This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience. Learn more

flints

flints Sentence Examples

  • The sickle was of wood (92), with flints (91) inserted, apparently a copy of the ox-jaw and teeth.

    1
    0
  • The Senonian series is represented by the White Limestone, a hardened chalk with flints, which is often glauconitic and conglomeratic at the base.

    1
    1
  • The succession of beds in descending order is as follows: - (1) Shingle consisting of pebbles of limestone, slate and other local rocks, with fragments of stalagmite and containing a few bones and worked flints.

    0
    0
  • The implements of man are relatively more common, seventeen chipped flints having been found.

    0
    0
  • thick, and formed of a core of rough rubble cemented together with mortar (containing much coarse gravel) of extraordinary hardness and tenacity, and a facing for the most part of stone - Kentish rag, freestone or ironstone - but occasionally of flints; about 2 ft.

    0
    0
  • By his collection of flints Boucher de Perthes had been the first to attempt to establish the existence of man in remote ages; but it had been objected that if the flints were indeed the work of man, human remains would have been found in association with them.

    0
    0
  • The contemporaneity of these structures has been demonstrated by the identity of the pottery and other objects discovered in them, including some remarkable steatopygic figures in stone, and it is clear that they belong to the neolithic period, numerous flints, but no metal, having been found.

    0
    0
  • The notched flints for it are common from the 1st to the XVIIIth Dynasty.

    0
    0
  • It is probable that certain rudely chipped flints, so-called eoliths, in the alluvial gravels (formed generally at the mouth of wadis opening on to the Nile) at Thebes and elsewhere, are the work of primitive man; but it has been shown that such are produced also by natural forces in the rush of torrents.

    0
    0
  • Enormous numbers of flints and also less abundant fragments of chalk are found in glacial deposits bordering the Moray Firth.

    0
    0
  • The period is characterized by two series of chipped flints, one modelled on the laurel-leaf, the other on that of the willow.

    0
    0
  • Those of the first series are artistically chipped upon the two faces and the end, and are readily distinguishable from the flints of the preceding Mousterian epoch.

    0
    0
  • The traces of human occupation are pieces of charcoal, flints, moccasin tracks and a single skeleton embedded in stalagmite in one of the chasms, estimated, from the present rate of stalagmitic growth, to have lain where found for not more than five hundred years.

    0
    0
  • About the same time P. C. Schmerling of Liege was exploring the ossiferous caverns of the valley of the Meuse, and satisfied himself that the men whose bones he found beneath the stalagmite floors, together with bones cut and flints shaped by human workmanship, had inhabited this Belgian district at the same time with the cave-bear and several other extinct animals whose bones were imbedded with them (Recherches sur les ossements fossiles decouverts dans les cavernes de la province de Liege (Liege, 1833-1834)).

    0
    0
  • p. 286), that the human bones and worked flints had been deposited indiscriminately together with the remains of fossil elephant, rhinoceros, &c. Certain caves and rock-shelters in the province of Dordogne, in central France, were examined by a French and an English archaeologist, Edouard Lartet and Henry Christy, the remains discovered showing the former prevalence of the reindeer in this region, at that time inhabited by savages, whose bone and stone implements indicate a habit of life similar to that of the Eskimos.

    0
    0
  • They hold water like a sponge, but part with it under pressure to fissures by which they are intersected, and, in the case of the Upper Chalk, to ducts following beds of flints.

    0
    0
  • McEnery, who found worked flints in intimate association with the bones of extinct mammals.

    0
    0
  • This serves to distinguish flints which have been fashioned by human agencies from those which have been split merely by the action of frost and the weather.

    0
    0
  • The purest flints have the most perfect conchoidal fracture, and prehistoric man is known to have quarried or mined certain bands of flint which were specially suitable for his purposes.

    0
    0
  • Nodules of flint when removed from the chalk which encloses them have a white dull rough surface, and exposure to the weather produces much the same appearance on broken flints.

    0
    0
  • Where the flints lie the chalk must have been dissolved away; we have in fact a kind of metasomatic replacement in which a siliceous rock has slowly replaced a calcareous one.

    0
    0
  • Seasoned flints from the land, having been long exposed to the atmosphere, are preferred to flints freshly dug from the chalk pits.

    0
    0
  • Formerly flint and steel were everywhere employed for striking a light; and gun flints were required for fire-arms. A special industry in the shaping of gun flints long existed at Brandon in Suffolk.

    0
    0
  • Since then the trade has become almost extinct as gun flints are in demand only in semi-savage countries where modern fire-arms are not obtainable.

    0
    0
  • Chalk flints occur frequently in the surface-deposits of the south of Ireland, associated with rocks brought from the north during the glacial epoch, and probably also of northern origin.

    0
    0
  • The more deep-seated type of these rocks is seen in the olivine-gabbro mass of Carlingford Mountain; but most of the igneous region became covered with sheets of basaltic lava, which filled up the hollows of the downs, baked the gravels into a layer of red flints, and built up, pile upon pile, the great plateaus of the north.

    0
    0
  • The results were more positive, especially from one field, which produced 12 worked flints including two arrowheads.

    0
    0
  • The flints were prehistoric arrowheads; one remedy was for the animal to drink water in which the offending stone had been placed 18.

    0
    0
  • burnt flints found across the survey area.

    0
    0
  • Stone Age flints have been found in the sea caves.

    0
    0
  • A small mound, 1 foot high and 14 feet in diameter containing one cremation with six calcined flints.

    0
    0
  • Apart from several struck flints, of possible Neolithic / Bronze Age date, the only material recorded was Romano-British.

    0
    0
  • The earliest finds so far are Mesolithic flints, including fine tanged points of the later Mesolithic.

    0
    0
  • Even in the woods, Ju finds more flint and Roman pottery... One of the many burnt flints found across the survey area.

    0
    0
  • The discovery of some fifty Neolithic flints in 1978 (HER 4609) is the earliest recorded evidence for prehistoric human activity at Kenton.

    0
    0
  • flinty loam and the subsoil clay with flints, and the chief crops are wheat and beans.

    0
    0
  • An oval mound, two and a half feet high and twenty-eight feet long, containing four interments all with pottery and flints.

    0
    0
  • knapped flints would be used on the main house, with less worked field flints used on boundary walls.

    0
    0
  • Such features could provide additional small sources of " fresh " flints, together with some input from the eroding Eocene sandstones.

    0
    0
  • The succession of beds in descending order is as follows: - (1) Shingle consisting of pebbles of limestone, slate and other local rocks, with fragments of stalagmite and containing a few bones and worked flints.

    0
    0
  • (2) Red cave earth with angular fragments of limestone, bones and worked flints, and having a thickness of 3 to 4 ft.

    0
    0
  • The implements of man are relatively more common, seventeen chipped flints having been found.

    0
    0
  • thick, and formed of a core of rough rubble cemented together with mortar (containing much coarse gravel) of extraordinary hardness and tenacity, and a facing for the most part of stone - Kentish rag, freestone or ironstone - but occasionally of flints; about 2 ft.

    0
    0
  • By his collection of flints Boucher de Perthes had been the first to attempt to establish the existence of man in remote ages; but it had been objected that if the flints were indeed the work of man, human remains would have been found in association with them.

    0
    0
  • The contemporaneity of these structures has been demonstrated by the identity of the pottery and other objects discovered in them, including some remarkable steatopygic figures in stone, and it is clear that they belong to the neolithic period, numerous flints, but no metal, having been found.

    0
    0
  • The Senonian series is represented by the White Limestone, a hardened chalk with flints, which is often glauconitic and conglomeratic at the base.

    0
    0
  • Numerous flints of palaeolithic type have been discovered, notably at Tlemcen and Kolea.

    0
    0
  • with rubble stones, flints, brickbats or similar material, thoroughly drained at bottom.

    0
    0
  • Some of the best water-meadows in England have but a thin soil resting on gravel and flints, this constituting a most effectual system of natural drainage.

    0
    0
  • The sickle was of wood (92), with flints (91) inserted, apparently a copy of the ox-jaw and teeth.

    0
    0
  • The notched flints for it are common from the 1st to the XVIIIth Dynasty.

    0
    0
  • The cutters were sometimes flints of a crescent shape (P. Ab.

    0
    0
  • It is probable that certain rudely chipped flints, so-called eoliths, in the alluvial gravels (formed generally at the mouth of wadis opening on to the Nile) at Thebes and elsewhere, are the work of primitive man; but it has been shown that such are produced also by natural forces in the rush of torrents.

    0
    0
  • Enormous numbers of flints and also less abundant fragments of chalk are found in glacial deposits bordering the Moray Firth.

    0
    0
  • The most important data bearing upon the first great period are given elsewhere in this work, and it is proposed to offer here a more general survey.5 To the prehistoric ages belong the palaeolithic and neolithic flints, from the distribution of which an attempt might be made to give a synthetic sketch of early Palestinian man.6 A burial cave at Gezer has revealed the existence of a race of slight build and stature, muscular, with elongated crania, and thick and heavy skull-bones.

    0
    0
  • The period is characterized by two series of chipped flints, one modelled on the laurel-leaf, the other on that of the willow.

    0
    0
  • Those of the first series are artistically chipped upon the two faces and the end, and are readily distinguishable from the flints of the preceding Mousterian epoch.

    0
    0
  • The traces of human occupation are pieces of charcoal, flints, moccasin tracks and a single skeleton embedded in stalagmite in one of the chasms, estimated, from the present rate of stalagmitic growth, to have lain where found for not more than five hundred years.

    0
    0
  • About the same time P. C. Schmerling of Liege was exploring the ossiferous caverns of the valley of the Meuse, and satisfied himself that the men whose bones he found beneath the stalagmite floors, together with bones cut and flints shaped by human workmanship, had inhabited this Belgian district at the same time with the cave-bear and several other extinct animals whose bones were imbedded with them (Recherches sur les ossements fossiles decouverts dans les cavernes de la province de Liege (Liege, 1833-1834)).

    0
    0
  • p. 286), that the human bones and worked flints had been deposited indiscriminately together with the remains of fossil elephant, rhinoceros, &c. Certain caves and rock-shelters in the province of Dordogne, in central France, were examined by a French and an English archaeologist, Edouard Lartet and Henry Christy, the remains discovered showing the former prevalence of the reindeer in this region, at that time inhabited by savages, whose bone and stone implements indicate a habit of life similar to that of the Eskimos.

    0
    0
  • They hold water like a sponge, but part with it under pressure to fissures by which they are intersected, and, in the case of the Upper Chalk, to ducts following beds of flints.

    0
    0
  • McEnery, who found worked flints in intimate association with the bones of extinct mammals.

    0
    0
  • This serves to distinguish flints which have been fashioned by human agencies from those which have been split merely by the action of frost and the weather.

    0
    0
  • The purest flints have the most perfect conchoidal fracture, and prehistoric man is known to have quarried or mined certain bands of flint which were specially suitable for his purposes.

    0
    0
  • Nodules of flint when removed from the chalk which encloses them have a white dull rough surface, and exposure to the weather produces much the same appearance on broken flints.

    0
    0
  • Where the flints lie the chalk must have been dissolved away; we have in fact a kind of metasomatic replacement in which a siliceous rock has slowly replaced a calcareous one.

    0
    0
  • Seasoned flints from the land, having been long exposed to the atmosphere, are preferred to flints freshly dug from the chalk pits.

    0
    0
  • Formerly flint and steel were everywhere employed for striking a light; and gun flints were required for fire-arms. A special industry in the shaping of gun flints long existed at Brandon in Suffolk.

    0
    0
  • Since then the trade has become almost extinct as gun flints are in demand only in semi-savage countries where modern fire-arms are not obtainable.

    0
    0
  • Chalk flints occur frequently in the surface-deposits of the south of Ireland, associated with rocks brought from the north during the glacial epoch, and probably also of northern origin.

    0
    0
  • The more deep-seated type of these rocks is seen in the olivine-gabbro mass of Carlingford Mountain; but most of the igneous region became covered with sheets of basaltic lava, which filled up the hollows of the downs, baked the gravels into a layer of red flints, and built up, pile upon pile, the great plateaus of the north.

    0
    0
  • I have brought some with me, here they are"--and he showed a bag--"a hundred flints.

    0
    0
  • But having caught himself saying too much about the flints, he was now afraid to speak out.

    0
    0
  • Such features could provide additional small sources of " fresh " flints, together with some input from the eroding Eocene sandstones.

    0
    0
  • The tread was hardly worn, there were no cuts of any kind, no flints or slivers of glass.

    0
    0
  • Numerous flints of palaeolithic type have been discovered, notably at Tlemcen and Kolea.

    0
    1
  • with rubble stones, flints, brickbats or similar material, thoroughly drained at bottom.

    0
    1
  • Some of the best water-meadows in England have but a thin soil resting on gravel and flints, this constituting a most effectual system of natural drainage.

    0
    1
  • The most important data bearing upon the first great period are given elsewhere in this work, and it is proposed to offer here a more general survey.5 To the prehistoric ages belong the palaeolithic and neolithic flints, from the distribution of which an attempt might be made to give a synthetic sketch of early Palestinian man.6 A burial cave at Gezer has revealed the existence of a race of slight build and stature, muscular, with elongated crania, and thick and heavy skull-bones.

    0
    1
  • Or perhaps your flints are giving out, or are worn out--that happens sometimes, you know.

    0
    1
  • I say, aren't the flints in your pistols worn out?

    0
    2
Browse other sentences examples →