Fleury sentence example

fleury
  • The pope condemned this marriage as adulterous; and Abbo of Fleury, who visited Rome shortly after Gregory V.'s accession, is said to have procured the restoration of Arnulf at the new pontiff's demand.

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  • He found favour at the Frankish court, was made abbot of Fleury and of Saint-Aignan, and in 781 became bishop of Orleans.

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  • Four of the medieval historians from whom he quotes most frequently are Sigebert of Gembloux, Hugh of Fleury, Helinand of Froidmont, and William of Malmesbury, whom he uses for Continental as well as for English history.

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  • It passed into the office of Prime, apparently first at Fleury.

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  • Fleury and Hirsau are well-known examples.

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  • Basing themselves on St Gregory's counsel to St Augustine, Dunstan, lEthelwold and Oswald adopted from the observance of foreign monasteries, and notably Fleury and Ghent, what was suitable for the restoration of English monachism, and so produced the Concordia Regularis, interesting as the first serious attempt to bring about uniformity of observance among the monasteries of an entire nation.

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  • Other notable Roman Catholic historians of the 17th and 18th centuries were Natalis Alexander, Bossuet, Tillemont, Fleury, Dupin and Ceillier.

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  • This Epitoma vitae Roberti regis, which is probably part of a history of the abbey of Fleury, deals rather with the private than with the public life of the king, and its value is not great either from the literary or from the historical point of view.

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  • On the death of the regent Orleans in 1723 Fleury, although already seventy years of age, deferred his own supremacy by suggesting the appointment of Louis Henri, duke of Bourbon, as first minister.

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  • Fleury was present at all interviews between Louis XV.

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  • Internal peace was only seriously disturbed by the severities which Fleury saw fit to exercise against the Jansenists.

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  • Fleury had economized in the army and navy, as elsewhere, and when in 1733 war was forced upon him he was hardly prepared.

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  • Fleury was driven by Chauvelin to more energetic measures; he concluded a close alliance with the Spanish Bourbons and sent two armies against the Austrians.

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  • Fleury disavowed his own letter, and died a few days after the French evacuation of Prague on the 29th of January 1743.

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  • One of the most prominent personages of the century was Gerbert of Aurillac, who, after teaching at Tours and Fleury, became abbot of Bobbio, archbishop of Reims, and ultimately pope under the name of Silvester II.

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  • A greater originality in the method of teaching the ancient languages was exemplified by Fenelon, whose views were partially reflected by the Abbe Fleury, who also desired the simplification of grammar, the diminution of composition, and even the suppression of Latin verse.

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  • Of the ordinary teaching of Greek in his day, Fleury wittily observed that most boys " learned just enough of that language to have a pretext for saying for the rest of their lives that Greek was a subject easily forgotten."

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  • The badge is a green cross fleury; the ribbon is green.

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  • The other two orders wear the cross fleury - Alcantara red, Calatrava green, with corresponding ribbons.

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  • Of all the European nations France was the one on which Jacobite hopes mainly rested, and the warm sympathy which Cardinal Tencin, who had succeeded Fleury as French minister, felt for the Old Pretender resulted in a definite scheme for an invasion of England to be timed simultaneously with a prearranged Scottish rebellion.

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  • Fleury, Etudes revolutionnaires (2 vols., 1851), with which cf.

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  • He also wrote a Vita Abbonis, abbatis Floriacensis, the last of a series of lives of the abbots of Fleury, all of which, except the life of Abbo, have been lost.

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  • He had been some time in orders when Louis XIV., in 1672, selected him as tutor of the princes of Conti, with such success that the king next entrusted to him the education of the count of Vermandois, one of his natural sons, on whose death in 1683 Fleury received for his services the Cistercian abbey of Loc-Dieu, in the diocese of Rhodez.

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  • Fleury's evident intention was to write a history of the church for all classes of society; but at the time in which his great work appeared it was less religion than theology that absorbed the attention of the clergy and the educated public; and his work accordingly appealed to the student rather than to the popular reader, dwelling as it does very particularly on questions of doctrine, of discipline, of supremacy, and of rivalry between the priesthood and the imperial power.

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  • Fleury, who had been appointed confessor to the young king Louis XV.

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  • Fleury left many works besides his Histoire ecclesiastique.

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  • Fleury, bishop of Frejus, was appointed his tutor, and the little king was sincerely attached to him.

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  • In 1726 the duke of Bourbon was displaced by the king's tutor, Bishop (afterwards Cardinal) Fleury, who exercised almost absolute power, for the king took little interest in affairs of state.

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  • Fleury's great age (he died still in office at the age of ninety) prevented him from really controlling the policy of France and of Europe.

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  • On Fleury's death in 1743 no one took his place, and the king professed to adopt the example of Louis XIV.

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  • Fleury, Rabelais is a sober reformer, an apostle of earnest work, of sound education, of rational if not dogmatic religion, who wraps up his morals in a farcical envelope partly to make them go down with the vulgar and partly to shield himself from the consequences of his reforming zeal.

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  • After his return to France he was made abbot of Fleury on the Loire (988).

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  • From 1723 to 1743 came the mealy- eighteenth mouthed despotism of Cardinal Fleury, and his century.

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  • They found standing in their way the very man who had been the author of their fortunes, Louis XV.s tutor, uneasy in the exercise of a veiled authority; for the churchman Fleury knew how to wait, on condition of ultimately attaining his end.

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  • From the hands of his unthinking pupil Fleury eventually received the supreme direction of affairs, which he retained for seventeen years.

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  • He was aged seventy-two when Fleury, he thus obtained the power which had been his un 1726 measured though not ill-calculated ambition.

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  • The Jesuits, returned to power in 1723 with the duc de Bourbon and in 1726 with Fleury, rekindled the old strife regarding the bull Unigenitus in opposition to the Gallicans and the Jansenists.

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  • Fleury found no other remedy for this agitationin which appeal was made even to miraclesthan lits de justice and leUres de cachet; Jansenism remained a potent source of trouble within the heart of Catholicism.

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  • Fleury, supported by the English Hanoverian alliance, to which he sacrificed the French navy, obliged the emperor Charles VI.

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  • The question of the succession in France lay dormant until the end of the century, and Fleury thought he had definitely obtained peace in the treaty of Vienna (1731).

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  • Fleury hardly had time to breathe before a new conflagration broke out in the east.

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  • He had to humble himself before Austria and the whole of Europe; and it was high time for Fleury, now fallen into second childhood, to vanish from the scene (January 1743).

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  • Consequently, to the surprise of all Europe, while the allied forces were drawn up ready for battle, Napoleon, without consulting Victor Emmanuel, sent General Fleury on the 6th of July to Francis Joseph to ask for an armistice, which was agreed to.

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  • In consulting the work of Fleury and its supplement, tile general table of contents, published by Rondel, Paris, 1758, i vol.

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  • This was an ephemeral success, ill-prepared and obtained by taking a sudden advantage of national sentiment; it was soon followed by a check, owing to a Russian and German coalition and the baseness of Cardinal Fleury, who, in order to avoid intervening, pretended to tremble before an imaginary threat of reprisals on the part of England.

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  • Joly de Fleury and DOrmesson, Neckers successors, pushed their narrow spirit of reaction and the temerity of their inexperience to the furthest limit; but the reaction which reinforced the privileged classes was not sufficient to fill the coffers of the treasury, and Marie Antoinette, who seemed gifted with a fatal perversity of instinct, confided the finances of the kingdom to Calonne, an upper-class official and a veritable Cagliostro of finance.

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  • The work of Fleury only comes down to the year 1414.

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