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fodder

fodder

fodder Sentence Examples

  • He wasn't about to donate any fodder to the other horse in the race.

  • Fodder for another horse race, Dean thought.

  • I'm better off as demon fodder.  I was doomed when I was born a half-demon.

  • It would be used as winter fodder for the two goats she had kept.

  • Horses appear to be fond of this species, and in Sweden it is stored for use as winter fodder.

  • The majority of the species of Acacia are edible and serve as reserve fodder for sheep and cattle.

  • The country to the east and south-east of the Aravallis affords a striking contrast to the sandy plains on the north-west of the range, and is blessed with fertile lands, hill-ranges and long stretches of forest, where fuel and fodder are abundant.

  • The landlord found land, labour, oxen for ploughing and working the wateringmachines, carting, threshing or other implements, seed corn, rations for the workmen and fodder for the cattle.

  • If he stole the seed, rations or fodder, the Code enacted that his fingers should be cut off.

  • Horse beans are grown, especially in the south and in the larger islands; lupines are also grown for fodder.

  • Beetroot (Beta vulgaris) is used as fodder, and yields about 10 tons per acre.

  • lettuce, endive, beet, radish, cress; cereals; and fodder plants such as lucerne and carob.

  • A variety of oil-bearing plants and green fodder, as also cotton, hemp, flax and poppies, are grown.

  • It forms excellent fodder for cattle, and is regularly gathered for that purpose.

  • In France the leaves serve as fodder.

  • Various kinds of fodder crops are grown in Transcaucasia, such as hay, rye-grass and lucerne.

  • Lupine, beans, peas and vetches were grown for fodder, and meadows, often artificially watered, supplied hay.

  • Ten years before, John Worlidge, one of his correspondents, and the author of the Systema Agriculturae (1669), observes, " Sheep fatten very well on turnips, which prove an excellent nourishment for them in hard winters when fodder is scarce; for they will not only eat the greens, but feed on the roots in the ground, and scoop them hollow even to the very skin.

  • The great losses arising from spoilt hay crops served to stimulate experimental inquiry into the method of preserving green fodder known as ensilage, with the result that the system eventually became successfully incorporated in the ordinary routine of agricultural practice.

  • The extent to which the annual production of the leading fodder crop may vary is shown in the table by the two consecutive years 1893 and 1894; from only nine million tons in the former year the production rose to upwards of fifteen million tons in the latter, an increase of over 70%.

  • Whatever the specific rotation, there may in practice be deviations from the plan of retaining on the farm the whole of the root-crops, the straw of the grain crops and the leguminous fodder crops (clover, vetches, sainfoin, &c.) for the production of meat or milk, and, coincidently, for that of manure to be returned to the land.

  • It is the leguminous fodder crops-especially clover, which has a much more extended period of growth, and much wider range of collection within the soil and subsoil, than any of the other crops of the rotation-that yield in their produce the largest amount of nitrogen per acre.

  • The young shoots are also given to oxen in the long winters of those northern latitudes, when other green fodder is hard to obtain.

  • The Swedish army now began to suffer severely, bread and fodder running short, and the soldiers subsisting entirely on captured bullocks.

  • The outgoing must leave for the incoming tenant convenient housing and other facilities for the labours of the year following; the incoming must procure for the outgoing tenant conveniences for the consumption of his fodder and for the harvests remaining to be got in.

  • The meal, in fact, is so rich in protein that it is best utilized as a food for animals when mixed with some coarse fodder, thus furnishing a more evenly-balanced ration.

  • Most of the trade of Brielle was diverted to Hellevoetsluis by the cutting of the Voornsche Canal in 1829, but it still has some business in corn and fodder, as well as a few factories.

  • If they fall on pasture land or fodder of any kind and are eaten by any herbivorous animal, such as a hare, rabbit, horse, sheep or ox, the active embryos or larvae are set free in the alimentary canal of the new host.

  • The principal products are corn, oats, barley, potatoes, rye, beetroot, hemp, flax, hay and other fodder.

  • Besides the use of the straw when cut up and mixed with other food for fodder, the oat grain constitutes an important food for both man and beast.

  • daily and only require water every third or fourth day: in cool weather, with ample green fodder they can go twentyfive days or more without drinking.

  • Temples that had been wellnigh deserted were already beginning to be frequented, rites long intermitted were being renewed, and the trade in fodder for sacrificial victims was reviving.

  • The principal fodder crops are green barley and a tall clover called " sulla " (Hedysarum coronarum), having a beautiful purple blossom.

  • Barley-straw is considered inferior both as fodder and litter.

  • The production of fodder also declined steadily, the number of cattle fell, and the army horses were insufficiently fed.

  • Neither of these is much grown in Great Britain for the production of oil, but the "winter" variety is very extensively grown as green food for sheep. For this purpose it is generally sown at short intervals throughout the summer to provide a succession of fodder.

  • Throughout other parts bullocks are fed on pasture land, and also in stables on nourishing and succulent feed such as hay, Indian corn fodder, Indian corn silage, turnips, carrots, mangels, ground oats, barley, peas, Indian corn, rye, bran and linseed oil cake.

  • Slaughtering notably free from epizootic diseases, with a fertile D soil or the growth of fodder crops and pasture, with abundance of pure air and water, and with a plentiful supply of ice, the conditions in Canada are ideal for the dairying industry.

  • The leaves are used as fodder in northern latitudes.

  • The young shoots of the larch are sometimes given in Switzerland as fodder to cattle.

  • Its culms and leaves afford excellent fodder for cattle; and the grain, of which the yield in favourable situations is upwards of a hundredfold, is used for the same purposes as maize, rice, corn and other cereals.

  • In Germany it is occasionally raised for green fodder.

  • The measures by which the government of India chiefly endeavours to reduce the liability of the country to famine are the promotion of railways; the extension of canal and well irrigation; the reclamation of waste lands, with the establishment of fuel and fodder reserves; the introduction of agricultural improvements; the multiplication of industries; emigration; and finally the improvement where necessary of the revenue and rent systems. In times of famine the function of the railways in distributing the grain is just as important as the function of the irrigation-canals in increasing the amount grown.

  • The list consists of oxen, sheep, geese, hens, honey, ale, loaves, cheese, butter, fodder, salmon and eels.

  • The bunts and smuts which damage our grain and fodder plants comprise about 400 species of internal parasites, found in all countries on herbaceous plants, and especially on Monocotyledons.

  • The extensive cultivation of beetroot, of potatoes for distilleries, and of fodder crops has led to the introduction of a rotation of several years instead of the former " three-fields " system; and agricultural machinery is in more general use, especially on the larger estates of the west.

  • in tropical or subtropical countries for their grain or as fodder grasses, or both, each variety of soil, from swamp to desert, having its characteristic forms.

  • In 1906 the commerce of the port, chiefly in lumber, cement, coal, cedar posts and ties, fodder and general merchandise, was valued at $3,018,894.

  • In fact such pastures are essential to the inhabitants of pastoral alpine districts, for the fodder to be obtained in the valley itself would not suffice to support the number of cattle which are required to afford sustenance to the inhabitants.

  • Rice, barley and wheat are the chief cereals cultivated, and lucerne for fodder.

  • Some hold the view that maize originated from a common Mexican fodder grass, Euchlaena mexicana, known as Teosinte, a closely allied plant which when crossed with maize yields a maize-like hybrid.

  • It can be grown in the tropics from the level of the sea to a height equal to that of the Pyrenees and in the south and middle of Europe, but it cannot be grown in England with any chance of profit, except perhaps as fodder.

  • It is also largely used for fodder and is an important article of export.

  • The amount of forage that may be produced in this way is enormous; 50,000 to 80,000 lb of green fodder are grown per acre, which makes 8000 to 12,000 lb as field-cured.

  • Lucerne and a trefoil called shaftal form important fodder crops in the western parts of the country, and, when irrigated, are said to afford ten or twelve cuttings in the season.

  • It is stored for winter use, and forms an excellent fodder.

  • It is common to cut down the green wheat and barley before the ear forms, for fodder, and the repetition of this, with barley at least, is said not to injure the grain crop. Bellew gives the following statement of the manner in which the soil is sometimes worked in the Kandahar district: - Barley is sown in November; in March and April it is twice cut for fodder; in June the grain is reaped, the ground is ploughed and manured and sown with tobacco, which yields two cuttings.

  • Their only hope lies in the introduction of fodder crops as a regular stage in the agricultural course.

  • The fodder famines that accompanied the great famines of 1897 and 1900 proved little short of disastrous to the cattle in the affected provinces.

  • In Gujarat half of its 12 million cattle perished in spite of the utmost efforts to obtain fodder.

  • In these forests every reasonable facility is afforded to the people concerned for the full and easy satisfaction of their needs, which are generally for small timber for building or fuel, fodder and grazing for their cattle, and edible products for themselves; and considerations of forest income are subordinated to those purposes.

  • Thus a shipper of cattle is not entitled to have the extra wages and provisions of his cattlemen on board, nor the extra fodder consumed by the cattle during the stay at a repairing port, made as good as G.A.

  • The native grasses are especially adapted for fodder.

  • Roughly about 48.5% of the total cultivated area is under cereals, 33.8 under fodder plants, 5.8 under root-crops, and 11.

  • The scarcity of animals, as well as the dearness of fodder, is one of the causes of the dearness of transport, and freights have risen on the most frequented roads from 3d.

  • On the Karroo are numerous ostrich farms. Lucerne is very largely grown as fodder for the cattle.

  • Among the more important productions, the potato, oca (Oxalis tuberosa), quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa) and some coarse grasses characterize the puna region, while barley, an exotic, is widely grown for fodder.

  • Theophrastus says the leaves are sweet and used for fodder for most kinds of cattle.

  • dactyloides (gama grass) extends northwards to Illinois and Connecticut; it is used for fodder and as an ornamental plant.

  • sanguinalis is a very widespread grass, in Bohemia it is cultivated as a food-grain; it is also the crab-grass of the southern United States, where it is used for fodder.

  • Phleum has a cylindrical spike-like inflorescence; P. pratense (timothy) is a valuable fodder grass, as also is Alopecurus pratensis (foxtail).

  • Buchloe dactyloides is the buffalo grass of the North American prairies, a valuable fodder.

  • Glyceria fluitans, manna-grass, socalled from the sweet grain, is one of the best fodder grasses for swampy meadows; the grain is an article of food in central Europe.

  • Lucerne and clover are extensively grown for fodder.

  • The hay crop of 1899 was grown on 1,095,706 acres and amounted to 1,617,905 tons, but nearly one-half of this was made from wild grasses; since then the amounts of fodder obtained from alfalfa, Kafir corn, sorghum cane and timothy have much increased, and that obtained from wild grasses has decreased; in 1909 the acreage was 900,000 and the crop 810,000 tons.

  • Grazing and fodder are not wanting, and besides the reeds peculiar to Seistan there are two grasses which merit notice - that called bannu, with which the bed of the Hamun abounds on the south and the taller and less salt kirta on the higher ground.

  • Cereals constitute the principal object of cultivation, and among these wheat ranks first, the next in imoortance beine barley, the chief fodder of horses and mules.

  • Pease straw, if not sandy, and good bright oat straw are good fodder for horses; but with barley and wheat straw, in the case of a horse, more energy is consumed during its passage through the alimentary canal than the digested straw yields.

  • He wasn't about to donate any fodder to the other horse in the race.

  • Fodder for another horse race, Dean thought.

  • I'm better off as demon fodder.  I was doomed when I was born a half-demon.

  • It would be used as winter fodder for the two goats she had kept.

  • These studies indicate a greater removal of potash by fodder beet in practice than existing standards allow for.

  • does a wild donkey bray when it has grass, or an ox bellow when it has fodder?

  • cannon fodder to trigger the trap they knew had been set for them.

  • You can easily become cannon fodder in religious strife.

  • He says the jihadists provide cannon fodder for the insurgency in the form of suicide bombers.

  • With the absence of zombies, room has been made for far more intelligent cannon fodder.

  • disjointed style, and made good mindless fodder for a train journey.

  • At least 60% of the dry matter in daily rations is to consist of roughage, fresh or dried fodder, or silage.

  • If it's just some tasty filling fodder you're after, try Pizza Express or Ask.

  • fodder for the farm livestock, especially cattle.

  • fodder for the cattle and to feed the pigs.

  • While she was never exactly tabloid fodder, focus inevitably shifted to her personal life.

  • Back then the overnight parcel delivery company - with its £ 40m sales and £ 5m profits - had been mere flotation fodder.

  • Scottish Dance Theater will appear with Highland, something the artistic director calls " perfect Fringe fodder " .

  • The summer season was also shorter, which meant that less crops could be grown for animal fodder to last over a longer winter.

  • In other words they're the usual teen fodder we've come to expect from genre offerings like this.

  • You'd think this would be ideal technical blog fodder wouldn't you...?

  • fodder beet in practice than existing standards allow for.

  • fodder legumes capable of enriching soil fertility.

  • fodder maize.

  • fodder crop for cattle and only began being consumed by man during times of hunger.

  • You were betrayed by your group - cannon fodder to trigger the trap they knew had been set for them.

  • Written off as relegation fodder after three successive defeats, victory over Nottingham Forest was Pool's only hope.

  • The peasantry were also called upon as canon fodder in times of war.

  • Rather than burn field stubble, farmers could mix the organic residue with nutrients to make cattle fodder.

  • You obviously have a disregard for democracy after allowing yourself to be used as lobby fodder for Tony Blair.

  • For some, the need is for a bigger hay harvest to boost winter fodder reserves.

  • free-rangefood litters the ground, fodder for free-ranging cattle.

  • In winter, some additional fodder, such as grass or alfalfa hay may be provided.

  • There is a local tradition of gathering and storing birch twigs for winter fodder, and cutting fresh holly for winter feed.

  • imbibes United Witness El Tel's Super Whites do battle, when they're not busy imbibing alcohol or dining on Italian fodder.

  • I know I know, not normal radio fodder it just happened to be on, honest john.

  • White clover has been an important constituent of fodder since the 17th century and is the most important pasture legume in Britain.

  • The rice-wheat rotation has led to the displacement of grain and fodder legumes capable of enriching soil fertility.

  • They are there to provide winter fodder for the farm livestock, especially cattle.

  • lobby fodder will not do.

  • More like out of the loop It was a bold move shunning celeb mag fodder in favor of news.

  • They are intended to monitor the long term impact of the cultivation of an AgrEvo GM fodder maize.

  • Grassland; commonly cultivated as a fodder plant and widely naturalized.

  • Three crops are involved - sugar beet, oilseed rape and fodder maize - all modified to be herbicide resistant.

  • Eleven years in the graveyard of English football a few rungs above Hackney Marshes fodder is not nearly good enough.

  • The indigenous population were easy fodder for an Armada of Portuguese sailors.

  • Basically there were plenty of naturally regenerating seedlings - farmers cut back those they did not want to develop into fodder trees.

  • bronze sickles could have been better employed to collect fodder (most probably leaf or twig foddering) for working animals, especially horses.

  • The bark is poisonous and the plant, when used for fodder, is said to produce stomatitis in animals.

  • tabloid fodder, focus inevitably shifted to her personal life.

  • wank fodder... .

  • Before this thread is over taken by guitar geek wank fodder... .

  • Horses appear to be fond of this species, and in Sweden it is stored for use as winter fodder.

  • The majority of the species of Acacia are edible and serve as reserve fodder for sheep and cattle.

  • The country to the east and south-east of the Aravallis affords a striking contrast to the sandy plains on the north-west of the range, and is blessed with fertile lands, hill-ranges and long stretches of forest, where fuel and fodder are abundant.

  • The landlord found land, labour, oxen for ploughing and working the wateringmachines, carting, threshing or other implements, seed corn, rations for the workmen and fodder for the cattle.

  • If he stole the seed, rations or fodder, the Code enacted that his fingers should be cut off.

  • Horse beans are grown, especially in the south and in the larger islands; lupines are also grown for fodder.

  • Beetroot (Beta vulgaris) is used as fodder, and yields about 10 tons per acre.

  • lettuce, endive, beet, radish, cress; cereals; and fodder plants such as lucerne and carob.

  • A variety of oil-bearing plants and green fodder, as also cotton, hemp, flax and poppies, are grown.

  • It forms excellent fodder for cattle, and is regularly gathered for that purpose.

  • In France the leaves serve as fodder.

  • Various kinds of fodder crops are grown in Transcaucasia, such as hay, rye-grass and lucerne.

  • Lupine, beans, peas and vetches were grown for fodder, and meadows, often artificially watered, supplied hay.

  • Ten years before, John Worlidge, one of his correspondents, and the author of the Systema Agriculturae (1669), observes, " Sheep fatten very well on turnips, which prove an excellent nourishment for them in hard winters when fodder is scarce; for they will not only eat the greens, but feed on the roots in the ground, and scoop them hollow even to the very skin.

  • The great losses arising from spoilt hay crops served to stimulate experimental inquiry into the method of preserving green fodder known as ensilage, with the result that the system eventually became successfully incorporated in the ordinary routine of agricultural practice.

  • The two meteorological events of the decade which will probably live longest in the recollection were, however, the terrible drought of 1893, resulting in a fodder famine in the succeeding winter, and the severe frost of ten weeks' duration at the beginning of 1895.

  • The extent to which the annual production of the leading fodder crop may vary is shown in the table by the two consecutive years 1893 and 1894; from only nine million tons in the former year the production rose to upwards of fifteen million tons in the latter, an increase of over 70%.

  • Whatever the specific rotation, there may in practice be deviations from the plan of retaining on the farm the whole of the root-crops, the straw of the grain crops and the leguminous fodder crops (clover, vetches, sainfoin, &c.) for the production of meat or milk, and, coincidently, for that of manure to be returned to the land.

  • It is the leguminous fodder crops-especially clover, which has a much more extended period of growth, and much wider range of collection within the soil and subsoil, than any of the other crops of the rotation-that yield in their produce the largest amount of nitrogen per acre.

  • The young shoots are also given to oxen in the long winters of those northern latitudes, when other green fodder is hard to obtain.

  • The Swedish army now began to suffer severely, bread and fodder running short, and the soldiers subsisting entirely on captured bullocks.

  • The outgoing must leave for the incoming tenant convenient housing and other facilities for the labours of the year following; the incoming must procure for the outgoing tenant conveniences for the consumption of his fodder and for the harvests remaining to be got in.

  • The meal, in fact, is so rich in protein that it is best utilized as a food for animals when mixed with some coarse fodder, thus furnishing a more evenly-balanced ration.

  • Most of the trade of Brielle was diverted to Hellevoetsluis by the cutting of the Voornsche Canal in 1829, but it still has some business in corn and fodder, as well as a few factories.

  • If they fall on pasture land or fodder of any kind and are eaten by any herbivorous animal, such as a hare, rabbit, horse, sheep or ox, the active embryos or larvae are set free in the alimentary canal of the new host.

  • The principal products are corn, oats, barley, potatoes, rye, beetroot, hemp, flax, hay and other fodder.

  • Besides the use of the straw when cut up and mixed with other food for fodder, the oat grain constitutes an important food for both man and beast.

  • daily and only require water every third or fourth day: in cool weather, with ample green fodder they can go twentyfive days or more without drinking.

  • Temples that had been wellnigh deserted were already beginning to be frequented, rites long intermitted were being renewed, and the trade in fodder for sacrificial victims was reviving.

  • The principal fodder crops are green barley and a tall clover called " sulla " (Hedysarum coronarum), having a beautiful purple blossom.

  • Barley-straw is considered inferior both as fodder and litter.

  • The production of fodder also declined steadily, the number of cattle fell, and the army horses were insufficiently fed.

  • Neither of these is much grown in Great Britain for the production of oil, but the "winter" variety is very extensively grown as green food for sheep. For this purpose it is generally sown at short intervals throughout the summer to provide a succession of fodder.

  • Throughout other parts bullocks are fed on pasture land, and also in stables on nourishing and succulent feed such as hay, Indian corn fodder, Indian corn silage, turnips, carrots, mangels, ground oats, barley, peas, Indian corn, rye, bran and linseed oil cake.

  • Slaughtering notably free from epizootic diseases, with a fertile D soil or the growth of fodder crops and pasture, with abundance of pure air and water, and with a plentiful supply of ice, the conditions in Canada are ideal for the dairying industry.

  • The leaves are used as fodder in northern latitudes.

  • The young shoots of the larch are sometimes given in Switzerland as fodder to cattle.

  • Its culms and leaves afford excellent fodder for cattle; and the grain, of which the yield in favourable situations is upwards of a hundredfold, is used for the same purposes as maize, rice, corn and other cereals.

  • In Germany it is occasionally raised for green fodder.

  • The measures by which the government of India chiefly endeavours to reduce the liability of the country to famine are the promotion of railways; the extension of canal and well irrigation; the reclamation of waste lands, with the establishment of fuel and fodder reserves; the introduction of agricultural improvements; the multiplication of industries; emigration; and finally the improvement where necessary of the revenue and rent systems. In times of famine the function of the railways in distributing the grain is just as important as the function of the irrigation-canals in increasing the amount grown.

  • The list consists of oxen, sheep, geese, hens, honey, ale, loaves, cheese, butter, fodder, salmon and eels.

  • After attending the Latin school of his native town, Gotthold was sent in 1741 to the famous school of St Afra at Meissen, where he made such rapid progress, especially in classics and mathematics, that, towards the end of his school, career he was described by the rector as "a steed that needed double fodder."

  • The bunts and smuts which damage our grain and fodder plants comprise about 400 species of internal parasites, found in all countries on herbaceous plants, and especially on Monocotyledons.

  • The extensive cultivation of beetroot, of potatoes for distilleries, and of fodder crops has led to the introduction of a rotation of several years instead of the former " three-fields " system; and agricultural machinery is in more general use, especially on the larger estates of the west.

  • in tropical or subtropical countries for their grain or as fodder grasses, or both, each variety of soil, from swamp to desert, having its characteristic forms.

  • In 1906 the commerce of the port, chiefly in lumber, cement, coal, cedar posts and ties, fodder and general merchandise, was valued at $3,018,894.

  • In fact such pastures are essential to the inhabitants of pastoral alpine districts, for the fodder to be obtained in the valley itself would not suffice to support the number of cattle which are required to afford sustenance to the inhabitants.

  • Rice, barley and wheat are the chief cereals cultivated, and lucerne for fodder.

  • Some hold the view that maize originated from a common Mexican fodder grass, Euchlaena mexicana, known as Teosinte, a closely allied plant which when crossed with maize yields a maize-like hybrid.

  • It can be grown in the tropics from the level of the sea to a height equal to that of the Pyrenees and in the south and middle of Europe, but it cannot be grown in England with any chance of profit, except perhaps as fodder.

  • It is also largely used for fodder and is an important article of export.

  • The amount of forage that may be produced in this way is enormous; 50,000 to 80,000 lb of green fodder are grown per acre, which makes 8000 to 12,000 lb as field-cured.

  • Lucerne and a trefoil called shaftal form important fodder crops in the western parts of the country, and, when irrigated, are said to afford ten or twelve cuttings in the season.

  • It is stored for winter use, and forms an excellent fodder.

  • It is common to cut down the green wheat and barley before the ear forms, for fodder, and the repetition of this, with barley at least, is said not to injure the grain crop. Bellew gives the following statement of the manner in which the soil is sometimes worked in the Kandahar district: - Barley is sown in November; in March and April it is twice cut for fodder; in June the grain is reaped, the ground is ploughed and manured and sown with tobacco, which yields two cuttings.

  • Their only hope lies in the introduction of fodder crops as a regular stage in the agricultural course.

  • The fodder famines that accompanied the great famines of 1897 and 1900 proved little short of disastrous to the cattle in the affected provinces.

  • In Gujarat half of its 12 million cattle perished in spite of the utmost efforts to obtain fodder.

  • In these forests every reasonable facility is afforded to the people concerned for the full and easy satisfaction of their needs, which are generally for small timber for building or fuel, fodder and grazing for their cattle, and edible products for themselves; and considerations of forest income are subordinated to those purposes.

  • Thus a shipper of cattle is not entitled to have the extra wages and provisions of his cattlemen on board, nor the extra fodder consumed by the cattle during the stay at a repairing port, made as good as G.A.

  • The native grasses are especially adapted for fodder.

  • Roughly about 48.5% of the total cultivated area is under cereals, 33.8 under fodder plants, 5.8 under root-crops, and 11.

  • The scarcity of animals, as well as the dearness of fodder, is one of the causes of the dearness of transport, and freights have risen on the most frequented roads from 3d.

  • On the Karroo are numerous ostrich farms. Lucerne is very largely grown as fodder for the cattle.

  • Among the more important productions, the potato, oca (Oxalis tuberosa), quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa) and some coarse grasses characterize the puna region, while barley, an exotic, is widely grown for fodder.

  • Theophrastus says the leaves are sweet and used for fodder for most kinds of cattle.

  • dactyloides (gama grass) extends northwards to Illinois and Connecticut; it is used for fodder and as an ornamental plant.

  • Panicum Crus-galli is a polymorphic cosmopolitan grass, which is often grown for fodder; in one form (P. frumentaceum) it is cultivated in India for its grain.

  • sanguinalis is a very widespread grass, in Bohemia it is cultivated as a food-grain; it is also the crab-grass of the southern United States, where it is used for fodder.

  • Phleum has a cylindrical spike-like inflorescence; P. pratense (timothy) is a valuable fodder grass, as also is Alopecurus pratensis (foxtail).

  • Buchloe dactyloides is the buffalo grass of the North American prairies, a valuable fodder.

  • Glyceria fluitans, manna-grass, socalled from the sweet grain, is one of the best fodder grasses for swampy meadows; the grain is an article of food in central Europe.

  • Lucerne and clover are extensively grown for fodder.

  • The hay crop of 1899 was grown on 1,095,706 acres and amounted to 1,617,905 tons, but nearly one-half of this was made from wild grasses; since then the amounts of fodder obtained from alfalfa, Kafir corn, sorghum cane and timothy have much increased, and that obtained from wild grasses has decreased; in 1909 the acreage was 900,000 and the crop 810,000 tons.

  • Grazing and fodder are not wanting, and besides the reeds peculiar to Seistan there are two grasses which merit notice - that called bannu, with which the bed of the Hamun abounds on the south and the taller and less salt kirta on the higher ground.

  • Cereals constitute the principal object of cultivation, and among these wheat ranks first, the next in imoortance beine barley, the chief fodder of horses and mules.

  • Pease straw, if not sandy, and good bright oat straw are good fodder for horses; but with barley and wheat straw, in the case of a horse, more energy is consumed during its passage through the alimentary canal than the digested straw yields.

  • His highest duty to fodder and water his horses!

  • Corn, my boy, for fodder; corn for fodder.

  • But as it turns out, just at that moment a third enemy rises before us--namely the Orthodox Russian soldiers, loudly demanding bread, meat, biscuits, fodder, and whatnot!

  • Despite their pale swollen faces and tattered uniforms, the hussars formed line for roll call, kept things in order, groomed their horses, polished their arms, brought in straw from the thatched roofs in place of fodder, and sat down to dine round the caldrons from which they rose up hungry, joking about their nasty food and their hunger.

  • "Flesh, bodies, cannon fodder!" he thought, and he looked at his own naked body and shuddered, not from cold but from a sense of disgust and horror he did not himself understand, aroused by the sight of that immense number of bodies splashing about in the dirty pond.

  • Alpatych named others, but they too, according to Dron, had no horses available: some horses were carting for the government, others were too weak, and others had died for want of fodder.

  • Well, to mention only firewood and fodder, let me inform you.

  • Three crops are involved - sugar beet, oilseed rape and fodder maize - all modified to be herbicide resistant.

  • Eleven years in the graveyard of English football a few rungs above Hackney Marshes fodder is not nearly good enough.

  • The indigenous population were easy fodder for an Armada of Portuguese sailors.

  • Basically there were plenty of naturally regenerating seedlings - farmers cut back those they did not want to develop into fodder trees.

  • Bronze sickles could have been better employed to collect fodder (most probably leaf or twig foddering) for working animals, especially horses.

  • The bark is poisonous and the plant, when used for fodder, is said to produce stomatitis in animals.

  • Before this thread is over taken by guitar geek wank fodder....

  • The British colonies also provided design fodder for furniture manufacturers and designers.

  • If you are a fan of the Spiderman comic series, then you know that the character and all of the drama and conflict he experiences present excellent fodder for the video game industry.

  • Sometimes unexpected events, like the wind blowing away your beach umbrella or your child dumping sand on her head, are great fodder for creativity.

  • Making for more tabloid fodder, Paris was burglarized five times, the first time in October 2008, by the Bling Ring, a group of Hollywood teenagers that broke into the homes of celebrities and stole their possessions.

  • Met with the pressures of fame and fortune, Spears' life quickly became tabloid fodder.

  • Following his death, she seemed constant fodder for tabloids, as she sought to claim her inheritance.

  • Since her treatment and release, Mary-Kate has been in the news for the usual celebrity gossip fodder, like who she is dating, who is dating her ex-boyfriends and who she likes to party with -- but not for any health related problems.

  • Portman's personal life is rarely tabloid fodder.

  • Kim Kardashian - Reality star and socialite Kim Kardashian used her 2007 Playboy nude photo spread as fodder for Keeping Up With the Kardashians.

  • Her engagement to actor Sacha Baron Cohen (of Borat fame) is well known, but never quite the stuff of tabloid fodder.

  • His trial became tabloid media fodder, as he continually placed blame on CBS, the Survivor production staff and others for his failure to report his winnings as income.

  • Jon isn't the only one in this marriage that is subject to tabloid fodder though.

  • Other celeb scandal fodder includes the stars committing heinous and serious crimes.

  • Cruise and Holmes have been tabloid fodder since their relationship began, often appearing with bizarre headlines in gossip magazines.

  • Pitt continually finds himself as tabloid fodder, but that doesn't stop him from delivering great movies.

  • As most celebrities have found, Roberts' personal life has become fodder for tabloids, but she seems to be able to do no wrong as far as her fans are concerned.

  • The two were popular tabloid fodder for antics such as wearing each other's blood in a vial around their necks.

  • Child actors endear viewers with their charm and ability but they tend to become tabloid fodder once they've grown up.

  • With the extent of coverage available, these celebrity deaths turn into high-profile whodunits that become fodder for water coolers around the world.

  • Of course many people are just naturally curious about this type of thing, and dates and details surrounding the death of a celebrity make for common trivia fodder.

  • Guitar for Beginners: This website has more than 100 guitar lessons, so you'll have plenty of fodder for future classes.

  • Growing your own natural produce, flower garden, or fodder for animal feed is an easy process, and it all starts with choosing non-hybrid varieties from an organic seed company.

  • A great deal of the waste generated in your kitchen makes ideal fodder for compost.

  • Plastic mulches eventually just become fodder for overcrowded landfills.

  • Suddenly, manufactured games were landfill fodder instead of coveted Christmas presents.

  • Just as Wii Sports eventually paved the way for Wii Sports Resort, it seemed that the original Nintendo exercise game would provide perfect fodder for a sequel.

  • More wind, more cannon fodder, more mountains…you name it, it's there.

  • Or, if you've picked up cannon fodder, then use your small hand cannon (isn't medieval times fun?) and blast away.

  • These can create great fodder for an expanded universe where their individual tales can be explored in greater depth.

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