How to use Flower in a sentence

flower
  • She stared at a flower pattern on the wall.

    842
    337
  • She picked the flower up and poked it over her left ear.

    545
    268
  • The metal panels on top of the generator opened like a flower, automatically adjusting themselves to catch the most sun.

    231
    162
  • She ripped the flower from her hair and slung it in the dust.

    198
    148
  • She looked again at the flower, puzzled.

    138
    89
    Advertisement
  • She worked her way toward a little yellow flower and leaned down to examine it.

    95
    73
  • Why did you think I sent you the flower - and that dress?

    83
    67
  • A bee settling on a flower has stung a child.

    54
    41
  • The parts of the flower are in fives in calyx, corolla and stamens, followed by two carpels which unite to form a superior ovary.

    14
    7
  • He glanced at the flower over her ear.

    73
    67
    Advertisement
  • These have the coronet in the centre of the flower very large in proportion to the other parts, and much expanded, like the old hooped petticoats.

    6
    1
  • With a trembling hand, she lifted the flower and tucked it behind her right ear.

    46
    42
  • The Order thus reached the highest pinnacle of its fame, and new knights flocked to be enrolled therein from the flower of the nobility of Europe; La Valette refused a cardinal's hat, determined not to impair his independence.

    3
    0
  • Crocus in flower, reduced.

    3
    0
  • It is a very suitable subject for the back row in mixed flower borders, or for recesses in the front part of shrubbery borders.

    5
    3
    Advertisement
  • I, Flower reduced; 2, Same in vertical section; 3, Flattened branch much reduced; 4, Horizontal plan of arrangement of flower.

    2
    0
  • Graceful in form and active in motion, sun-birds flit from flower to flower, feeding on small insects which are attracted by the nectar and on the nectar itself; but this is usually done while perched and rarely on the wing as is the habit of humming-birds.

    2
    0
  • The ideal of a prosperous, brilliant and attractive Magyar capital, which would keep the nobles and the intellectual flower of the country at home, uniting them in the service of the Fatherland, had received a powerful impetus from Count Stephan Szechenyi, the great Hungarian reformer of the pre-Revolutionary period.

    2
    0
  • The principal modern genera are grouped by the differences in the flower - tube just explained.

    1
    0
  • There are numerous varieties, differing in the size of the flower and the period of flowering.

    1
    0
    Advertisement
  • In modern botany it is a technical term sometimes denoting the lower part of the capsule called pyxidium, attached to the flower stalk in the form of an urn.

    1
    0
  • The forget-me-not, a favourite with poets, and the symbol of constancy, is a frequent ornament of brooks, rivers and ditches, and, according to an old German tradition, received its name from the last words of a knight who was drowned in the attempt to procure the flower for his lady.

    1
    0
  • Its industries include wool-weaving and spinning, dyeing, iron-founding, the manufacture of cotton and silk goods, machinery, sewing machines and machine oil, leather and tobacco, and printing (books and maps) and flower gardening.

    1
    0
  • Sprengel came very near to appreciating the meaning of cross-pollination in the life of plants when he states that "it seems that Nature is unwilling that any flower should be fertilized by its own pollen."

    1
    0
  • It is possible, though not certain, that to this date also belongs the famous portrait of himself at Munich bearing a false signature and date, 150o; in this it has been lately shown that the artist modified his own lineaments according to a preconceived scheme of facial proportion, so that it must be taken as an ideal rather than a literal presentment of himself to posterity as he appeared in the flower of his early middle age.

    2
    1
    Advertisement
  • The arrangement of the parts in the flower resembles that in the nearly allied order Amaryllidaceae (Narcissus, Snowdrop, &c.), but differs in the absence of the inner whorl of stamens.

    2
    1
  • The pasque flower is found on all the prairies and is the earliest to appear.

    0
    0
  • The structure of the flower represents the simple type of monocotyledons, consisting of two whorls of petals, of three free parts each, six free stamens, and a consolidated pistil of three carpels, ripening into a three-valved capsule containing many winged seeds.

    0
    0
  • It was used in unguents and against the bites of snakes, &c. In the middle ages the flower continued to be common and was taken as the symbol of heavenly purity.

    0
    0
  • The pots should be plunged in a cold frame and protected from frost, and about May may be removed to a sheltered and moderately shady place out-doors to remain till they flower, when they may be removed to the greenhouse.

    0
    0
  • Of the Ceylonese galls, " some are as symmetrical as a composite flower when in bud, others smooth and spherical like a berry; some protected by long spines, others clothed with yellow wool formed of long cellular hairs, others with regularly tufted hairs."

    0
    0
  • Tulips are readily raised from seeds, and the seedlings when they first flower (after about 7 years cultivation) are of one colour - that is, they are self-coloured.

    0
    0
  • The flower is then said to be "rectified"; it is a bizarre when it has a yellow ground marked with purple or red, a bybloemen when it has a white ground marked with violet or purple, or a rose when it has a white ground marked with rose colour.

    0
    0
  • The least stain at the base of the flower, technically called the "bottom," would render a tulip comparatively valueless.

    0
    0
  • The best effects are produced in formal beds by planting the same variety in each, to secure the plants being of the same height and in flower simultaneously.

    0
    0
  • In mixed flower borders, mixed varieties may be planted.

    0
    0
  • They are usually strong enough to flower the third year from this sowing.

    0
    0
  • The bulbs are placed in long shallow boxes, plunged in soil or ashes in the open air, and are later introduced as required into heat in semi-darkness, and are afterwards transferred to benches in the forcing houses where they flower.

    0
    0
  • According to Captain Stanley Flower, director of the Zoological Gardens at Giza, Cairo, Egypt, the ancient Egyptians kept various species of wild animals in captivity, but the first Zoological Garden of which there is definite knowledge was founded in China by the first emperor of the Chou dynasty, who reigned about iioo B.C. This was called the "Intelligence Park," and appears to have had a scientific and educational object.

    0
    0
  • According to a reference list compiled by Captain Stanley Flower, there were 102 actually existing public gardens or parks containing collections of wild animals in 1910, while there are also a considerable number of private collections.

    0
    0
  • Pollen may be transferred to the stigma of the same flower - self-pollination (or autogamy), or to the stigma of another flower on the same plant or another plant of the same species - crosspollination (or allogamy).

    0
    0
  • Thus the anthers and stigmas in any given flower are often mature at different times; this condition, which is known as dichogamy and was first pointed out by Sprengel, may be so well marked that the stigma.

    0
    0
  • In very many cases the pollen is carried to the stigma by elongation, curvature or some other movement of the filament, the style or stigma, or corolla or some other part of the flower, or by correlated movements of two or more parts.

    0
    0
  • Selfpollination frequently becomes possible towards the end of the life of a flower which during its earlier stages has been capable only of cross-pollination.

    0
    0
  • In many cases pollen has no effect on the stigma of the same flower, the plants are selfsterile, in other cases external pollen is more effective (pre-potent) than pollen from the same flower; but in a very large number of cases experiment has shown that there is little or no difference between the effects of external pollen and that from the same flower.

    0
    0
  • An increasing number of workers in this field of plant biology in England, on the Continent and in America has produced a great mass of observations, which have recently been brought together in Dr Paul Knuth's classic work, Handbook of Flower Pollination, an English translation of which has been published (1908) by the Clarendon Press.

    0
    0
  • Virginia, separating the two hostile capitals, Richmond and Washington, was the theatre of the great campaigns of the east, where the flower of both armies fought.

    0
    0
  • As a matter of fact, barbarism did break out after the flower had fallen from Neoplatonism.

    0
    0
  • It was first formally proposed as an independent method, with great improvements, by Robert Flower in The Radix, a new way of making Logarithms, which was published in 1771; and Leonelli, in his Supplement logarithmique (1802-1803), already noticed, referred to Flower and reproduced some of his tables.

    0
    0
  • In mammals Sir William Flower pointed out that a generalized type of liver exists, from which that of any mammal may be derived by suppression or fusion of lobes.

    0
    0
  • The type form is the Caucasian species roseum of botanists, hardy perennial, with finely cut leaves and large flower heads, having a ray of deep rosecoloured ligulate florets surrounding the yellow centre or disk.

    0
    0
  • They bloom during the months of May and June, as well as later, and are always most welcome ornaments for the flower borders, and useful for cutting for decorative purposes.

    0
    0
  • They may be placed either in separate beds or in the mixed flower border as may be required.

    0
    0
  • Seeds should be sown in spring in a cold frame, and the young plants should be put out into beds when large enough, and should flower the following May.

    0
    0
  • Each spikelet contains a solitary flower with two outer small barren glumes, above which is a large tough, compressed, often awned, flowering glume, which partly encloses the somewhat similar pale.

    0
    0
  • It derives its scientific name from a curious beak-like appendage at the end of the stigma, in the centre of the flower; this appendage though solid was supposed to be hollow (hence the name from 46a, a bladder, and stigma).

    0
    0
  • In Pelargonium the flower is zygomorphic with a spurred posterior sepal and the petals differing in size or shape.

    0
    0
  • They rendered good service at Syracuse and Arginusae; but their greatest achievement was the decisive victory at Delium over the flower of the Athenian army (424), in which both their heavy infantry and their cavalry displayed unusual efficiency.

    0
    0
  • These latter bore (obverse) a Nepalese emblem surrounded by eight fleurons containing the eight sacred Buddhist jewels, and (reverse) an eight-petalled flower surrounded by eight fleurons containing the names of the eight jewels in Tibetan characters.

    0
    0
  • In botany the word is used of the praefloration or folded arrangement of the petals in a flower before expansion in the summer, contrasted with "vernation" of leaves which unfold in the spring.

    0
    0
  • The collar of the Star of India is composed of alternate links of the lotus flower, red and white roses and palm branches enamelled on gold, with an imperial crown in the centre; that of the Indian Empire is composed of elephants, peacocks and Indian roses.

    0
    0
  • The last two classes of the Rising Sun wear a decoration formed of the Paulownia flower and leaves.

    0
    0
  • Increased direct effect of solar radiation compensates for the cold of the nights, and in the few spots where plants have been found in flower up to a height of 12,000 ft., nothing has indicated that the processes of vegetation were arrested by the severe cold which they must sometimes endure.

    0
    0
  • An inferior variety of pear, for instance, may suddenly produce a shoot bearing fruit of superior quality; a beech tree, without obvious cause, a shoot with finely divided foliage; or a camellia an unwontedly fine flower.

    0
    0
  • The reproductive process of which the formation of the flower is the first stage being an exhaustive one, it is necessary that the plant, as gardeners say, should get " established " before it flowers.

    0
    0
  • Moreover, although the green portions of the flower do indeed perform the same office as the leaves, the more highly coloured and more specialized portions, which are further removed from the typical leaf-form, do not carry on those processes for which the presence of chlorophyll is essential; and the floral organs may, therefore, in a rough sense, be said to be parasitic upon the green parts.

    0
    0
  • A check or arrest of growth in the vegetative organs seems to be a necessary preliminary to the development of the flower.

    0
    0
  • The most characteristic feature of the Angiosperm is the flower, which shows remarkable variety in form and elaboration, and supplies the most trustworthy characters for the distinction of the series and families or natural orders, into which the group is divided.

    0
    0
  • The flower is a shoot (stem bearing leaves) which has a special form associated with the special function of ensuring the fertilization of the egg and the development of fruit containing seed.

    0
    0
  • Occasionally, as in violet, a flower arises singly in the axil of an ordinary foliage-leaf; it is then termed axillary.

    0
    0
  • The primary function of the flower is to bear the spores.

    0
    0
  • The flower may consist only of spore-bearing leaves, as in willow, where each flower comprises only a few stamens or two carpels.

    0
    0
  • These form the perianth and are in one series, when the flower is termed monochlamydeous, or in two series (dichlamydeous).

    0
    0
  • In the second case the outer series (calyx of sepals) is generally green and leaf-like, its function being to protect the rest of the flower, especially in the bud; while the inner series (corolla of petals) is generally white or brightly coloured, and more delicate in structure, its function being to attract the particular insect or bird by agency of which pollination is effected.

    0
    0
  • The insect, &c., is attracted by the colour and scent of the flower, and frequently also by honey which is secreted in some part of the flower.

    0
    0
  • The leaves show a remark the carpel of the same or another flower.

    0
    0
  • Frequently the influence of fertilization is felt beyond the ovary, and other parts of the flower take part in the formation of the fruit, as the floral receptacle in the apple, strawberry and others.

    0
    0
  • A relation between such vegetative distribution buds and production of flower is usually marked.

    0
    0
  • Where there is free formation of buds there is little flower and commonly no seed, and the converse is also the case.

    0
    0
  • Viviparous plants are an illustration of substitution of vegetative buds for flower.

    0
    0
  • Within each class the flower-characters as the essential feature of Angiosperms supply the clue to phylogeny, but the uncertainty regarding the construction of the primitive angiospermous flower gives a fundamental point of divergence in attempts to construct progressive sequences of the families.

    0
    0
  • In Monocotyledons a similar advance from hypogyny to epigyny is observed, and from the dorsiventral to the radial type of flower.

    0
    0
  • In his arrangement the last subdivision disappears, and the Dicotyledons fall into two groups, a larger containing those in which both calyx and corolla are present in the flower, and a smaller, Monochlamydeae, representing the Apetalae and Diclines Irregulares of Jussieu.

    0
    0
  • Series 6, Apocarpeae, is characterized by 5 carpels, and in the last series Glumaceae, great simplification in the flower is associated with a grass-like habit.

    0
    0
  • The second subclass, Gamopetalae, includes 9 series and culminates in those which show the most elaborate type of flower, the series Aggregatae, the chief representative of which is the great and wide-spread order Compositae.

    0
    0
  • Chamberlain of Chicago University have given a valuable general account of the morphology of Angiosperms as far as concerns the flower, and the series of events which ends in the formation of the seed (Morphology of Angiosperms, Chicago, 1903).

    0
    0
  • Many new varieties of the flower have recently been cultivate$ in gardens.

    0
    0
  • The shady park and flower gardens are a popular resort of the people of Pozharevats.

    0
    0
  • The usual ornament is a conventional flower pattern, pricked in from paper and dusted along the pricking.

    0
    0
  • Its large variety of trees and shrubs, including oak, hickory, elm, maple, chestnut, birch, ash, cedar, pine, larch and sumach, its flower gardens, a palm house, ponds, a lake of 61 acres for boating, skating and curling, a parade ground of 40 acres for other athletic sports, a menagerie, and numerous pieces of statuary, are among its objects of interest or beauty.

    0
    0
  • Double nuts are the result of the equal development of the two carpels of the original flower, of which ordinarily one becomes abortive; fusion of two or more nuts is not uncommon.

    0
    0
  • Other characteristic plants of the Coastal Plain are the cranberry, wild rice, wild yam, wax myrtle, wistaria, trumpet flower, passion flower, holly and white alder.

    0
    0
  • But that audacious exploratory energy which formed the motive force of the Renaissance as distinguished from the Revival of Learning took, as we shall see, very different directions in the several nations who now were sending the flower of their youth to study at the feet of Italian rhetoricians.

    0
    0
  • But it was reserved for the 17th century to witness the flower and fruit time of this powerful art in the work of Porbus, Rubens and Vandyck, in the Dutch schools of landscape and home-life, and in the unique masterpieces of Rembrandt.

    0
    0
  • As cultivated it is an annual with an erect stalk rising to a height of from 20 to 40 in., with alternate, sessile, narrowly lance-shaped leaves, branching only at the top, each branch or branchlet ending in a bright blue flower.

    0
    0
  • Sweet-peas raised in Calcutta from seed imported from England rarely blossom, and never yield seed; plants from French seed flower better, but are still sterile; but those raised from Darjeeling seed (originally imported from England) both flower and seed profusely.

    0
    0
  • The species and the numerous hybrids which have been obtained artificially, show a great variety in size and colour of the flower, including the richest deep crimson and blood-red, white, or with striped, mottled or blended colours.

    0
    0
  • The flower has in rare cases a perianth of six scale-like leaves arranged in two whorls, and thus conforming to the common monocotyledonous type of flower.

    0
    0
  • They grow slowly and flower but once after a number of years, when a tall stem or "mast" grows from the centre of the leaf rosette and bears a large number of shortly tubular flowers.

    0
    0
  • Quedlinburg is famous for its nurseries and market gardens, and exports vegetable and flower seeds to all parts of Europe and America.

    0
    0
  • Flowering plants include numerous species of terrestrial orchids, the socalled arum lily (Richardia Africana), common in low-lying moist land, and the white everlasting flower, found abundantly in some regions of Cape Colony.

    0
    0
  • The flower differs from that of the majority of grasses in having usually three lodicules and six stamens.

    0
    0
  • A dethroned sultan of Morocco, named Mulai Ahmad (Mahommed XI.), offered to acknowledge Portuguese suzerainty if he were restored to the throne by Portuguese arms, and Sebastian eagerly accepted these terms. The flower of his army was in Asia and his treasury was empty; but he contrived to extort funds from the " New Christians," and collected a force of some 18,000 men, chiefly untrained lads, wornout veterans, and foreign free-lances.

    0
    0
  • In the most arid regions there is a small growth of green in the rainy season, and a rich display of small wild-flowers, as well as the enormous flower clusters of the yucca, and blooms in pink and orange, crimson, yellow and scarlet of the giant cactus and its fellows.

    0
    0
  • Even in the Mexican border, desert oak, juniper and manzanita cover the mountains, and there is a vigorous though short-lived growth of grasses and flower from July to October.

    0
    0
  • But it is easy to understand the half-despairing adoration with which a shrewd and somewhat prosaic person like Joinville must have regarded this flower of chivalry born out of due time.

    0
    0
  • It is, however, in the face that the most remarkable disposition of vivid hues occurs, more resembling those of a brilliantly coloured flower than what might be expected in a mammal.

    0
    0
  • On ladies' seals the owner is often gracefully depicted standing and holding flower or bird, or with shields of arms. After the 14th century, the figures of ladies, other than queens, vanish from seals.

    0
    0
  • His method of writing was characteristic. He planted a subject in his mind, and waited for thoughts and illustrations to come to it, as birds or insects to a plant or flower.

    0
    0
  • The bracts on the flower-stalk are either small and scattered or large and leafy, and then placed near the flower, forming a sort of outer calyx or epicalyx.

    0
    0
  • This coronet forms the most conspicuous and beautiful part of the flower of many species, and consists of outgrowths from the tube formed subsequently to the other parts, and having little morphological significance, but being physiologically useful in favouring the cross-fertilization of the flower by means of insects.

    0
    0
  • From the base of the inner part of the tube of the flower, but quite free from it, uprises a cylindrical stalk surrounded below by a small cup-like outgrowth, and bearing above the middle a ring of five flat filaments each attached by a thread-like point to an anther.

    0
    0
  • The grass-tree of Australia (Xanthorrhoea) is a remarkable plant, allied to the rushes in the form of its flower, but with a tall, unbranched, soft-woody, palm-like trunk bearing a crown of long, narrow, grass-like leaves and stalked heads of small, densely-crowded flowers.

    0
    0
  • In immediate relation with the flower itself, and often entirely concealing it, is the palea or pale (" upper pale " of most systematic agrostologists).

    0
    0
  • The flower with its pale is sessile, and is placed in the axil of another bract in such a way that the pale is exactly opposed to it, though at a slightly higher level.

    0
    0
  • In Leptaspis it is formed into a closed cavity by the union of its edges, and encloses the flower, the styles projecting through the pervious summit.

    0
    0
  • The axis of the spikelet is frequently jointed and breaks up into articulations above each flower.

    0
    0
  • The axis is often continued beyond the last flower or glume as a bristle or stalk.

    0
    0
  • Fertile glumes, each enclosing one flower with its pale d.

    0
    0
  • Thus the species' of wheat are usually selffertilized, but cross-fertilization is possible since the glumes are open above, the stigmas project laterally, and the anthers empty only about one-third of their pollen in their own flower and the rest into the air.

    0
    0
  • In the genus Cycas the female flower is peculiar among cycads in consisting of a terminal crown of separate leaf-like carpels several inches in length; the apical portion of each carpellary leaf may be broadly triangular in form, and deeply dissected on the margins into narrow woolly appendages like rudimentary pinnae.

    0
    0
  • The male flower of Cycas conforms to the type of structure characteristic of the cycads, and consists of a long cone of numerous sporophylls bearing many oval pollen-sacs on their lower faces.

    0
    0
  • In Cycas revoluta and C. circinalis each leaf-like carpel may produce several laterally attached ovules, but in C. Normanbyana the carpel is shorter and the ovules are reduced to two; this latter type brings us nearer to the carpels of Dioon, in which the flower has the form of a cone, and the distal end of the carpels is longer and more leaf-like than in the other genera of the Zamieae, which are characterized by shorter carpels with thick peltate heads bearing two ovules on the morphologically lower surface.

    0
    0
  • This lateral course is due to the more vigorous growth of the axillary branch formed near the base of each flower, which is a terminal structure, and, except in the female flower of Cycas, puts a limit to the apical growth of the stem.

    0
    0
  • The mesarch structure of the leaf-bundles is met with in a less pronounced form in the flower peduncles of some cycads.

    0
    0
  • A typical male flower consists of a central axis bearing numerous spirally-arranged sporophylls (stamens), each of which consists of a slender stalk (filament) terminating distally in a more or less prominent knob or triangular scale, and bearing two or more pollen-sacs (microsporangia) on its lower surface.

    0
    0
  • The female flower is enveloped in a closely fitting sac-like investment, which must be regarded as a perianth; within this is an orthotropous ovule surrounded by a single integument prolonged upwards as a beak-like micropyle.

    0
    0
  • After fertilization, some of the uppermost bracts below each flower become red and fleshy; the perianth develops into a woody shell, while the integument remains membranous.

    0
    0
  • A male flower consists of a single angular perianth, through the open apex of which the flower-axis projects as a slender column terminating in two anthers.

    0
    0
  • The whole flower may be looked upon as an adventitious bud bearing two pairs of leaves; each pair becomes concrescent and forms a perianth, the apex of the shoot being converted into an orthotropous ovule.

    0
    0
  • Each cone consists of an axis, on which numerous broad and thin bracts are arranged in regular rows; in the axil of each bract occurs a single flower; a male flower is enclosed by two opposite pairs of leaves, forming a perianth surrounding a central sterile ovule encircled by a ring of stamens united below, but free distally as short filaments, each of which terminates in a trilocular anther.

    0
    0
  • A complete and functional female flower consists of a single ovule with two integuments, the inner of which is prolonged into a narrow tubular micropyle, like that in the flower of Gnetum.

    0
    0
  • The ceremonies which accompany a wedding preserve the tradition of marriage by capture; a peasant bride must enter her new home carrying bread and salt, and in parts of Walachia a flower is painted on the outer wall of cottages in which there is a girl old enough to marry.

    0
    0
  • Among plants remarkable in their appearance and structure may be noted the cactus-like Euphorbiae or spurge plants, the Stapelia or carrion flower, and the elephant's foot or Hottentots' bread, a plant of the same order as the yam.

    0
    0
  • The hardy and ubiquitous sunflower has been chosen as the Kansas state flower or floral emblem.

    0
    0
  • Simon., fought most gallantly, and was left dead on the field along with his eldest son Henry, his justiciar HughDespenser, and the flower of his party.

    0
    0
  • In ecclesiastical architecture his reign represents the early flower of the Decorated order, perhaps the most beautiful of all the developments of English art.

    0
    0
  • The female flower is a small bud-like cone situated at the apex of a small branch, and consists of two or three whorls of two or three scales.

    0
    0
  • The anniversary of his death has since been honoured in an unprecedented manner, the 19th of April being celebrated as "Primrose Day" - the primrose, for reasons impossible accurately to define, being popularly supposed to have been Disraeli's favourite flower.

    0
    0
  • It made most havoc in the flower of the nation, since every kind of eminence marked men for death.

    0
    0
  • Each flower consists of an outer or lower glume, called the flowering glume, of the same shape as the empty glume and terminating in a long, or it may be in a short, awn or "beard."

    0
    0
  • On the other side of the flower and at a slightly higher level is the "palea," of thinner texture than the other glumes, with infolded margins and with two ribs or veins.

    0
    0
  • The separation of the glumes, which occurs at the time of fertilization, and which permits the egress of the useless stamens after that operation, occurs only under certain conditions of temperature, when the heat, in fact, is sufficient to cause the lodicules of the flower to become turgid and thus to press apart the glumes.

    0
    0
  • The fungus-spores, from some diseased plant, alight on the stigma of the flower, and germinate there along with the pollen-grains.

    0
    0
  • The name of Hallgrim Petursson, whose Passion-hymns, " the flower of all Icelandic poetry," have been the most popular composition in the language, is foremost of all writers since the second change of faith.

    0
    0
  • No historic event has made such a deep impression on the mind of the Serbs as the battle of Kossovo - probably because the flower of the Serb aristocracy fell in that battle, and because both the tsar of the Serbs, Lazar, and the sultan of the Turks, Murad I., lost their lives.

    0
    0
  • The Papuan loves personal adornment and loses no chance of dressing himself up. His chief home-made ornaments are necklaces, armlets and ear-rings of shells, teeth or fibre, and cassowary, cockatoo, or bird of paradise feathers - the last two, or a flower, are worn through the septum of the nose.

    0
    0
  • In the United Kingdom the prevailing conditions, climatic A, Flower, magnified twice.

    0
    0
  • It is impossible to give a rigid botanical definition of the term " flower."

    0
    0
  • The flower is a characteristic feature of the highest group of the plant kingdom - the flowering plants (Phanerogams) - and is the name given to the association of organs, more or less leaf-like in form, which are concerned with the production of the fruit or seed.

    0
    0
  • The term bract is properly applied to the leaf from which the primary floral axis, whether simple or branched, arises, while the leaves which arise on the axis between the bract and the outer envelope of the flower are bracteoles or bractlets.

    0
    0
  • They are distinguished by their position at the base of the flower or flower-stalk.

    0
    0
  • When the flower is sessile the bracts are often applied closely to the calyx, and may thus be confounded with it, as in the order Malvaceae and species of Dianthus and winter aconite (Eranthis), where they have received the name of epicalyx or calyculus.

    0
    0
  • In Compositae besides the involucre there are frequently chaffy and setose bracts at the base of each flower, and in Dipsacaceae a membranous tube surrounds each flower.

    0
    0
  • Axis prolonged, bearing an imperfect flower at its apex.

    0
    0
  • A flower having a stalk is called pedunculate or pedicel- late; one having no stalk is sessile.

    0
    0
  • The peduncle is simple, bearing a single flower, as in primrose; or branched, as in London-pride.

    0
    0
  • The peduncle occasionally becomes abortive, and in place of bearing a flower, is transformed into a tendril; at other times it is hollowed at the apex, so as apparently to form the lower part of the outer whorl of floral leaves as in Eschscholtzia.

    0
    0
  • The termination of the peduncle, or the part on which the whorls of the flower are arranged, is called the thalamus, torus or receptacle.

    0
    0
  • In this the axis is either elongated and ends in a solitary flower, which thus terminates the axis, and if other.

    0
    0
  • From the leaves which are radical proceeds the axis ending in a solitary terminal flower f'.

    0
    0
  • About the middle of this axis there is a leaf or bract, from which a secondary floral axis a" is produced, ending in a single flower less advanced than the flower f.

    0
    0
  • This secondary axis bears a leaf also, from which a tertiary floral axis a" is produced, bearing an unexpanded solitary flower f"'.

    0
    0
  • Here f is the termination of the primary axis, and this flower expands first, while the other flowers are developed centrifugally on separate axes.

    0
    0
  • Amongst indefinite forms the simplest occurs when a lateral shoot produced in the axil of a large single foliage leaf of the plant ends in a single flower, the axis of the plant elongating beyond, as in Veronica hederifolia, Vinca minor and Lysimachia nemorum.

    0
    0
  • The flower in this case is solitary, and the ordinary leaves become bracts by producing flower-buds in place of leaf-buds; their number, like that of the leaves of this main axis, is indefinite, varying with the vigour of the plant.

    0
    0
  • Usually, however, the floral axis, arising from a more or less altered leaf or bract, instead of ending in a solitary flower, is prolonged, and bears numerous bracteoles, from which smaller peduncles are produced, and those again in their turn may be branched in a similar way.

    0
    0
  • The simplest form of the definite type of the inflorescence is seen in Anemone nemorosa and in gentianella (Gentiana acaulis), where the axis terminates in a single flower, no other flowers being produced upon the plant.

    0
    0
  • If other flowers were produced, they would arise as lateral shoots from the bracts below the first-formed flower.

    0
    0
  • A cymose inflorescence is an inflorescence where the primary floral axis before terminating in a flower gives off one or more lateral unifloral axes which repeat the process - the development being only limited by the vigour of the plant.

    0
    0
  • Here the primary axis t ends in a flower, which has passed into the state of fruit.

    0
    0
  • But on examination it is found that there is a central flower expanding first, and from its axis two secondary axes spring bearing solitary flowers; the expansion is thus centrifugal.

    0
    0
  • The bract is not, however, the one from which the axis terminating in the flower arises, but is a bract produced upon it, and gives origin in its axil to a new axis, the basal portion FIG.

    0
    0
  • From the axil of this leaf, that is, between it and the primary axis a l arises a secondary axis a2, ending in a flower f 2, and producing a leaf about the middle.

    0
    0
  • From the axil of this leaf a tertiary floral axis a 3, ending in a flower f 3, takes origin.

    0
    0
  • Here there are scorpioid cymes of pairs of flowers, each pair consisting of an older and a younger flower.

    0
    0
  • Upon this torus the parts of the flower are arranged in a crowded manner, usually forming a series of verticils, the parts of which alternate; but they are sometimes arranged spirally especially if the floral axis be elongated.

    0
    0
  • The flower is supposed to be cut transversely, and the parts of each whorl are distinguished by a different symbol.

    0
    0
  • The sepals are generally of a greenish colour; their function is mainly protective, shielding the more delicate internal organs before the flower opens.

    0
    0
  • Sometimes both are absent, when the flower is achlamydeous, or naked, as in willow.

    0
    0
  • The gynoecium or pistil is the central portion of the flower, terminating the floral axis.

    0
    0
  • When both are present the flower is hermaphrodite; and in descriptive botany such a flower is indicated by the symbol l.

    0
    0
  • When only one of those organs is present the flower is unisexual or diclinous, and is either male (staminate), j, or female (pistillate), ?

    0
    0
  • A flower then normally consists of the four series of leaves - calyx, corolla, androecium and gynoecium - and when these are all present the flower is complete.

    0
    0
  • Usually the successive whorls of the flower, disposed from below upwards or from without inwards upon the floral axis, are of the same number of parts, or are a multiple of the same number of parts, those of one whorl alternating with those of the whorls next it.

    0
    0
  • In Symmetry contrast to the cyclic flowers are those, as in Magnoli of the flower.

    0
    0
  • A flower is said to be symmetrical when each of its whorls consists of an equal number of parts, or when the parts of any one whorl are multiples of that preceding it.

    0
    0
  • Thus, a symmetrical flower may have five sepals, five petals, five stamens and five carpels, or the number of any of these parts may be ten, twenty or some multiple of five.

    0
    0
  • In all these cases the flower is symmetrical.

    0
    0
  • Flowers in which the number of parts in each whorl is the same, are isomerous (of equal number); when the number in some of the whorls is different, the flower is anisomerous (of unequal number).

    0
    0
  • In such circumstances, however, a flower has been called symmetrical, provided the parts of the other whorls are normal, - the permanent state of the pistil not being taken into account in determining symmetry.

    0
    0
  • A flower in which the parts are arranged in twos is called dimerous; when the parts of the whorls are three, four or five, the flower is trimerous, tetramerous or pentamerous, respectively.

    0
    0
  • The various parts of the flower have a certain definite relation to the axis.

    0
    0
  • When the different members of each whorl are like in size and shape, the flower is said to be regular; while differences in the size and shape of the parts of a whorl make the flower irregular, as in the papilionaceous flower, represented in fig.

    0
    0
  • When a flower can be divided by a single plane into two exactly similar parts, then it is said to be zygomorphic. Such flowers as Papilionaceae, Labiatae, are examples.

    0
    0
  • When the parts of any whorl are not equal to or some multiple of the others, then the flower 15 asymmetrical.

    0
    0
  • By suppression or non-appearance of a part at the place where it ought to appear if the structure was normal, the symmetry or completeness of the flower is disturbed.

    0
    0
  • This suppression when confined to the parts of certain verticils makes the flower asymmetrical.

    0
    0
  • In many instances the parts which are afterwards suppressed can be seen in the early stages of growth, and occasionally some vestiges of them remain in the fully developed flower.

    0
    0
  • The suppression of parts of the flower may be carried so far that at last a flower consists of only one part of one whorl.

    0
    0
  • In the Euphorbiaceae we have an excellent example of the gradual suppression of parts, where from an apetalous, trimerous, staminal flower we pass to one where one of the stamens is suppressed, and then to forms where two of them are wanting.

    0
    0
  • We next have flowers in which the calyx is suppressed, and its place occupied by one, two or three bracts (so that the flower is, properly speaking, achlamydeous), and only one or two stamens are produced.

    0
    0
  • There is thus traced a degradation, as it is called, from a flower with three stamens and three divisions of the calyx, to one with a single bract and a single stamen.

    0
    0
  • Thus in Cucurbita the stamens are originally five in number, but subsequently some cohere, so that three stamens only are seen in the mature flower.

    0
    0
  • Thus in the horse-chestnut there is an interposition of two stamens, and thus seven stamens are formed in the flower, which is asymmetrical.

    0
    0
  • Parts of the flower are often increased by a process of deduplication, or chorisis, i.e.

    0
    0
  • The symmetry in the flower is evidently dimerous, and the abnormality in the androecium, where the four long stamens are opposite the posterior sepals, takes place by a splitting, at a very early stage of development, of a single outgrowth into two.

    0
    0
  • Branching of stamens also produces apparent want of symmetry; thus, in the so-called polyadelphous stamens of Hypericaceae there are really only five stamens which give off numerous branches, but the basal portion remaining short, the branches have the appearance of separate stamens, and the flower thus seems asymmetrical.

    0
    0
  • As a convenient method of expressing the arrangement of the parts of the flower, floral formulae have been devised.

    0
    0
  • As regards each leaf of the flower, it is either spread out, as the sepals in the bud of the lime-tree, or folded upon itself (conduplicate), as in the petals of some species of Lysimachia, or slightly folded inwards or outwards at the edges, as in the FIG.

    0
    0
  • When the flower expands, the traces of twisting often disappear, but sometimes, as in Apocynaceae, they remain.

    0
    0
  • Whatever be its colour, the external envelope of the flower is considered as the calyx.

    0
    0
  • They serve various purposes in the economy of the flower, often closing the way to the honey-secreting part of the flower to small insects, whose visits would be useless for purposes of pollination.

    0
    0
  • Other modifications of some part of the flower, especially of the corolla and stamens, are produced either by degeneration or outgrowth, or by chorisis, or deduplication.

    0
    0
  • The stamens and the pistil are sometimes spoken of as the essential organs of the flower, as the presence of both is required in order that perfect seed may be produced.

    0
    0
  • The flower is then isostemonous.

    0
    0
  • When the stamens are not equal in number to the sepals or petals, the flower is anisostemonous.

    0
    0
  • A flower with a single row of stamens is haplostemonous.

    0
    0
  • If the stamens are double the sepals or petals as regards number, the flower is diplostemonous; if more than double, polystemonous.

    0
    0
  • The number of stamens is indicated by the Greek numerals prefixed to the term androus; thus a flower with one stamen is monandrous, with two, three, four, five, six or many stamens, di-, tri-, tetr-, pent-, hexor polyandrous, respectively.

    0
    0
  • Young stamen is abortive, flower in which the stigma (N) is receptive and cannot perform and the stamens (3) have not yet opened; its functions.

    0
    0
  • Older flower with the stamens (S) anther is developed o n the c orolla dried up.er(X2) dth e hairs before the filament, and when the latter is not produced, the anther is sessile, as in the mistletoe.

    0
    0
  • The length sometimes bears a relation to that of the pistil, and to the position of the flower, whether erect or drooping.

    0
    0
  • The anthers dehisce at different periods during the process of flowering; sometimes in the bud, but more commonly when the pistil is fully developed and the flower is expanded.

    0
    0
  • The anthers are called introrse when they dehisce by the surface next to the centre of the flower; they are extrorse when they dehisce by the outer surface; when they dehisce by the sides, as in Iris and some grasses, they are laterally dehiscent.

    0
    0
  • Some are enclosed within the tube of the flower, as in Cinchona (included); others are exserted, or extend beyond the flower, as in Littorella or Plantago.

    0
    0
  • Sometimes the stamens in the early state of the flower project beyond the petals, and in the progress of growth become included, as in Geranium striatum.

    0
    0
  • When there is more than one row or whorl in a flower, those on the outside are sometimes longest, as in many Rosaceae; at other times those in the interior are longest, as in Luhea.

    0
    0
  • Thus, in some flowers the stamens are didynamous, having only four out of five stamens developed, and the two corresponding to the upper part of the flower longer than the two lateral ones.

    0
    0
  • To allure and attract them to visit the flower the odoriferous secretions and gay colours are developed, and the position and complicated structure of the parts of the flower are adapted to the perfect performance of the process, It is comparatively rare in hermaphrodite flowers for self-fertilization to occur, and the various forms of dichogamy, dimorphism and trimorphism are fitted to prevent this.

    0
    0
  • The pistil or gynoecium occupies the centre or apex of the flower, and is surrounded by the stamens and floral envelopes when these are present.

    0
    0
  • This comparison is borne out by an examination of the flower of the double-flowering cherry.

    0
    0
  • A flower with a simple pistil is monogynous; with two carpels, digynous; with three carpels, trigynous, &c.

    0
    0
  • The ovary enlarges, and, with the seeds enclosed, constitutes the fruit, frequently incorporated with which are other parts of the flower, as receptacle, calyx, &c. In gymnosperms the pollen-tubes, having penetrated a certain distance down the tissue of the nucellus, are usually arrested in growth for a longer or shorter period, sometimes nearly a year.

    0
    0
  • As a rule, however, the fossil stems show a marked difference from modern forms in the possession of lateral shoots given off from the axils of leaves, and terminating in a flower of complex structure containing numerous orthotropous seeds.

    0
    0
  • The structure of this type of flower may be briefly described as follows.

    0
    0
  • In shape and size the flower is similar to that long known as the female flower of Bennettites and Williamsonia.

    0
    0
  • A number of hairy linear bracts enclose the whole; internal to these occur 12 to 20 crowded pinnate leaves (sporophylls), with their apical portions bent over towards the axis of the flower, the bases of the petioles being fused laterally into a disk surrounding the base of the conical receptacle.

    0
    0
  • It remains to be seen if the ovuliferous cone in the centre of the flower represents simply a functionless gynoecium, as in Welwitschia and abnormal cones of certain Coniferae, or if the flowers were hermaphrodite, with both male and female organs fully developed.

    0
    0
  • We have a combination in the same flower of stalked ovules, the structure of which has already been described, and interseminal scales constituting a complex gynoecium, which exhibits in certain features an approach to the angiospermous type, and differs in structure from other Gymnosperm flowers, associated with male organs constructed on a plan almost identical with that.

    0
    0
  • We cannot decide at present whether the gynoecium in a flower, such as that represented in fig.

    0
    0
  • One large specimen is figured by Heer from Lower Cretaceous rocks of Greenland, and by the side of the frond is shown a carpel with lateral ovules, as in the female flower of Cycas; but an examination of the type-specimen in the Copenhagen Museum led the present writer to regard this supposed carpel as valueless.

    0
    0
  • It consists of a comparatively small and repeatedly forked axis bearing in each fork a flower; the flowers, which are regarded as male and female, appear to be similar to those of Bennettites.

    0
    0
  • Seeds like those of Ginkgo biloba have also been recorded as fossils in Jurassic rocks, and it is possible that the type of flower known as Beania, from the Inferior Oolite rocks of Yorkshire, may have been borne by Ginkgo or Baiera.

    0
    0
  • A flower of a rather different type, Pseudaraucaria major, exhibiting in the occurrence of two seeds in each scale an approach to the cones of Abietineae, has been described by Professor Fliche from Lower Cretaceous rocks of Argonne.

    0
    0
  • His publications include The Reality of Religion (1884); The Poetry of Tennyson (1889); The Other Wise Man (1896); Ships and Havens (1897); The Toiling of Felix, and Other Poems (1900); The Poetry of the Psalms (1900); The Blue Flower (1902); Days Off (1907); The House of Rimmon (1908); Out-of-Doors in the Holy Land (1908); Collected Poems (191 I); The Bad Shepherd (1911); The Unknown Quantity (1912); The Lost Boy (1914); Fighting for Peace (1917); The Valley of Vision (1919); and Golden Stars (1919) .

    0
    0
  • Absently, she turned it into a frog then a flower then a piece of wood.

    0
    0
  • She was harmless to him, like a trash-talking flower.

    0
    0
  • But who knows if a shrub or flower is more or less pure, based on the distance from the sky?

    0
    0
  • Talal, their home in exile, the canyon filled with hulking grey ships in the moonlight near Romas's home, the flower in the fountain of the sacred temple.

    0
    0
  • Cynthia let out a gasp and wilted like a flower in a furnace; a dead faint.

    0
    0
  • The pernicious weed has spread all through the flower bed.

    0
    0
  • However, privet in flower is seldom sufficiently abundant for this to occur.

    0
    0
  • Andy Flower Andy suffered a slight aggravation of his back problem after a long batting session in the last Championship game against Gloucestershire.

    0
    0
  • The moment the flower opens, on the plant chosen to be female, snip off the pollen covered anthers.

    0
    0
  • The male anthers are clearly visible, the stigma is beneath them, half way up the flower tube.

    0
    0
  • Herb Tea Put a few leaves of fresh thyme, sage, lemon balm, mint or a Lavender flower head in a cup.

    0
    0
  • The police station, which closed in 1971, was opposite the rear entrance - the corner stone is preserved in the flower bed.

    0
    0
  • All roads lead to the large quayside which is backed by flower bedecked tavernas.

    0
    0
  • The top lip of the flower is hooded and it is pollinated by bees.

    0
    0
  • Each species of bee orchid is pollinated by a specific species of bee orchid is pollinated by a specific species of bee, males of which try to mate with the flower.

    0
    0
  • Apple blossom Heather Self raising flower Clover 4. What do beekeepers call the special box their bees live in?

    0
    0
  • To get much flower the first year, they need to be fairly biggish specimens already.

    0
    0
  • Hedge and large bindweed were still in flower as was Self-heal, Red clover and Cat's-ear.

    0
    0
  • Going against ourselves Like the flower, we humans have the same birthright.

    0
    0
  • Clusters of medium sized white very fragrant blooms, each having a hint of cream at the heart of the flower.

    0
    0
  • Link texas bluebonnets - GardenGuides Forums texas bluebonnets General Flower Discussions.. .

    0
    0
  • Contrasting navy blue and white cotton polkadot empireline bodice decorated with orange, yellow and green flower bouquets.

    0
    0
  • A cottage garden flower border runs along the front of the house.

    0
    0
  • Show your Mom you love her with a beautiful bouquet, flower basket, or planted basket.

    0
    0
  • He came all so still to his mother s bower, As dew in April that falleth on the flower.

    0
    0
  • The flower's petals are enclosed by hairy green bracts.

    0
    0
  • In summer large, greenish yellow flower bracts are produced with a prominent black eye.

    0
    0
  • They also make lovely bridesmaid or flower girl gifts.

    0
    0
  • A very sweet retro vintage brooch, in the form of a flower, dating to circa 1963.

    0
    0
  • On any section of spike, there are blooms in all stages, from unopened bud to full flower.

    0
    0
  • A growth or flower bud (" axillary bud ") often appears in the axil.

    0
    0
  • The first flower buds appear in spring are yellow, not red.

    0
    0
  • In waste places, white dead nettle, violets and coltsfoot may be in flower, attracting early bumblebees and honey bees.

    0
    0
  • The great burnet is an elegant plant with a compact blood-red flower head.

    0
    0
  • The flower head becomes a prickly seed head, with each individual flower producing a stiff spiky calyx holding the seed.

    0
    0
  • Each individual flower produces its own seed, which is held tightly in the spiky calyx.

    0
    0
  • A flower containing a burst calyx must be disqualified.

    0
    0
  • Rare chance to see rare flower NOW is the best time to see the Carmarthenshire's county flower - the whorled caraway.

    0
    0
  • When did you last hear somebody come into the pub and say they'd seen the first celandines in flower?

    0
    0
  • The flower center is a new hub of growth for the floriculture industry in the 21 st century.

    0
    0
  • To aid sleep consider the short term use of Valerian & Passion flower formula, and drink chamomile flower tea.

    0
    0
  • Plants exhibiting desirable characteristics of flower color, habit, size, variegation, fruit color, flavor etc. are often given names.

    0
    0
  • This will help prevent chlorosis, produce dark green foliage with more intensive flower color.

    0
    0
  • The pictures include a close-up of the leaf of each species, together with a flower or fruit.

    0
    0
  • Clearly, the red clover is more than just a pretty flower.

    0
    0
  • We've had a lot of white clover in flower on the lawn.

    0
    0
  • The brighter the color of the flower, the greater the amount of active constituents its ' petals contain.

    0
    0
  • The flower of this species appeared to be the responsible agent in a farmer aged 35 years who had contact dermatitis of the hands.

    0
    0
  • The gently sloping gardens - not suitable for the elderly or toddlers, include a copse, lawns, flower meadow and formal gardens.

    0
    0
  • Too many leaf variations to describe but flower corollas are white with no spots.

    0
    0
  • It is decorated with delicate pink lace and a removable velvet flower corsage.

    0
    0
  • Here we found meadow and bloody cranesbill, creeping jenny and rock stonecrop, as well as hoary plantain in flower.

    0
    0
  • The Mix & Match Activity garden has colorful rings and garden critters that can be sorted and stacked onto three soft flower stems.

    0
    0
  • A classic easy to grow early flowering basket cultivar that seems to be forever in flower.

    0
    0
  • Similarly, a rotary cutter has been developed to remove the flower heads of bolted weed beet growing in sugar beet crops.

    0
    0
  • A heart shaped cookie cutter, or a flower shaped one.

    0
    0
  • I may mention I've got daffodils in flower - the first daffodils seen in Mesopotamia.

    0
    0
  • The first dwarf daffodil, in the patch that we planted in the autumn, has suddenly sprung into flower.

    0
    0
  • My favorite flower in those days was the dahlia â I showed mainly dahlias and some Chrysanthemums.

    0
    0
  • A prize dahlia can certainly be the star of any flower show, due to their striking beauty and large size.

    0
    0
  • The plant has an attractive daisy like flower from which many medicines are made.

    0
    0
  • Flower painted the only piece of English delftware, of which we can be sure who the decorator was.

    0
    0
  • He nodded slowly and glanced at the bunch of blue delphiniums I had taken him from the wholesale flower stalls around 27th Street.

    0
    0
  • By the very nature of the flower waters, (being a pure distillate ), they are not ' bacteria friendly ' .

    0
    0
  • The vastly divergent views on the color white can lead to major flower issues.

    0
    0
  • Now lost in thought, now spotting a dragonfly, now a flower new to her.

    0
    0
  • Nests are frequently located in loft spaces, cavity walls, flower beds, garden sheds, rockeries and roof eaves.

    0
    0
  • How to use the Alaskan essences Flower Essence Practitioner Kit There are 72 essences in the Alaskan Flower Essence Practitioner Kit.

    0
    0
  • These essences are evocative of some of the most subtle levels of healing that have even been explored with flower essences.

    0
    0
  • During the evenings, Tersteegen studied the Bible and began compositions for his now famous Little Flower Garden.

    0
    0
  • We ended up at the village bar/restaurant, whose flower festooned terrace is a winner in itself.

    0
    0
  • We should warn you â these range from the local village fete to the Chelsea Flower Show!

    0
    0
  • You don't have to be an expert florist or flower arranger.

    0
    0
  • We can also help you choose the perfect winter scented flower for your big day.

    0
    0
  • Venture out on a trip to visit a garden center and create a wonderful flower arrangement with a professional flower arranger.

    0
    0
  • The entire building is covered in depictions of the lotus flower from the tops of the vast columns to the pictograms on the walls.

    0
    0
  • We can also provide beautiful silk flower arrangements for homemade or shop bought cakes.

    0
    0
  • The time taken for each explant to start growing a new leaf, new roots, or develop flower buds, can be recorded.

    0
    0
  • A particularly dull autumn will produce less flower buds.

    0
    0
  • A shortage of water at this time of year can cause flower buds to drop next spring before they open.

    0
    0
  • However, it is possible to keep this solely for its beautiful foliage by removing the flower buds as they appear.

    0
    0
  • Yet cold winters and late frosts often damage the flower buds and prevent blooming.

    0
    0
  • Caper This is the unopened flower bud of a plant which grows wild among the rocks of Greece an Northern Africa.

    0
    0
  • In addition smaller flower buds emerge from the upper leaf joints.

    0
    0
  • Mulch with spent mushroom compost in July-August when the new flower buds are being formed.

    0
    0
  • Broccoli is a member of the cabbage family prized for its top crowns of tender, edible, green flower buds.

    0
    0
  • Lavandulas produce flower heads, that when dry the birds love to eat.

    0
    0
  • Should I remove the flower heads once they are finished flowering?

    0
    0
  • They are very striking in flower with the contrast of textures against the lush foliage.

    0
    0
  • The leading export sectors in South America, including the flower industry, use a predominantly female labor force.

    0
    0
  • Beds will be weeded, any dead flower heads removed and grass edge trimmed approximately fortnightly March to October and monthly November to February.

    0