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flowers

flowers Sentence Examples

  • She took the flowers and put them into a vase.

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  • One cute little fellow stole her hair-ribbon, and another tried to snatch the flowers out of her hat.

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  • Howie's total conversational contributions, if not discussing his flowers, were hovering entreaties if everyone had enough to eat or drink.

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  • She walked slowly, taking in everything from the patches of blue sky visible through the trees to the spring flowers sprinkling the forest floor.

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  • "Looking for flowers again?" he asked dryly.

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  • The flowers did not seem to give her pleasure, and she was very quiet while we stayed there.

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  • How about flowers that bloom in different colors when they are on top of land mines?

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  • Down in the lower pastures there are already some flowers in bloom.

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  • Tucked into the braids were delicate flowers that circled her head like a golden crown.

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  • "Don't worry, flowers," she murmured as she entered the elevator.

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  • "Don't worry, flowers," she murmured as she entered the elevator.

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  • Damian's wine goblet was never empty during the day, and he always had well-cared-for boots and more fresh flowers in his room than Darian.

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  • Damian's wine goblet was never empty during the day, and he always had well-cared-for boots and more fresh flowers in his room than Darian.

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  • Its cool year-round creek and rolling hills dotted with wild flowers filled her dreams at night – beckoned.

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  • She knelt beside her father's grave to place flowers, then rose and turned.

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  • In his hand was a bouquet of wild flowers, which he promptly threw to the side when he saw her on the floor.

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  • I placed flowers on her road side resting place.

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  • She'd kept the flowers around Jonny's bed as fresh as the day they arrived last week.

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  • Carmen had chosen the colors pastel violet and light gray, with the theme being hearts and the flowers being forget-me-nots.

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  • Carmen had chosen the colors pastel violet and light gray, with the theme being hearts and the flowers being forget-me-nots.

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  • "One of these wreaths." said the queen, "is made of flowers plucked from your garden.

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  • Evelyn handled it all with cheerfulness while Kiera stressed over the shade of flowers clashing with the décor, and the cake containing nuts, which Romas was allergic to.

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  • She talks forward of the spring; seeing the flowers and the young people riding on these new wheels called bicycles, but I think to myself she'll not last the winter.

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  • Still, it sure would be nice to have someone open doors, send flowers, and compliment her on a nice dress or a job well done.

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  • He wouldn't be caught dead with a bouquet of wildflowers and there was no way he was going to waste money on flowers that would wither and die within a week.

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  • There was no humidity, an ideal temperature and enough of a breeze to perfume the air with the zillion flowers recently wakened after a tough winter or per­haps just planted to welcome the approaching summer season.

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  • She remembered the flowers in his hand that day.

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  • The other is made of artificial flowers, shaped and colored by a skillful artist.

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  • In it there are numberless trees and flowers and rivers and waterfalls, and other things to make the heart glad.

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  • Teacher and I went to walk in the yard, and I learned about how flowers and trees grow.

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  • In this room it was almost dark; only two tiny lamps were burning before the icons and there was a pleasant scent of flowers and burnt pastilles.

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  • The flowers should have made her feel cheerful, but they ushered in that dark feeling instead.

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  • Cotton has pretty white and red flowers on it.

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  • Gradually winter released its grip and flowers erupted from the ground in celebration of spring.

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  • "I thought bees were attracted to flowers by sight and smell," I said.

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  • A slow waltz began playing and she closed her eyes, imagining the bright sunlight and flowers bursting from swollen buds.

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  • We gladly allowed her to use freely our library of embossed books, our collection of stuffed animals, sea-shells, models of flowers and plants, and the rest of our apparatus for instructing the blind through the sense of touch.

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  • I saw some flowers in the woods and went to look at them.

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  • The smell of the flowers alone would have kept me up.

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  • "I just wanted to pick some flowers," he said.

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  • This causes them to be drawn to those flowers in their search of pollen.

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  • Until the attack was defended and defeated, Christmas mornings, autumn leaves, spring flowers and summer picnics were no more than passing dreams.

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  • I followed about twenty lost souls up a rickety flight of stairs to a brightly lighted room, smelling of flowers and candles.

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  • Taking pity on the sad flowers, she bought a bunch before continuing on her journey home.

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  • She placed a bouquet of brightly colored flowers on the table.

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  • Jewelry, flowers, candy... any suggestions?

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  • That's probably true, but it is fun, and you find the most interesting flowers here in the woods.

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  • Many years ago, before people came to live on the earth, great trees and tall grasses and huge ferns and all the beautiful flowers cover the earth.

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  • All the love that is in our hearts comes from him, as all the light which is in the flowers comes from the sun.

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  • The flowers were still asleep.

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  • The dining room table is cherry and topped with fresh flowers in a crystal bowl.

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  • Wild flowers had become a hobby of Cynthia's since coming to Ouray County.

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  • But even when it's overcast, like today, you can get some interesting images; not so much close ups, but distance shots, with fog rolling down the valley and blankets of flowers shrouded in mist.

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  • Her gaze lingered on a small bunch of colorful flowers hugging the base of a tree.

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  • Deidre paced through the garden, not really interested in the blooming flowers, statuary or neat rows of hedges.

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  • He shivered at the taste of night-blooming flowers and the salty ocean on the cool breeze.

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  • I picked some yellow flowers to go in her hair, but she said they looked better in a vase.

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  • I was delighted to receive the flowers from home.

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  • I love the beautiful spring, because the budding trees and the blossoming flowers and the tender green leaves fill my heart with joy.

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  • The snow melted, leaving in its wake a harvest of spring flowers.

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  • Giddon swung his arm out and pointed to a patch of flowers.

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  • You'll have to show me these beautiful flowers.

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  • If he caught her in the woods, she could say she was looking for wild flowers.

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  • I was beginning to think you went out in the woods again, looking for flowers.

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  • Do you like flowers?

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  • You're doing this so the bees will be more interested in certain flowers?

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  • His features were stoic, his beautiful purple eyes the color of spring flowers.

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  • If you're half the man everyone tells me you are, you'll send Han some flowers.

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  • I feel like a criminal driving over these beautiful plants and flowers.

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  • Before they could get out of sight, Joseph Dawkins' rental Jeep pulled up below them, cutting new destruction through the flowers.

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  • Both jumped to their feet and started around the cluster of boulders where Joseph had parked only to see the tail of Joseph Dawkins' Jeep as it bumped across the blanketing wave of wild flowers.

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  • Entertained by her pep talk with the flowers, Deidre reached her towering apartment building a short time later and paused to collect the mail.

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  • She tossed her keys on the counter and set down the flowers.

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  • The scent of pine and blooming flowers was thick in the air.

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  • Carmen admired the flowers.

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  • If he were in a grave—in a cemetery somewhere—I could go there and put flowers on it.

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  • Only this time her focus spread out to other things; the arbor of forget-me-nots where they would exchange vows, the cake with its three tiers of cascading flowers.

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  • Matching flowers spilled gracefully down the smooth cake.

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  • Behind the cake was a large heart made of grape vines and forget-me-not flowers.

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  • The kitchen would smell of good food and her soft neck would be as fragrant as spring flowers.

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  • She went to the window and stared down at the flowers.

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  • For some reason, the flowers under that tree made her feel uneasy.

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  • I always wondered if it was because Dad was gone so much, or maybe because he refused to buy her flowers.

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  • Through her tears the old Oak tree stood tall, the flowers at its base waving softly in the breeze.

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  • Something white glistened in the flowers.

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  • He had placed the little box containing the tiny body in the grave and planted the flowers.

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  • He alone had watered and weeded the flowers.

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  • The sun peered over the ocean to the north while blooming apple trees sprinkled their flowers into piles in a cool sea breeze.

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  • Darian studied him a moment before his gaze went to the flowers floating from the apple trees.

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  • The colors were more intense, brighter, the air filled with the perfume of flowers.

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  • She'd been wearing pale pink, as innocent as the flowers that fell from blooming apple trees and caught in her hair.

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  • Taran stepped into a cavernous bedchamber lit by low burning hearths and scented by the white flowers sitting in each window.

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  • Wasn't that where she had seen the tiny blue flowers?

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  • She wouldn't be buried in the ethereal silks of the wealthy or have her hair inlaid with flowers and perfumes.

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  • And I hate flowers.

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  • He stared at the flowers, a sign of disorder in his otherwise sterile condo.

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  • WATER-LILY, a name somewhat vaguely given to almost any floating plant with conspicuous flowers, but applying more especially to the species of Nymphaea, Nuphar, and other members of the order Nymphaeaceae.

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  • Their flowers range from white to rose-coloured, yellow and blue.

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  • Amongst hardy species of Nymphaea now much grown are candida, nitida, odorata, pygmaea and tuberosa, all with white, more or less sweet-scented flowers; flava, yellow, and sphaerocarpa, rose-carmine.

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  • in diameter and flowers 8 to 16 in.

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  • Liszt, in after years when they had drifted apart, wrote of her: " George Sand catches her butterfly and tames it in her cage by feeding it on flowers and nectar - this is the love period.

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  • FLOWERS Imitations of natural flowers are sometimes made for scientific purposes (as the collection of glass flowers at Harvard University, which illustrates the flora of the United States), but more often as articles of decoration and ornament.

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  • They are herbaceous perennials, generally with hairy serrated leaves and handsome flowers.

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  • Suitable proportions of materials to form a rust joint are 90 parts by weight of iron borings well mixed with 2 parts of flowers of sulphur, and I part of powdered sal-ammoniac. Another joint, less rigid but sound and durable, is made with yarn and white and red lead.

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  • afar, essence), a perfume consisting of essential oil of roses, prepared by distilling, or, in some districts, by macerating the flowers.

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  • Trade is in cider, cattle, butter, flowers and fruit, and there are salmon and other fisheries.

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  • The Paseo, or public park, is distinguished for its fine trees and flowers.

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  • The natives were accustomed to suck its tubular flowers for the honey they contained.

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  • Monoecious, and bearing their male flowers in catkins, they are readily distinguished from the rest of the catkin-bearing trees by their peculiar fruit, an acorn or nut, enclosed at the base in a woody cup, formed by the consolidation of numerous involucral bracts developed beneath the fertile flower, simultaneously with a cup-like expansion of the thalamus, to which the bracteal scales are more or less adherent.

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  • The male flowers are in small clusters on the usually slender and pendent stalk, forming an interrupted catkin; the stamens vary in number, usually six to twelve.

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  • c, Female flowers of Q.

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  • - Flowers of Oak (Quercus).

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  • c d, Male flowers of Q.

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  • e, Female flowers of Q.

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  • by Sebastian Evans, 1 The Little Flowers of St Francis.

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  • p, Pistillate, s, staminate flowers; h, sterile flowers forming a circlet of stiff hairs closing the mouth of the chamber formed by the lower part of the spathe.

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  • Fragments of wood not infrequently occur, with the tissues well-preserved by impregnation with the resin; while leaves, flowers and fruits are occasionally found in marvellous perfection.

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  • Saturn for lead, Venus for copper, and Mars for iron, and the belief that the colours of flowers ' The Egyptians believed that the medicinal virtues of plants were due to the spirits who dwelt within them.

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  • Many instances might be given of appreciation of and response to other changes in the environment by the growing parts of plants; among them we may mention the opening and closing of flowers during the days of their expansion.

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  • Schinzia, which forms galllike swellings on the roots of rushes; Gymnosporangium, causing excrescences on juniper stems; numerous leaf Fungi such as Puccinia, Aecidium, Sep/one, &c., causing yellow, brown or black spots on leaves; or Ustilago in the anthers of certain flowers.

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  • double flowers, phyllody of floral parts, contortions and fascinations, dwarfing, malformed leaves, &c.can not only be transmitted in cultivation, but occur ii.

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  • In many cases, however, monstrosities of flowers have been shown to be due to the irritating action of minute insects or Fungi, and others are known which, although induced by causes unknown to us, and regarded as internal, would not be likely to survive in the wild condition.

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  • The pollination, of flowers and the dispersal of seeds by various animals are biological factors; but pollination and dispersal by the wind cannot be so regarded.

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  • In the case of aquatic plants with aerial flowers, the latter obey the ordinary laws of pollination.

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  • Chromoplasts are the yellow, orange or red color-bodies found in some flowers and fruits.

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  • Tamus communis, Asparagus, Lonscera, berries of Solaneae, flowers of Cacalici coccinea, Tropaeolum.

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  • The colors of flowers are due to coloring matters contained in the sap of which the chief is anthocyanin.

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  • Moreover there is the fact that the flowers of nearly all the primitive phanerogams, such as the Gymnosperms, consist solely of sporophylls, having no perianth.

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  • It is also probable that the various forms of the angiospermous flower, with its many specialized mechanisms for pollination, may be the result of insect-visits, the flowers becoming adapted to certain kinds of insects, and the insects having undergone corresponding modification.

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  • He considered, for instance, that stems, leaves, roots and flowers differ as they do because the plastic substances entering into their structure are diverse.

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  • The town is a trading centre of some importance, and in the surrounding district are large sheep and ostrich farms. The neighbourhood is noted for its abundance of everlasting flowers.

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  • It has pale-purple flowers, rarely more than three in number; the perianth is funnel-shaped, and produced below into a long slender tube, in the upper part of which the six stamens are inserted.

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  • A smaller corm is then formed from the old one, close to its root; and this in September and October produces the crocus-like flowers.

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  • Amaryllidaceae) of bulbous plants with rather broad leaves and a solid leafless stem, bearing a cluster of handsome white or red funnel-shaped regular flowers.

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  • In the plains below, the swards are gay with the scarlet and white verbena and other brilliant wild flowers.

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  • The next following instalments of vapour, getting diffused throughout a large mass of relatively cold gas, condense into a kind of "snow," known in commerce and valued as "flowers of sulphur" (fibres sulphuris).

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  • By conducting the distillation slowly, so that the temperature within the chamber remains at a sufficiently low degree, it is possible to obtain the whole of the product in the form of "flowers."

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  • One part of quicklime is slaked with 6 parts of water, and the paste produced diluted with 24 parts of water; 2.3 parts of flowers of sulphur are added; and the whole is boiled for about an hour or longer, when the sulphur dissolves.

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  • Sulphur sesquioxide, S203, is formed by adding well-dried flowers of sulphur to melted sulphur trioxide at about 12-15° C. The sulphur dissolves in the form of blue drops which sink in the liquid and finally solidify in blue-green crystalline crusts.

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  • This salt may be prepared by digesting flowers of sulphur with sodium sulphite solution or by boiling sulphur with milk of lime.

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  • Those contained in the British Pharmacopoeia are the following: (1) Sulphur sublimatum, flowers of sulphur (U.S.P.), which is insoluble in water.

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  • FLORA, in Roman mythology, goddess of spring-time and flowers, later identified with the Greek Chloris.

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  • In art Flora was represented as a beautiful maiden, bedecked with flowers (Ovid, Fasti, v.

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  • Ground orchids and tree orchids are well represented; Polystachya liberica, an epiphytic orchid with sprays of exquisite small flowers of purple and gold, might well be introduced into horticulture for its beauty.

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  • in height, with rose-coloured flowers nearly i in.

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  • long; there are other orchids of fantastic design in their green and white flowers, some of which have spurs (r ectaries) nearly 7 in.

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  • Many trees offer magnificent displays of flowers at certain seasons of the year; perhaps the loveliest effect is derived from the bushes and trailing creepers of the Combretum genus, which, during the "winter" months from December to March, cover the scrub and the forest with mantles of rose colour.

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  • The flowers appear with the leaves in April and May.

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  • The attributes of Demeter are chiefly connected with her character as goddess of agriculture and vegetation - ears of corn, the poppy, the mystic basket (calathus) filled with flowers, corn and fruit of all kinds, the pomegranate being especially common.

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  • Flowers.

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  • On the dome-like tops of such mountains as are too high for trees are large clusters of rhododendrons and patches of grasses fringed with flowers.

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  • Honey forms the staple nourishment of many ants, some of the workers seeking nectar from flowers, working it up into honey within their stomachs and regurgitating it so as to feed their comrades within the nest, who, in their turn, pass it on to the grubs.

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  • The conformation of those flowers a consists essentially in the pres- ' 'A B ence of a six-parted perianth, the three outer segments of which correspond to a calyx, the three inner ones to a corolla.

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  • Other common modifications arise from the union of certain parts of the perianth to each other, and from the varied and often very remarkable outgrowths from the lip. These modifications are associated with the structure and habits of insects and their visits to the flowers.

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  • In some cases, as in Catasetum, male flowers are produced so different from the female that before the different flowers had been found on the same pike, and before the facts of the case were fully known, they were taken to be representatives of distinct genera.

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  • It contains two small genera of tropical Asia and Africa with almost regular flowers, and the large genus Cypripedium containing about 80 species in the north-temperate zone and tropical Asia and America.

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  • Masderallia is common in cultivation and has often brilliant scarlet, crimson or orange flowers.

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  • The jointed leaves are fleshy or leathery; the flowers are generally large with a well-developed lip.

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  • Catasetinae, with three tropical American genera, two of which, Cataselurn and Cycnoches, have dior tri-morphic flowers.

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  • They are cultivated for their strange-looking flowers.

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  • Dendrobiinae, with six genera in the warmer parts of the Old World; the chief is Dendrobium, with 300 species, often with showy flowers.

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  • The young involucre surrounds the female flower and the stalk supporting the spike of male flowers, and when ripe has the appearance of bluish-white porcelain.

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  • Shrubbery graced its area and flowers its window-sills.

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  • - (Residence at the Court of London, p. 286.) Bentham's love of flowers and music, of green foliage and shaded walks, comes clearly out in this pleasant picture of his home life and social surroundings.

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  • On the Thursday before Easter a special church service is celebrated, and the wells are beautifully ornamented with flowers, prayers being offered at each.

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  • The appearance of the tree - the bark, the foliage, the flowers - is, however, usually quite characteristic in the two species.

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  • For new varieties the flowers should be fertilized with a view to combine, in the seedlings which result from the union, the desirable qualities of the parents.

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  • As she was gathering flowers with her playmates in a meadow, the earth opened and Pluto, god of the dead, appeared and carried her off to be his queen in the world below.

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  • One of the things that he looked forward to during his last journey to Avignon was seeing the spring flowers and completing a flora of the locality.

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  • Male Flowers.

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  • 130) dealing with his fatal mistake in not dismembering Austria after Wagram, and in marrying an Austrian princess - "There I stepped on to an abyss covered with flowers"; or that again (iii.

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  • In the case of the common drone-fly, Eristalis tenax, the individual, from a sedentary maggot living in filth, without any relations of sex, and with only unimportant organs for the ingestion of its foul nutriment, changes to a creature of extreme alertness, with magnificent powers of flight, living on the products of the flowers it frequents, and endowed with highly complex sexual structures.

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  • It may eat roots or refuse, while the imago lives on leaves and flowers.

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  • Buttercups, violets, anemones, spring beauties, trilliums, arbutus, orchids, columbine, laurel, honeysuckle, golden rod and asters are common wild flowers, and of ferns there are many varieties.

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  • Many Thomisidae lurk amongst the stamens and petals of flowers, which they closely match in colour, waiting to seize the insects which visit the blossoms for nectar.

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  • Seeds covered with long hairs only, flowers yellow, turning to red.

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  • Flowers yellow or white, turning to red.

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  • Flowers white.

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  • Flowers yellow.

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  • Flowers purple or red.

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  • The first flowers usually appear in June, and the bolls ripen from early in August.

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  • Flowering and fruiting go on continually, although in diminishing degree, until the advent of frost, which kills the flowers and young bolls and so puts an end to the production of cotton for the season.

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  • The flowers, which are borne in the leaf-axils at the ends of the stem, are very handsome, the six, generally narrow, petals are bent back and stand erect, and are a rich orange yellow or red in colour; the six stamens project more or less horizontally from the place of insertion of the petals.

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  • From the name of the day in the calendar, Pascua Florida, or from the fact that many flowers were found on the coast, the country was named Florida.

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  • Great quantities of early potatoes and vegetables, together with flowers and fish, are sent to London and elsewhere.

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  • Sometimes she wears a garland of flowers on her head, ears of corn and poppy-heads in her hand, symbolical of a prosperous harvest.

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  • He determined to make the pilgrimage to Jerusalem and to practise all the austerities that he read of in The Flowers of the Saints.

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  • Travellers are especially struck with the beauty of some of the wild flowers, more especially with the lilies and convolvuluses; and European greenhouses have been enriched by several Formosan orchids and other ornamental plants.

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  • Their forms are not ungraceful, and many of them are covered over with beautiful and elaborate carvings of flowers, animals and palm branches.

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  • The Hindus are fond of painting the outside of their houses a deep red colour, and of covering the most conspicuous parts with pictures of flowers, men, women, bulls, elephants and gods and goddesses in all the many forms known in Hindu mythology.

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  • It has been regarded as a survival of the Roman Floralia, but its origin is believed by some to be Celtic. Flowers and branches were gathered, and dancing took place in the streets and through the houses, all being thrown open, while a pageant was also given and a special ancient folk-song chanted.

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  • A characteristic feature is the one-sided (dorsiventral) inflorescence, well illustrated in forget-me-not and other species of Myosotis; the cyme is at first closely coiled, becoming uncoiled as the flowers open.

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  • At the same time there is often a change in colour in the flowers, which are red in bud, becoming blue as they expand, as in Myosotis, Echium, Symphytum and others.

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  • The flowers are generally regular; the form of the corolla varies widely.

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  • The flowers show well-marked adaptation to their color and attract insects.

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  • ==Flora== In central and northern Alberta the opening spring brings in the prairie anemone, the avens and other early flowers.

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  • The advancing summer introduces many flowers of the sunflower family, until in August the plains are one blaze of yellow and purple.

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  • The flowers are regular as in Viburnum Flowering shoot of Lonicera Caprifolium, slightly reduced.

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  • In Sambucus and Viburnum the small white flowers are massed in heads; honey is secreted at the base of the styles and, the tube of the flower being very short, is exposed to the visits of flies and insects with short probosces.

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  • The flowers of Lonicera, which have a long tube, open in the evening, when they are sweet-scented and are visited by hawk-moths.

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  • Several genera afford ornamental plants; such are Lonicera, erect shrubs or twiners with long-tubed white, yellow or red flowers; Symphoricarpus, a North American shrub, with small whitish pendulous flowers and white berries; Diervilla (also known as Weigelia), and Viburnum, including V.

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  • Opulus, guelder rose, in the cultivated forms of which the corolla has become enlarged at the expense of the essential organs and the flowers are neuter.

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  • As offerings meat, milk, show-bread, fruits, flowers and consecrated water were used.

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  • It is convenient to place in a small envelope gummed to an upper corner of the sheet any flowers, seeds or leaves needed for dissection or microscopical examination, especially where from the fixation of the specimen it is impossible to examine the leaves for oilreceptacles and where seed is apt to escape from ripe capsules and be lost.

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  • To preserve the colour of flowers pledgets of cotton wool, which prevent bruising, should be introduced between them, as also, if the stamens are thick and succulent, as in Digitalis, between these and the corolla.

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  • By the last two methods the colour of the flowers may be well preserved.

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  • The range of temperature is not sufficient to give the variety of annual wild flowers of more northern climates; nevertheless flowers cover the bottom lands and uplands in great profusion.

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  • The royal pinon (Erytlrrina velatina) is remarkable for the magnificent purple flowers that cover it.

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  • He was in truth the Sicilian bee, and, plucking the flowers of the prophetic and apostolic meadow, he produced a wonderfully pure knowledge in the souls of the listeners."

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  • In general terms the peach may be said to be a medium-sized tree, with lanceolate, stipulate leaves, borne on long, slender, relatively unbranched shoots, and with the flowers arranged singly, or in groups of two or more, at intervals along the shoots of the previous year's growth.

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  • The flowers have a hollow tube at the base bearing at its free edge five sepals, an equal number of petals, usually concave or spoon-shaped, pink or white, and a great number of stamens.

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  • The flowers spring in branching spadices from the axils of the leaves, and as the trees are unisexual it is necessary in cultivation to fertilize the female flowers by artificial means.

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  • The flowers are usually pale green.

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  • 1, branch their vitality well, have with flowers (6 nat.

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  • milk, which is acid, is coagulated by 1, leaf; 2, twig with the addition of the alkaline juice of male flowers; 3, twig the ' ` achete " plant, or of another with female flowers; plant called " coasso."

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  • The flowers are yellow, and the seeds enclosed in a pod are long and thin with numerous long silky fibres attached to them, which enable the seeds to be readily carried by the wind.

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  • 1, twig with flowers (4 nat.

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  • I, twig with flowers (8 nat.

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  • The flowers are arranged in racemes without bracts; during the life of the flower its stalk continues to grow so that the open flowers of an inflorescence stand on a level (that is, are corymbose).

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  • The flowers are regular, with four free sepals arranged in two pairs at right angles, four petals arranged crosswise in one series, and two sets of stamens, an outer with two members and an inner with four, in two pairs placed in the middle line of the flower and at right angles to the outer series.

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  • platform of planks pierced with fine holes, on which a bull, magnificent with flowers and gold, is slain.

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  • In spring the traveller crosses a sea of grass above which the flowers of the paeony, aconite, Orobus, Carallic, Saussurea and the like wave 4 or 5 ft.

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  • The rooms and the drinking vessels in them were adorned with spring flowers, as were also the children over three years of age.

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  • The flowers, which are solitary, or rarely in pairs, at the end of slender axillary flower-stalks, are very irregular in form, with five sepals prolonged at the base, and five petals, the lowest one larger than the others and with a spur, in which collects the honey secreted by the spurs of the two adjoining stamens.

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  • The anthers are so situated that the pollen on escaping comes into contact with the stigma; in such flowers self-fertilization is compulsory and very effectual, as seeds in profusion are produced.

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  • pallida plena) is a form with very sweet-scented, double, pale lavender flowers; var.

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  • sulphurea has shining deep green leaves and lemon-yellow flowers, deeper yellow in the centre, and with a pale-violet spur.

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  • altaica, flowers yellow or FIG.

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  • high with small yellow flowers, the large petal being streaked with black; V.

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  • calcarata, flowers light blue or white, or yellow in var.

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  • cornuta, flowers pale blue - there are a few good varieties of this, including one with white flowers; V.

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  • cucullata, a free-flowering American species with violet-blue or purple flowers; V.

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  • Munbyana, a native of Algeria, with large violet or yellow flowers; V.

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  • pedata, the bird's-foot violet, with pedately divided leaves and usually bright blue flowers; V.

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  • rothomagensis, a native of western Europe, with flowers bright blue striped with black, and sometimes called the Rouen violet; and V.

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  • suavis, a native of Asia Minor, the Russian violet, with pale-blue sweet-scented flowers.

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  • They are handsome plants, the tall stem being crowned by racemes of showy flowers.

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  • Many species of aconite are cultivated in gardens, some having blue and others yellow flowers.

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  • Tofieldia, an arctic and alpine genus of small herbs with a slender scape springing from a tuft of narrow ensiform leaves and bearing a raceme of small green flowers; Narthecium (bog-asphodel), herbs with a habit similar to Tofieldia, but with larger golden-yellow flowers; and Colchicum, a genus with about 30 species including b the meadow saffron or autumn crocus (C. autumnale).

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  • 3, 4: and persists after the flowers and leaves, bearing next season's plant as a lateral shoot in the axil of a scale-leaf at its base.

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  • Gloriosa, well known in cultivation, climbs by means of its tendril-like leaftips; it has handsome flowers with decurved orange-red or yellow petals; it is a native of tropical Asia and Africa.

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  • The flowers are borne in a terminal raceme, the anthers open introrsely and the fruit is a capsule, very rarely, as in Dianella, a berry.

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  • Anthericum and Chlorophytum, herbs with radical often grass-like leaves and scapes bearing a more or less branched inflorescence of small generally white flowers, are widely spread in the tropics.

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  • A small group of Australian genera closely approach the order Juncaceae in having small crowded flowers with a scarious or membranous perianth; they include Xanthorrhoea (grass-tree or blackboy) and Kingia, arborescent plants with an erect woody stem crowned with a tuft of long stiff narrow leaves, from the centre of which rises a tall dense flower spike or a number of stalked flower-heads; this group has been included in Juncaceae, from which it is doubtfully distinguished only by the absence of the long twisted stigmas which characterize the true rushes.

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  • There is a close relation between the pollination of many yuccas and the life of a moth (Pronuba yuccasella); the flowers are open and scented at night when the female moth becomes active, first collecting a load of pollen and then depositing her eggs, generally in a different flower from that which has supplied the pollen.

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  • b, b', Flowers.

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  • Young corm produced from k', in autumn, which in succeeding autumn will produce flowers.

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  • evergreen shrub with flattened leaf-like cladodes, native in the southerly portion of England and Wales; the small flowers are unisexual and borne on the face of the cladode; the male contains three stamens, the filaments of which are united to form a short stout column on which are seated the diverging cells of the anthers; in the female the ovary is enveloped by a fleshy staminal tube on which are borne three barren anthers.

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  • 7), so called from the seal-like scars on the rhizome of stems of previous seasons, the hanging flowers of which contain no honey, but are visited by bees for the pollen.

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  • Convallaria is lily of the valley; Aspidistra, native of the Himalayas, China and Japan, is a well-known pot plant; its flowers depart from the normal arrangement of the order in having the parts From Strasburger's Lehrbuch der Botanik, by permission of in fours (tetraGustav Fischer.

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  • poly :merous flowers w, Roots.

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  • terminating the short annual shoot which bears a whorl of four or more leaves below the flower; in this and in some species of the nearly allied genus Trillium (chiefly temperate North America) the flowers have a fetid smell, which together with the dark purple of the ovary and stigmas and frequently also of the stamens and petals, attracts carrion-loving flies, which alight on the stigma and then climb the anthers and become dusted with pollen; the pollen is then carried to the stigmas of another flower.

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  • Lapageria, a native of Chile, is a favourite greenhouse climber with fine bell-shaped flowers.

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  • Smilacoideae are climbing shrubs with broad net-veined leaves and small dioecious flowers in umbels springing from the leaf-axils; the fruit is a berry.

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  • The tribe Smilacoideae, shrubby climbers with net-veined leaves and small unisexual flowers, bears much the same relationship to the order as a whole as does the order Dioscoreaceae, which have a similar habit, but flowers with am inferior ovary, to the Amaryllidaceae.

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  • Of this smallest of birds there are fifty-nine well-known species, divided into two groups, the Phaethorninae, which prefer the forest shade and live on insects, and the Trochilinae, which frequent open sunny places where flowers are to be found.

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  • There are still, however, in the coast belt woods of leguminous evergreens bearing bright-coloured flowers.

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  • in height and include the knob-thorn, water-boom, kafir-boom (with brilliant scarlet flowers), the Cape chestnut and milkwoods (Mimusops).

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  • It has dull pink flowers, succeeded by seed vessels, each of which is crowned by two scarlet-coloured leafy lobes.

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  • Flowers which bloom in the early spring are abundant, especially on the edges of forests.

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  • As a rule flowers common to all zones are on the coast smaller and with paler colours than they are in the midlands.

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  • Aloes are common; in part of the midland zone they form when in bloom with abundance of orange and scarlet flowers a most picturesque sight.

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  • Climbing plants with gorgeous flowers are common, and there are numerous species of Compositae and about a hundred cinchonaceous plants.

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  • It serves for the thatching of roofs, for a papermaking material, for ornamenting small surfaces as a "strawmosaic," for plaiting into door and table mats, mattresses, &c., and for weaving and plaiting into light baskets, artificial flowers, &c. These applications, however, are insignificant in comparison with the place occupied by straw as a raw material for the straw bonnets and hats worn by both sexes.

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  • The neighbourhood was then healthy, highly cultivated, and celebrated for its flowers; the "twice blooming roses of Paestum" are mentioned by Virgil (Geor.

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  • The most characteristic members of the order are twining plants with generally smooth heart-shaped leaves and large showy white or purple flowers, as, for instance, the greater bindweed of English hedges, Calystegia sepium, and many species of the genus Ipomaea, the largest of the order, including the "convolvulus major" of gardens, and morning glory.

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  • One of the commonest tropical weeds, Evolvulus alsinoides, has slender, long-trailing stems with small leaves and flowers.

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  • In hot dry districts such as Arabia and north-east tropical Africa, genera have been developed with a low, much-branched, dense, shrubby habit, with small hairy leaves and very small flowers.

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  • The large showy flowers are visited by insects for the honey which is secreted by a ring-like disk below the ovary; large Convolvulus sepium, slightly reduced.

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  • The plants are hardy herbaceous perennials with narrow tufted radical leaves and an elongated stem bearing a handsome spike of white or yellow flowers.

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  • fistulosus have white flowers and grow from 12 to 2 ft.

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  • ramosus is a larger plant, the large white flowers of which have a reddishbrown line in the middle of each segment.

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  • Bog-asphodel (Narthecium ossifragum), a member of the same family, is a small herb common in boggy places in Britain, with rigid narrow radical leaves and a stem bearing a raceme of small golden yellow flowers.

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  • Its general connexion with death is due no doubt to the greyish colour of its leaves and its yellowish flowers, which suggest the gloom of the underworld and the pallor of death.

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  • A large yellow tulip (Homerica pallida) is one of the most abundant flowers on moist vlei lands on the high veld and is occasionally met with in the low veld; slangkop (Urginea Burkei) with red bulbs like a beetroot is a low bush plant apparently restricted to the Transvaal and adjacent Portuguese territory.

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  • male figures wear not only a wreath or corona proper, but also a garland of flowers hung round the neck.

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  • The flowers are gathered at the end of October, in the early morning, just when they are beginning to open after the night.

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  • The small inconspicuous flowers are generally more or less crowded in terminal or lateral clusters, the form of the inflorescence varying widely according to the manner of branching and the length of the pedicels.

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  • The flowers are hermaphrodite and regular, with the same number and arrangement of parts as in the order Liliaceae, from which they differ in the inconspicuous membranous character of the perianth, the absence of honey or smell, and the brushlike stigmas with long papillae-adaptations to wind-pollination as contrasted with the methods of pollination by insect agency, which characterize the Liliaceae.

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  • INCENSE, 'the perfume (fumigation) arising from certain resins and gum-resins, barks, woods, dried flowers, fruits and seeds, when burnt, and also the substances so burnt.

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  • From Meroe to Memphis the commonest subject carved or painted in the interiors of the temples is that of some contemporary Phrah or Pharaoh worshipping the presiding deity with oblations of gold and silver vessels, rich vestments, gems, the firstlings of the flock and herd, cakes, fruits, flowers, wine, anointing oil and incense.

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  • The grateful perfumed powder abir or rand y is composed either of rice, flour, mango bark or deodar wood, camphor and aniseed, or of sandalwood or wood aloes, and zerumbet, zedoary, rose flowers, camphor and civet.

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  • 13) gives distinct expression to his sense of the needlessness of any such ritual ("the Creator and Father of the universe does not require blood, nor smoke, nor even the sweet smell of flowers and incense"); and Arnobius (Adv.

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  • In the East End and other poor quarters a large trade in second-hand clothing, flowers and vegetables, and many other commodities is carried on in the streets on movable stalls by costermongers and hawkers.

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  • The markets thus controlled are: Central Markets, Smithfield, for meat, poultry, provisions, fruit, vegetables, flowers and fish.

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  • Spitalfields Market (fruit, vegetables and flowers).

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  • Covent Garden, the great mart in the west of London for flowers, fruit and vegetables, is in the hands of private owners.

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  • In 1613 The Masque of Flowers was presented by the members of Gray's Inn in the Old Banqueting House in honour of the marriage of the infamous Carr, earl of Somerset, and the equally infamous Lady Frances, daughter of the earl of Suffolk.

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  • This is illustrated in the "harbinger of spring," a name given to a small plant belonging to the Umbelliferae, which has a tuberous root, and small white flowers; it is found in the central states of North America, and blossoms in March.

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  • Orchids are among the common flowers.

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  • Engraved flowers, views and devices are often combined with decorative cutting.

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  • They are freegrowing shrubs with showy bell-shaped flowers, and are favourite greenhouse plants.

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  • Shoots, flowers and berries form the food of the indri, which was first discovered by the French traveller and naturalist Pierre Sonnerat in 1780.

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  • The gardens and fields produce an abundance of flowers, which justify the city's title of la cittd dei fiori.

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  • The small yellow flowers are borne in compound umbels.

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  • .The flowers are small, green and fragrant, and are arranged in dense clusters.

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  • Exclusively female flowers without stamens do not appear to have been observed.

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  • Seedling plants from the cultivated vines often produce unisexual flowers, thus reverting to the feral type.

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  • If the bunches are too numerous they must be thinned before the flowers expand, and the berries also must be properly thinned out and regulated as soon as they are well set, care being taken, in avoiding overcrowding, that the bunches be not made too thin and loose.

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  • The means which have proved most efficacious, both as a remedy and a preventive of this disease, is to scatter flowers of sulphur over mthe vines, before the morning dew has evaporated.

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  • Massee recommends that the shoots should be dredged with flowers of sulphur at intervals of ten days, while the disease continues to spread, a small quantity of quicklime in a finely powdered con FIG.

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  • It has large compound leaves composed of four or five pairs, with a terminal odd one, of short-stalked, oblong, blunt, leathery leaflets, and inconspicuous green flowers.

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  • Simarubaceae, but is readily distinguished by its large handsome red flowers arranged in terminal clusters.

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  • The small flowers or spikelets are borne in pairs on the ultimate branches of a much branched feathery plume-like terminal grey inflorescence, 2 ft.

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  • Production of flowers is uncertain under cultivation and seed is formed very rarely.

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  • rustica, a smaller plant with a much-branched stem and greenish-yellow flowers with a short, broad tube.

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  • The tobacco flower is fortunately perfectly self-fertile, and by enclosing the flowers of selected plants in paper bags, so as to exclude all possibility of hybridization, progeny true to the type of the mother plant can be obtained.

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  • The flowers are unisexual and monoecious, the numerous males borne in thick catkins proceeding from the side of last year's shoot.

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  • The female flowers are solitary or few in number, and borne on Short terminal spikes of the present season's growth.

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  • The receptacle is, in consequence, extended more or less horizontally so that the flowers appear to be placed on the upper surface of horizontally spreading stalks.

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  • There is usually no trace of ovary in the male flowers, though by exception one may occasionally be formed.

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  • The inflorescence is a very simple one, consisting of one or two male flowers each comprising a single stamen, and a female flower comprising a flask-shaped pistil.

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  • male flowers each of one (2, 3, 4 enlarged.) is regarded as representing a very reduced type nearly allied to the Aroids.

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  • At night it crawls about in search of food, which consists to a small extent of dead animal or vegetable matter, but principally, as gardeners are aware, of the petals and other parts of flowers of growing shoots and soft ripe fruit.

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  • The plants are bulbous herbs, with flat or rounded radical leaves, and a central naked or leafy stem, bearing a head or umbel of small flowers, with a spreading or bell-shaped white, pink, red, yellow or blue perianth.

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  • Moly, an old garden plant with bright yellow flowers, and A.

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  • On the rocky hill-sides in Yemen the Adenium Obesum is worthy of notice, with its enormous bulb-like stems and brilliant red flowers.

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  • The earlier stones are devoid of ornamentation, but the later stones and bronzes are sometimes ornamented with designs of leaves, flowers, ox-heads, men and women.

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  • The jalap plant has slender herbaceous twining stems, with alternately placed heart-shaped pointed leaves and salver-shaped deep purplish-pink flowers.

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  • It has fine gardens, and its flowers and palms are especially famous: the former are largely exported, while the latter serve for the supply of palm branches for St Peter's at Rome and other churches on Palm Sunday.

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  • The male and female flowers grow on the same tree, but are separate.

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  • The flowers are large and white, and are succeeded by very large globose fruits like oranges, but paler in colour, and with a more pungent flavour.

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  • The wild flowers of the north of Tunisia are so extremely beautiful during the months of February, March and April as to constitute a distinct attraction in themselves.2 1 See L.

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  • But, when the mists set in, the low hills near the coast bordering the deserts, which are called lomas, undergo a change as if by magic. A blooming vegetation of wild flowers for a short time covers the barren hills.

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  • The other flowers of the lonaas are the papita de San Juan (Begonia geranifolia), with red petals contrasting with the white inner sides, valerians, the beautiful Bomarea ovata, several species of Oxalis, Solanum and crucifers.

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  • But this carpet of flowers is very partially distributed and lasts but a short time.

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  • Among the first wild shrubs and trees that are met with are the chilca (Baccharis Feuillei), with a pretty yellow flower, the Mutisia acuminata, with beautiful red and orange flowers, several species of Senecio, calceolarias, the Schinus molle, with its graceful branches and bunches of red berries, and at higher elevations the lambras (Alnus acuminata), the sauco (Sambucus peruviana), the quenuar (Buddleia incana), and the Polylepis racemosa.

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  • With the cinchona trees grow many kinds of melastomaceae, especially the Lasiandra, with masses of purple flowers, tree-ferns and palms. In the warm valleys there are large plantations of coca (Erythroxylon Coca), the annual produce of which is stated at 15,000,000 lb.

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  • The other industrial products include wall-paper, railway plant, machinery, gloves and artificial flowers.

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  • This grows to a height of about 3 ft., the lower part of the stoutish stem being furnished with leaves, while near the top is developed a crown of large pendant flowers surmounted by a tuft of bright green leaves like those of the lower part of the stem, only smaller.

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  • The flowers are bell-shaped, yellow or red, and in some of the forms double.

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  • It flowers in April or early in May.

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  • In a fragment of autobiography printed in the Athenaeum (12th of January 1850) he says that he was entirely self-taught, and attributes his poetic development to long country walks undertaken in search of wild flowers, and to a collection of books, including the works of Young, Barrow, Shenstone and Milton, bequeathed to his father by a poor clergyman.

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  • On the 16th of the month Maimacterion, a long procession, headed by a trumpeter playing a warlike air, set out for the graves; wagons decked with myrtle and garlands of flowers followed, young men (who must be of free birth) carried jars of wine, milk, oil and perfumes; next came the black bull destined for the sacrifice, the rear being brought up by the archon, who wore the purple robe of the general, a naked sword in one hand, in the other an urn.

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  • It was with the aid of these youthful enthusiasts that Savonarola arranged the religious carnival of 1496, when the citizens gave their costliest possessions in alms to the poor, and tonsured monks, crowned with flowers, sang lauds and performed wild dances for the glory of God.

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  • Among the other manufactures are food preparations, wooden ware, wagons and carriages, stoves and furnaces, boots and shoes, tobacco and cigars, flour, candy, gloves, bricks, tile and pottery, furniture, paper boxes and firearms. Utica is a shipping point for the products of a fertile agricultural region, from which are exported dairy products (especially cheese), nursery products, flowers (especially roses), small fruits and vegetables, honey and hops.

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  • The plants have long narrow leaves springing from the bulb and a central scape bearing one or more generally large, white or yellow, drooping or inclined flowers, which are enveloped before opening in a membranous spathe.

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  • The flowers are regular, with a perianth springing from above the ovary, tubular below, with spreading segments and a central corona; the six stamens are inserted within the tube.

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  • - Flowers of Narcissus base of the flower-segments.

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  • The most probable supposition is that the cup is simply an excrescence or "enation" from the mouth of the flower-tube, and is connected with the fertilization of the flowers by insect agency.

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  • in height, and have grassy foliage and yellow or white flowers.

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  • Bulbocodium, which has comparatively large bright yellow flowers; N.

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  • The flowers are large, yellow, scented and a little drooping, with a corolla deeply cleft into six lobes and a bell-shaped corona which is crisped at the margin; they appear in March or April.

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  • cyclamineus is a pretty dwarf subspecies, native of Portugal, with narrow linear leaves and drooping flowers with reflexed lemon-yellow segments and an orange-yellow corona N.

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  • broad and bright lemon-yellow flowers 2-21 in.

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  • long; maximus is a closely-related but still finer form; obvallaris (the Tenby daffodil) is an early form with uniformly yellow flowers.

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  • incomparabilis, one of which, with large, double flowers, is known as butter-and-eggs; N.

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  • odorus, known as the campernelle jonquil, has two to four uniform bright yellow flowers, and is considered a hybrid between N.

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  • A form with sweet-scented double flowers is known as Queen Ann's jonquil; N.

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  • juncifolius, a graceful little plant from Spain, Portugal and south France, has one to four small bright yellow flowers on each scape.

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  • triandrus - Ganymede's Cup - is a pretty little species with white flowers about i in.

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  • long; in several of its varieties the flowers are a pale or deeper yellow; they make attractive pot plants.

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  • The polyanthus or bunch narcissi form another well-marked group, whose peculiarity of producing many flowers on the stem is indicated by the name.

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  • They admit of being forced into early bloom, like the hyacinth and tulip. They vary with a white, creamy or yellow perianth, and a yellow, lemon, primrose or white cup or coronet; and, being richly fragrant, they are general favourites amongst spring flowers.

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  • Many tons of these flowers are exported from the Scilly Isles to the London markets in spring.

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  • Jonquilla, with yellow flowers, a native of south Europe and Algeria, of which there are single and double flowered varieties, is also grown in pots for early flowering, but does well outside in a warm border.

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  • Foreigners visiting Japan are immediately struck by the affection of the people for flowers, trees and natural beauties of every kind.

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  • Spring is supposed to begin in February when, according to the old calendar, the new year sets in, but th only flowers then in bloom are the camellia japonsca and some kinds of daphne.

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  • Queen of spring flowers is the plun (ume).

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  • Scarcely has the cherry season passed when that of the wistaria (fuji) comes, followed by the azalea(tsutsuji) and the iris (shibu), the last being almost contemporaneous with the peony (botan), which is regarded by many Japan se as the king of flowers and is cultivated assiduously.

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  • With the exception of the dog-days and the dead of winter, there is no season when flowers cease to be an object of attention to the Japanese, nor does any class fail to participate in the sentiment.

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  • Flowers are cultivated, but for their own sakes, not as a feature of the Jandscape garden.

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  • Forests of cherry-trees, plumtrees, magnolia trees, or hiyaku-jikko (Lagerstroemia indica), banks of azalea, clumps of hydrangea, groups of camelliasuch have their permanent places and their foliage adds notes of color when their flowers have fallen.

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  • Besides, the flowers are curiously wanting in fragrance.

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  • The influence of politics may be strongly traced in the literature of that time, for the first romances produced by the new school were all of a political character: Keikoku Bidan (Model for Statesmen, with Epaminondas for hero) by Yano Fumin; Seichubai(Plum-blossomsin snow) andKwakwan-o(Nightingale Among Flowers) by Suyehiro.

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  • Thus though neither botanically nor ornithologically correct, their flowers and their birds show a ttuth to nature, and a habit of minute observation in the artist, which cannot be too much admired.

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  • A special feature of their art is that, while often closely and minutely imitating natural objects, such as birds, flowers and fishes, the especial objects of their predilection and study, they frequently combine the facts of external nature with a conventional mode of treatment better suited to their purpose.

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  • The chief motives were landscapes of a peculiarly wild and romantic type, animal life, trees and flowers, and figtire compositions drawn from Chinese and Buddhist history and Taoist legend; and these, together with the grand aims and strange shortcomings of its principles and the limited range of its methods, were adopted almost without change by Japan.

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  • 1895), whose books of birdsthe Bairei hyakucho gwafu (1881 and 1884) and Yaka-notsuki (1889)are unequalled of their kind; Imao Keinen, who also issued a beautiful set of illustrations of birds and flowers (Keinen kwacho gwafu), engraved by Tanaka Jirokichi and printed by Miki NisaburO (1891-1892); and Watanabe Seitei, whose studies of similar subjects have appeared in Seitei kwac/jO gwafu (1890-1891) and the Bijutsu sekai (1894), engraved by Goto Tokujiro.

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  • The pillars, architraves, ceilings, panels, and almost every available part of the structure, are covered with arabesques and sculptured figures of dragons, lions, tigers, birds, flowers, and even pictorial compositions with landscapes and figures, deeply carved in solid or open workthe wood sometimes plain, sometimes overlaid with pigment and gilding, as in the panelled ceiling of the chapel of Iyeyasu in Tokyo.

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  • Thus, having pierced a spray of flowers in a thin sheet of shibuichi, the artist fits a slender rim of gold, silver or shakudo to the petals, leaves and stalks, so that an effect is produced of transparent blossoms outlined in gold, silver or purple.

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  • It is nothing to a Japanese that a vase should be covered with profuse decoration of flowers and foliage: he requires that every blossom and every leaf shall be instinct with vitality, and the comparative costliness of fine workmanship does not influence his choice.

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  • Indeed, of this porcelain it may be said that, from the monster pieces of blue-and-white manufactured at Setovases six feet high and garden pillar-lamps half as tall again do not dismay the BishU ceramistto tiny coffee-cups decorated in Tokyo, with theil delicate miniatures of birds, flowers, insects, fishes and so forth, everything indicates the death of the old severe aestheticism.

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  • Kawanabe ItchO is celebrated for his representations of flowers and foliage, and Morishita Morihachi and Asano Saburo (of Kaga) are admirable in all styles, but especially, perhaps, in the charming variety called togi-dashi (ground down), which is pre-eminent for its satin-like texture and for the atmosphere of dreamy softness that pervades the decoration.

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  • The plumage of gorgeously-hued birds, the blossoms of flowers (especially the hydrangea), the folds of thick brocade, microscopic diapers and arabesques, are built up with tiny fragments of iridescent shell, in combination with silver-foil, goldlacquer and colored bone, the whole producing a rich and sparkling effect.

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  • He takes for subject a landscape, a seascape, a battle-scene, flowers, foliage, birds, fishes, insectsin short, anything.

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  • in height, and has oval entire leaves, and unisexual flowers on short stalks.

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  • In the male flowers, which are numerous, the stamens are sixteen in number and arranged in pairs; the female flowers are solitary, with traces of stamens, and a smooth ovary with one ovule in each of the eight cells - the ovary is surmounted by four styles, which are hairy at the base.

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  • perforatum, small shrubby plants with slender stems, sessile opposite leaves which are often dotted with pellucid glands, and showy yellow flowers.

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  • calycinum (Rose of Sharon), a creeping plant with large almost solitary flowers 3 to 4 in.

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  • These fresh little flowers of his leisure used to decorate the walls of his studio, and at the sale of its contents after his death realized considerable prices.

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  • One of these varieties is black, with a yellow spot in the centre of each scale; these spots are larger on the back, forming a series of tetrapetalous flowers; the head is similarly ornamented.

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  • flowers, male flowers, and sterile 3.

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  • flowers forming a ring of hairs 4.

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  • The small flowers are densely crowded on thick fleshy spikes, which are associated with, and often more or less enveloped by, a large leaf (bract), the so-called spathe, which, as in cuckoo-pint, where it is green in colour, Richardia, where it is white, creamy or yellow, Anthurium, where it is a brilliant scarlet, is often the most striking feature of the plant.

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  • The details of the structure of the flower show a wide variation; the flowers are often extremely simple, sometimes as in Arum, reduced to a single stamen or pistil.

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  • These are followed by the inflorescence, a fleshy spadix bearing in the lower part numerous closely crowded simple unisexual flowers and continued above into a purplish or yellowish appendage; the spadix is enveloped by a leafy spathe, constricted in the lower part to form a chamber, in which are the flowers.

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  • He was a horticulturist of profound attainments, and himself originated several new varieties of flowers.

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  • The female flowers are equally simple, consisting of a bract, from whose axil arises usually a very short stalk, surmounted by two carpels adherent one to the other for their whole length, except that the upper ends of the styles are separated into two stigmas.

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  • The flowers appear generally before the leaves and are thus rendered more conspicuous, while passage of pollen by the wind is facilitated.

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  • Fertilization is effected by insects, especially by bees, which are directed in their search by the colour and fragrance of the flowers; but some pollen must also be transported by the wind to the female flowers, especially in arctic species which, in spite of the poverty of insect life, set abundant fruit.

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  • Its catkins are collected in England in celebration of Palm Sunday, the bright-coloured flowers being available in early spring when other decorations of the kind are scarce.

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  • The chief industries are tanning and the manufacture of weapons, shoes, cloth, hats and artificial flowers.

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  • The rather small tubular yellow or red flowers are borne on simple or branched leafless stems, and are generally densely clustered.

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  • This word, applied in the form of KaKros by the ancient Greeks to some prickly plant, was adopted by Linnaeus as the name of a group of curious succulent or fleshy-stemmed plants, most of them prickly and leafless, some of which produce beautiful flowers, and are now so popular in our gardens that the name has become familiar.

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  • The flowers are frequently large and showy, and are generally attractive from their high colouring.

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  • I), the flowers are rotate, that is to say, the long tube is replaced by a very short one.

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  • Those with long - tubed flowers comprise the genera Melocactus, Mammillaria, Echinocactus, Cereus, Pilocereus, Echinopsis, Phyllocactus, Epiphyllum, &c.; while those with short-tubed flowers are Rhipsalis, Opuntia, Peireskia, and one or two of minor importance.

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  • At the summit of this crown the small rosy-pink flowers are produced, half protruding from the mass of wool, and these are succeeded by small red berries.

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  • The Melocacti are distinguished by the distinct cephalium or crown which bears the flowers.

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  • The flowers issue from between the mammillae, towards the upper part of the stem, often disposed in a zone just below the apex, and are either purple, rose-pink, white or yellow, and of moderate size.

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  • The flowers, produced near the apex of the plant, are generally large and showy, yellow and rose being the prevailing colours.

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  • - Echinocactus much reduced; the flowers are several inches in diameter.

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  • The plants are nearly allied to Cereus, differing chiefly in the floriferous portion developing these longer and more attenuated hair-like spines, which surround the base of the flowers and form a dense woolly head or cephalium.

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  • They are dwarf, ribbed, globose or cylindrical plants; and the flowers, which are produced from the side instead of the apex of the stem, are large, and in some cases very beautiful, being remarkable for the length of the tube, which is more or less covered with bristly hairs.

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  • - Branch of Phyllocactus much reduced; the flowers are 6 in.

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  • The margins of these leaf-like branches are more or less crenately notched, the notches representing buds, as do the spine-clusters in the spiny genera; and from these crenatures the large showy flowers are produced.

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  • As garden plants the Phyllocacti are amongst the most ornamental of the whole family, being of easy culture, free blooming and remarkably showy, the colour of the flowers ranging from rich crimson, through rosepink to creamy white.

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  • The turning of them outdoors to ripen their growth is the surest way to obtain flowers, but they do not take on a free blooming habit until they have attained some age.

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  • - This name is now restricted to two or three dwarf branching Brazilian epiphytal plants of extreme beauty, which agree with Phyllocactus in having the branches dilated into the form of fleshy leaves, but differ in having them divided into short truncate leaf-like portions, which are articulated, that is to say, provided with a joint by which they separate spontaneously; the margins are crenate or dentate, and the flowers, which are large and showy, magenta or crimson, appear at the apex of the terminal joints.

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  • truncatum the flowers have a very different aspect from that of other Cacti, from the mouth of the tube being oblique and the segments all reflexed at the tip. The short separate pieces of which these plants are made up grow out of each other, so that the branches may be said to resemble leaves joined together endwise.

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  • It is a very heterogeneous group, being fleshy-stemmed with a woody axis, the branches being angular, winged, flattened or cylindrical, and the flowers small, short-tubed, succeeded by small, round, peashaped berries.

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  • They are fleshy shrubs, with rounded, woody stems, and numerous succulent branches, composed in most of the species of separate joints or parts, which are much compressed, often elliptic or suborbicular, dotted over in spiral lines with small, fleshy, caducous leaves, in the axils of which are placed the areoles or tufts of barbed or hooked spines of two forms. The flowers are mostly yellow or reddish-yellow, and are succeeded by pear-shaped or egg-shaped fruits, having a broad scar at the top, furnished on their soft, fleshy rind with tufts of small spines.

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  • The flowers are subpaniculate, white or yellowish.

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  • Thus, wasps catch flies; worker ants make raids and carry off weak insects of many kinds; bees gather nectar from flowers and transform it into honey within their stomachs - largely for the sake of feeding the larvae in the nest.

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  • Elwesii, a native of the Levant, with large flowers, the three inner segments of which have a much larger and more conspicuous green blotch than the commoner kinds.

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  • high, of flowers with spiny bracts.

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  • It was a garland, or wreath, of leaves or flowers, conferred on the winners in the athletic games.

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  • The corona obsidionalis was formed of grass and flowers plucked on the spot and given to the general who conquered a city.

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  • The alpine vegetation on all these lofty mountains is of a mixed Cape and Abyssinian character - witch-hazels, senecios, lobelias, kniphofias, everlasting flowers, tree heaths and hypericums. The really tropical vegetation of Buganda is nearly identical with that of West Africa, but there is no oil-palm.

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  • The leading crops and their percentages of the total crop value were hay and forage (39.1%), vegetables (23.9%), fruits and nuts (11.7%), forest products (8.4%), and flowers and plants (7.1%).

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  • The value of farms on which dairying was the chief source of income in 1900 was 46% of the total farm value of the state; the corresponding percentages for livestock, vegetables, hay and grain, flowers and plants, fruit and tobacco, being respectively 14.6, 10 2, 8 o, 4.2, 3.2, and 1 8%.

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  • wide, which serves as an outlet for the overflow of those lakes and as a waterway for the natives who bring in flowers and vegetables for sale.

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  • The mild climate assists the growth of esculent plants and roots; and a considerable trade is carried on with New York, principally in onions, early potatoes, tomatoes, and beetroot, together with lily bulbs, cut flowers and some arrowroot.

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  • BIRDS OF PARADISE, a group of passerine birds inhabiting New Guinea and the adjacent islands, so named by the Dutch voyagers in allusion to the brilliancy of their plumage, and to the current belief that, possessing neither wings nor feet, they passed their lives in the air, sustained on their ample plumes, resting only at long intervals suspended from the branches of lofty trees by the wire-like feathers of the tail, and drawing their food "from the dews of heaven and the nectar of flowers."

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  • The genus is represented in Europe, north Asia, North America and Australia, and is characterized by oblong or linear stem-leaves, flowers in.

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  • terminal scorpioid cymes, small blue, pink or white flowers, a five-cleft persistent calyx, a salveror funnel-shaped corolla, having its mouth closed by five short scales and hard, smooth, shining nutlets.

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  • It attains its greatest perfection under cultivation, and, as it flowers throughout the summer, is used with good effect for garden borders; a variety, M.

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  • strigulosa, is more hairy and erect, and its flowers are smaller.

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  • versicolor the flowers are yellow when first open and change generally to a dull blue; sometimes they are permanently yellowish-white.

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  • dissitiflora, 6 to 8 in., with large handsome abundant sky-blue flowers, is the best and earliest, flowering from February onwards; it does well in light cool soils, preferring peaty ones, and should be renewed annually from seeds or cuttings.

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  • azorica (a native of the Azores) with purple, ultimately blue flowers about half an inch across, has a similar habit but larger flowers; M.

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  • The flowers are generally arranged in terminal or axillary clusters, and are markedly regular with the same number of parts in each series.

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  • It grows profusely on dry rocks and walls, especially on the western coasts, and bears a spike of drooping greenish cup-shaped flowers.

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  • A festival called the Rushbearing takes place on the Saturday within the octave of St Oswald's day (August 5th), when a holiday is observed and the church decorated with rushes, heather and flowers.

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  • The state has made great advances, too, in the production of flowers, ornamental plants, nursery products, fruits, vegetables, poultry and eggs.

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  • All the flowers of each triplet of spikelets on both sides of the rachis are fertile and produce ripe fruits; hence the ear produces six longitudinal rows of grain.

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  • All the flowers of each triplet are fertile as in (ii.), but the rows are not arranged regularly at equal distances round the rachis.

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  • He was the husband of Chloris, the goddess of flowers, by whom he had a son, Carpus, the god of fruit (Ovid, Fasti, v.

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  • He took an active part in the levee-en-masse, and in November 1793 was given the task of establishing the revolutionary government in the departments of Meuse and Moselle, where he gained an unenviable notoriety by ordering the execution of the sentence of death decreed by the revolutionary tribunal on some young girls at Verdun who had offered flowers to the Prussians when they entered the town.

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  • Bladder-wort bears small, yellow, two-lipped flowers on a stem which rises above the surface of the water.

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  • To the north-east of the Fort is the Lake, a ramifying sheet of fresh water, which adds greatly to the beauty of the site of Colombo, its banks being clothed with luxuriant foliage and flowers.

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  • Waxcloth is manufactured at Leipzig, and artificial flowers at Leipzig and Dresden.

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  • Male and female flowers are borne on distinct plants.

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  • esteemed Quesnay much, and used to call him his thinker; when he ennobled him he gave him for arms three flowers of the pansy (pensee), with the motto Propter excogitationem mentis.

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  • The prairies of the more humid regions are covered with valuable grasses, and with masses of showy native flowers, which bloom from spring to autumn.

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  • The disulphide, CaS2, and pentasulphide, CaS 5, are formed when milk of lime is boiled with flowers of sulphur.

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  • He divided them into eighteen classes, distinguishing plants according as they were woody or herbaceous, and taking into account the nature of the flowers and fruit.

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  • In 1690 Rivinus 2 promulgated a classification founded chiefly on the forms of the flowers.

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  • The production of dates in Egypt, by bringing two kinds of flowers into contact, proves that in very remote periods some notions were entertained on the subject.

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  • The Babylonians suspended male clusters from wild dates over the females; but they seem to have supposed that the fertility thus produced depended on the presence of small flies among the wild flowers, which, by entering the female flowers, caused them to set and ripen.

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  • He mentions two experiments made by him to prove this - one by cutting off the staminal flowers in Maize, and the other by rearing the female plant of Mercurialis apart from the male.

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  • In these instances most of the flowers were abortive, but a few were fertile, which he attributes to the dust of the apices having been wafted by the wind from other plants.

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  • Linnaeus also studied the periodical movements of flowers and leaves, and referred to the assumption of the night-position as the sleep-movement.

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  • Under the windows of the palace stretched the same park that we admire to-day, open all the year to privileged persons and twice a year to the public, a park filled with trees of rare essences and the most delicious flowers so artistically disposed, and so refreshing to the eyes, that M.

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  • cruentum latifolium, and three with pendulous flowers, apparently forms of the martagon lily.

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  • candidum, the Xdpiov of the Greeks, was one of the commonest garden flowers of antiquity, appearing in the poets from Homer downwards side by side with the rose and the violet.

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  • The small pendulous bellshaped flowers contain no honey but are visited by bees for the pollen.

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  • auratum, with its large white flowers, having a yellow band and numerous red or purple spots, is a magnificent plant when grown to perfection; and so are the varieties called rubro-vittatum and cruentum, which have the central band crimson instead of yellow; and the broad-petalled platyphyllum, and its almost pure white sub-variety called virginale.

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  • Thunbergianum and its many varieties being also good border flowers.

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  • tenuifolium make up, with those already mentioned, a series of the finest hardy flowers of the summer garden.

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  • high, bearing a dozen or more large deflexed, funnelshaped, white, purple-stained flowers; L.

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  • An excellent packing material for dormant buds is coarsely crushed woodcharcoal to which has been added a sprinkling of flowers of sulphur.

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  • The cup-shaped flowers have six regular segments in two rows, as many free stamens, and a three-celled ovary with a sessile stigma, which ripens into a leathery many-seeded capsule.

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  • Owing to the great beauty of the flowers they have been favourites in European gardens for two or three centuries, and have been crossed and recrossed till it has become almost impossible to refer the plants to their original types.

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  • silvestris, with elegant yellow flowers, is a doubtful native of England.

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  • Judged by the florists' rules, they are either good or bad in form, and pure or stained (white or yellow) at the base; the badly formed and stained flowers are thrown away, while the good and pure are grown on, these being known as "breeder" tulips.

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  • The breeder bulbs and their offsets may grow on for years producing only self-coloured flowers, but after a time, which is varied and indefinite, some of the progeny "break," that is, produce flowers with the variegation which is so much prized.

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  • (The colour variation in the flowers of seedlings is discussed above.) Seeds are sown in.

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  • The flowers are mostly heavy and drooping, petals brightly coloured, the edges being curiously notched and waved.

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  • Through a cleft in the rock a ray of light falls upon Iseult's face, Mark stops up the crevice with his glove (or with grass and flowers), and goes his way, determined to recall his wife and nephew.

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  • This was followed by a long series of popular treatises in rapid succession, amongst the more important of which are Light Science for Leisure Hours and The Sun (1871); The Orbs around Us and Essays on Astronomy (1872); The Expanse of Heaven, The Moon and The Borderland of Science (1873); The Universe and the Coming Transits and Transits of Venus (1874);(1874); Our Place among Infinities (1875); Myths and Marvels of Astronomy (1877); The Universe of Stars (1878); Flowers of the Sky (1879); The Peotry of Astronomy (1880); Easy Star Lessons and Familiar Science Studies (1882); Mysteries of Time and Space and The Great Pyramid (1883); The Universe of Suns (1884); The Seasons (1885); Other Suns than Ours and Half-Hours with the Stars (1887).

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  • For the processes of the paper manufacturer esparto is used in the dry state, and without cutting; roots and flowers and stray weeds are first removed, and the material is then boiled with caustic soda, washed, and bleached with chlorine solution.

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  • Effective pollination may also occur between flowers of different species, or occasionally, as in the case of several orchids, of different genera - this is known as hybridization.

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  • In bisexual or hermaphrodite flowers, that is, those in which both stamens and pistil are present, though self-pollination might seem the obvious course, this is often prevented or hindered by various arrangements which favour cross-pollination.

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  • Spontaneous self-pollination is rendered impossible in some homogamous flowers in consequence of the relative position of the anthers and stigma - this condition has been termed herkogamy.

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  • Flowers in which the relative position of the organs allows of spontaneous self-pollination may be all alike as regards length of style and stamens (homomorphy or homostyly), or differ in this respect (heteromorphy) the styles (From Strasburger's by permission of Gustav Fischer.) FIG.

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  • - Long-styled, L, and short-styled, K, flowers of Primula sinensis.

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  • and stamens being of different lengths in different flowers (heterostyly) or the stamens only are of different lengths (heteranthery).

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  • Flowers which are closed at the time of maturity of anthers and stigmas are termed cleistogamous.

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  • Cross-pollination may occur between two flowers on the same plant (geitonogamy) or between flowers on distinct plants (xenogamy).

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  • The former, which is a somewhat less favourable method than the latter, is effected by air-currents, insect agency, the actual contact between stigmas and anthers in neighbouring flowers, where, as in the family Compositae, flowers are closely crowded, or by the fall of the pollen from a (From Darwin's by permission.) FIG.

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  • - Diagram of the flowers of the three forms of Lythrum salicaria in their natural position, with the petals and calyx removed on the near side.

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  • Even in homogamous flowers cross-pollination is in a large proportion of cases the effective method, at any rate at first, owing to the relative position of anther and stigma or the fact that the plant is self-sterile.

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  • Many plants produce, in addition to ordinary open flowers, so-called cleistogamous flowers, which remain permanently closed but which notwithstanding produce fruit; in these the corolla is inconspicuous or absent and the pollen grows from the anther on to the stigma of the same flower.

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  • The cleistogamous flowers are developed before or after the normal open flowers at seasons less s-- favourable for cross-pollination.

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  • In some cases flowers, which open under normal circumstances, remain closed owing to unfavourable circumstances, and self-pollination occurs as in a FIG.

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  • where flowers remain closed in dull or cold weather.

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  • Systems of classification of flowers according to the agency by which pollination is effected have been proposed by Delpino, H.

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  • Najas where the pollen grains are rather heavier than water, and sinking down are caught by the stigmas of the extremely simple female flowers.

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  • In these the pollen floats on the surface and reaches the stigmas of the female flowers as in Callitriche, Ruppia, Zostera, Elodea.

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  • 4) the male flowers become detached and float on the surface of the water; the anthers are thus brought in contact with the stigmas of the female flowers.

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  • As no means of attraction are required the flowers are inconspicuous and without scent or nectar.

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  • B, male flowers; I before; 2, after spreading of the petals...

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  • - Catkin of Male ing pendulous anthers and pro Flowers of Hazel.

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  • In small flowers which are crowded at the same level or in flat flowers in which the stigmas and anthers project but little, slugs or snails creeping over their surface may transfer to the stigma the pollen which clings to the slimy foot.

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  • Pollen Flowers.

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  • These contain nectar and include the following groups: Flowers with exposed nectar, readily visible and accessible to all visitors.

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  • These are very simple, open and generally regular flowers, white, greenish-yellow or yellow in colour and are chiefly visited by insects with a short proboscis, such as short-tongued wasps and flies, also beetles and more rarely bees.

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  • Flowers with nectar partly concealed and visible only in bright sunshine.

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