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flodden

flodden

flodden Sentence Examples

  • From this date till the battle of Flodden, in September 1513, he appears to have been occupied with his ecclesiastical duties and literary work.

  • After the disaster at Flodden he was completely absorbed in public business.

  • His own hopes of preferment had been strengthened by the death of many of the higher clergy at Flodden.

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  • He fought at Flodden and escaped with his life, but his eldest son Alexander, (fifth of Merchiston) was killed.

  • In his seventieth year, as lieutenant-general of the North, he led the English host on the great day of Flodden, earning a patent of the dukedom of Norfolk, dated 1 February 1513/4, and that strange patent which granted to him and his heirs that they should bear in the midst of the silver bend of their Howard shield a demi-lion stricken in the mouth with an arrow, in the right colours of the arms of the king of Scotland.

  • The victor of Flodden is the common ancestor of all living Howards that can show a descent from the main stock.

  • The second duke, twice married, was father of at least eleven sons and six daughters, the sons including Edward the lord high admiral, killed in boarding Pregent's galleys at Brest, Edmund the knight marshal of the army at Flodden, and William the first Lord Howard of Effingham.

  • He had fought as captain of the vanguard at Flodden and after the victory was created earl of Surrey.

  • The eldest of the cadet branches of the ducal house has its origin in William (c. 1510-1573), eldest son of the victor of Flodden by his second marriage.

  • A drama by him, Flodden Field, was acted at His Majesty's theatre in 1903.

  • in 1513, along with other disastrous results of the battle of Flodden, brought this era of prosperity to an abrupt close.

  • FLODDEN, or Flodden Field, near the village of Branxton, in Northumberland, England (10 m.

  • On the 6th of September, however, he left Ford and took up a strong position facing south, on Flodden Edge.

  • When they returned to Rome, his pupil departed to Scotland, to fall a few years later by his father's side at Flodden; Erasmus also found a summons to call him northwards.

  • in 130o; another Sir Herbert was made a lord of the Scottish parliament before 1445; and his great-grandson John, 3rd Lord Maxwell, was killed at Flodden in 1513.

  • JOHN CRAIG (1512 ?-1600), Scottish reformer, born about 1512, was the son of Craig of Craigston, Aberdeenshire, who was killed at Flodden in 1513.

  • Continuing to participate in public affairs he opposed the policy of hostility towards England which led to the disaster at Flodden in September 1513, and died in Edinburgh on the 25th of October 1514.

  • James declined to commit this chivalrous folly; but, for lack of scouts, permitted Surrey to out-manoeuvre him and pass, concealed by a range of hills, across his front, to a position north of Flodden, on his lines of communication.

  • Next day, 9th of September, Surrey crossed the Till, unobserved, by Twizel bridge and Millford, and moved south against Branxton hill, the middle of three ridges on the Flodden slope.

  • The king's death assured the victory, which Surrey had not the strength to pursue, though the townsmen of Edinburgh built their famous Flodden Wall to resist him if he approached.

  • England never won a victory more creditable to the fighting and marching powers of her sons than at the battle of Flodden.

  • The Scots had so handled their enemies that they could not or dared not pursue their advantage; on the other hand, it was long indeed before the memory of Flodden ceased to haunt the Scots and deter them from invading England in force.

  • The burgesses, of course, had long been a relatively rich and powerful body: it is a fond delusion to suppose that they sprang into being under John Knox, though their attachment to his principles made them prominent among his disciples, while Flodden probably began to deter them from the ancient attachment to France.

  • i.) describes Forman as "the Wolsey of Scotland, and a fomenter of the war which ended at Flodden."

  • The battle, which took place at Flodden, or more correctly, at the foot of Brankston Hill, on Friday the 9th of September 1513, is among the most famous and disastrous, if not among the most momentous, in the history of Scotland.

  • Prominent both as an administrator and as a lawgiver, the king by his vigorous rule did much to destroy the tendencies to independence which existed in the Highlands and Islands; but, on the other hand, his rash conduct at Flodden brought much misery upon his kingdom.

  • (1512-1542), king of Scotland, son of James IV., was born at Linlithgow on the 10th of April 1512, and became king when his father was killed at Flodden in 1513.

  • The English had not followed up their victory at Flodden, although there were as usual forays on the borders, but Henry VIII.

  • The attack of the English failed to make any gap in the line of defence, many knights and men-atarms were injured by falling into the pits, and the battle became a melee, the Scots, with better fortune than at Falkirk and Flodden, presenting always an impenetrable hedge of spears, the English, too stubborn to draw off, constantly trying in vain to break it down.

  • In 1514, the year after the battle of Flodden, in which the burghers had suffered severely, a number of young men surprised an English force at Hornshole, a spot on the Teviot 2 m.

  • He suffered a disaster Flodden.

  • After taking a few Northumbrian castles, James was brought to action at Flodden Field by the earl of Surrey (September gth, 1513).

  • This Thomas, who had a command at Flodden, held his ancestors' castle as constable for the king.

  • Berwick and Carlisle were repeatedly assailed, and battles took place at Halidon Hill (1333), Otterburn (1388), Nisbet (1402), Homildon (1402), Piperden (1435), Hedgeley Moor (1464),(1464), Flodden (1513), Solway Moss (1542), and Ancrum Moor (1544), in addition to many fights arising out of family feuds and raids fomented by the Armstrongs, Eliots, Grahams, Johnstones, Maxwells and other families, of which the most serious were the encounters at Arkenholme (Langholm) in 1455, the Raid of Reidswire (1575), and the bloody combat at Dryfe Sands (1593).

  • His son Robert also fought at Flodden, and had an equally grisly fate.

  • Now, she hears the shout of Bannockburn; and now, the long wail of Flodden.

  • From this date till the battle of Flodden, in September 1513, he appears to have been occupied with his ecclesiastical duties and literary work.

  • After the disaster at Flodden he was completely absorbed in public business.

  • The latter dying soon afterwards (January 1514) in Wigtownshire, where he had gone as justiciar, and his son having been killed at Flodden, the succession fell to Gavin's nephew Archibald (6th earl).

  • His own hopes of preferment had been strengthened by the death of many of the higher clergy at Flodden.

  • over a legacy claimed by Margaret was a contributory cause of the war which ended at Flodden, where James IV.

  • He fought at Flodden and escaped with his life, but his eldest son Alexander, (fifth of Merchiston) was killed.

  • His father, Patrick, the 3rd earl (c. 1512-1556), was the only son of Adam, the 2nd earl, who was killed at Flodden, and the grandson of Patrick (d.

  • In his seventieth year, as lieutenant-general of the North, he led the English host on the great day of Flodden, earning a patent of the dukedom of Norfolk, dated 1 February 1513/4, and that strange patent which granted to him and his heirs that they should bear in the midst of the silver bend of their Howard shield a demi-lion stricken in the mouth with an arrow, in the right colours of the arms of the king of Scotland.

  • The victor of Flodden is the common ancestor of all living Howards that can show a descent from the main stock.

  • The second duke, twice married, was father of at least eleven sons and six daughters, the sons including Edward the lord high admiral, killed in boarding Pregent's galleys at Brest, Edmund the knight marshal of the army at Flodden, and William the first Lord Howard of Effingham.

  • He had fought as captain of the vanguard at Flodden and after the victory was created earl of Surrey.

  • The eldest of the cadet branches of the ducal house has its origin in William (c. 1510-1573), eldest son of the victor of Flodden by his second marriage.

  • A drama by him, Flodden Field, was acted at His Majesty's theatre in 1903.

  • in 1513, along with other disastrous results of the battle of Flodden, brought this era of prosperity to an abrupt close.

  • FLODDEN, or Flodden Field, near the village of Branxton, in Northumberland, England (10 m.

  • On the 6th of September, however, he left Ford and took up a strong position facing south, on Flodden Edge.

  • When they returned to Rome, his pupil departed to Scotland, to fall a few years later by his father's side at Flodden; Erasmus also found a summons to call him northwards.

  • in 130o; another Sir Herbert was made a lord of the Scottish parliament before 1445; and his great-grandson John, 3rd Lord Maxwell, was killed at Flodden in 1513.

  • JOHN CRAIG (1512 ?-1600), Scottish reformer, born about 1512, was the son of Craig of Craigston, Aberdeenshire, who was killed at Flodden in 1513.

  • Continuing to participate in public affairs he opposed the policy of hostility towards England which led to the disaster at Flodden in September 1513, and died in Edinburgh on the 25th of October 1514.

  • After securing his flank and rear by taking Norham, Wark and Eitel castles, he awaited the approach of Surrey's army at Ford castle, behind which lies Flodden Edge, a strong position, which he presently occupied.

  • James declined to commit this chivalrous folly; but, for lack of scouts, permitted Surrey to out-manoeuvre him and pass, concealed by a range of hills, across his front, to a position north of Flodden, on his lines of communication.

  • Next day, 9th of September, Surrey crossed the Till, unobserved, by Twizel bridge and Millford, and moved south against Branxton hill, the middle of three ridges on the Flodden slope.

  • The king's death assured the victory, which Surrey had not the strength to pursue, though the townsmen of Edinburgh built their famous Flodden Wall to resist him if he approached.

  • England never won a victory more creditable to the fighting and marching powers of her sons than at the battle of Flodden.

  • The Scots had so handled their enemies that they could not or dared not pursue their advantage; on the other hand, it was long indeed before the memory of Flodden ceased to haunt the Scots and deter them from invading England in force.

  • The burgesses, of course, had long been a relatively rich and powerful body: it is a fond delusion to suppose that they sprang into being under John Knox, though their attachment to his principles made them prominent among his disciples, while Flodden probably began to deter them from the ancient attachment to France.

  • i.) describes Forman as "the Wolsey of Scotland, and a fomenter of the war which ended at Flodden."

  • The battle, which took place at Flodden, or more correctly, at the foot of Brankston Hill, on Friday the 9th of September 1513, is among the most famous and disastrous, if not among the most momentous, in the history of Scotland.

  • He left one legitimate child, his successor James V., but as his gallantries were numerous he had many illegitimate children, among them (by Marion Boyd) Alexander Stewart, archbishop of St Andrews and chancellor of Scotland, who was killed at Flodden, and (by Janet Kennedy) James Stewart, earl of Moray (d.

  • Prominent both as an administrator and as a lawgiver, the king by his vigorous rule did much to destroy the tendencies to independence which existed in the Highlands and Islands; but, on the other hand, his rash conduct at Flodden brought much misery upon his kingdom.

  • (1512-1542), king of Scotland, son of James IV., was born at Linlithgow on the 10th of April 1512, and became king when his father was killed at Flodden in 1513.

  • The English had not followed up their victory at Flodden, although there were as usual forays on the borders, but Henry VIII.

  • The attack of the English failed to make any gap in the line of defence, many knights and men-atarms were injured by falling into the pits, and the battle became a melee, the Scots, with better fortune than at Falkirk and Flodden, presenting always an impenetrable hedge of spears, the English, too stubborn to draw off, constantly trying in vain to break it down.

  • In 1514, the year after the battle of Flodden, in which the burghers had suffered severely, a number of young men surprised an English force at Hornshole, a spot on the Teviot 2 m.

  • He suffered a disaster Flodden.

  • After taking a few Northumbrian castles, James was brought to action at Flodden Field by the earl of Surrey (September gth, 1513).

  • This Thomas, who had a command at Flodden, held his ancestors' castle as constable for the king.

  • Berwick and Carlisle were repeatedly assailed, and battles took place at Halidon Hill (1333), Otterburn (1388), Nisbet (1402), Homildon (1402), Piperden (1435), Hedgeley Moor (1464),(1464), Flodden (1513), Solway Moss (1542), and Ancrum Moor (1544), in addition to many fights arising out of family feuds and raids fomented by the Armstrongs, Eliots, Grahams, Johnstones, Maxwells and other families, of which the most serious were the encounters at Arkenholme (Langholm) in 1455, the Raid of Reidswire (1575), and the bloody combat at Dryfe Sands (1593).

  • Now, she hears the shout of Bannockburn; and now, the long wail of Flodden.

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