Flax sentence example

flax
  • Salt, flax, cotton and currants are also mentioned among the produce.
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  • Tile chief textile plants are hemp, flax and cotton.
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  • Flax is almost of as much importance as wheat, and the potato is more cultivated than in any other part of Russia.
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  • Wheat, barley, oats, rye, maize, flax, hemp and tobacco are grown in large quantities, and the products of the vineyards are of a good quality.
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  • Among the other agricultural products are barley, hemp, flax and various vegetables, including good asparagus.
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  • Tobacco, in the Werra district, hops and flax are also raised.
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  • The principal products are corn, oats, barley, potatoes, rye, beetroot, hemp, flax, hay and other fodder.
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  • Flax is one of the principal exports of this region, timber being another.
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  • Dvina, which falls into the sea below Riga, is shallow above the rapids of Jacobstadt, but navigation is carried on as far as Vitebsk - corn, timber, potash, flax, &c., being the principal shipments of its navigable tributaries (the Obsha, Ulla and Kasplya).
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  • The leading industries are ship-building, bleaching and the making of flax and glue.
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  • Hemp and flax are mentioned as common crops.
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  • A variety of oil-bearing plants and green fodder, as also cotton, hemp, flax and poppies, are grown.
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  • Flax and hemp occupy considerable acreages in central and N.W.
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  • Water-melons, sun-flowers and flax, both the last two for oil, are usual crops.
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  • Though the fondness of this species for the seeds of flax (Linum) and hemp (Cannabis) has given it its common name in so many European languages,' it feeds largely, if not chiefly in Britain on the seeds of plants of the order Compositae, especially those growing on heaths and commons.
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  • It has a large trade in wool, flax and grain, its markets for these commodities being very numerously attended.
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  • The principal crops are wheat, rye, oats, barley, maize, hemp, flax, potatoes, beetroot and tobacco.
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  • The soil of Zeeland consists of a fertile sea clay which especially favours the production of wheat; rye, barley (for malting), beans and peas, and flax are also cultivated.
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  • were: combined textiles (not including flax, hemp and jute products) in 1900, $77,998,396; in 1905, $103,096, 311; foundry and machine shop products in 1900, $13,269,086; in 1905, $16,338,512; woollen goods in 1900, $5,330,550; in 1905, $8,163,167; rubber boots and shoes in 1 9 00, $8,034,417; electrical machinery, apparatus and supplies in 1900, $5,113,292; in 1905, $5,435,474; silversmithing and silverware in 1900, $4,249,190; in 1905, $5,323,264; gold and silver, reducing and refining (not from ore) in 1900, $3,484,454; in 1905, $4,260,698; cotton small wares in 1900, $2,379,500; in 1 905, $3,944, 60 7; hosiery and knit goods in 1900, $2,713,850; in 1905, $3,344,655; silk and silk goods in 1900, $1,311,333; in 1905, $2,555,986.
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  • The principal articles of its trade are rice and cotton, some sugar cane (nai shakar), flax (Katun) and hemp (Kanab) are also grown.
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  • The principal crops are rye, oats, barley, buckwheat, potatoes, though wheat, beetroot, flax, hemp and tobacco are also grown.
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  • It has important commerce in linen, flax, hemp, wool and seeds, and a considerable transit trade.
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  • The country on the east side and on the slopes of the Hardt yield a number of the most varied products, such as wine, fruit, corn, vegetables, flax and tobacco.
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  • Hemp and flax had an importance, lost between 1827 and 1849, but responsible in 1792 for fairs on Saturday and Monday before Palm Sunday.
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  • From his committee he reported in April 1888 the "Mills Bill," which provided for a reduction of the duties on sugar, earthenware, glassware, plate glass, woollen goods and other articles, the substitution of ad valorem for specific duties in many cases, and the placing of lumber (of certain kinds), hemp, wool, flax, borax, tin plates, salt and other articles on the free list.
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  • Among the principal goods dealt with are tea, silk, opium, sugar, flax, salt, earthenware, oil, amber, cotton and cotton goods, sandal-wood, ivory, betel, vegetables, live stock and granite.
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  • The principal industries are flax, sugar, tobacco and machinery, and there is a trade in cattle and horses.
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  • Agriculture is highly developed; cereals, principally wheat and oats, and beetroot are the chief crops; potatoes, flax, hemp, rape and hops are also grown.
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  • Indian corn, quinoa, mandioca, possibly the potato, cotton and various fruits, including the strawberry, were already known to the aborigines, but with the conqueror came wheat, barley, oats, flax, many kinds of vegetables, apples, peaches, apricots, pears, grapes, figs, oranges and lemons, together with alfalfa and new grasses for the plains.
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  • Flax 2,346 2,435 3,173
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  • Flax is cultivated chiefly in the northern departments of Nord, Seine- Infrieure, Pas-de-Calais, Ctes-du-Nord, hemp in Sarthe, Morbihan and Maine-ct-Loire.
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  • The chief agricultural products are timber, fruit, grain, hemp, flax and vegetables.
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  • Rye is the staple crop, though buckwheat, flax, green crops and the potato are cultivated in considerable quantities.
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  • The principal exports are grain, eggs, cattle, linen cloth and flax, and the imports include timber, groceries and coal.
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  • The town has a tribunal of commerce and a communal college, flour-mills, manufactories of earthenware, biscuits, furniture, casks, and glass and brick works; the port has trade in grain, timber, hemp, flax, &c.
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  • - 64,856 18,451 i ~28 i Flax.
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  • The commodities which the United Kingdom principally takes are wheat, wool, barley, eggs, oats and flax.
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  • Flax is a less important crop than formerly.
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  • Flax covers about 160,000 acres, with a product, in fibre, amounting to about 20,000 tons.
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  • It is a market for live-stock, and for dairy and farm products, and has slaughtering and packing establishments, flour mills, creameries and cheese factories, canning and preserving factories, carriage works, a flax fibre mill and grain elevators.
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  • The principal crops are potatoes, rye and oats, but wheat and barley are grown in the more fertile districts; tobacco, flax, hops and beetroot are also cultivated.
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  • The agricultural products are corn, flax, tobacco, grapes and various other fruits.
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  • Sunflowers are very extensively grown for oil in the government of Kuban and elsewhere, and also some flax.
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  • The imports comprise timber, grain, iron, linseed and flax.
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  • The industries include the spinning of jute, flax, hemp and cotton, iron-founding, brewing, and the manufacture of machinery, fishing-nets, sailcloth, sacks, casks, and soap. There are also saw-and flour-mills, petroleum refineries and oil-works.
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  • The chief agricultural products are barley, oats, wheat, and in the north-east flax is also grown, and exported to South Holland and Belgium.
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  • Trade is carried on in flax, cloth, cereals, oilseeds, &c.
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  • touches the agrarian line already mentioned, the principal crops are rye and oats, with barley and wheat coming next, though flax and green crops are also grown.
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  • The surrounding country is fertile and highly cultivated, and the large quantities of flax and hemp there raised encourage an active weaving industry in the town.
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  • Flax and hemp showed a decreasing acreage from 1881 onwards.
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  • Flax, Hemp, Jute, &c.The preparation and spinning of these materials and the manufacture of nets and rope, together with the weaving of linen and other fabrics, give occupation to 112,000 persons chiefly in the departments of Nord (Lille, Armentires, Dunkirk), Somme (Amiens) and Maine-et-Loire (Angers, Cholet).
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  • A small quantity of hemp and flax is raised, but a considerable quantity of fruit and vegetables is annually produced, and some wine, in the Coburg district of Konigsberg.
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  • In the valleys the soil is particularly fertile, yielding luxuriant crops of wheat, maize, barley, spelt, beans, potatoes, flax, hemp, hops, beetroot and tobacco; and even in the more mountainous parts rye, wheat and oats are extensively cultivated.
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  • The principal crops are oats and potatoes, but all grain crops are decreasing, and flax, formerly grown to a considerable extent, is now practically neglected.
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  • Rice, wheat, barley, oats, Indian corn, various kinds of millet, pulses, oil-seeds, tobacco, cotton, indigo, opium, flax and hemp and sugar-cane, are the principal agricultural products of Bhagalpur district.
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  • Flax is mainly grown in the northern districts of Kiejdani, Shavli, Ponevyez and Rakishki.
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  • In 1920 were exported farm products, live stock, fowls, timber and flax valued at 501,797,000 marks, and imported foreign products and machines at 428,728,000 marks.
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  • The flax and forests of its extensive territory are mentioned by classical authors, and we find Tarquinii offering to furnish Scipio with sailcloth in 195 B.C. A bishop of Tarquinii is mentioned in A.D.
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  • The soil, though not very fertile, except in some of the valleys and sheltered hillsides, produces wheat, maize, barley, rye, flax, grapes, peaches, apples and other fruits.
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  • Oats is the principal crop, but rye, potatoes and flax are also grown in considerable quantities.
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  • The soil in the valleys is fertile, yielding wheat, barley, maize, flax, hemp and fruits.
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  • The principal exports are cereals and flour, cattle, horses, hemp, flax, timber, sugar and oilcake.
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  • Wheat, maize, rice, oil, flax and hemp, of fine quality, are grown in considerable quantities; as well as saffron, madder, liquorice, sumach, and a variety of fruits.
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  • The leading industries include manufactures of woollens, flax and chemicals, and there is also a brisk trade in live-stock.
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  • Tilsit carries on trade in timber, grain, hemp, flax, herrings and coal; but its trade with Russia, at one time considerable, has fallen off since the construction of the railway from Konigsberg to Kovno.
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  • The principal crops are rye, oats, barley, flax and potatoes, with some wheat, hemp and buckwheat.
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  • Woollen, cloth, cotton and flax mills, steam flour and saw mills, distilleries and breweries, machinery works, paper mills, furniture, tobacco, soap, candle and hardware works are among the chief industrial establishments.
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  • Livonia carries on a large export trade, especially through Riga and Pernau, in petroleum, wool, oilcake, flax, linseed, hemp, grain, timber and wooden wares; the Dvina is the chief channel for this trade.
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  • The swamps covered with flax and giant bulrushes were often redeemed to the eye by sheets of golden-plumed toe-toe, a kind of pampas grass.
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  • The chief factory industries come under the following heads: meat-freezing and tallow; tanning and wool-scouring; flax mills, saw-mills and grain-mills; boots and shoes; woollen and clothing; butter and Tons.
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  • After him came other navigators, French, Spanish, Russian and American; and, as the 8th century neared its end, came sealers, whalers and trading-schooners in quest of flax and timber.
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  • The Rhine valley is in great part fertile, yielding good crops of potatoes, cereals (including maize), sugar beet, hops, tobacco, flax, hemp and products of oleaginous plants.
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  • Flax is grown in the Erzgebirge and Lusatian mountains, where the manufacture of linen was at one time a flourishing domestic industry.
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  • They practised agriculture, cultivating several varieties of wheat and barley, besides millet and flax.
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  • In its output of flax, grown almost entirely for the seed, the state held second rank with a product of 5,640,000 bush.
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  • The flax is cultivated for the seed, and only slightly for the fibre.
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  • In that year, and again in 1825, great reductions were made in the duties on raw materials, especially on wool, raw silk, flax and iron, while considerable reductions were also made in the duties on manufactured goods.
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  • Such was the case not only with some metals, such as lead, zinc, copper, but still more strikingly with textile materials such as wool, flax, and the like, and most of all with agricultural products such as grain, meat and meat products, timber.
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  • Meline, with high duties on agricultural products and raw materials as well as on manufactures, and with provisions for limited domestic bounties on silk, hemp and flax.
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  • Jiiterbog carries on weaving and spinning both of flax and wool, and trades in the produce of those manufactures and in cattle.
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  • Silk is largely produced, and tobacco, wine, flax, hemp and fruits are cultivated.
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  • where crops are generally light, Indian corn, oats and potatoes are the principal products, but tobacco, flax and cotton are grown.
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  • The culture of silk, flax, grapes (for wine-making) and fruits and cereals in general, and the manufacture of flour and of woollen, flannel and cotton fabrics, were carried on under a rule requiring every adult to labour 12 or 14 hours each day in field or mill.
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  • Maize, millet, rye, flax, liquorice and fruits of all sorts - especially nuts, almonds, oranges, figs, walnuts and chestnuts - are produced.
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  • In general the soil is extremely fertile, and where it is naturally drained a rich vegetation of fern and flax occurs.
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  • The inhabitants of Kalocsa and its wide-spreading communal lands are chiefly employed in the cultivation of the vine, fruit, flax, hemp and cereals, in the capture of water-fowl and in fishing.
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  • The crops include grain of all kinds (not sufficient, however, for the needs of the province), peas and beans, buckwheat, potatoes, fruit and hemp. The cultivation of flax is very extensive, especially in the N.E.
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  • The woollen trade once promised to reach considerable dimensions, but towards the end of the 18th century was superseded by the linen (for which flax came to be largely grown); and when this in turn collapsed before the products of the mills of Dundee, Dunfermline and Glasgow, straw-plaiting was taken up, though only to be killed in due time by the competition of the south.
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  • The industrial establishments comprise cotton, flax and flour mills, sawmills, tanneries, salt and soap works, breweries, chemical manure and engineering works.
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  • Flax and hemp are also cultivated.
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  • In the market square a considerable trade in grain, flax and provisions is prosecuted.
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  • Flax, for which much of the soil is admirably adapted, is extensively cultivated, and forms an important article of export, chiefly, however, in the form of yarn.
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  • There is some import trade in flax, timber and, coal.
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  • Flax is still a frequent crop in the hilly districts, and sugar-beets are raised over large areas.
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  • Philadelphia, the Atlantic port, exports chiefly petroleum, coal, grain and flour, and imports chiefly iron ore, sugar, drugs and chemicals, manufactured iron, hemp, jute and flax.
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  • The employment of children under fourteen years of age in coal-mines is forbidden, as is also the employment of children under fourteen years of age in any cotton, woollen, silk, paper, bagging or flax factory, or in any laundry, or the employment of children under twelve years of age in any mill or factory whatever within the commonwealth.
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  • - Tunic Of Linen, Vove With Bands Of Purple Wool Embroidered With White Flax.
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  • The vineyards (in the west especially) yield much red wine (bought "mainly by Rouen, Cette, Trieste and Venice); the currant, introduced about 1859, has gradually come to be the principal source of wealth (the crop averaging 2,500,000 lb); and small quantities of cotton, flax, tobacco, valonia, &c., are also grown.
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  • Linen, flax, jute and wool are also spun and woven.
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  • Flax.
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  • The level country, including both Lower Bavaria (extending northwards to the Danube) and the western and middle parts of Franconia, is productive of rye, oats, wheat, barley and millet, and also of hemp, flax, madder and fruit and vines.
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  • Flax and beetroot are also cultivated on the clay lands.
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  • Before the igth century Darlington was noted for the manufacture of linen, worsted and flax, but it owes its modern importance to the opening of the railway between Darlington and Stockton on the 27th of September 1825.
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  • Krushevats is the capital of a department bearing the same name, and has an active trade in tobacco, hemp, flax, grain and livestock, for the sale of which it possesses about a dozen markets.
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  • The usual cereal crops are, however, all grown with success, and tobacco, hops, flax, rape, hemp and beetroot (for sugar) are cultivated for commercial purposes.
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  • The principal imports are food supplies` and raw material such as cotton, wool, silk, flax, hemp and jute.
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  • Altogether nearly 16 million acres of Russian Poland, or almost one-half of the total area, are under crops, principally rye, oats, wheat, barley, potatoes and hay, with some flax, hemp, peas, buckwheat and hops.
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  • Smaller areas are devoted to maize, buckwheat, pease, rape, hemp, flax, hops and tobacco.
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  • PHORMIUM, or NEW Zealand Flax (also called "New Zealand hemp"), a fibre obtained from the leaves of Phormium tenax (nat.
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  • Phormium is a cream-coloured fibre with a fine silky gloss, capable of being spun and woven into many of the heavier textures for which flax is used, either alone or in combination with flax.
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  • Other crops are potatoes, colza, hemp and flax.
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  • Flax is grown in the north, and hemp more particularly in the central districts.
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  • Flax and hemp are cultivated, though not so much as formerly, for manufacture into linen and canvas, and also rape seed for the production of oil.
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  • Although Germany produces wool, flax and hemp, the home production of these materials is not sufficient to meet the demand of manufactures, and large quantities of them have to be imported.
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  • In the textile industry for flax and hemp there were, in 1905, 276,000 fine spindles, 22,300 hand-looms and 17,600 power-looms in operation, and, in 1905, linen and jute materials were exported of an estimated value of over 2,000,000.
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  • Flax and other vegetable spinning materials except cotton.
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  • The town has some trade in domestic produce, and in leather and linen manufactures, there being several flax spinning-mills and bleach-works in the immediate neighbourhood.
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  • The exports are olive oil, hemp, flax, rice, fruit, wine, hats, cheese, steel, velvets, gloves, flour, paper, soap and marble, while the main imports are coal, cotton, grain, machinery, &c. Genoa has a large emigrant traffic with America, and a large general passenger steamer traffic both for America and for the East.
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  • By far the most important export is grain, which goes almost entirely to British ports; but wool, flax and cattle are also shipped.
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  • Cotton, sugar and rice are the chief summer crops; wheat, barley, flax an.d vegetables are chiefly winter crops; maize, millet and flood rice are Nih crops; millet and vegetables are also, but in a less degree, summer crops.
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  • Flax and hemp are grown in a few places.
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  • There were green crops such as clover, and lentils, peas, beans, radishes, onions, lettuces (as a vegetable and for oil), castor oil and flax were grown.
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  • Flax, linseed, corn and timber are the leading articles of commerce.
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  • The chief crop is maize; but wheat, rye and other grains, potatoes, saffron, hemp, flax and tobacco are also grown.
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  • The production of linen from flax and hemp is a home industry throughout Transylvania.
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  • The exports consist chiefly of grain, timber, flax, hides, wool, a species of anchovy, and hemp, and the imports of manufactured goods and machinery.
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  • 2.7.1 (a) Wool and Worsted 2.7.2 (b) Flax, Hemp and Jute 2.7.3 (c) Cotton 2.7.4 (d) Silk and other Textiles 2.7.5 (e) Whisky and Beer 2.7.6 (f) Miscellaneous
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  • The manufacture of cloth from flax is of very ancient date, and towards the close of the 16th century Scottish linen cloths were largely exported to foreign countries, as well as to England.
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  • Comines carries on the spinning of flax, wool and cotton.
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  • Bacon-curing is the staple industry, and there are flour, flax and paper mills.
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  • The chief crops are cotton and flax; the chief manufactures are blankets and cotton cloth.
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  • The soil of Bukovina is fertile, and agriculture has made great progress, the principal products being wheat, maize, rye, oats, barley, potatoes, flax and hemp. Cattlerearing constitutes another important source of revenue.
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  • The staple crop is barley, but wheat, lentils, vetches, flax and gourds are also cultivated.
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  • In the first half of the 19th century other exports were lime, freestone, and grain; West Indian, American and Baltic produce, Irish flax and Welsh pig iron were imported, and shipbuilding was a growing industry.
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  • Vast quantities of coarse matting used for packing furniture, heavy and coarse goods, flax and other plants, &c., are made in Russia from the bast or inner bark of the lime tree.
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  • In 1900 the chief crops were oats, barley, rye, wheat, potatoes, hay, beet (for sugar), flax and oil-yielding plants.
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  • The surface of the islands is generally sandy, the soil thin and the climate keen; yet Scotch fir, spruce and birch are grown; and rye, barley, flax and vegetables are produced in sufficient quantity for the wants of the people.
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  • LINSEED, the seed of the common flax or lint, Linum usitatissimum.
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  • Linseed is subject to extensive and detrimental adulterations, resulting not only from careless harvesting and cleaning, whereby seeds of the flax dodder, and other weeds and grasses are mixed with it, but also from the direct admixture of cheaper and inferior oil-seeds, such as wild rape, mustard, sesame, poppy, &c., the latter adulterations being known in trade under the generic name of " buffum."
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  • On the left bank of the Ericht, opposite Blairgowrie, with which it is connected by a four-arched bridge, stands the town and police burgh of Rattray (pop. 2019), where there are flax and jute mills.
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  • When the commerce of New England was interrupted as a consequence of the Napoleonic wars, the abundance of water power afforded by the rivers encouraged manufacturing, and the region rapidly acquired prominence in this industry, especially in the manufacture of textiles, of boots and shoes, and of paper and wood pulp; in 1905 the value of the textile products of New England (excluding flax, hemp and jute) alone was $522,821,440 (more than 45% of that of the entire country), the value of boots and shoes was $181,023,946 (more than 55% of the total for the entire country), the value of paper and wood pulp was $49,813,133 (more than one-quarter of that of the entire country), and the value of all factory products amounted to $2,025,998,437 (nearly one-seventh of the total for the entire country).
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  • The goods transmitted in largest quantity are fish, metals, manufactured wares, hides, flax, timber, cereals, petroleum, oils and salt.
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  • FLAX.
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  • The flax plant (Linum usitatissimum) belongs to the natural order Linaceae, and, like most plants which have been long under cultivation, it possesses numerous varieties, while its origin is doubtful.
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  • The seeds of the flax plant, well known as linseed, are heavy, smooth, glossy and of a bright greenish-brown colour.
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  • The earliest cultivated flax was Linum angustifolium, a smaller plant with fewer and narrower leaves than L.
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  • The annual flax (L.
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  • This annual flax appears to have been introduced into the north of Europe by the Finns, afterwards into the west of Europe by the western Aryans, and perhaps here and there by the Phoenicians; lastly, into Hindustan by the eastern Aryans after their separation from the European Aryans.
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  • (De Candolle, Origin of Cultivated Plants.) The cultivation and preparation of flax are among the most ancient of all textile industries, very distinct traces of their existence during the stone age being preserved to the present day.
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  • " The use of flax," says Ferdinand Keller (Lake Dwellings of Switzerland, translated by J.
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  • Rough or unworked flax is found in the lake-dwellings made into bundles, or what are technically called heads, and, as much attention was given to this last operation, it was perfectly clean and ready for use."
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  • As to its applications at this early period, Keller remarks: " Flax was the material for making lines and nets for fishing and catching wild animals, cords for carrying the earthenware vessels and other heavy objects; in fact, one can hardly imagine how FIG.
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  • - Flax Plant (Linum usitatissimum).
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  • - That flax was extensively cultivated and was regarded as of much importance at a very early period in the world's history there is abundant testimony.
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  • 42), and among the plagues of Egypt that of hail destroyed the flax and barley crops, " for the barley was in the ear, and the flax was bolled " (Exod.
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  • Further, numerous pictorial representations of flax culture and preparation exist to the present day on the walls of tombs and in Egypt.
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  • Wilkinson in his description of ancient Egypt shows clearly the great antiquity of the ordinary processes of preparing flax.
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  • The preparation of the fibre as conducted in Egypt is illustrated by Pliny, who says: " The stalks themselves are immersed in water, warmed by the heat of the sun, and are kept down by weights placed upon them, for nothing is lighter than flax.
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  • For many ages, even down to the early part of the 14th century, Egyptian flax occupied the foremost place in the commercial world, being sent into all regions with which open intercourse was maintained.
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  • Flax prospers most when grown upon land of firm texture resting upon a moist subsoil.
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  • It is usually inexpedient to apply manure directly to the flax crop, as the tendency of this is to produce over-luxuriance, and thereby to mar the quality of the fibre, on which its value chiefly depends.
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  • The weeders, faces to the wind, move slowly on hands and knees, and should remove every vestige of weed in order that the flax plants may receive the full benefit of the land.
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  • When flax is cultivated primarily on account of the fibre, the crop ought to be pulled before the capsules are quite ripe, when they are just beginning to change from a green to a pale-brown colour, and when the stalks of the plant have become yellow throughout about two-thirds of their height.
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  • The various operations through which the crop passes from this point till flax ready for the market is produced are - (i) Pulling, (2) Rippling, (3) Retting, (4) Drying, (5) Rolling, (6) Scutching.
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  • Flax is always pulled up by the root, and under no circumstances is it cut or shorn like cereal crops.
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  • long, to allow a sufficient spring, and save much breaking of flax.
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  • It is unadvisable to ripple the flax so severely as to break or tear the delicate fibres at the upper part of the stem.
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    0
  • The two valuable commercial products of the flax plant, the seeds and the stalk, are separated at this point.
    0
    0
  • For this - the process by which flax is generally prepared - pure soft water, free from iron and other materials which might colour the fibre, is essential.
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  • The rippled stalks are tied in small bundles and packed, roots downwards, in the dams till they are quite full; over the top of the upper layer is placed a stratum of rushes and straw, or sods with the grassy side downwards, and above all stones of sufficient weight to keep the flax submerged.
    0
    0
  • The exact time, however, depends upon the weather and upon the particular kind of water in which the flax is immersed.
    0
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  • At this point advantage is taken of fine dry weather to gather up the flax, which is now ready for scutching, but the fibre is improved by stooking and stacking it for some time before it is taken to the scutching mill.
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    0
  • Dew-retting is the process by which all the Archangel flax and a large portion of that sent out from St Petersburg are prepared.
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  • By this method the operation of steeping is entirely dispensed with, and the flax is, immediately after pulling, spread on the grass where it is under the influence of air, sunlight, night-dews and rain.
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  • The process is tedious, the resulting fibre is brown in colour, and it is said to be peculiarly liable to undergo heating (probably owing to the soft heavy quality of the flax) if exposed to moisture and kept close packed with little access of air.
    0
    0
  • Archangel flax is, however, peculiarly soft and silky in structure, although in all probability water-retting would result in a fibre as good or even better in quality.
    0
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  • About the year 1851 Chevalier Claussen sought to revive a process of " cottonizing " flax - a method of proceeding which had been suggested three-quarters of a century earlier.
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  • Claussen's process consisted in steeping flax fibre or tow for twenty-four hours in a weak solution of caustic soda, next boiling it for about two hours in a similar solution, and then saturating it in a solution containing 5% of carbonate of soda, after which it was immersed in a vat containing water acidulated with z% of sulphuric acid.
    0
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  • For open pools and dams Schenck substitutes large wooden vats under cover, into which the flax is tightly packed in an upright position.
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  • during the whole time the flax is in steep. In a short time a brisk fermentation is set up, gases at first of pleasant odour, but subsequently becoming very repulsive, being evolved, and producing a frothy scum over the surface of the water.
    0
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  • In connexion with improvements in retting, Mr Michael Andrews, secretary of the Belfast Flax Supply Association, made some suggestions and experiments which deserve close attention.
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  • In a paper contributed to the International Flax Congress at Vienna in 1873 he entered into details regarding an experimental rettery he had formed, with the view of imitating by artificial means the best results obtained by the ordinary methods.
    0
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  • By this means the flax is kept at a uniform temperature with great certainty, since even should the heat of the air vary considerably through neglect, the water in the vat only by slow degrees follows such fluctuations.
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    0
  • " It may be remarked," says Mr Andrews, " that the superiority claimed for this method of retting flax over what is known as the `hot-water steeping' is uniformity of temperature; in fact the experiments have demonstrated that an absolute control can be exercised over the means adopted to produce the artificial climate in which the vats containing the flax are situated."
    0
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  • Several other attempts have been made with a view of obtaining a quick and practical method of retting flax.
    0
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  • The flax is placed in the upper chamber and covered by two sets of rods or beams at right angles to each other.
    0
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  • As the tank fills, the water enters the upper chamber and carries with it the flax and the beams, the latter being prevented from rising too high.
    0
    0
  • By this arrangement the flax is almost continually immersed in fresh water, a condition which hastens the retting.
    0
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  • When the operation is completed, the whole of the water is run off, and the flax remains on the perforated floor, where it drains thoroughly before being removed to dry.
    0
    0
  • The Department of Agriculture and Technical Instruction for Ireland, and the Belfast Flax Supply Association, have jointly made some experiments with this method, and the following extract from the Association's report for 1905 shows the success which attended their efforts: " By desire of the department (which has taken up the position of an impartial critic of the experiment) a quantity of flax straw was divided into two equal lots.
    0
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  • Both lots when retted and scutched were examined by an inspector of the department and by several flax spinners.
    0
    0
  • It has been proved that flax can be thoroughly dried in the field in Ireland.
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  • A really good chemical, mechanical or other method would probably be the means of reviving the flax industry in the remote parts of the British Isles.
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  • For ordinary waterretted flax two operations are required, first breaking and then scutching, and these are done either by hand labour or by means of small scutching or lint mills, driven either by water or steam power.
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  • The breaking is done by passing the stalks between grooved or fluted rollers of different pitches; these rollers, of which there may be from 5 to 7 pairs, are sometimes arranged to work alternately forwards and backwards in order to thoroughly break the woody material or " boon " of the straw, while the broken " shoves " are beaten out by suspending the fibre in a machine fitted with a series of revolving blades, which, striking violently against the flax, shake out the bruised and broken woody cores.
    0
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  • The celebrated Courtrai flax of Belgium is the most valuable staple in the market, on account of its fineness, strength and particularly bright colour.
    0
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  • There the flax is dried in the field, and housed or stacked during the winter succeeding its growth, and in the spring of the following year it is retted in crates sunk in the sluggish waters of the river Lys.
    0
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  • In all operations the greatest care is taken, and the cultivators being peculiarly favoured as to soil, climate and water, Courtrai flax is a staple of unapproached excellence.
    0
    0
  • An experiment made by Professor Hodges of Belfast on 7770 lb of air-dried flax yielded the following results.
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  • The 5824 lb (52 cwt.) of flax straw remaining lost in steeping 13 cwt., leaving 39 cwt.
    0
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  • 2 lb (702 lb) of finished flax was procured.
    0
    0
  • Thus the weight of the fibre was equal to about 9% of the dried flax with the bolls, 12% of the boiled straw, and over 16% of the retted straw.
    0
    0
  • The following analysis of two varieties of heckled Belgian flax is by Dr Hugo Miller (Hoffmann's Berichte fiber die Entwickelung der chemischen Industrie): - According to the determinations of Julius Wiesner (Die Rohstoffe des Pflanzenreiches), the fibre ranges in length from 20 to 140 centimetres, the length of the individual cells being from 2.0 to 4.0 millimetres, and the limits of breadth between 0 012 and 0.025 mm., the average being o 016 mm.
    0
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  • Among the circumstances which have retarded improvement both in the growing and preparing of flax, the fact that, till comparatively recent times, the whole industry was conducted only on a domestic scale has had much influence.
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  • At no very remote date it was the practice in Scotland for every small farmer and cotter not only to grow " lint " or flax in small patches, but to have it retted, scutched, cleaned, spun, woven, bleached and finished entirely within the limits of his own premises, and all by members or dependents of the family.
    0
    0
  • Thus the flax industry was long kept away from the most powerful motives to apply to it labour-saving devices, and apart from the influence of scientific inquiry for the improvement of methods and processes.
    0
    0
  • As cotton came to the front, just at the time when machine-spinning and power-loom weaving were being introduced, the result was that in many localities where flax crops had been grown for ages, the culture gradually drooped and ultimately ceased.
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  • Riga and St Petersburg (including Cronstadt) are the principal ports, but flax is also exported from Revel, Windau, Pernau, Libau, Narva and Konigsberg.
    0
    0
  • The raw flax is almost invariably known by the same name as the district in which it is grown, and it is further classified by the different groups would be: K.
    0
    0
  • These names indicate the particular district in which the flax has been grown, but it is more general to group the material into classes such as Livonian Crowns, Rija Crowns, Hoffs, Wracks, Drieband, Zins, Ristens, Pernau, Archangel, &c.
    0
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  • Of the lower qualities of Riga flax the following may be named: PW, Picked wrack flax.
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  • GPW, Grey picked wrack flax.
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  • PD, Picked Dreiband flax.
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  • The lowest quality of Riga flax is marked DW, meaning Dreiband Wrack.
    0
    0
  • Another Russian port from which a large quantity of flax is imported is Pernau, where the marks in use are comparatively few.
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    0
  • Pernau flax is shipped as Livonian and Fellin sorts, the latter being the best.
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    0
  • Both dew-retted and water-retted flax are exported from St Petersburg, the dew-retted or Slanitz flax being marked 1st, 2nd, 3rd and 4th Crown, also Zebrack No.
    0
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  • 2, while all the Archangel flax is dew-retted.
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  • Some idea of the extent of the Russian flax trade may be gathered from the fact that 233,000 tons were exported in 1905.
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  • The chief British ports for the landing of flax are: - Belfast, Dundee, Leith, Montrose, London and Arbroath, the two former being the chief centres of the flax industry.
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    0
  • The following table, taken from the annual report of the Belfast Flax Supply Association, shows the quantities received from all sources into the different parts of the United Kingdom: - W, Wrack flax.
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    0
  • The extent of flax cultivation in Ireland is considerable, but the acreage has been gradually diminishing during late years.
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    0
  • After 1869 it declined, there being 229,252 acres in flax crop that year, and only 122,003 in 1872.
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    0
  • JUTE, a vegetable fibre now occupying a position in the manufacturing scale inferior only to cotton and flax.
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    0
  • The seed is then sown broadcast as in the case of flax.
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  • The fibre is separated from the stalks by a process of retting similar to that for flax and hemp. In certain districts of Bengal it is the practice to stack the crop for a few days previous to retting in order to allow the leaves to dry and to drop off the stalks.
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  • The fibre is decidedly inferior to flax and hemp in strength and tenacity; and, owing to a peculiarity in its microscopic structure, by which the walls of the separate cells composing the fibre vary much in thickness at different points, the single strands of fibre are of unequal strength.
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  • Jute, indeed, is much more woody in texture than either flax or hemp, a circumstance which may be easily demonstrated by its behaviour under appropriate reagents; and to that fact is due the change in colour and character it undergoes on exposure to the air.
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  • The pioneers of the work were confronted with many difficulties; most people condemned the fibre and the cloth, many warps were discarded as unfit for weaving, and any attempt to mix the fibre with flax, tow or hemp was considered a form of deception.
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  • Indeed, it was not until Mr. Rowan got the Dutch government, about 1838, to substitute jute yarns for those made from flax in the manufacture of the coffee bagging for their East Indian possessions, that the jute trade in Dundee got a proper start.
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  • In their general features the spinning and weaving of jute fabrics do not differ essentially as to machinery and processes from those employed in the manufacture of hemp and heavy flax goods.
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  • Tales, Prologue 676, where the Pardoner's hair is compared with a "strike of flax."
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  • The principles of jute spinning are similar to those of dry spinning for flax.
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  • For detailed information regarding jute, the cloths made from it and the machinery used, see the following works: Watts's Dictionary of the Economic Products of India; Royle's Fibrous Plants of India; Sharp's Flax, Tow and Jute Spinning; Leggatt's Jute Spinning; Woodhouse and Milne's Jute and Linen Weaving; and Woodhouse and Milne's Textile Design: Pure and Applied.
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  • The chief cereal cultivated is wheat; oats, colza, flax and beetroot are also grown.
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    0
  • The chief crops are rye, oats and potatoes, while flax is cultivated in the district of Ermeland, between the Passarge and the upper Alle.
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  • The work of van Tieghem, van Senus, Fribes, Omeliansky and others has now shown that while certain anaerobic bacteria decompose the substance of the middle lamella - chiefly pectin compounds - and thus bring about the isolation of the cellulose fibres when, for instance, flax is steeped or " retted," they are unable to attack the cellulose itself.
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  • The nuts furthermore have been applied to the manufacture of an oil for burning, cosmetic preparations and starch, and in Switzerland, France and Ireland, when rasped on ground, to the bleaching of flax, hemp, silk and wool.
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  • The potato crop, which forms the staple food of the people, is great; the Saaz district is celebrated for hops, and the flax is also of a good quality.
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    0
  • On an average, £3,000,000 to £4,000,000 worth of wheat, about £i,000,000 worth of rye, and over £1,500,000 worth of barley are exported annually, besides oats, flax, linseed, rape seed, oilcake, bran, flour, vegetable oils, raw wool and caviare.
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    0
  • The town carries on an extensive trade in grain, flax, hemp, wood, tar and leather.
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    0
  • Flax and linseed also occupy a prominent place, Riga being the chief Russian port for the extensive flax-producing region of north-west Russia.
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    0
  • It has some trade in wool, cotton, flax, corn and liqueurs.
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    0
  • Rape is grown in the marsh lands and flax on the east coast, while large quantities of apples and other fruit are raised near Altona for the Hamburg and English markets.
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    0
  • The crops principally raised are wheat and maize, though here, as well as in other parts of the government, barley, flax, tobacco, water-melons, gourds, fruit, wine, saffron and madder are grown.
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    0
  • The cultivation of flax is almost extinct, but it is practised in a few districts, such as the East and West Ridings of 'Yorkshire.
    0
    0
  • Agriculture is the chief occupation, the principal crops being rye, barley, oats, wheat, flax and potatoes.
    0
    0
  • Flax spinning is mostly a domestic industry.
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    0
  • The spinning of flax by machinery was introduced early in the 19th century by 1VIr John Marshall, a Holbeck manufacturer, who was one of the first to apply Sir Richard Arkwright's water frame, invented for cotton manufacture, to the spinning of linen yarn.
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  • Marco Polo, who passed through the town in 1274, says that "Everything is to be had there [at Cotan, Khotan] in plenty, including abundance of cotton, with flax, hemp, wheat, wine, and the like.
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    0
  • Whale-oil is principally used in oiling wools for combing, in batching flax and other vegetable fibres, in currying and chamois leather-making, and as a lubricant for machinery.
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    0
  • The chief trade of Harlingen is the exportation of Frisian produce, namely, butter and cheese, cattle, sheep, fish, potatoes, flax, &c. There is also a considerable import trade in timber, coal, raw cotton, hemp and jute for the Twente factories.
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  • The city's industries consist chiefly in a large trade in tobacco, hemp, grain and live stock - there are large semi-annual horse sales - and in the manufacture of " Bourbon " whisky, tobacco, flour, dressed flax and hemp, carriages, harness and saddles.
    0
    0
  • There are also mills for flax and hemp yarns, a weaving factory and a hosiery factory.
    0
    0
  • Oats, flax and hemp are cultivated.
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    0
  • It is the chief place in the Kuhlandchen, a fertile valley peopled by German settlers, who rear cattle and cultivate flax.
    0
    0
  • Its inhabitants are employed chiefly in the cultivation of flax and hemp, and in the making of ropes.
    0
    0
  • There is considerable trade in grain, wool and flax.
    0
    0
  • Maize and wheat are the chief cereals; potatoes, flax and vegetables are also produced.
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    0
  • There is a lively trade with St Petersburg, and the sea-borne exports, which consist chiefly of timber, flax, linseed, oats, flour, pitch, tar, skins and mats, amount in value to about 12 millions sterling annually (822% for timber), but the imports (mostly fish) are worth only about £ 200,000.
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    0
  • But for an English trade, which sprang up out of the halfsmuggling, half-buccaneering enterprise of the Bristol merchants, the island would have fared badly, for during the whole of the 15th century their trade with England, exporting sulphur, eiderdown (of which the English taught them the value), wool, and salt stock-fish, and importing as before wood, iron, honey, wine, grain and flax goods, was their only link with the outer world.
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  • Flax, hemp and tobacco are also grown; hemp especially near Leskovats.
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    0
  • The chief manufacturing industries are those for which the country supplies raw material, notably meat-packing, flour-milling, brewing, tanning, and the weaving or spinning of hemp, flax and wool.
    0
    0
  • Indian corn, wheat, cotton, oats and hay are the principal crops, but the variety of farm and garden produce is great, and includes Kafir corn, broom corn, barley, rye, buckwheat, flax, tobacco, beans, castor beans, peanuts, pecans, sorghum cane, sugar cane, and nearly all the fruits and vegetables common to the temperate zone; stock-raising, too, is a very important industry.
    0
    0
  • Starting, however, with that year as the most important in Irish economic history in modern times, we find that between 1847 and 1905 the total area under crops - cereals, green crops, flax, meadow and clover - decreased by 582,348 acres.
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    0
  • Outside the recognized cereal and green crops, two others may be considered, flax and meadow and clover.
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    0
  • The number of acres under flax in 1905 was only 46,158.
    0
    0
  • Flax was cultivated at a very early period in Ireland and was both spun into thread and manufactured into cloth.
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    0
  • He invested a large sum of his own money in it, imported great quantities of flax seed from Holland and induced skilled workmen from France and the Netherlands to settle in Ireland.
    0
    0
  • A similar policy was pursued with even more energy by his successor in office, the duke of Ormonde, at whose instigation an Irish act was passed in 1665 to encourage the growth of flax and the manufacture of linen.
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    0
  • The English parliament in their desire to encourage the linen industry at the expense of the woollen, followed Ormonde's lead by passing an act inviting foreign workmen to settle in Ireland, and admitting all articles made of flax or hemp into England free of duty.
    0
    0
  • In 1850 the number of persons employed in flax mills and factories was 21,121; in 1901 the number in flax, hemp and jute textile factories was 64,802.
    0
    0
  • Clarendon, A Sketch of the Revenue and Finances of Ireland (1791); the annual reports of the Flax Supply Association and other local bodies, published at Belfast; reports by the Department of Agriculture on Irish imports and exports (these are a new feature and contain much valuable information).
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    0
  • The only industrial plants were flax and the dye-plants, chief among which were woad and rud, roid (a kind of bed-straw?).
    0
    0
  • The peculiar character of the flax business has prevented it from crossing the mountains which bound the northern province.
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    0
  • Both medicinal and flowering plants are exceptionally abundant; a few of the former are ginseng, snakeroot, bloodroot, hore-hound, thoroughwort, redroot (Ceanothus Americanus), horse mint and wild flax, and prominent among the latter are jessamines, azaleas, lilies, roses, violets, honey-suckle and golden-rod.
    0
    0
  • Indian corn heads the list of cereals, but wheat, oats, rye and barley are also cultivated, besides hemp, flax, tobacco and large quantities of potatoes.
    0
    0
  • The winters are here long and cold; the vine and maize are no longer cultivated,the principal crops being wheat, barley, oats, rye, hemp and flax.
    0
    0
  • Galicia has the largest area under potatoes and legumes in the whole of Austria, and hemp, flax, tobacco and hops are of considerable importance.
    0
    0
  • Much of the lower ground is well adapted for agriculture, and yields grain in abundance; the principal fruit grown is the apple, from which cider is made in some districts; hemp, flax and oil are also produced, and mulberries are cultivated for silkworms. The wine trade is active, and the products of the vineyards are in great demand in south-west France and at Passages in Guipuzcoa for mixing with French wines.
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  • - Diagram of the flower of Flax (Linum), consisting of five sepals (s), five petals (p), five stamens (a), and five carpels (c), each of which is partially divided into two.
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    0
  • - Syncarpous Pistil of Flax (Linum), consisting of five carpels, united by their ovaries, while their styles and stigmas are separate.
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    0
  • In the southern districts hemp and flax are raised, but grain crops are little cultivated, so that the bark of trees has often to be ground up to eke out the scanty supply of flour.
    0
    0
  • The chief crops are corn (especially wheat), fruit, vegetables, potatoes, beet, tobacco, flax, linseed and hops.
    0
    0
  • Sunn hemp, Manila hemp, Sisal hemp, and Phormium (New Zealand flax, which is neither flax nor hemp) are treated separately.
    0
    0
  • When the male plants are ripe they are pulled, put up into bundles, and steeped in a similar manner to flax, but the female plants are allowed to remain until the seed is perfectly ripe.
    0
    0
  • The time of sowing, the quantity of seed per acre (about three bushels) and the method of gathering and retting are very similar to those of flax; but, as a rule, it is a hardier plant than flax, does not possess the same pliability, is much coarser and more brittle, and does not require the same amount of attention during the first few weeks of its growth.
    0
    0
  • The very finest hemp, that grown in the province of Piedmont, Italy, is, however, very similar to flax, and in many cases the two fibres are mixed in the same material.
    0
    0
  • They were still hunters, but had domesticated animals; they were fairly skilful metallurgists, casting bronze in moulds of stone and clay; they were also agriculturists, cultivating beans, the vine, wheat and flax.
    0
    0
  • Flax, hops and oilseeds are also cultivated, and large quantities of excellent fruit are grown at the foot of the Harz and in the valleys of the Unstrut and the Saale.
    0
    0
  • Flax and Hemp Project Participatory research and development of best practice agronomy for hemp and flax in West Wales.
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    0
  • bruised reed, nor quench the smoking flax.
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    0
  • Banks of wild flowers - centaury, wild carrot, harebell, bird's foot trefoil, purging flax and thrift adorn the route.
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    0
  • spinning the wool, spinning the flax, making the scarlet, making the linen, making the purple garments.
    0
    0
  • Toward the end of the 18 th Century, the area became a huge center for growing flax.
    0
    0
  • Helen mixes up her own paper clay for large pieces and sometimes uses porcelain paper flax for smaller work.
    0
    0
  • Other crops included flax, beans and herbs used for cooking and for dyeing cloth.
    0
    0
  • At Hawkswick Wood there is an area of limestone grassland containing rockrose, thyme and purging flax.
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    0
  • Precious picture of Him who would not break the bruised reed, nor quench the smoking flax.
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    0
  • They serve to put in motion several thrashing and corn-mills, and a small one erected some years ago for spinning flax.
    0
    0
  • In the 18th century the production of linen made from local flax became an important industry in the area.
    0
    0
  • flax mill.
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    0
  • flax seed oil or even a lot of sleep.
    0
    0
  • flax fibers are bound together using a thermoplastic binder.
    0
    0
  • flax straw [Salmon-Minotte and Franck in Franck] .
    0
    0
  • flax oil or both, you cannot go wrong.
    0
    0
  • flax factory, some were bought by local farmers.
    0
    0
  • Some such as fairy flax, devil's bit scabious and sneezewort are due to seed introductions.
    0
    0
  • How do you make " smoking flax " burn?
    0
    0
  • Linen is made out of the natural fiber flax.
    0
    0
  • Good sources of these fats include extra virgin olive oil, canola oil, ground flax seeds and walnuts.
    0
    0
  • Upland calcareous grassland occurs on landslip material below the chalk cliffs; species include harebell, thyme, purging flax and early purple orchid.
    0
    0
  • From rain-fed organic cotton, to organic bamboo, and organic UK-grown hemp or flax.
    0
    0
  • The flax for this was locally grown and the coarse linen woven by hand, some two hundred years ago.
    0
    0
  • lint mills for the processing of flax for the linen industry.
    0
    0
  • A flax spinning and thread manufactory is carried on in the village of High Lorton, by Mr. W. Jennings.
    0
    0
  • In the flax mill, Marshall added ventilation and heating, with baths and changing rooms added later.
    0
    0
  • The flax 9 bar is being launched nationwide May 2006 and contains the equivalent of 1000mg of Flax seed oil in each bar.
    0
    0
  • The inner two were made of stout trees, lined with flax making them almost bullet proof.
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    0
  • They make a constant noise, like beating flax or grinding barley in a hollow stone quern.
    0
    0
  • redshank seed has been found as an impurity in cereal, flax, grass and clover seed.
    0
    0
  • spin flax from another group of textile producers in the Lakes - the Langdale Linen Industry.
    0
    0
  • spinning flax but happily this will not be the end of the mill.
    0
    0
  • Crops include sugar beet, potatoes, grain, grapes, tobacco, flax, hemp and wine.
    0
    0
  • transference of skills from Shrewsbury flax workers to employees of the firm.
    0
    0
  • Industry used to flourish here, including wheelwrights, ostlers, and a flax factory.
    0
    0
  • Industrial Plants.s T he manufacture of sugar from beetroot, owing to the increased~use of sugar, became highly important during Cultures -industriellesUnder this head the French group beetroot, hemp, flax and other plants, the products of which pass through some process of manufacture before they reach the consu mer.
    0
    0
  • The prophet reproaches his Ephraimite countrymen for going after their " lovers," the old local Baals who were supposed to have bestowed on them the bread, water, wool, flax and oil, and for not knowing that " it is I (Yahweh) who have bestowed on her (i.e.
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  • In the introductory paper in Maxwell's collection we are told that " The practice of draining, enclosing, summer fallowing, sowing flax, hemp, rape, turnip and grass seeds, planting cabbages after, and potatoes with, the plough, in fields of great extent, is introduced; and that, according to the general opinion, more corn grows now yearly where it was never known to grow before, these twenty years last past, than perhaps a sixth of all that the kingdom was in use to produce at any time before."
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  • Flora.-Almost every description of grain is found, especially wheat and maize, besides Turkish pepper or paprika, rape-seed, hemp and flax, beans, potatoes and root crops.
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  • During the 19th century the opening of a railway system in East Prussia and Russia gave a new impetus to its commerce, making it the principal outlet for the Russian staples - grain, seeds, flax and hemp. It has now regular steam communication with Memel, Stettin, Kiel, Amsterdam and Hull.
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  • In 1765 he published a small pamphlet On the Flax Husbandry of Scotland; and, besides availing himself of his extensive acquaintance with the proprietors of Scotland to recommend the introduction of manufactures, he took a prominent part in furthering the project of the Forth and Clyde Canal.
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  • The terms flax or lint (Ger.
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  • A process to turn good flax into bad cotton had, however, on the face of it, not much to recommend it to public acceptance; and Claussen's process therefore remains only as an interesting and suggestive experiment.
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  • How careful he was to quench no smoking flax!
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  • Redshank seed has been found as an impurity in cereal, flax, grass and clover seed.
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  • The list of genetically improved plants also includes potatoes, flax, rice, sugar beet, wheat, chicory and faster ripening tomatoes.
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  • A new mixing head enables the established LFI technology to be used for flax, hemp or sisal fibers.
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  • Annie Garnett learned to spin flax from another group of textile producers in the Lakes - the Langdale Linen Industry.
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  • In 1997 the company ceased spinning flax but happily this will not be the end of the mill.
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  • It is not clear whether there was any transference of skills from Shrewsbury flax workers to employees of the firm.
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  • Flax, for instance, has a pleasant aroma.
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  • And still others like flax are best known as extracts like flax seed oil, a plant-based source of the all important fatty acids.
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  • By replacing it with one tablespoon of ground flax seed whipped with a quarter cup of boiling water you remove all the fat from the egg yolk.
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  • In a small bowl mix the lemon juice, flax seed and vanilla.
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  • Additionally, vegetarians tend to have clear, vibrant skin because they load up on olive oil, dark leafy greens and flax seeds, while avoiding saturated animal fats that clog the system.
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  • Common raw garnishes are parsley, avocado, flax seeds and green onion.
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  • In other words, I bring some raw trail mix or flax crackers just in case I get hungry.
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  • Ingredients included calendula, chamomile, green tea, organic sunflower oil, and organic flax oil.
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  • Hemp grows extremely quickly, and produces more fiber yield per year than other sustainable fibers like cotton and flax.
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  • Linen comes from the stalk of the flax plant.
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  • This includes things you might expect like vegetables and grains, dairy and meat, but it also extends to crops like cotton and flax that can be processed for clothing.
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  • They have five different kinds to choose from: whole grain, buttermilk, flax, buckwheat and spelt.
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  • Organix - Castor and Pollux's line of dog and cat foods contains free range chicken and organic rice, peas and flax seed.
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  • It is made from the stalk of the flax plant.
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  • It is expensive to manufacture linen because of the nature of the flax plant, which is temperamental by nature.
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  • Getting the fibers for the linen from the flax stalk must be done by hand, which adds to the overall expensive nature of linen.
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  • Flax fibers are processed, spun and woven into strong, durable cloth called linen.
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  • In fact, hemp yields about twice that of flax and the fabrics are almost identical.
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  • Linen - Often considered a classic summer fabric, linen is produced form the stem of a flax plant.
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  • For example, the Men's Polarized Flax Jacket Sunglass looks so much like the real deal that no one may be able to tell the difference.
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  • Flax seed oil is another source of fatty acids known to reduce cholesterol levels.
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  • Soluble fibers include pectin, flax, and gums; insoluble fibers include psyllium and brans from grains like wheat and oats.
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  • Selenium-based shampoos, topical applications of flax oil and/or olive oil, and biotin supplementation are among the therapies recommended for seborrheic dermatitis.
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  • Some researchers believe that soluble fiber, such as those found in oatmeal, chia, flax and other plant-based foods, lowers cholesterol.
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  • Unlike flax, which is best stored whole to retain its nutrients and oils, chia contains such a high amount of antioxidants that it can be stored as ground seeds.
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  • Trials along these same lines done with flax seed reduced egg production, while those done with fish oil produced a fishy flavor in eggs; neither problem was an issue in the chia seed research.
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  • The products contain flax, acacia, oat bran and chia seeds to deliver a balance of soluble and insoluble fiber.
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  • Food sources of these essential fatty acids include breast milk, flax seed, hempseed, leafy greens, chia seeds, eggs, cold water fish, seaweed, and microalgae supplements.
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  • Omega-3 fats are found in fatty fish, walnuts, flax, and other seafood, nuts and seeds.
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  • You can also supplement Omega-3 fats by taking fish oil or flax oil.
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  • Healthy Crust: A healthy alternative for celiacs and non-celiacs alike, this recipe makes use of whole-grain flours and ground flax.
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  • Glutenfreeda's Instant Oatmeal: Made with flax meal as well as oats and available in a variety of flavors, including Maple Raisin, Banana Maple and Apple Cinnamon.
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  • Of these options, ground flax seed is amongst the more nutritious as it is a whole food.
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  • Moreover, flax seeds are a rich source of omega 3 fatty acids and cancer-fighting lignans.
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  • She also offers a yeast-free version that adds supplemental flax seed fiber to the mix.
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  • Canvas is made of materials like flax, hemp or cotton.
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  • It comes in black, flax, navy, saddle tan and white leather and is priced at approximately $45.95.
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  • Margo Flax Martin played by actress Eileen Letchworth got a significant face lift when her portrayer did the same.
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  • Flax, olive, and canola oils should only be consumed in very limited quantities.
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  • Oils-Choose flax seed oil and extra virgin oil.
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  • Cook with olive, sesame seed, flax seed, and coconut oils.
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  • Not only is flax seed high in soluble fiber, but it is also high in Omega-3 oils, which are beneficial to health.
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  • Flax seeds can be stored for up to 2 years, but once ground should be used and kept refrigerated to prevent spoiling.
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  • Polyunsaturated fats, such as omega-3 and omega-6 triglycerides, are best found in fish, flax, and certain nuts.
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  • Fortify muffins and breads with ground flax, pureed beans, or grated carrots to increase fiber as well as flavor.
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  • Don't completely eliminate fat from your diet; add healthy fats such as those found in flax seed, nuts, olive oil and avocados.
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  • Some people swear by flax seed oil instead of fish oil.
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  • With rich cocoa butter, protective vitamin E and nourishing kukui, macadamia and flax seed oils, there's nothing better to slather on after a long, luxurious bath.
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  • The other textile industries (flax, jute, &c.) have made notable progress.
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  • Thus, while one village would produce nothing but felt shoes, another would carve sacred images (ikons), and a third spin flax only, a fourth make wooden spoons, a fifth nails, a sixth iron chains, and so on.
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  • The external trade of the Russian empire (bullion and the external trade of Finland not included) since the year 1886 is shown in the following table: The exports rank in the following order :- cereals (wheat, barley, rye, oats, maize, buckwheat) and flour, 49.2%; timber and wooden wares, 7.2; petroleum, 5.8; eggs, 5.4; flax, 5; butter, 3; sugar, 2-4; cottons and oilcake, 2 each; oleaginous seeds, &c., 1.5; with hemp, spirits, poultry, game, bristles, hair, furs, leather, manganese ore, wool, caviare, live-stock, gutta-percha, vegetables and fruit, and tobacco.
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  • The leading industry of Udine is silk-spinning, but it also possesses manufactures of linen, cotton, hats and paper, tanneries and sugar refineries, and has a considerable trade in flax, hemp, &c. Branch railways lead to Cividale del Friuli and S.
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  • Large quantities of flax are grown, while the timber trade is of considerable importance.
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  • Among other important productions of the Ottoman Empire are sesame, coleseed, castor oil, flax, hemp, aniseed, mohair, saffron, olive oil, gums, scammony and liquorice.
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  • flava is known in gardens as the day lily; Phormium, a New Zealand genus to which belongs New Zealand flax, P. tenax, a useful fibre-plant; Kniphofia, South and East Africa, several species of which are cultivated; and Aloe.
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  • Besides wool, leading imports are jute, cotton, flax, timber, petroleum, coal, pitch, wine, cereals, oil-seeds and oil-cake, nitrate of soda and other chemical products, and metals.
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