features a vegetarian menu for both lunch and dinner.
  • They offer customers a variety of dining options, which include dine-in, take-out, catering, delivery, and a banquet room for parties.
  • Gauchos Do Brazil 444 Quaker Lane, Unit 4Warwick, RI 02886(401) 825-7945www.gauchosdobrazil.com Cantina Brazil For a more casual Brazilian experience, Cantina Brazil is a great choice.
  • Don't forget to leave room for dessert, including the decadent Fried Cheesecake and Baked Alaska.
  • The choices are endless, making this form of dining great for a large group or a special night out with your companion.
  • There is a modern lounge for small groups to meet and a patio for those wishing to dine outside.
  • There is a modern lounge for small groups to meet and a patio for those wishing to dine outside.
  • There is a private dining room that can handle parties from 20 to 75 people.427 East Main StreetColumbus, Ohio 43215 (614) 220-9390indianoven.com/ Taj Mahal Taj Mahal has been serving North Indian cuisine in Columbus for 25 years.
  • If you are looking for Indian food in Columbus, there are a few restaurants not far from local parks.
  • Buckeye Lake, a popular spot for boating and water sports, is less than 30 miles to the east, and Olentangy Indian Caverns, a well-preserved caving system, is less than 30 miles to the north.
  • Get in a workout in the hotel's state-of-the-art fitness center, or go for a dip in the outdoor swimming pool.
  • The city of Boston has decided to crack down on access to clubs for the under-21 crowd.
  • The hotel's on-site restaurant, Buffalo Wings and Rings, serves an American menu of burgers, wings, chicken and fish for lunch and dinner.4747 Montgomery RoadCincinnati, OH 45212(513) 351-6000qualityhotelandsuites.com/index1.php
  • There is a free breakfast buffet for guests, an outdoor pool with a picnic area, a video game room and on-site barbershop.
  • On-site dining options include Orchids at Palm Court, a fine dining restaurant with a seasonal menu, The Grille at Palm Court, which serves American cuisine for both breakfast and lunch, and PC Express, which serves on the go breakfasts.
  • Both parks contain hiking trails, and Burnet Woods offers a man-made lake for fishing, a disc golf course and a trailside nature center as well.
  • Brooklyn NY 11235(718) 891-1177theatlanticgrill.com/index.php?p=home Tatiana Restaurant and Nightclub When the weather is right, you can ask for outdoor seating and revel in the view offered at the Tatiana Restaurant and Nightclub.
  • However, for those preferring plainer fare, there also are menu items such as grilled cheese sandwiches and pot roast.
  • Denver, CO 80218 (303) 831-8277 Uoki This restaurant combines authentic Japanese and Korean cuisine in Alamo Placita, and is recognized by local publications for its daring menu.
  • From Red Rocks Park, with its outdoor amphitheater that provides ideal acoustics to Rocky Mountain National Park, the area is a natural one-stop shop for hiking, biking, camping and backpacking.
  • Nicknamed the "Mile High City," Denver is known for its extensive outdoor activities and natural beauty.
  • Hikers traveling together may opt for one of the restaurant's group feast offers.
  • Open for breakfast, lunch and dinner, the restaurant serves specialties from around the world.
  • Prices are under $10 for entrees from the adult menu and under $5 for the kids menu. 1680 Union Ave.
  • Prices are under $10 for entrees from the adult menu and under $5 for the kids menu. 1680 Union Ave.
  • Memphis, TN 38104(901) 274-2556Tsunamimemphis.com Pei Wei Asian Diner Authentic food is served at Pei Wei Asian Diner, along with a kids Wei menu that is for kids 12 years and under and includes lo mein (white rice and chicken).
  • The average price for an entrée is between $18 and $28. 928 S.
  • Most restaurants are affordable, with prices under $20 for per person to eat lunch or dinner.
  • Try a slice of cheesecake or pie for dessert.601 Summit Ave.
  • Seattle, WA 98102(206) 323-0807serafinaseattle.com Ristorante Machiavelli Open for dinner Monday through Saturday, the Ristorante Machiavelli would be a great place to fuel up after a long day's hike.
  • If it's a craving for Italian food, Capitol Hill's eatery choices will satisfy every appetite.
  • Known for its range of recreational attractions, Illinois is also famous for its steakhouses.
  • Known for its range of recreational attractions, Illinois is also famous for its steakhouses.
  • The aptly-named Pot Sticker restaurant is an ideal choice for obtaining this Asian delicacy.
  • San Francisco, CA 94108-1305(415) 392-7958 House of Nanking Look for the House of Nanking restaurant's rainbow-colored sign, noticeable almost as soon as you smell the sweet and savory smells of the restaurant's trademark stir frys.
  • Discount coupons for the Chinatown Restaurant can often be found in local magazines and newspapers, the California Entertainment coupon book and from employees standing on nearby street corners.
  • Previous visitors say that the White Buck's owner has a reputation for making guests feel comfortable and telling great stories about the area.
  • Naples, NY 14512(585) 374-6360 White Buck Inn The White Buck Inn is a pub-style establishment for casual dining.
  • If you're camping in the area, the restaurant has a take-out menu, and it also has kids menus for smaller portions.
  • The streams and rivers that run down the mountains are a haven for outdoor sports.
  • Manny's is known for their pulled pork, some of the best to be found in the Denver area.
  • Offering a variety of entrees served alongside rice and macaroni salad, L & L Hawaiian Barbecue is a great place to stop for a quick lunch on the go.
  • The Mile High City has many exciting things for visitors to do.
  • For lighter dining, the adjacent Tasting Room opens daily at 11:30 a.m.
  • If you are in Alexandria on the third Saturday of a month, make reservations for the 2 p.m. traditional Story Tea Time.
  • Put on your evening wear for the Chef's Tasting Menu in the dining room.
  • Settle in to the Bistro and Lounge for cocktails and classic Maryland crabcakes, roasted halibut and country hen dishes.
  • Known for its legendary sandwiches and salads, the Full Belly Deli offers the perfect accents for your active day.
  • Known for its legendary sandwiches and salads, the Full Belly Deli offers the perfect accents for your active day.
  • Cafe on the Green Ristorante100 Aunt Hack RoadDanbury, CT 06811(203) 791-8946www.cafeonthegreenrestaurant.com Full Belly Deli If packing for a picnic or a boat trip in Danbury, the place to load up on lunch is the Full Belly Deli.
  • With a saloon-type menu including huge sandwiches and burgers, this is not a place to go for a light meal.
  • Danbury is the seventh-largest city in Connecticut and has a historic past, particularly for events during the American Revolution.
  • Pacific Coast HighwaySeal Beach, CA 90740(562) 430-0116shorehousecafe.net Norms When someone asks for a 24-hour diner in Orange County, Norms is usually the first place that locals will rattle off.
  • Bristol St., Suite BSanta Ana, CA, 92704 (714) 549-2011gallogiro.com Shore House Cafe Shore House Café is famous for its huge portions and late-night dining.
  • Lee's Sandwiches13991 Brookhurst St. @ Westminster Avenue Garden Grove, CA 92843 (714) 636-2288Leessandwiches.com El Gallo Giro El Gallo Giro is the best place for authentic Mexican food any time of the day.
  • Lee's Sandwiches Whatever time of day or night it is, you can always count on Lee's Sandwiches for a great, inexpensive meal.
  • Orange County, a region of Southern California, is most known for its impeccable weather, beautiful beaches and fast-paced lifestyle.
  • The menu includes something for everyone, with a variety of cuisines and foods including salads, pastas, sandwiches and other specialties.
  • It is open for lunch and dinner and is available for parties, meetings and other special events.
  • It is open for lunch and dinner and is available for parties, meetings and other special events.
  • It has a loyalty program to earn certificates for meals.
  • Entree prices range from $14 to $45, as of 2009, and the restaurant is open for lunch and dinner seven days a week.
  • As of 2009, entree prices range between $8 and $22, and the restaurant is open for dinner Wednesday through Saturday.
  • Combining wine selections with dishes like veal osso buco and house-made three cheese gnocchi makes for a memorable Italian dining experience.
  • Kodam, both of whom have passion for food and wine.
  • As of 2009, entree prices start at $19.95, and the restaurant is open daily for dinner from 5:30 p.m. to 11 p.m.
  • If you are in the mood for Italian cuisine, Honolulu has many options for you.
  • If you are in the mood for Italian cuisine, Honolulu has many options for you.
  • Open daily for breakfast and lunch, with daily soup and lunch specials.20 Main StreetChatham, NY 12037 (518) 392-3291http://ralphsprettygoodcafe.com/
  • Load up for a big hike the next day with one of their handcrafted dessert items.
  • An entire menu just for steak items is available, including Outlaw Ribeye, Longhorn Porterhouse and Renegade Top Sirloin.
  • Healthy eaters will be glad for the "Health Nuts" menu that offers salads and lighter fare.
  • Whether you've been hiking the Cumberland Trail, biking through the Prentice Cooper State Forest or exploring the Lookout and Signal mountains, Chattanooga, Tennessee, is great for adventurous, outdoor explorers.
  • Kem's Restaurant serves American cuisine for breakfast and dinner, while the Loafing Leprechaun serves Irish and American cuisine for lunch and dinner.
  • Kem's Restaurant serves American cuisine for breakfast and dinner, while the Loafing Leprechaun serves Irish and American cuisine for lunch and dinner.
  • For those seeking international fare, China King, located just west of Main Street on Central Avenue, offers an inexpensive and freshly prepared Chinese buffet.
  • West of Main Street Demetri's On The Lake is a Dunkirk favorite for international cuisine in a charming lakefront atmosphere.
  • For independently owned local flavor, De John's Italian restaurant is located on the twenty-sixth block of Main Street.
  • Main Street For those who enjoy the convenience of dining at a familiar institution, Applebee's, Domino's and Bob Evans restaurants have locations within the town limits of Dunkirk.
  • Whether it is a moderately priced authentic Italian dinner, upscale steak or seafood option, or an inexpensive international option such as Chinese or Greek food, Dunkirk's restaurants deliver a delicious array of choices for all to enjoy.
  • This is a cool bar for those that want an out of the ordinary experience.
  • Andriaccio's Restaurant4837 West Lake RoadMayville, NY 14757(716) 753-5200andriaccios.com Windjammer's Lakeview Restaurant Pull in to the Clarion Hotel Marina for lunch or dinner along the shores of Lake Erie.
  • Jamestown, NY 14701(716) 664-6204fentongrill.com Andriaccio's Restaurant Order a wrap, panini and salad to go as you head out for a day of adventure on Chautauqua Lake.
  • Fenton Grill Paddle the Chadakoin River water trail, fish lower Chautauqua Lake or hike along the lake shore, then settle in for a relaxing evening at Fenton Grill.
  • The extensive Rails to Trails network provides miles of pathways for bicycling, hiking and cross country skiing.
  • Chautauqua County is a haven for outdoor activities in western New York.
  • Pabst Blue Ribbon is only a buck, and Metro Pizza serves quality pizza for a low price right next door.
  • Portland, OR 97219(503) 653-8669tonyshookahlounge.com Lava Lounge Downtown Portland's Lava Lounge is a bargain for the hookah smoker on a budget.
  • With lots of Sublime on the stereo and an atmosphere that varies from mellow to frenzied, Tony's Smoke Shop is a good option for the 18-and-older crowd.
  • While Portland isn't a mecca for hookah, there are a handful of hookah bars that have made their mark on the rainy city.
  • Hookah is a true leisure activity, allowing for quick and lucid intoxication.
  • Wolff's is open for lunch, dinner and weekend brunch.
  • With picnic tables and antler chandeliers as decor, the restaurant has nightly specials and events for both lunch and dinner.
  • The warm and welcoming atmosphere makes up for the short and predictable menu.
  • Victor's is open for breakfast Sunday and Monday from 8 a.m. until 2 p.m. and Tuesday through Saturday from 7 a.m. until 2:30 p.m.
  • Middlesex, New Jersey(732) 667-3863boulevardpub.com Whitlock Tavern La Taverna Restaurant & Bar The Whitlock Tavern started as an inn for travelers in the 1730s.
  • Average prices for meals in 2009 range from $14 to $26.
  • The restaurant also offers home catering for cocktail parties, buffets and sit-down dinners.
  • It can host private parties for 20 to 70 guests and staffers will be glad to make all the arrangements, including RSVPs and procuring live musicians.
  • The restaurant offer menus for a snack at the bar and for brunch, lunch, dinner and special occasions as well as carrying an extensive selection of fine Italian wines.
  • The restaurant offer menus for a snack at the bar and for brunch, lunch, dinner and special occasions as well as carrying an extensive selection of fine Italian wines.
  • For example, you can have a Japanese catered menu featuring Asian delicacies like tempura and shoyu chicken.
  • The cafe can create platters and food baskets, and can even pack soup for your catered meal.
  • The restaurant can cater for private and business gatherings.
  • It's perfect for large parties or simple dinner gatherings.
  • The Hawaiian sunshine makes every day a perfect day for hiking the nearby mountains or surfing and swimming at Waikiki Beach.
  • Tourists are drawn to Honolulu for its world-class shopping, vibrant arts scene and relaxed outdoor culture.
  • Churrascos has served Latin-American cuisine for over 20 years.
  • Mark's consists of three meeting spaces with a combined seating for about 70 people: The Cloisters, The Loft and The Alcove.
  • If you are in the mood for wine, you can select from a list of over 250 selections.
  • Quattro Quattro, located in the Four Seasons Houston hotel, is a top dining location for Italian cuisine, and accommodates 235 diners for breakfast, lunch and dinner.
  • Quattro Quattro, located in the Four Seasons Houston hotel, is a top dining location for Italian cuisine, and accommodates 235 diners for breakfast, lunch and dinner.
  • This diverse city is one of the nation's "most populous cities in total acreage of parkland," according to the Trust for Public Land.
  • For your small plate try its gourmet twist on a grilled cheese sandwich ($10).
  • Berwyn, PA 19312(610) 251-9600meridiths.com Blue Pear Bistro For late-night gourmet dining, go to Blue Pear Bistro.
  • During football seasons, Seahawks fans congregate for a pre-game, Big Easy-themed brunch.
  • Cafe Beignet305 Harrison St.2nd FloorSeattle, WA 98109(206) 441-0262cafebeignet.com/ Crawfish King The name leaves no room for ambiguity when it comes to this unpretentious eatery's specialty.
  • Mainly a breakfast and lunch venue for tourists and local shoppers, the Bayou stays open until 7:30 p.m. on weekends.
  • Beijing Chinese Restaurant provides delivery service for customers who place orders over the phone.
  • New Great Wall Chinese Restaurant also offers vegetable dishes for health-conscious diners.
  • New Great Wall Chinese Restaurant New Great Wall Chinese Restaurant offers an authentic Mongolian dining experience with great value for the money.
  • The hours for Spinning Wheel Diner change seasonally.
  • This family-owned restaurant has been a Lebanon staple for over 20 years.
  • The restaurant has an 80 person capacity, and is available for private parties.
  • There are a number of area restaurants for tourists to enjoy.
  • Come during the Happy Hour, where you can purchase for less than $2 bar fare, such as steamed mussels or 1/2 pound cheeseburger while sitting at the bar.
  • For non-seafood lovers, there are plenty of other options such as the Ribeye with Chimmichuri.
  • Joe's Crab Shack Perfect for meeting friends after work or just hanging out on the weekends, Joe's Crab Shack is a causal place that attracts a lively crowd looking for filling fare and good times.
  • Joe's Crab Shack Perfect for meeting friends after work or just hanging out on the weekends, Joe's Crab Shack is a causal place that attracts a lively crowd looking for filling fare and good times.
  • Take advantage of these chains whether you are a local, visiting or passing through, and looking for a familiar name for your dining experience.
  • Take advantage of these chains whether you are a local, visiting or passing through, and looking for a familiar name for your dining experience.
  • With New Jersey's proximity to the Atlantic coastline, seafood is a natural choice for dining.
  • Be sure to stop in for some delectable traditional Italian pastries, including cannoli, rum baba, lobster tails, and pasticiotti.
  • Diners can eat-in, take-out or order delivery service for both lunch and dinner.
  • Marsilio's Restaurant541 Roebling AvenueTrenton, NJ 08611(609) 695-1916marsilios.com‎ Jeppy's Gourmet Pizza Shop This no-frills pizza joint has been serving up hot pies and other Italian specialties in Chambersburg for more than 40 years.
  • Amici Milano Restaurant600 Chestnut AvenueTrenton, NJ 08611-1302(609) 396-6300amicimilano.com‎ Marsilio's Restaurant This New Jersey landmark has been serving up Italian favorites for more than 50 years.
  • DeLorezo's Tomato Pies530 Hudson StreetTrenton, NJ 08611(609) 695-9534delorenzostomatopies.com‎ Amici Milano Restaurant Amici Milano is the place for Northern Italian food in the Chambersburg section of Trenton.
  • DeLorezo's Tomato Pies Established in 1947, this local favorite is known for their fantastic tomato pies, a type of pizza made with a thick, bread-like crust, tomato sauce and Romano cheese.
  • Located near local state forests, parks, hiking trails, and the Delaware River, Trenton, New Jersey is a great destination for outdoor enthusiasts seeking a more metropolitan vacation.
  • It also will plan a party menu for large groups or special occasions.
  • Its dining room is large and spacious, perfect for celebrations.
  • Reservations are strongly recommended for the weekend.
  • Scalini Fedeli's sommelier can make suggestions about wine pairings for all meals.
  • The restaurant offers catering and delivery for customers' convenience.
  • The restaurant hours change seasonally, so call for the most current hours of operation.
  • From exploring caverns to trying your luck at extreme sports, there is something for everyone in Pennsylvania.
  • Kids will enjoy dishes specifically prepared for young ages at lower rates.
  • Monday through Friday and for dinner from 5 to 10:30 p.m. every day.
  • Gaucho Steakhouse is open for lunch from 11:30 a.m. to 2 p.m.
  • It is well-known for the dish picanha, a Brazilian rump roast considered king of the grill.
  • Birmingham, MI 48009pampasusa.com Gaucho Steakhouse Gaucho Steakhouse offers a premier and authentic Brazilian dining experience for steakhouse enthusiasts.
  • Outdoor enthusiasts consider Michigan a haven perfect for hunting, camping, boating, water sports, golf, skiing and winter sports, snowmobiling and fishing.
  • Selection of soups and salads are avaliable for those who want a lighter, healthier lunch.
  • For breakfasts, diners can choose from one of 10 types of egg dishes, including eggs benedict, ham and eggs, Dave's three-egg omelet and steak and eggs.
  • For the older diners, there is a beer and wine menu, which includes non-alcoholic beers and several ales on tap.
  • Children eat for a discounted price at Walter's Café and Bistro, and there is a children's menu with pizza and junior burgers.
  • For those whose tastes are simpler, the restaurant offers classic cold and hot sandwiches like tuna melt on rye, beef panini, turkey Cuban and grilled cheese as well as a variety of hamburgers.
  • Because of its rural setting, it is a popular destination for those who enjoy camping, hiking or mountain biking.
  • Burlington, VT 05401(802) 658-6276breakwatervt.com The Skinny Pancake The Skinny Pancake offers great views and a patio for a casual breakfast, lunch or dinner on Burlington's waterfront.
  • Watch ferry boats set off for the New York shore as you enjoy a meal on the Burlington waterfront.
  • Burlington, VT 05401(802) 657-3377maderasvt.com Breakwater Cafe & Grill For casual dining on the edge of Lake Champlain, Breakwater Cafe and Grill on the King Street Ferry Dock is the place to go.
  • Madera's Restaurante Mexicano & Cantina If you're in the mood for authentic Mexican fare at an affordable price while enjoying Burlington's proximity to Lake Champlain, Madera's is a good bet.
  • Whether you're in the mood for an elegant meal or a quick snack, you can get it on Burlington's waterfront.
  • Located on the shore of Lake Champlain, the city of Burlington, Vt., has long been a destination for outdoor enthusiasts eager to explore the Green Mountains in Vermont or the Adirondacks in New York just a short ferry boat ride away.
  • Reservations are a must for dinner, Monday through Saturday.
  • Try the French cheeses, the soupe a l'oignon, and the steak tartare, and save room for the pot de crème au caramel or a chocolate tarte for dessert.
  • Try the French cheeses, the soupe a l'oignon, and the steak tartare, and save room for the pot de crème au caramel or a chocolate tarte for dessert.
  • Reservations are generally recommended, and are required for high tea, as everything is freshly made to order.
  • Lavendou: Bistro Provençal A country French bistro in the far north part of Dallas, Lavendou serves lunch, high tea. and dinner, Monday through Saturday, and is available for catering.
  • There are many opportunities for French dining in Dallas, suitable to a variety of budgets and providing a variety of ambiances.
  • Tampa, FL 33611(813) 835-5885theluigis.com Bern's Steak House For visitors to Tampa Bay seeking a sophisticated steak dinner in a fine dining environment, Bern's is the place to go.
  • True to its name, Ella's features a variety of folk art, from the weird to the wacky and beyond; you'll have plenty to ponder while you're waiting for your meal.
  • Ella's Americana Folk Art Café If you're looking for a taste of authentic American cuisine, Ella's is the place to be in the Tampa Bay area.
  • Whether you're in the mood for steak in a fine dining environment, munching on down home American classics while surrounded by weird art, or just feel like pasta and a glass of red wine, your stomach will be satisfied with what Tampa Bay has to offer.
  • Guests can also check out the art gallery while waiting for their seat.
  • Rios has worked for various kitchens up and down the east coast and has finely honed her Latin infused cooking skills.
  • With cooks right at the table, you will be able to see your sushi personally prepared for you -- a good experience all the way around from the food to the preparation.
  • Shogun of Japan While Shogun is more of a traditional Japanese steakhouse, there are some sushi options for diners who are interested in that as an alternative.
  • There is only one restaurant for sushi in Tyler, Texas.
  • If you are traveling in east Texas, you may not think there are many options out there for fresh sushi.
  • Those planning to visit Italy's Best can call for a reservation.
  • When visiting for dinner, be sure to save room for a tasty selection from the pastry cart.
  • When visiting for dinner, be sure to save room for a tasty selection from the pastry cart.
  • The town is a popular winter resort for individuals from New York and Northern New Jersey.
  • Park and Orchard240 Hackensack StreetEast Rutherford, NJ 07073(201) 939-9292parkandorchard.com Sorrento Ristorante Sorrento Ristorante serves Italian cuisine for lunch Tuesday through Friday from 11:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m.
  • Dinner prices range from $5 for appetizers to $28 for filet mignon, and a children's menu is also available.
  • Dinner prices range from $5 for appetizers to $28 for filet mignon, and a children's menu is also available.
  • For dessert, choose between baklava, chocolate, flan, konefa, and um ali.
  • It has been a neighborhood favorite for many years now, with its winning kebabs, beef kofta and falafel platters.
  • Doner G also offers catering services for events like weddings, business meetings, conferences, luncheons, holiday gatherings and summer picnics.
  • Thrill-seeking tourists flock to Orange County not just for the theme parks, but also to explore the wilds of Casper's Wilderness Park, to surf the waves on Huntington Beach and to fish at Dana Wharf.
  • The Cottage Restaurant also caters to private parties and banquets with seating for up to 100 guests.
  • Best known for breakfast and brunch, the Cottage Restaurant serves lunch and dinner menus as well.
  • The building was built in 1917 and remained a residence for quite some time until it opened as a restaurant 35 years ago.
  • Trabuco Oaks Steakhouse Trabuco Oaks Steakhouse is open for dinner only.
  • Orange County is a popular destination for water and mountain enthusiasts alike.
  • Many of the customers have been coming to Heinrich's for years and bringing visitors to the area.
  • Fort Myers, Florida 33931 (239) 437-8664fortmyersschnitzelhouse.com Heinrich's German Grill Heinrich's German Grill gets high marks from former diners for authenticity, with some going so far as to say it's the best German restaurant outside of Germany.
  • Good cordon bleu dishes, pastas, and excellent seafood entrees are also presented for variety, and the restaurant features a decent wine list.
  • It gets great reviews for its Wiener schnitzel, sauerbraten, beef stroganoff, and potato pancakes.
  • Brats and other sandwiches with two sides each are available for lunch around $8, and turducken is available for $15 per serving.
  • Brats and other sandwiches with two sides each are available for lunch around $8, and turducken is available for $15 per serving.
  • Yats Lafayette340 East State StreetWest Lafayette, IN 47906(765) 743-9287yatscajuncreole.com Mudbugs Cajun Cafe Mudbugs serves up affordable Cajun mainstays for lunch and dinner.
  • Order from a chalkboard menu at the entrance and pay for your meal.
  • Kokomo, Indiana is blessed with four excellent nature trails that offer perfect routes for hiking, running, cycling and roller-blading.
  • This is a great place to stop in for a bite after a day of golfing at Thornton's Jack O' Lantern golf course.
  • William Tell Restaurant The William Tell Restaurant is a Thornton favorite, for tourists and locals alike.
  • The vast miles of forest provide a lovely setting for any outdoor enthusiast that enjoys hiking or biking.
  • El Rey Taqueria There are four Houston locations of this Cuban/Mexican joint, which made the Best of Citysearch 2009 list for Best Houston Cuban Food.
  • Today, you have a wealth of options for Cuban dining in Houston.
  • It has been difficult for Cuban restaurants---or any restaurants, for that matter---to compete with the popularity of Mexican fare in Houston.
  • It has been difficult for Cuban restaurants---or any restaurants, for that matter---to compete with the popularity of Mexican fare in Houston.
  • Osteria Rustico provides non-skimpy portions and chain-restaurant prices that make up for the minimal atmosphere.
  • Boston, MA 02114(617) 742-4144‎ ducalipizza.com Osteria Rustico Osteria Rustico offers daily lunchtime options popular with folks working in the North Station area and people looking for a reasonably priced meal before afternoon TD Garden events.
  • Ducali is open seven days for lunch and dinner with take-out available.
  • Enjoy an array of beers on tap, flat-screen televisions for watching the game and free Wi-Fi.
  • Non-food draws include a seasonal patio with views of the cityscape, live music on weekends, valet parking, the "Grape Room" (a dining area simulating a vineyard) and a fireplaced ballroom for special functions.
  • Joe Tecce's Ristorante and Cafe Joe Tecce's Ristorante and Cafe is a mere third of a mile from the TD Garden and has been dishing up Neapolitan cuisine for over 60 years.
  • Dedicated in 1928 as Boston Garden and renamed in 1995 and again in 2005, the TD Garden remains an important venue for concerts, shows and sporting events.
  • You may order either fondue portioned for a singe diner, or you may have it sized up to serve two or more diners.
  • These restaurants are popular for good reason-the menu offers a wide range of options sure to appeal to fondue lovers and to make converts out of those who have yet to be introduced to fondue.
  • With such a setting, it is no wonder that Annapolis is best known for its water sports, including sailing, boating, and fishing.
  • The establishment also hosts private functions from bachelor parties to birthday parties for any size group.
  • While the pub will make reservations for those seeking special accommodations, a standard dinner service is strictly on a first come, first served basis.
  • In addition to standard dining, the Krooked Cafe provides a catering service for any size event for 2 to 200 guests.
  • In addition to standard dining, the Krooked Cafe provides a catering service for any size event for 2 to 200 guests.
  • Serving traditional and organic ingredients, this Zagat-rated eatery is also well known in the area for its smoothies and fresh juices.
  • Featuring a menu that is as varied as it is lengthy, Maggie's Krooked Cafe serves everything from eggs jardiniere to tofu to polenta to eggplant in a setting suitable for families, couples or singles.
  • Try the pan-crisped "all crab" cake, homemade pumpkin gnocchi or short rib and oxtail fettuccini and you'll see why Match receives high marks for its innovative American cuisine.
  • Famous for its historic stonewalls and autumn foliage, Fairfield County has a lot to offer the outdoor enthusiast, including boundless opportunities for quiet nature walks and bike rides in the area's many wooded parks.
  • Famous for its historic stonewalls and autumn foliage, Fairfield County has a lot to offer the outdoor enthusiast, including boundless opportunities for quiet nature walks and bike rides in the area's many wooded parks.
  • The only complaint that can be levied at this restaurant is that the prices are higher than one might expect for such simple fare.
  • Best known for their dosas--a crepe made from rice and black lentils--Devi also offers many other delicious treats such as a wide variety of chutneys both hot and cold, and a carrot halwa (semolina pudding) for dessert.
  • Best known for their dosas--a crepe made from rice and black lentils--Devi also offers many other delicious treats such as a wide variety of chutneys both hot and cold, and a carrot halwa (semolina pudding) for dessert.
  • Taste of India Best known for its large buffet and reasonable prices, Taste of India serves traditional Indian fare with plenty to choose from in both vegetarian and non-vegetarian fare.
  • Most offer buffet options that won't bust your wallet as well as meal options for the strict vegetarian in your group.
  • Travelers seeking to sample Indian cuisine for the first time, or those more familiar with an Indian diet will be glad to find that many of India's diverse flavors and recipes are available at a number of establishments in the Reading, Pennsylvania, area.
  • Contact Sotiris Taverna for event or party catering.
  • Both the lunch and dinner menus are filled with Greek dishes including some suitable for vegetarians, such as the vegetable sampler.
  • Vegetarians do not have to go hungry here either, as there are many items on the menu for them.
  • DeVassa Bar and Grill Popular for its location within Victoria Square, this restaurant serves tapas with a Brazilian twist.
  • Not only is it the location of highly esteemed equestrian competitions, but it's also famous for the Keeneland Race Course and Kentucky Horse Park, where visitors can observe 50 breeds of horses.
  • Horse lovers have recognized Lexington, Ky. as a special place for decades.
  • For lunch, Tsunami offers a range of soups and sandwiches as well as several seafood entrees.
  • Memphis, TN 38104(901) 726-4372hueyburger.com Tsunami Tsunami specializes in high-end seafood dishes for lunch and dinner.
  • The Midtown Huey's is open for lunch, dinner and late nights seven days a week.
  • The restaurant is also known for its Po Boy sandwiches, which range from catfish to barbecue pork.
  • The restaurant serves Southern and seafood favorites for lunch and dinner Monday through Sunday.
  • From walking on Beale Street, to cycling the city's more than 60 miles of bike routes, Memphis has plenty for the outdoor enthusiast to do.
  • Boulder, CO 80301(303) 442-6868On 28th Street just before Pearl St.www.goldenlotuscuisine.com‎ China Gourmet‎ If you have a taste for authentic Chinese food, stop by the China Gourmet next time you are in Boulder.
  • Paved and unpaved hiking and mountain bike trails into the mountains begin at the city's edge for your convenience.
  • Explore the Flatirons or the Boulder Canyon for a day of rock climbing.
  • Beth's Cafe is famous for breakfast, on the healthful or not so healthful side, served any time.
  • And for dinner, Denny's cooks up deep Southern cuisine such as golden-fried chopped beef steaks glazed with country gravy, or country-fried steak and eggs with grits.
  • The restaurant offers mostly down South food for breakfast, including buttermilk biscuits, hash browns, hearty whole wheat pancakes and eggs.
  • While it is not particular to Seattle, it's one of the few places locals and visitors can go for a full Southern breakfast, lunch and dinner menu any time they wish.
  • Along with the active life, Seattle has some fine restaurants that are open 24 hours. 13 Coins 13 Coins is an upscale restaurant with a 24-hour menu for late night and early morning guests. 13 Coins has been a Seattle dining institution since 1967.
  • It also has banquet packages and the perfect place for weddings and other celebrations.
  • Save room for bread pudding with a whiskey sauceClementine's Cafe306 Main St.
  • For a sweet treat, try the Evening Ice Cream Parlor, which has everything from to sundaes to egg creams.
  • For on-the-beach dining, visit its Boardwalk Grill window and enjoy jumbo Sabrette hotdogs or cheese fries while lounging in the sand.
  • Perfect for a day trip, Avon is only an hour's drive away from New York City, but with its boardwalk dotted by Victorian lamps and benches, it seems a world apart.
  • The decor sets an upscale scene, making Toyo a good choice for a special night out in Mishawaka.
  • If a stroll through Shiojiri Niwa creates a craving for sushi, Mishawaka has a few options.
  • Visitors can race the 2,000-foot course in their own kayak or can pay for a seat on the resident "funyaks." St.
  • Perfect for meeting a group of friends for the weekend or after work.
  • Perfect for meeting a group of friends for the weekend or after work.
  • A perfect place for a first date, dine on familiar Italian classics such as Chicken Fiorentina, Veal Sorrentino and Gnocchi Bolognese.
  • Once famous for the Boonton Iron Works, the township is now in the process of urban renewal and expanding its interest in culture and diversity, which can be especially seen in its growing restaurant scene.
  • There is a good sized kids menu for the little ones, and a vast margarita menu for grownups.
  • There is a good sized kids menu for the little ones, and a vast margarita menu for grownups.
  • Stop by on Monday for all you can eat spaghetti, or try some of the other delicious dinner offerings served up.
  • Winters are cold and snowy, and great for skiing, cross-country skiing, snowshoeing.
  • Diners at this restaurant, named after the Japanese city of Kobe that the restaurant's owners say is famous for its tender prime rib, can choose from a range of Japanese steak offerings, sushi and seafood.
  • For younger eaters, Amarillo Roadhouse features its Li'l Buckaroos menu.
  • There is a reward card you can sign up for, which allows for a $5 reimbursement for every $60 spent.
  • There is a reward card you can sign up for, which allows for a $5 reimbursement for every $60 spent.
  • There is a reward card you can sign up for, which allows for a $5 reimbursement for every $60 spent.
  • Murtha's New York Steakhouse4777 Sunrise HighwayBohemia, NY 11716(631) 589-6278murthassteakhouse.com McGuire's If you would enjoy some witty entertainment after visiting the Connetquot River State Park, stop in for a bite to eat at McGuire's.
  • You can bring in large groups for special events or have Murtha's cater to you outside of the restaurant.
  • While you wait for your meal to arrive, make sure to look over the extensive wine list.
  • This restaurant strives for perfection, using the finest seasonal produce in each individually prepared dish.
  • Bradley Beach, NJ 07720(732) 775-1117ferrarosfamous.com Uva Bianca Restaurant and Wine Bar For upscale Mediterranean Italian cuisine in a contemporary atmosphere, go to Uva Bianca Restaurant and Wine Bar.
  • For those who wish to relax, Sogo offers an extensive menu of cocktails.
  • Meals are prepared right in front of you, and the staff all around gets high marks for courtesy, professionalism, and sense of humor.
  • Sogo Sogo offers ambitious Japanese cuisine for adventurous diners.
  • Denville is a quaint New Jersey town that is home to numerous sights of interest for the recreational traveler.
  • Houston, TX 77083 (281) 988-9912‎ Bunga Raya Restaurant Again, what this restaurant lacks in atmosphere it makes up for in delicious food, friendly service and very modest prices.
  • This restaurant howls for some aesthetic improvement but receives high complements for mouthwatering fare.
  • This restaurant howls for some aesthetic improvement but receives high complements for mouthwatering fare.
  • Dairy AshfordHouston, TX 77077(281) 497-8783‎ Rice Bowl Chinese/Indonesian Restaurant Bring your appetite and order from the Indonesian menu for excellent tasting meals and lots of it.
  • Rijsttafel (named for "rice table" by Dutch settlers) is its largest entree and most popular--think curried rice with numerous sides that you mix in to your own taste.
  • Set your expectations--go for some tasty food that will be easy on the pocketbook, not for high class.
  • Set your expectations--go for some tasty food that will be easy on the pocketbook, not for high class.
  • Prices are surprisingly affordable and the portions offer great value for the money spent.
  • This family operated restaurant has been delighting patrons with its culinary offerings since 1954, and has garnered a reputation for excellent seafood, including fish from the Northern Atlantic, lobster, and clams.
  • Something Else Someplace Else Restaurant and Tavern is a brand-new Canastota restaurant that is already garnering regional attention for its creative approach to continental and American cuisines.
  • Canastota, New York, is found in the central region of the state, an area that draws hikers, bikers, and other outdoors enthusiasts for its beauty, particularly during the fall foliage season.
  • After you have your fill of golf, consider stopping by Eden Wok for a bit to eat.
  • The sloping golf courses provide golfers with a challenge that can entertain them for hours.
  • Rangoli also has catering available for special occasions.
  • The restaurant they opened is well known for its authentic old-world ambience, particularly the outdoor biergarten complete with strolling accordion player.
  • European restaurants are particularly plentiful, so if you find yourself in the mood for sauerbraten or schnitzel, you have several options for fine German dining (with and without polka music).
  • European restaurants are particularly plentiful, so if you find yourself in the mood for sauerbraten or schnitzel, you have several options for fine German dining (with and without polka music).
  • Children can order from the Kid's Corner, including Chicken Tenders for $5.
  • Each dinner entrée comes with two side dishes; try the Crab Imperial Stuffed Tilapia for $35 or the Jumbo Fried Shrimp for $20 (prices as of 2009).
  • Each dinner entrée comes with two side dishes; try the Crab Imperial Stuffed Tilapia for $35 or the Jumbo Fried Shrimp for $20 (prices as of 2009).
  • Seafood cuisine Americana lines the menu for lunch and dinner.
  • Clarke's Landing Restaurant For fine dining in a casual atmosphere by the water's edge, drive nine minutes north of Lexington Park on Route 235 to Hollywood, Md.
  • Take a two-mile hike on an unimproved trail from the parking lot and spend the day hunting for fossils along the beach.
  • Downstairs, Sally O'Brien's Bar offers a full bar menu, a selection of live acts and DJ's, and big crowds. (For that reason, families with children should note the nightclub noise may go on pretty late at night.) Royal Hotel Arklow25 Main St.
  • On Sunday afternoons, visit the Ferrybank Carvery for a Sunday roast.
  • Woodenbridge Hotel & LodgeVale of AvocaArklow County Wicklow Ireland011 (+353) 402 35146woodenbridgehotel.com Arklow Bay Conference, Leisure, & Spa Hotel The 92-room Arklow Bay Hotel offers a relaxed setting for the business and leisure traveler.
  • For more formal dining, the Woodenbridge's Redmond Restaurant offers a combination of traditional Irish and contemporary dishes.
  • Arklow offers several accommodations for travelers to County Wicklow.
  • This port city is situated on the mighty Avoca River and known for its boat building and sea fishing.
  • Nicknamed "Cowboy Capital of the World," visitors to Bandera won't be surprised to see that this section of Texas' Hill Country is composed mostly of working and recreational "dude" ranches for those wanting to improve their ridin' and ropin' skills.
  • Again, if you're visiting on the weekends, expect a wait for dinner.605 N.
  • Chicago, IL 60620(312) 664-7444featuredfoods.com Vong's Thai Kitchen For visitors searching for a taste of contemporary Thai food, Vong's Thai Kitchen is a must-stop.
  • Chicago, IL 60620(312) 664-7444featuredfoods.com Vong's Thai Kitchen For visitors searching for a taste of contemporary Thai food, Vong's Thai Kitchen is a must-stop.
  • If you visit on the weekends, expect a long wait for dinner.640 N.
  • Elate For contemporary American food, few restaurants in River North rate as highly as does Elate.
  • It's little surprise, then, that there are restaurants in this Chicago neighborhood for every age, taste range and budget preference.
  • Particularly well-suited to families, the young-at-heart or those simply looking for a noisy, fun and inexpensive dining option, C.
  • For diners who want their seafood as close to nature as possible, there is a raw bar for oysters, clams, shrimp and--for those over 21--shooters complete with vodka.125 Bayview Ave.
  • For diners who want their seafood as close to nature as possible, there is a raw bar for oysters, clams, shrimp and--for those over 21--shooters complete with vodka.125 Bayview Ave.
  • Prices range from moderate to high, there is a children's menu and the restaurant is open for lunch and dinner every day.
  • If you do not feel like eating Italian, there are also plenty of seafood dishes for your enjoyment.
  • After you have your fill of the park, you can head a few blocks down to Lark for a bite to eat.
  • Make sure to look over the wine list while you wait for your meal.
  • If you find yourself a little hungry while you are in the area, consider stopping by Union Restaurant for some Italian cuisine and seafood.
  • For example, if you travel on Seneca Street and head toward the pier, you will find a little spot called Freeway Park.
  • Carmine Smeraldo has owned and operated this restaurant for the last 26 years and strives to provide patrons with a one of a kind dining experience.
  • If you find yourself out on the water at night, make sure to take a look back toward shore and see the twinkling lights of Seattle at night, which make for an impressive view.
  • Once featured on PBS's "Dining Out" with Jonathon Swift, Moro's is dimly lit; the perfect ambiance for a relaxing dinner with your loved one, although it also hosts private parties.
  • Riverview, MI 48193 (734) 285-5430dolcevitariverview.com Moro's Dining If you're looking for a night out after riding the trails around Wyandotte, you may want to try Moro's Dining in downtown Allen Park.
  • Prices won't break the bank too much, as two people could easily dine for $50, even after ordering appetizer and dessert.
  • Open for both lunch and dinner, the dress code is business casual and there is live entertainment on the weekends, as well as an outside patio that opens depending on the weather.
  • Known for its Italian fare, Portofino has a menu complete with a variety of steaks, veal specialties and its famous sautéed lake perch.
  • Portofino Riding the trails all day is sure to put you in the mood for a filling dinner.
  • Whatever style you're in the mood for, there is an Italian steak house nearby.
  • Grab a made-to-order omelet with any three ingredients for just $4.25, or a homemade-Italian style roast beef sandwich au jus with sweet peppers and hot giardiniera for a mere $5.95.
  • Grab a made-to-order omelet with any three ingredients for just $4.25, or a homemade-Italian style roast beef sandwich au jus with sweet peppers and hot giardiniera for a mere $5.95.
  • DearbornChicago, IL 60610(312) 832-7700 Rosebud Express Located on West Madison Street, Rosebud Express offers authentic Italian for those on the go.
  • Nightlife includes live entertainment and an outdoor cafe perfect for people watching.
  • Riverside Park has an aquatic center and a sports complex, Prospect Park houses the Quad City Music Guild and the Ben Butterworth Parkway, a four-mile trail following the scenic Mississippi River for running, walking or biking activities.
  • Indian restaurants are not plentiful in this city--there is only one--but it makes up for its monopoly with delicious food and friendly service.
  • A saloon is not a saloon without drinks, and So Long Saloon has a nice selection for you to choose from.
  • Beef is not the only thing on the menu for you to enjoy.
  • If you want to be a little adventurous, go for the Belly Buster, with slices of ham, turkey, American and Swiss cheeses, tomato and lettuce.
  • Rock-A-Belly Bar & Grill Across from the Kansas State University campus, Rock-A-Belly Bar & Grill is a great place for food, drinks and fun.
  • After a long day in the outdoors, you will certainly be ready for some night life.
  • New Krishna Indian Restaurant11974 Lebanon RoadSharonville, OH 45241-1700(513) 769-6266 Anand India Restaurant Take I-75 for a nine-minute drive to Anand Indian Restaurant for authentic Indian food.
  • New Krishna Indian Restaurant11974 Lebanon RoadSharonville, OH 45241-1700(513) 769-6266 Anand India Restaurant Take I-75 for a nine-minute drive to Anand Indian Restaurant for authentic Indian food.
  • Authentic, top-rated Indian restaurants also surround Springdale for your dining pleasure.
  • During the off-season (May through September), the prices go down significantly, making it an enticing place for visitors to Anza-Borrego State Park who are on a budget.
  • Stanlunds allows pets for a $10 surcharge, as of December 2009.
  • Formerly a resort for Hollywood movie stars, the current owners took over the Palms in 1993 and renovated it, being careful to respect the original design of the place, and thus giving it a chic retro look, combined with a luxury southwestern air.
  • While there are plenty of campgrounds in the vicinity, if you're looking for somewhere more comfortable to spend the night, there are plenty of hotels in and around Anza-Borrego to make your stay an enjoyable one.
  • Reservations recommended for parties of five or more.
  • For non-steak eaters, choose from salmon and sea bass to ravioli and chicken.
  • Cliffs also features meals to share from the porterhouse for two-four to the rack of Colorado lamb for two.
  • Cliffs also features meals to share from the porterhouse for two-four to the rack of Colorado lamb for two.
  • Assembly Steak House495 Sylvan AvenueEnglewood Cliffs, NJ(201) 568-2616‎assemblysteakhouse.com Cliffs Steakhouse Located in Englewood Cliffs, Cliffs Steakhouse is open seven day days a week for lunch and dinner.
  • Assembly serves all types of steaks, from filet and prime rib to porterhouse for two and t-bone.
  • There is even a small selection of "American food" (shrimp, chicken wings, burgers, steak) should you be dining with anyone who doesn't care for Chinese food.
  • If a day at the shore leaves you in the mood for Chinese food, you have several local options, with both dine-in and takeout options.
  • This setting naturally makes it a prime location for water sports, and you can enjoy anything from a relaxing afternoon of beachcombing to kayaking the Patuxent (rentals are available at the nearby Patuxent Adventure Center).
  • For some reason, the Latin American Restaurant is closed on Wednesdays.
  • If you are at a loss as to what to order, go for the Picadillo.
  • For lunch, we particularly recommend the tasty pan con bistec sandwich.
  • El Artesano This place has been in business for so long, it is something of a local legend.
  • Union City is also a great place for lovers of authentic Cuban cuisine.
  • The service and décor can be a bit lacking at times, but for those seeking spicy Latin food, this is the place to be when in this part of New Jersey.
  • Guido's has been in existence for six years now, and has a devoted base of customers.
  • The rest of the week, all the food is made to order, which may account for some of the lengthy waiting times diners occasionally complain about here.
  • On Sundays, there is an all-you-can-eat buffet, which is a good excuse for trying out the entire menu.
  • Fried fish, potato salad, seasoned rice, candied yams, and greens---this is the kind of fare that will fill you up and leave you yearning for more.
  • Corinne's Place Offering both sit-down meals and a popular catering service, Corinne's is the place to go in Camden for soul food.
  • Despite its past reputation as a hotbed for violent activity, the local government has recently invested a lot of time and resources into developing Camden's waterfront area.
  • The menu for lunch consists of soup and salad, appetizers, sandwiches and entrees.
  • The fries at Bobby's are nothing to scoff at, either---nor, for that matter, are the onion rings.
  • Sawa Hibachi Steakhouse & Sushi Bar With its colorful, fish tank-lined walls and friendly waitstaff, the Sawa Hibachi Steakhouse & Sushi Bar has been luring Eatontown residents for years with its diverse sushi offerings.
  • Eatontown, New Jersey is a popular stopping point for visitors on their way to the New Jersey shore, which offers a range of activities for the active outdoor sports enthusiast, including swimming and fishing.
  • Eatontown, New Jersey is a popular stopping point for visitors on their way to the New Jersey shore, which offers a range of activities for the active outdoor sports enthusiast, including swimming and fishing.
  • A menu special for Subway is their $5 foot-long sandwiches.
  • Look for the large Happy Chef figure with his hand out and wooden spoon raised to the sky.
  • This is a popular hang-out spot for those with late night breakfast cravings.
  • Highway 30Toledo, Iowa 52342(641) 484-3720 Happy Chef A full menu is available all day long with special pricing for people 55 years of age and older.
  • They are famous for their Maid Rite sandwiches, which can be ordered individually, in a meal or by the dozen.
  • Pricing is moderate, and there is often a buffet at lunchtime for those who'd like to try a little of everything.
  • They are known for their strudel, so definitely save room for some dessert.
  • They are known for their strudel, so definitely save room for some dessert.
  • Authentic desserts like Black Forest cake and sacher tortes are offered for after dinner, as are a variety of delicious coffee drinks spiked with brandy, vodka or schnapps.
  • The beach is beautiful, clean white sand with a wide promenade next to it for walking, running, biking or rollerblading.
  • Cutillo's Restaurant is open for lunch and dinner Wednesday through Sunday, and for dinner only on Tuesdays.
  • Cutillo's Restaurant is open for lunch and dinner Wednesday through Sunday, and for dinner only on Tuesdays.
  • Reservations are recommended for groups of 5 or more.
  • Abruzzi Trattoria is open for lunch and dinner 7 days a week.
  • Both facilities offer numerous opportunities for hiking and enjoying the area's natural scenery.
  • If you are in the mood for Italian cuisine, there are several Italian restaurants close by.
  • Assaggio's is an especially ideal option for families and large parties.
  • Located 21 miles west of Salton City in Borrego Springs, it's one of the most reliable places locals and tourists go for a taste of home cooked Italian.
  • Known to many as a hangout for locals, the restaurant offers a full menu, with a range of choices from fajitas to fish and chips.
  • Bordered in the south by Imperial Valley and in the west by Anza-Borrego Desert State Park, Salton Sea offers lots of choices for campgrounds, hiking, and exploration.
  • During the festival, the restaurant sells food and drinks and sets up games for children, as well as provides information about local fisheries.208 SW Ankeny St.
  • Every summer, the Dan and Louis Oyster Bar sponsors the Annual Oyster Festival, which raises money for charity.
  • Portland, OR 97205(503) 326-1300southparkseafood.com/ Dan and Louis Oyster Bar Established in 1907, the Dan & Louis Oyster Bar is world-renowned for its seafood and considered the oldest family-operated restaurant in Portland.
  • The restaurant, which is open for happy hour, lunch and dinner, features ravioli, duck, lamb, pork chops and rib eye entrees.
  • Located in the northwestern part of the United States, Portland, Oregon, is a diverse city renowned for its outdoor activities, cultural scene and recreational parks.
  • If you're looking for healthy alternatives to drive-through fried food, this is a good place to start.
  • Louis, MO 63118(314) 771-2236blackbearbakery.org Gokul Snacks and Sweets For five years, Gokul Snacks and Sweets has been serving vegetarian dishes and desserts.
  • OR Smoothies and Cafe OR Smoothies and Café's devotion to healthy eating includes organic juices and produce, sea salt, raw natural sugar cane and beet sugar for sweeteners, and organic maple syrup.
  • However, this city and surrounding area is home to 100 parks, including Forest Park, which is a 1,300 acre oasis for joggers, hikers, bicyclists, skaters, and rollerbladers.
  • For a quick meal, PB's serves salads and homemade soups.
  • Visit for lunch for tasty entrees or Bento Boxes, served with sushi rolls, the meat of your choice, salad with ginger dressing, and soup, all reasonably prices between $4.50 and $9.50.
  • Visit for lunch for tasty entrees or Bento Boxes, served with sushi rolls, the meat of your choice, salad with ginger dressing, and soup, all reasonably prices between $4.50 and $9.50.
  • The Italian Affair9870 St. 900 Route 47 North Glassboro, NJ 08096(856) 881-2121http://www.italianaffairglassboro.com/ Asian Fare Toyko Mandarin is the place to go when looking for Chinese food.
  • Best known for their Old Bay fries, buffalo chicken cheese steak and their burgers, the Landmark is the perfect place for Rowan college students and the local community to gather for an inexpensive meal.
  • Best known for their Old Bay fries, buffalo chicken cheese steak and their burgers, the Landmark is the perfect place for Rowan college students and the local community to gather for an inexpensive meal.
  • Best known for their Old Bay fries, buffalo chicken cheese steak and their burgers, the Landmark is the perfect place for Rowan college students and the local community to gather for an inexpensive meal.
  • Visit the Landmark for a meal or to hang out with friends and enjoy wine, beer or other speciality drink.
  • The Roadhouse is a local favorite for steak on the lake.
  • Working farmers and ranchers (and a few real cowboys) come to the area for supplies and great steaks.
  • Known in southeastern Kansas for well-priced and beautifully cooked steaks since 1938, the family at Jim's in Pittsburg cuts their own steaks.
  • Broadway Haysville, KS 67060(316) 522-1113vfw6957.org Jim's Steak House Fans of this steak house come from as far away as Kansas City and have been filling its tables for more than 50 years.
  • In an unassuming metal building, some of the best steaks around are prepared and grilled to perfection by veterans for veterans and their customers.
  • Reservations only needed for events and large parties.
  • Large but not pretentious, this northeast Kansas restaurant is known for home cooking and a monstrous 20 oz.
  • Dodge City, KS 67801-9011 (620) 227-5225 Puffy's Steak & Ice House Located just 15 minutes west of Topeka, in Maple Hill, Kan., Puffy's has been voted "Best Steakhouse in Northeast Kansas" for 16 years.
  • Ask the owner, Casey, for a tour and a glimpse of the Willie Nelson shrine.
  • Kansas is known for Toto, Dorothy and the production of wheat.
  • Nightly sushi tastings are also offered to give visitors an opportunity to savor an array of dishes for one price.2909 Webster St.
  • San Francisco, CA 94111(415) 644-5262ozumo.com Kiss Seafood The spot for locals, Kiss Seafood is tucked away in Japantown with the classically cool, easy-to-miss entrance.
  • The Robata-Yaki plates and Nabemono or Hot Pots are outstanding dishes for travelers looking to warm up after a cold day on the Bay. 161 Steuart St.
  • Located in the Financial District, the restaurant fills nightly with young professionals eager for an exquisite meal accompanied by an extensive sake selection.
  • The culinary experiences of San Francisco are abundant but the sushi is upheld by residents and visitors alike as a must for travelers.
  • Monday through Thursday has a menu for the ladies and a variety of specials for the rest of the bunch.
  • Monday through Thursday has a menu for the ladies and a variety of specials for the rest of the bunch.
  • But regardless of what night you go, you will always find pool tables, music and a dance floor for a night of great fun.
  • If you want to show the world that you really are a star, head over on Wednesday, Friday or Saturday night for karaoke night.
  • By day you interact with nature, but by night it is time for some social interaction and Columbus nightlife.
  • For a healthy lunch, try the Veggie Wrap, with hummus and avocado, or if you are an early riser, browse their breakfast menu and indulge in some scrambled egg whites or rolled oats with berries.
  • With plenty of choices for meat lovers and vegetarians, Chutney Masala has something for everyone.
  • With plenty of choices for meat lovers and vegetarians, Chutney Masala has something for everyone.
  • With facilities to cater for private functions, the Chutney Masala often has a busy party atmosphere, which is both enjoyable and social.
  • For dinner, its homemade meatloaf is a guest favorite as is the roast beef.
  • While known for their breakfast menu, it also serves lunch and dinner.
  • Hillary Clinton dined here in 1999 while she was campaigning for the Senate.
  • You can come here for a quick bite or sample their wine list and the chef's specialties if you are in need of a more elegant dining affair.
  • Funds raised support the North Idaho College Foundation and scholarships for students.
  • The restaurant is open for dinner and weekend brunch.
  • The Red Door is known for using fresh, organic ingredients from local farmers markets.
  • Beverly's is a destination for romantic dinners, anniversaries and special occasions.
  • Hunters Located right off Interstate 90 in Post Falls, GW Hunters is known as North Idaho's home for wild game.
  • Several of these eateries have actually become destinations for those who savor the taste of wild game.
  • North Idaho is a hunter's paradise, known for its abundance of deer, elk, grouse and duck.
  • For a reasonable price, visitors can expect large portions of seafood to pasta platters, pizza and pasta served with homemade sauce.
  • Although the portions are large enough to fill you, leave some room for its exclusive sundae concoction.
  • Make sure to leave room for homemade cheesecake and sorbets at this family-friendly restaurant.
  • Open seven days a week for lunch and dinner, La Pastaria offers everything for under $18 per plate.
  • Open seven days a week for lunch and dinner, La Pastaria offers everything for under $18 per plate.
  • Reservations are recommended, and business casual attire is best for this fine dining establishment.
  • Enjoy dinner with dishes like grilled pork chops, porcini mushrooms with quail for under $36 per plate.
  • The lunch menu offers dishes like asparagus risotto, roasted lamb shank and veal scalloppine, all for under $20 per plate.
  • Summit is open seven days a week for lunch and dinner and will deliver.
  • Second Watchung Mountain is known for its unique ecosystem that is ideal for hiking and exploring.
  • Second Watchung Mountain is known for its unique ecosystem that is ideal for hiking and exploring.
  • Burger Bar Plan B Burger Bar located in Glastonbury is a restaurant that grinds their own meat for burgers fromfresh whole chuck daily.
  • There are many reasons to visit Glastonbury one is for the great restaurants and food the town offers.
  • One particular restaurants grinds the meat fresh daily for the hamburgers they serve.
  • For the active traveler that enjoys different types of food, the choices are endless.
  • The restaurant has a separate banquet menu for parties and other events, which Ossy's caters in its private banquet facilities.
  • The restaurant is open for lunch and dinner; its menu features cold and hot appetizers, soup, salads and pasta dishes such as penne, linguini with red or white clam sauce, fussilli romana with pink sauce, cavatelli with broccoli, manicotti and ravioli.
  • Bowl a few games for fun or just hang out in the comfortable, 50s-era lounge and enjoy an upscale dining experience.
  • Tampa, FL 33689(813) 242-8226myspace.com/memasalaskantacos Splitsville If you're looking for something completely different, Splitsville is not to be missed.
  • Be sure to save room for a homemade and piping hot churro for dessert.
  • Be sure to save room for a homemade and piping hot churro for dessert.
  • Tampa, FL 33607(813) 874-1919restaurants-america.com/barlouie/ Mema's Alaskan Taco For a more laid-back dinner, think Mema's on 8th Avenue.
  • But its location in International Plaza makes the restaurant ideal for a late meal or midnight snack.
  • Bar Louie With roughly 50 beers on tap and giant plasma televisions on the wall, Bar Louie is a restaurant chain tailor-made for sports fans looking to catch their favorite game.
  • And if you find yourself hankering for a late-night bite, there are a number of restaurants ready to serve you until the wee hours.
  • You can spend the day jet-skiing in Tampa Bay, catch an evening Devil Rays or Lightning game (depending on the season), and then head out for some of the city's nightlife in Hyde Park or the Channelside Complex.
  • A sparkling gem on the Gulf Coast of Florida, Tampa is a city known for its love of all things sports-related.
  • This restaurant is also known for its selection of appetizers, such as crab cakes, bacon-wrapped scallops, Polish sausage and fried asparagus.
  • There are several area parks where families can gather for picnics, games and outdoor sports.
  • The Seabrook area provides numerous opportunities for outdoor activities, including fishing, swimming and kayaking.
  • If you are looking for a flavorful bite, check out the Pizza Hut.357 W.
  • A fun, family-friendly atmosphere and affordable price tag make this restaurant a great place to take the kids for a night out on the town.
  • If country-style eating in a relaxing and friendly atmosphere is what you desire, then the Ponderosa Steakhouse is the choice for you.382 W.
  • The restaurant is open for lunch and dinner seven days a week, ensuring that a great meal is available whenever you are ready to indulge.
  • Featuring an affordable price, this restaurant is a great choice for families.
  • This family-