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flat

flat

flat Sentence Examples

  • They swelled and blended smoothly - and that flat tummy was so masculine.

  • It wasn't a question, but a flat statement.

  • His tone was flat and uninterested.

  • "There's enough rock here to build a housing development," she commented as they worked their way across a jumble of flat red rocks.

  • His tone was flat, almost uninterested.

  • I opened each somewhere in the middle and held it flat on the table after recording the title and page number.

  • I was flat on my back on a stretcher and there were a number of people in the room, most with flashlights, all seemingly talking at the same time.

  • Similar to the bedroom, there was nothing on any of the flat surfaces, not even dust.

  • From his shoulders to his chest to his flat midsection, every part of him looked as if he'd been carefully carved from stone.

  • Jonny was on a low, flat rock, making love to a woman writhing in pleasure beneath him.

  • Sofia hung up and stared at the number on the paper, wondering if Jake had lied to her or if he flat out screwed up the number.

  • There was the sound of a phone being shuffled from one person to another, then a flat, deep male voice.

  • "We have a serious issue," Han said in a flat voice.

  • A chopper landed ahead of them on a wide, flat mesa.

  • As he glanced down at his vehicle, he saw both tires on the driver's side were totally flat.

  • Flat Fifties by the sound of it.

  • They came in a flat green tin—fifty of 'em. That's how they got the name.

  • "Want to see what a Lucky Strike Green Flat Fifty tin looks like?" he asked.

  • Her gaze continued up to the large western belt buckle that hugged his flat abdomen.

  • He flat out refused to go out after dark last night.

  • His elbows were propped on his knees, the trench falling back to show a lean body, flat stomach and muscular thighs outlined by the soft material of his pants.

  • No one wanted a dying girlfriend, especially when she'd flat out refused to marry him.

  • The second soul bartered for in private was flat out missing.

  • His hands were large, his palms flat.

  • "They're plastic," she said in a flat tone.

  • She staggered toward it, stumbled, then fell through it and landed flat on her back on a familiar, faded red rug.

  • She half-stumbled, half-ran to the park area before tripping and falling flat.

  • They even had a version of bread; it was unleavened and came in large, round, flat ears.

  • The landscape was open and flat, the heat making the ground shimmer.

  • The desert was flat, the rock formations and canyons plentiful.

  • He opened the communications device and touched two buttons on the flat control panel.

  • There were a number of different routes, but the Deans chose the two-mile town site loop, a nearly flat path that first traversed a scented pine forest and then opened to a spectacular view of the surrounding mountains.

  • She displayed beautiful intonation and reached the A flat without even a hint of shrillness.

  • I hand delivered a lovely lass to him, and he turned her down flat.

  • He was lean, with broad shoulders, narrow hips and a flat abdomen.

  • His accent appeared when he was too stressed to be concerned about emulating the flat, cultured accent of the political elite.

  • His shoulders were broad, his chest wide, his stomach flat, his hips lean.

  • She plopped a piece of flat bread over the top then sat down with her own plate.

  • Lana followed them into the medical facility after a quick look around, not recognizing the flat landscape and distant red rocks surrounding the canyon in which they'd landed.

  • If I had a buck for every flat I fixed, I could retire...no pun intended.

  • I thought it had a flat but I guess he fixed it.

  • Both of my tires are flat.

  • He had just fixed a flat on his bike.

  • Tom DeLeo continued doing legwork on the Wassermann case, a curious jurisdictional mess with the Federal boys in charge but legions of local flat feet in scattered municipalities doing their grunt work.

  • I fixed the flat on Mom's bike.

  • As long as the road is flat.

  • The ride starts out fairly flat and then climbs—Wolfe Creek Pass at 10,850 feet, Poncha Pass at 9,019, Fremont at 11,318 and finally Loveland Pass at 11,992 feet.

  • Although the route was relatively flat by Colorado standards, Dean learned that a body unaccustomed to elevation in the 7,000­foot range needed more oxygen to fuel its muscles.

  • It wasn't as if she were wearing a bikini, and her only physical attributes were a flat abdomen and smooth curves – well, those and her breasts, but they were over proportioned - out of balance, so to speak.

  • His tone was flat.

  • She was reaching for something in the cabinets and that flat abdomen with its velvety skin was exposed.

  • The large belt buckle at his lean waist lay flat against a washboard stomach.

  • After the strange exchange outside, the joke fell flat.

  • He moved to the bed and lowered her onto her back, pressing her soft shape flat with the full length of his body.

  • At his flat tone, the prince glanced at Vara.

  • That idea fell flat.

  • Jabbing it at him, she turned the tables, threatening him until he lay flat on the floor.

  • He was still lean, though, with that flat stomach.

  • Alex picked up a large flat rock and put it in the wheelbarrow.

  • His gaze went over the blonde's body in satisfaction: tall, slender, flat stomach, large breasts.

  • His television show was playing on the large, flat screen television in the main living area.

  • The washboard abs were flat, even when he was seated.

  • "Yeah," he said, looking at the round, flat crystal.

  • Jessi dug out the round, flat red crystal.

  • In Pteromys the tail is cylindrical and comparatively thin, while in Sciuropterus it is broad, flat and laterally expanded, so as to compensate for the absence of the interfemoral membrane by acting as a supplementary parachute.

  • The ovary has many cavities with a large number of ovules attached to its walls, and is surmounted by a flat stigma of many radiating rows as in a poppy.

  • The principal districts are the Fairmont (or Upper Monongahela) and the Elk Garden (or Upper Potomac) in the northern, and the Pocahontas (or Flat Top) and the New and Kanawha rivers districts in the southern part of the state.

  • The bituminous coal of West Virginia is a particularly good coking coal, and in 1905, 1906, 1907 and 1908 West Virginia ranked second (to Pennsylvania) among the states of the Union in the amount of coke manufactured; the Flat Top district is the principal cokemaking region.

  • The " roods " themselves were not The simplest form is the " flat roof " consisting of horizontal wood joists laid from wall to wall as in floor construction.

  • The roof must not be quite flat, for a slight fall is necessary in its upper surface to allow water to drain away into gutters placed at convenient points.

  • With flat roofs the pressure exerted upon the supports is directly vertical.

  • " Lean-to," " shed," or " pent " roofs are practically developments of the flat roof, one end of the joists (which are now called " rafters ") being tipped up to form a decided slope, which enables slates, tiles, corrugated iron and other materials to be employed which cannot be used upon a " flat " roof.

  • Cochin-China consists chiefly of an immense plain, flat and monotonous, traversed by the Mekong and extending from Ha-Tien in the west to Baria in the east, and from Bien-Hoa in the north-east to the southern point of the peninsula of Ca-Mau in the south-west.

  • The short screw whose divided milled head is shifts the zero of the micrometer by pushing, without turning, the short sliding rod whose flat end forms the point d'appui of the micrometer screw at I.

  • The architrave is flat, and there is a space over it, serving both to admit light and to relieve the pressure on it from above, and the size decreases slightly from the bottom to the top. Within the doorway is, as a rule, a niche on the right, and a staircase ascending in the thickness of the wall to the left; in front is another similar doorway leading to the chamber in the interior, which is circular, and about 15 ft.

  • or less in height and width, with the sides slightly inclined towards one another, and from 30 to 40 ft., or even more, in length; the sides are composed sometimes of slabs, sometimes of rough walling, while the roof is composed of flat slabs; and the bodies were probably disposed in a sitting position.

  • It is a modern town, although many of the houses have the flat roofs, view-turrets (miradores) and horseshoe arches characteristic of Moorish architecture.

  • Any note may be a pitch note; for orchestras custom has settled upon a' in the treble clef, for organs and pianos in Great Britain c 2, and for modern brass instruments b flat'.

  • The hills are formed by a short, broad, anticlinal fold, which is flat or nearly so on its summit.

  • In the north and north-east are great plains of black soil, favourable to cotton-growing; in the south and west are successive ranges of low hills, with flat fertile valleys between them.

  • One end of a pipe is finished flat, the end of the other pipe being brought to a conical edge.

  • A coupling collar, tapped in the same manner, is screwed on, and causes the conical edge to impress itself tightly on the flat end, giving a sound and lasting joint.

  • On the west the shore is perfectly flat, so that a slight rise in the water causes the inundation of a considerable area - a fact not without its influence on the estimates made at varying periods as to the size of the lake.

  • The Argentine " mesopotamia," between the Parana and Uruguay rivers, belongs in great measure to this same region, being partly wooded, flat and swampy in the north (Corrientes), but higher and undulating in the south (Entre Rios).

  • The surrounding country produces tobacco of a very superior quality, and to the tobacco industry, introduced in 1872, the growth of Winston is chiefly due; the manufacture of flat plug tobacco here is especially important.

  • Fore-feet with five well-developed toes, carrying small, flat, scale-like nails, not reaching the extremity of the digits.

  • Hind-feet rather long and slender, with a well-developed opposable and nailless first toe;: second and third digits united, with sharp, compressed curved claws; the fourth and fifth free, with small flat nails.

  • This is especially the case with the tributaries of the Darling on its left bank, where in seasons of great rains these rivers overspread their banks and flood the flat country for miles around and thus reach the main stream.

  • As early as 1860 there had been disturbances of a serious character, and the Chinese were chased off the goldfields of New South Wales, serious riots occurring at Lambing Flat, on the Burrangong goldfield.

  • The Bernam runs through flat swampy country for the greater part of its course, and steam-launches can penetrate to a distance of over 100 m.

  • The stone implements are generally of one or two types: a long rectangular adze or wedge rudely pointed at one end, and used in conjunction with a mallet or flat stone, and a roughly triangular axe-head, which has evidently been fixed in the B too R.

  • It lies on the river Weaver, in the upper part of its flat, open valley.

  • ft., are round or square, and for these sizes, and shapes, and of course for a flat surface, the relation P = .003 is fairly correct.

  • Sometimes, especially in the case of overhead travelling cranes for very heavy loads, the chain is a special pitch chain, formed of flat links pinned together, and the barrel is reduced to a wheel provided with teeth, or " sprockets," which engage in the links.

  • The magnet between the poles of which the rectangular signal coil moves is built up of a number of thin flat horseshoe-shaped permanent magnets of a special quality of steel, and is provided with adjustable pole pieces.

  • The method of induction between insulated primary and secondary circuits laid out flat on the surface of the earth proves to be of limited application, and in his later experiments Preece returned to a method which unites both conduction and induction as the means of affecting one circuit by a current in another.

  • In 1892, on the Bristol Channel, he established communication between Lavernock Point and an island called Flat Holme in that channel by placing at these positions insulated single-wire circuits, earthed at both ends and laid as far as possible parallel to each other, the distance between them being 3.3 m.

  • He proposed to employ two large flat coils of wire laid horizontally, on the ground, that on the mainland having in circuit a battery, interrupter and key, and that on the island a telephone.

  • Evershed, and has been practically adopted at Lavernock and Flat Holme.

  • Some of these experiments were made on Salisbury Plain and others in the Bristol Channel between Lavernock and Flat Holm and Bream Down in 1897.

  • off, being flat and deserted.

  • Little Andaman, with the exception of the extreme north, is practically flat.

  • external epithelium is flat on the ex-umbral surface, more columnar on the sub-umbral surface, where it forms the muscular tissue of the sub-umbrella and the velum.

  • In some hydroids the founder-polyp, developed from a planula after fixation, throws out numerous outgrowths from the base to form the hydrorhiza; these outgrowths may be radially arranged so as to form by contact or coalescence a flat plate.

  • The foot resembles that of the other lemurs in its large opposable great toe with a flat nail; but all the other toes have pointed compressed claws.

  • West, north and north-east of this the province is flat and consists of sea-clay or sand and clay mixed, except where patches of low and high fen occur on the Frisian borders.

  • A mountain, usually with very steep peaks, forms the centre, if not the whole island; on all sides steep ridges descend to the sea, or, as is oftener the case, to a considerable belt of flat land.

  • It is found in flat rolled pieces, irregularly distributed through a blue clay probably of Miocene age.

  • planta (for plancta, the root being that seen in planus, flat, cf.

  • The leaves of most mosses are flat plates, each consisting of a single layer of square or oblong assimilating (chlorophyllous) cells.

  • Other hairs consist of a chain of cells; others, again, are branched in various ways; while yet others have the form of a flat plate of cells placed parallel to the leaf surface and inserted on a stalk.

  • For example, in southern Algeria, a region of steppes is situated on a flat plateau, about 3000 ft.

  • In the red variety of Cucurbita pepo these crystals may consist of rods, thin plates, flat ribbons or spirals.

  • is a flat disk, circular or elliptical in outline, had in the ideas time of Homer acquired a special definiteness by the introduction of the idea of the ocean river bounding the whole, an application of imperfectly understood observations.

  • Thales of earth Miletus is claimed as the first exponent of the idea of a Flat Homer.

  • the transverse commissure of the right and left pallium) is in birds reduced to a narrow flat bundle of a few white fibres; it is situated immediately above and behind the much stronger anterior commissure, i.e.

  • West of the Ain, with the exception of the district covered by the Revermont, the westernmost chain of the Jura, the country is flat, consisting in the north of the south portion of the Bresse, in the south of the marshy Dombes.

  • The leaves are three or four in number, flat, lanceolate, erect and sheathing; and there is no stem.

  • of Jerusalem, standing on an isolated hill above a flat corn valley.

  • flat, bergen.

  • in length, actuating a universal joint on the first spindle of the register; it consisted of an air-tight thin metal tube with a coned fore-end, carrying flat metal vanes set at an angle.

  • Thus it consists of the immense plains and flat lands which extend between the plateau formation and the Arctic Ocean, including the series of parallel chains and hilly spurs which skirt the former region on the N.W.

  • The flat lands which extend from the base of the Alpine foothills to the shores of the Arctic Ocean, assume the character either of dry deserts, as in the Aral-Caspian depression, or of low tablelands, as in central Russia and E.

  • Over the greater part of the Cambrian country the strata are still nearly as flat as when they were first laid down, and the deposits, even of the Cambrian period, are as soft as those of the Mesozoic and Tertiary formations in England.

  • Stolypin defended the ukaz of the 2nd of June 1907, which in flat contradiction of the provisions of the fundamental laws altered the electoral law without the consent of the legislature, on the ground that what the autocrat had granted the autocrat could take away.

  • The same elevation is reached by a very few flat summits of the plateau about Kursk, and farther E.

  • Boats could be conveyed over flat and easy portages from one river-basin to another, and these portages were subsequently transformed with a relatively small amount of labour into navigable canals, and even at the present day the canals have more importance for the traffic of the country than have most of the railways.

  • winds - prevail over extensive areas, and sweep across the flat plains without hindrance.

  • The surface is undulatory; marshy meadow lands no longer exist on the flat watersheds, and only a few in the deeper and broader river valleys.

  • Goremykin, who had succeeded Witte at the head of the government, met these preposterous demands with a flat refusal, the House voted, on the motion of M.

  • of Selinus, separated from it by a small flat valley, lies a group of three huge temples.

  • at the ends, for the purpose of keeping the flat wheels on the track.

  • on this occasion William Jessop, of the Butterley Iron Works, near Derby, proposed to get over it by laying down two plates of iron, perfectly flat and level with the road but each having on its outside a groove 4 in.

  • These are flat bars of iron or steel from 18 in.

  • The gondola or flat car corresponds to the European open wagons and is used to carry goods not liable to be injured by the weather; but in the United States the practice of covering the load with tarpaulins is unknown, and therefore the proportion of box cars is much greater than in Europe.

  • In 1893 the construction was completed in Budapest of an underground railway with a thin, flat roof, consisting of steel beams set close together, with small longitudinal jack arches between them, the street pavement .

  • The low flat country round Baracaldo is covered with maize, pod fruit and vines.

  • Upolu is long and narrow; it has a backbone of mountains whose flanks are scored with lovely valleys, at the foot of which are flat cultivable tracts.

  • The surface is mostly flat, but on the W.

  • The summit is flat and quite bare of vegetation, but the panorama in every direction is extremely grand.

  • The country around is flat and fertile, producing much wine, dates, oranges, oil, saffron and aniseed.

  • With the exception of a few flat ridges running from north to south, it is so low that it requires, to protect it from overflows, an unbroken line of levees averaging 15 ft.

  • The north central part of the state, known as the "flat woods," is level and heavily forested.

  • - In the Western Church its actual form is that of a sort of folding cap consisting of two halves which, when not worn, lie flat upon each other.

  • 3,641,000 2,873,000 large spherical areas on a flat surface being necessarily continent.

  • Here the folded Archean rocks are overlaid by Cambrian and Ordovician beds, which still lie for the most part flat and undisturbed.

  • By far the largest area is occupied by the Mongolian group. These have yellow-brown skins, black eyes and hair, flat noses and oblique eyes.

  • The eyes and skin are dark, the beard often well developed, the nose broad and flat, the lips coarse, and jaws heavy.

  • There is, indeed, a flat contradiction between the two accounts, but a family of Greek MSS.

  • The delta of the Cauvery occupies the flat northern part, which is highly cultivated, dotted over with groves of coconut trees, and is one of the most densely populated tracts in India.

  • Naturally, it is among the free living forms that the parapodium is best developed, and least developed among the tubicolous belongs typically a long tentacle, the cirrus, which 'r podium or neuropodium, and may be developed into an arborescent gill or into a flat scale-like process, A the elytron (in Polynoe, &c.).

  • The houses are built of clay with (generally) flat roofs impervious to fire.

  • well-wooded site overlooking the flat lands bordering the Waveney.

  • The Armenian highlands, which run generally parallel to the Caucasus, though at much lower elevations (5000-6000 ft.), are a plateau region, sometimes quite flat, sometimes gently undulating, clothed with luxuriant meadows and mostly cultivable.

  • The short leaves are flat, those above pressed close to the stem, and the others forming two rows; they are of a rather light green tint above, whitish beneath.

  • The flat leaves are arranged in two regular, distinct rows; they are deep green above, but beneath have two broad white lines, which, as the foliage in large trees has a tendency to curl upwards, give it a silvery appearance from below.

  • The foot is always simple, with its flat crawling surface extending from end to end, but in the embryo Limnaea it shows a bilobed character, which leads on to the condition characteristic of Pteropoda.

  • The platy minerals have also a perfect cleavage parallel to their flat surfaces, while the fibrous species often have two or more cleavages following their long axes; hence a schistose rock may split not only by separation of the mineral plates from one another but also by cleavage of the parallel minerals through their substance.

  • Below the pediment comes an arcade with flat pilasters, which runs all round the exterior of the church.

  • The lower order contains the flat pilastered portal with two panelled spaces on each side.

  • Its whereabouts is thus, to a great extent, concealed both from enemies searching for spiders and from insects suitable for food; and its open meshwork of strong threads makes it much less liable to be beaten down by rain or torn to shreds by winds than if it were a flat sheet of closely woven silk.

  • The terraces may thus be regarded as flat and extended anticlines.

  • In summer the country appears as one waving field of wheat, millet and mealies; whilst on the mountain slopes and on their flat tops are large flocks of sheep, cattle and goats, and troops of ponies.

  • It contains a colourless fluid, with flat, oval, nucleated corpuscles, as a rule colourless, but in some cases tinged with yellow or red haemoglobin.

  • 5), be a pair of semi-cylindrical fixed trunnions which are carried on a supporting frame and held with flat sides downwards.

  • The pastures are everywhere luxuriant, and the wooded heights and winding glens, in which the tangled shrubbery is here and there broken up by open glades and flat meadows of green turf, exhibit a beauty of vegetation such as is hardly to be seen in any other district of Palestine.

  • Separated from Lycabettus by a depression to the south-west, through which flows a brook, now a covered drain (probably to be identified with the Eridanus), stands the remarkable oblong rocky mass of the Acropolis (512 ft.), rising precipitously on all sides except the western; its summit was partially levelled in prehistoric times, and the flat area was subsequently enlarged by further cutting and by means of retaining walls.

  • In Vitrina the spire is very flat and the surface glassy.

  • At their feet, the flat green valley floors of the higher elevations give place in the lower parts to lovely woods.

  • To the north, west and south, a flat coastal belt, bordering the Irish Sea, with its inlets Morecambe Bay and Solway Firth, and broadest in the north, marks off the Lake District, while to the east the valleys of the Eden and the Lune divide it from the Pennine mountain system.

  • Derwentwater and Bassenthwaite occupy a single depression, a flat alluvial plain separating them.

  • Maria della Pensola are buildings of the 11th century with flat arches; the former has some good Renaissance sculptures.

  • It is flat and densely wooded.

  • For the most part the country is flat, the only mountains being a low range which, rising in the west, runs south-east in an irregular line towards the Chilka lake and forms a water-parting between the district and the valley of the Mahanadi.

  • A rounded head, instead of flat on top. Blaze.

  • It stands on an abrupt hill-spur rising above flat lowlands which form a southward continuation of Romney marsh.

  • A flat sheet of lead or some other suitable weight should be laid upon the top of the pile of specimens, so as to keep up a continuous pressure.

  • In mounting, the specimen is floated out in a flat white dish containing sea-water, so that foreign matter may be detected, and a piece of paper of suitable size is placed under it, supported either by the fingers of the left hand or by a palette.

  • Lichens for the herbarium should, whenever possible, be sought for on a slaty or laminated rock, so as to procure them on flat thin pieces of the same, suitable for mounting.

  • A "map" of the spores should be taken by separating a pileus and placing it flat on a piece of thin paper for a few hours when the spores will fall and leave a nature print of the arrangement of the gills which may be fixed by gumming the other side of the paper.

  • Mosses when growing in tufts should be gathered just before the capsules have become brown, divided into small flat portions, and pressed lightly in drying paper.

  • The upper molars present a characteristic pattern of crown, having a much-developed flat or more or less sinuous outer wall, and two transverse ridges running obliquely inwards and backwards from it, terminating internally in conical eminences or columns, and enclosing a deep valley between.

  • part, with the provinces of Matanzas and Havana, is flat and rolling, with occasional hills a few hundred feet high.

  • These constitute the winter residence of the family, reception rooms, &c. The roofs of the houses are all flat, surrounded by parapets of sufficient height to protect them from the observation of the dwellers opposite, and separate them from their neighbours.

  • Several of the bazaars are vaulted over with brickwork, but the greater number are merely covered with flat beams which support roofs of dried leaves or branches of trees and grass.

  • The river, running through an absolutely flat country, composed entirely of alluvial soil, is apt to change its channel.

  • The face is flat and wide, the nose short, the mouth large and the eyes only slightly oblique.

  • It lies on a gentle eminence in the flat fen country, and the fine Perpendicular tower and spire of the church of St Mary are a landmark from far.

  • The city stands on the south side of the bay, and is built on a flat point of land only 8 ft.

  • In hand specimens they:often show a well-marked banding which is sometimes flat and parallel, but may be sinuous and occasionally is very irregular, resembling the pattern of damascened steel.

  • high, overlooks the confluence of the two rivers, the large, flat island of Veliki Voyn and several smaller islets.

  • QUERN, the primitive form of hand-mill for grinding corn, consisting of two flat circular stones; the lower stone, often shaped with a rim; has a wooden or metal pin in the centre which passes through a hole in the upper stone; the worker pours the grain through the hole with one hand, revolving the upper stone with the other by means of a peg fixed to one side.

  • The flat rounded cakes of rubber made in this manner are known in the London market as " biscuits.

  • Formerly filled with alpine lakes, these valleys are now sheeted with flat alluvial soil and occupied by human settlements, and are drained by rivers which flow along them before they make their way to the north through narrow gorges pierced in the mountain-walls.

  • may be, as in Cistella, applied flat to the inner surface of the dorsal mantle fold, but more usually they are raised free from the body like a pair of moustaches, and as they are usually far too long to lie straight in the mantle cavity, they are folded or coiled up. The brachial skeleton which in many cases supports the arms has been mentioned above.

  • Along its eastern boundary adjoining Burdwan district the country is flat and alluvial, presenting the appearance of the ordinary paddy lands of Bengal.

  • It lies in a flat plain on the river Don, with slight hills rising westward.

  • Steel articles, such as knitting or sewing needles and pieces of flat spring, may be readily magnetized by stroking them with the bar-magnet; after having produced magnetism in any number of other bodies, the magnet will have lost nothing of its own virtue.

  • If the cardboard scale upon which the beam of light is reflected by the magnetometer mirror is a flat one, the deflections as indicated by the movement of the spot of light are related to the actual deflections of the needle in the ratio of tan 20 to 0.

  • 20); the block is bored through at the upper end only, and its inner face opposite the hole is made quite flat and smooth.

  • A little instrument, supplied by Hartmann and Braun, contains a short length of fine bismuth wire wound into a flat double spiral, half an inch or thereabouts in diameter, and attached to a long ebonite handle.

  • The island is the flat summit of a submarine mountain more than 15,000 ft.

  • The flat summit is formed by a succession of limestones - all deposited in shallow water - from the Eocene (or Oligocene) up to recent deposits in the above-mentioned atoll with islands on its reef.

  • From the Devonian onwards the beds lie flat or dip at low angles.

  • about Faizabad, in the centre of Badakshan, but tailing off to iioo at Kunduz, in Kataghan, where it merges into the flat plains bordering the Oxus.

  • If a surface intended to be flat is affected with a slight general curvature, a remedy may be found in an alteration of focus, and the remedy is the less complete as the reflection is more oblique.

  • 2 " In the same way we may conclude that in flat gratings any departure from a straight line has the effect of causing the dust in the slit and the spectrum to have different foci - a fact sometimes observed " (Rowland, " On Concave Gratings for Optical Purposes," Phil.

  • Others occur in the flat northern half of the Crimea, and even close to Kerch, where the famous Kul Oba seems to have held a Scythic chieftain who had adopted a veneer of Greek tastes, but remained a barbarian at heart.

  • The Lebombo hills are flat topped but with a well-defined break on their seaward side.

  • The country west of the Drakensberg, though part of the main South African tableland, is not uniform in character, consisting of (I) elevated downs, (2) their slopes, (3) the flat " bottom " land.

  • Small springs of fresh water are frequent and there are 'several shallow lakes or pans - flat bottomed depressions with no outlet.

  • But the pure Laos are still distinguished by the high cheek-bones, small flat nose, oblique eyes, wide mouth, black lank hair, sparse beard, and yellow complexion of the Thai and other branches of the Mongol family.

  • 20), the female figure reclining on the lid wears a Greek chiton of a thin white material, with short sleeves fastened on the outside of the arm, by means of buttons and loops; a himation of dark purple thick stuff is wrapped round her hips and legs; on her feet are sandals, consisting of a sole apparently of leather, and attached to the foot and leg with leather straps; under the straps are thin socks which do not cover the toes; she wears a necklace of heavy pendants; her ears are pierced for ear-rings; her hair is partly gathered together with a ribbon at the roots behind, and partly hangs in long tresses before and behind; a flat diadem is bound round her head a little way back from the brow and 2 The tutulus was worn at Rome by the flaminica.

  • His face is flat, with highly protruding cheek-bones, and is lozenge-shaped or eurygnathous to a degree that is nowhere exceeded.

  • The hydrography of the region last mentioned, where the lowlands are flat and the rainfall heavy, is extremely complicated owing to the great number of small rivers and of lakes on or near the lower river courses.

  • It lies in the flat fen country, on the river Nene (mainly on the east bank), II m.

  • The regulation is effected by locks and movable dams, the latter so designed that in times of flood or frost they can be dropped flat on the bottom of the river.

  • It is mountainous in the south and southeast, while in the north, west and south-west it is flat and in some places marshy.

  • Its banks are low and flat, and numerous islands occur.

  • Beyond Bonn and Cologne the banks are again flat and the valley wide, though the hills on the right bank do not completely disappear till the neighbourhood of Dusseldorf.

  • On the north there is a flat tract between Chelsea and Westminster, covering Pimlico, but from Westminster down to the Tower there is a marked slope directly up from the river bank.

  • veins and flat deposits below the general level Boring of the country; or the outcrop lies beyond the limits of the property or under water or water-bearing formations, or is covered by quicksand, or is deeply buried.

  • Locomotive haulage is applicable to large mines, where trains of cars are hauled long distances on flat or undulating roads of moderate gradients.

  • This is similar to shaft hoisting, except that the grades are often quite flat.

  • A similar equalizing effect is obtained by the use of flat rope and reel, the rope winding on itself like a ribbon.

  • Flat rope is in favour in some districts.

  • As the sewing wires soon begin to break, a flat rope must usually be ripped Apart and resewed every six or eight months.

  • - Flat round Rope.

  • Natural ventilation is impracticable in flat deposits worked by drifts and without shafts.

  • The area is mostly flat up to the foothills.

  • For the purpose of rendering this minute examination possible, opposite plane surfaces of the glass are ground approximately flat and polished, the faces to be polished being so chosen as to allow of a view through the greatest possible thickness of glass; thus in slabs the narrow edges are polished.

  • The fractured end is heated, and by the combined action of heat and centrifugal force opens out into a flat foot.

  • When this is the case the gathering is carried to a block or half-open mould in which it is rolled and blown until it acquires, roughly, the shape of a hemisphere, the flat side being towards the pipe and the convexity away from it; the diameter of this hemisphere is so regulated as to be approximately that of the cylinder which is next to be formed of the viscous mass.

  • An effort at a more direct mechanical process is embodied in the inventions of Foucault which are at present being developed in Germany and Belgium; in this process the glass is drawn from the molten bath in the shape of flat sheets, by the aid of a bar of iron, previously immersed in the glass, the glass receiving its form by being drawn through slots in large fire-bricks, and being kept in shape by rapid chilling produced by the action of air-blasts.

  • A full account of the process of blowing crown-glass will be found in all older books and articles on the subject, so that it need only be mentioned here that the glass, instead of being blown into a cylinder, is blown into a flattened sphere, which is caused to burst at the point opposite the pipe and is then, by the rapid spinning of the glass in front of a very hot furnace-opening, caused to expand into a flat disk of large diameter.

  • It is, however, equally important that the glass as a whole should be flat and remains flat during the process of gradual cooling (annealing), otherwise great thicknesses of glass would have to be ground away at the projecting parts of the sheet.

  • The annealing process is therefore carried out in a manner differing essentially from that in use for any other variety of flat glass and nearly resembling that used for optical glass.

  • The rolled sheet is left on the castingtable until it has set sufficiently to be pushed over a flat iron plate without risk of distortion; meanwhile the table has been placed in front of the opening of one of the large annealing kilns and the slab of glass is carefully pushed into the kiln.

  • Glass, in flat pieces, such as might be employed for windows, has been found in the ruins of Roman houses, both in England and in Italy, and in the house of the faun at Pompeii a small pane in a bronze frame remains.

  • About 1350 considerable quantities of colourless flat glass were supplied by John Alemayn of Chiddingfold for glazing the windows in St George's chapel, Windsor, and in the chapel of St Stephen, Westminster.

  • There were two kinds of flat glass, known respectively as " brode-glas " and " Normandy " glass.

  • In 1447 English flat glass is mentioned in the contract for the windows of the Beauchamp. chapel at Warwick, but disparagingly, as the contractor binds himself not to use it.

  • According to Prechtl, the ordinary metals, in regard to the degree of facility or perfection with which they can be hammered flat on the anvil, rolled out into sheet, or drawn into wire, form the following descending series: Hammering.

  • It naturally falls into two divisions, the northern being more or less mountainous, while the southern is flat and marshy; the near approach of the two rivers to one another, at a spot where the undulating plateau of the north sinks suddenly into the Babylonian alluvium, tends to separate them still more completely.

  • This vast flat, the modern El-Jezireh, is about 250 miles in length, interrupted only by a single limestone range, rising abruptly out of the plain, and branching off from the Zagros mountains under the names of Sarazur, Hamrin and Sinjar.

  • The scums forming on the top of the continuous defecator become so hard and dry that they have to be removed from time to time with a specially constructed instrument like a flat spade with three flat prongs in front.

  • The larger rivers in the wet season form impassable morasses, especially in the S.E., where the mountains rise in isolated masses from flat plains.

  • Of the first the physical characteristics are a small, thin-limbed body, hair black, short and woolly, projecting jaws, rounded, narrow, retreating forehead, long and narrow head, enormous eyebrow ridges, flat nose and dark skin.

  • If they are supported at intervals along a flat side, they are called muffles, and the furnace is known as a Silesian furnace.

  • A "crested" furrow is obtained by the use of a share, the wing of which is set at a higher altitude than the point, but this type of furrow is less generally found than the "rectangular" form obtained by a level-edged share, which leaves a flat bottom.

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