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florid

florid

florid Sentence Examples

  • He had much taste and love for music, and considerable gifts as an orator of a florid type.

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    12
  • It is full of youthful enthusiasm and is written in florid language.

    17
    10
  • Her own account of her escape is, as usual, so florid that it provokes the question whether she was really in any danger.

    15
    9
  • Of the eleven churches, the most interesting is the cathedral of St Stephen, a florid, rococo edifice.

    12
    6
  • The robust, florid and distinctly Roman rendering of the classic, which followed the refined and attenuated treatment associated with the architecture of the brothers Adam, who died in 1792 and 1794, is the last development in England which can be regarded as a national style.

    9
    9
  • former was the leading representative of the Asiatic or florid style of oratory, and, like other members of the aristocracy, such as C.Memmius and L.

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    1
  • The present building, in florid rococo style, dates from 1744-1767.

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    2
  • The present building, in florid rococo style, dates from 1744-1767.

    6
    2
  • He had previously affected the florid, or Asiatic, style of oratory then current in Rome.

    6
    3
  • It is rich, ornate, yet hardly florid, distinguished by splendid effects of light and shade, obtained by a far bolder use of projections than had hitherto been found in the somewhat fiat design of Venetian façades.

    6
    5
  • A florid Jesuitical style of oratory became very popular in the time of Sigismund III., not without rhetorical power, but frequently becoming tawdry.

    5
    3
  • In mastery of prose language he has never been surpassed, when he chose to curb his florid imagination and his discursive eagerness of soul.

    5
    3
  • One is fair-haired, florid and blue-eyed; the other, more frequent among the Carpathians, is dark, resembling the southern Italians.

    5
    4
  • One is fair-haired, florid and blue-eyed; the other, more frequent among the Carpathians, is dark, resembling the southern Italians.

    5
    5
  • The free use of discords and of wider intervals, together with the influence of the florid elements of solo-singing, enlarged the bounds of choral expression almost beyond recognition, while they crowded into very narrow quarters the subtleties of 16th-, century music. These, however, by no means disappeared; :and such devices as the crossing of parts in the second Kyrie of Bach's B Minor Mass (bars 7, 8, 14, 15, 22, 23, 50) abundantly show that in the hands of the great masters artistic truths are not things which a change of date can make false.

    4
    2
  • As an orator he was the leader of the opponents of the florid Asiatic school, who took the simplest Attic orators as their model and attacked even Cicero as wordy and artificial.

    4
    2
  • They show an elongation of forms and an excess of decoration in which the florid qualities predominate.

    4
    2
  • The typical objects from South Russia were jewellery, pottery, terra-cottas, and glass, mostly of florid Greek style.

    4
    2
  • Its churches, of which the largest is San Giovanni Battista, are florid in decoration, as are the law-court, the theatre and the hotel-de-ville.

    4
    5
  • The sentimentality of her sentiment and the florid magniloquence of her style equally disgust the reader.

    3
    1
  • The town-hall, a large florid building of Classic order, stands on an eminence, and its clock tower forms a landmark; it contains the spacious Centennial Hall (commemorating the first Australian colonization here in 1787), and has one of the finest organs in the world.

    3
    1
  • did little to connect his name with the history of London, although the erection of the exquisite specimen of florid Gothic at Westminster Abbey has carried his memory down in its popular name of Henry VII.'s chapel.

    3
    1
  • In point of style it is greatly inferior to the Histories - florid, pompous and affected, and at the same time tedious.

    3
    1
  • He was the possessor of a clear and graceful, if somewhat florid, style, which showed to special advantage in his numerous obituary notices or encomiums (collected and published in three volumes Zur Erinnerung an vorangegangene Freunde, 1888).

    3
    2
  • The matter is well arranged, the style (modelled on that of Xenophon) simple, and on the whole free from the usual florid bombast of the Byzantine writers.

    2
    1
  • They range from the rough and noble pathos of Egil, the mystic obscurity of Kormak, the pride and grief of Hallfred, and the marvellous fluency of Sighvat, to the florid intricacy of Einar and Markus.

    2
    2
  • Langlois, "is learned, unctuous, ornate, florid, a mysticism which never indulges in dangerous temerities; it is the orthodox mysticism of a subtle and prudent rhetorician."

    2
    3
  • In it is the masterpiece of the sculptor, Adam Krafft, consisting of a ciborium, or receptacle for the host, in the form of a florid Gothic spire 65 ft.

    2
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  • His literary style was somewhat florid.

    1
    0
  • A third and still loftier tower, the upper part of which, in the florid Gothic style, is modern, surmounts the crossing.

    1
    3
  • Custis says that his complexion was "fair, but considerably florid."

    0
    0
  • His literary style was somewhat florid.

    0
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  • Another early influence was the verse anthem of the English baroque, in which florid solos alternated with slightly more sedate choruses.

    0
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  • bushy, white mustache and a florid face.

    0
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  • florid prose style will depend on what you are looking for in your wine writing.

    0
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  • florid face.

    0
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  • florid plaques throughout the brain.

    0
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  • florid language, which I can only presume reflects the original French.

    0
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  • florid symptoms are unusual and CD is usually detected during the child's first year, after introducing cereals at weaning.

    0
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  • florid complexion and dark eyes in a man.

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  • The initials HEE are crisply engraved in a very florid style.

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  • The left hand supports the often florid right hand part.

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  • It's a much more delicate and florid piece than the loopy Mr. Vengeance or the rampaging monster of a movie that was Oldboy.

    0
    0
  • moustachea bushy, white mustache and a florid face.

    0
    0
  • strapping florid girls that go so well with autumn scenery or Christmas decorations in church.

    0
    0
  • The free use of discords and of wider intervals, together with the influence of the florid elements of solo-singing, enlarged the bounds of choral expression almost beyond recognition, while they crowded into very narrow quarters the subtleties of 16th-, century music. These, however, by no means disappeared; :and such devices as the crossing of parts in the second Kyrie of Bach's B Minor Mass (bars 7, 8, 14, 15, 22, 23, 50) abundantly show that in the hands of the great masters artistic truths are not things which a change of date can make false.

    0
    0
  • It is rich, ornate, yet hardly florid, distinguished by splendid effects of light and shade, obtained by a far bolder use of projections than had hitherto been found in the somewhat fiat design of Venetian façades.

    0
    0
  • As an orator he was the leader of the opponents of the florid Asiatic school, who took the simplest Attic orators as their model and attacked even Cicero as wordy and artificial.

    0
    0
  • Her own account of her escape is, as usual, so florid that it provokes the question whether she was really in any danger.

    0
    0
  • The sentimentality of her sentiment and the florid magniloquence of her style equally disgust the reader.

    0
    0
  • Its churches, of which the largest is San Giovanni Battista, are florid in decoration, as are the law-court, the theatre and the hotel-de-ville.

    0
    0
  • The town-hall, a large florid building of Classic order, stands on an eminence, and its clock tower forms a landmark; it contains the spacious Centennial Hall (commemorating the first Australian colonization here in 1787), and has one of the finest organs in the world.

    0
    0
  • did little to connect his name with the history of London, although the erection of the exquisite specimen of florid Gothic at Westminster Abbey has carried his memory down in its popular name of Henry VII.'s chapel.

    0
    0
  • Of the eleven churches, the most interesting is the cathedral of St Stephen, a florid, rococo edifice.

    0
    0
  • He had much taste and love for music, and considerable gifts as an orator of a florid type.

    0
    0
  • former was the leading representative of the Asiatic or florid style of oratory, and, like other members of the aristocracy, such as C.Memmius and L.

    0
    0
  • It is unduly florid and redundant in style, but it supplies us with the fullest account of the emperor's antecedents, and of his policy during the first two years and a half of his rule.

    0
    0
  • He was the possessor of a clear and graceful, if somewhat florid, style, which showed to special advantage in his numerous obituary notices or encomiums (collected and published in three volumes Zur Erinnerung an vorangegangene Freunde, 1888).

    0
    0
  • It is full of youthful enthusiasm and is written in florid language.

    0
    0
  • A florid Jesuitical style of oratory became very popular in the time of Sigismund III., not without rhetorical power, but frequently becoming tawdry.

    0
    0
  • These two small books contain the earliest and most systematic of all Ruskin's efforts to depict a new social Utopia: they contain a vehement repudiation of the orthodox formulas of the economists; and they are for the most part written in a trenchant but simple style, in striking contrast to the florid and discursive form of his works on art.

    0
    0
  • In mastery of prose language he has never been surpassed, when he chose to curb his florid imagination and his discursive eagerness of soul.

    0
    0
  • In point of style it is greatly inferior to the Histories - florid, pompous and affected, and at the same time tedious.

    0
    0
  • They show an elongation of forms and an excess of decoration in which the florid qualities predominate.

    0
    0
  • The typical objects from South Russia were jewellery, pottery, terra-cottas, and glass, mostly of florid Greek style.

    0
    0
  • The robust, florid and distinctly Roman rendering of the classic, which followed the refined and attenuated treatment associated with the architecture of the brothers Adam, who died in 1792 and 1794, is the last development in England which can be regarded as a national style.

    0
    0
  • He had previously affected the florid, or Asiatic, style of oratory then current in Rome.

    0
    0
  • In it is the masterpiece of the sculptor, Adam Krafft, consisting of a ciborium, or receptacle for the host, in the form of a florid Gothic spire 65 ft.

    0
    0
  • Custis says that his complexion was "fair, but considerably florid."

    0
    0
  • A third and still loftier tower, the upper part of which, in the florid Gothic style, is modern, surmounts the crossing.

    0
    0
  • The matter is well arranged, the style (modelled on that of Xenophon) simple, and on the whole free from the usual florid bombast of the Byzantine writers.

    0
    0
  • They range from the rough and noble pathos of Egil, the mystic obscurity of Kormak, the pride and grief of Hallfred, and the marvellous fluency of Sighvat, to the florid intricacy of Einar and Markus.

    0
    0
  • Langlois, "is learned, unctuous, ornate, florid, a mysticism which never indulges in dangerous temerities; it is the orthodox mysticism of a subtle and prudent rhetorician."

    0
    0
  • Constance is one of those strapping florid girls that go so well with autumn scenery or Christmas decorations in church.

    0
    0
  • Then 18th-century musicians bemoaned the florid and vapid new style of Italian virtuosity which was destroying the true art on which they grew up.

    0
    0
  • Isabella Fiore is renowned for her ornate and florid artistry.

    0
    0
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