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flask

flask

flask Sentence Examples

  • The distilling flask has an elongated neck so that Wurtz.

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  • The distilling flask has an elongated neck so that Wurtz.

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  • The flask is again brought to room-temperature, and re-weighed.

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  • The flask is again brought to room-temperature, and re-weighed.

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  • On the table were vodka, a flask of rum, white bread, roast mutton, and salt.

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  • On distilling such a mixture under constant pressure, a mixture of the two components (of variable composition) will come over until there remains in the distilling flask the mixture of minimum vapour pressure.

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  • It generally happens that much of the mercury column is outside the flask and consequently at a lower temperature than the bulb, hence a correction of the observed temperature is necessary.

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    5
  • The flask is removed from the ice, allowed to attain the temperature of the room, and then weighed.

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  • a condenser so placed that the condensed vapours return to the distilling flask, a device permitting the continued boiling of a substance with little loss; W.

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    5
  • The retort may be replaced by a distilling flask, which is a round-bottomed flask (generally with a lengthened neck) provided with an inclined side tube.

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  • the less volatile vapours are condensed and return to the flask,, while the more volatile component passes over.

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  • For volatile liquids, a flask provided with a long neck which carries a graduation and is fitted with a well-ground stopper is recommended.

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  • The flask is now partially exhausted, transferred to the cooling bath, and after standing the pressure of the residual gas is taken by a manometer.

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  • The volume of the flask is determined by weighing empty and filled with water.

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  • The volume of the flask is determined by weighing empty and filled with water.

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  • The neck of the retort, or side tube of the flask, is connected to the condenser c by an ordinary or rubber cork, according to the nature of the substance distilled; ordinary corks soaked in paraffin wax are very effective when ordinary or rubber corks cannot be used.

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  • On distilling such a mixture, a mixture of constant composition will distil first, leaving in the distilling flask one or other of the components according to the composition of the mixture.

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    3
  • In filtering into a vacuum the flask receiving the filtrate should be connected to the exhaust through a second flask.

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    3
  • They found that the germ of tetanus had been introduced into the fluid before the bottle was opened at Malkowal, and they thought it probable that this might have occurred owing either to insufficient sterilization or to the process of filling the bottle from a larger flask having been performed with defective precautions.

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    3
  • On distilling such a mixture, a mixture of constant composition will distil first, leaving in the distilling flask one or other of the components according to the composition of the mixture.

    5
    3
  • The method differed from Regnault's inasmuch as the flask was exhausted to an almost complete vacuum,a performance rendered possible by the high efficiency of the modern air-pump. The actual experiment necessitates the most elaborate precautions, for which reference must be made to Morley's original papers in the Smithsonian Contributions to Knowledge (1895), or to M.

    4
    1
  • The oxidation, which is effected by chromic acid and sulphuric acid, is conducted in a flask provided with a funnel and escape tube, and the carbon dioxide formed is swept by a current of dry air, previously freed from carbon dioxide, through a drying tube to a set of potash bulbs and a tube containing soda-lime; if halogens are present, a small wash bottle containing potassium iodide, and a U tube containing glass wool moistened with silver nitrate on one side and strong sulphuric acid on the other, must be inserted between the flask and the drying tube.

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  • The flask was then brought to o° by immersion in melting ice, the pressure of the gas taken, and the stop-cock closed.

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    2
  • One gramme of the ore is treated in a flask with a mixture of nitric and sulphuric acids and evaporated until all the nitric acid is expelled.

    4
    2
  • One gramme of ore is usually taken for assay and treated in a small flask or beaker with 10 cc. of hydrochloric acid.

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    2
  • In the reduction by metallic zinc, about 3 grammes of granulated or foliated zinc are placed in the flask, which is closed with a small funnel; when the iron is reduced, add 10 cc. of sulphuric acid, and as soon as all the zinc is dissolved the solution is ready for titration.

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  • This method did not give very certain results, for it could not be guaranteed that the growth in the inoculated flask was necessarily derived from a single bacterium.

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  • nitrogen, carbon dioxide, &c., which is led in at the distilling flask before the process is started, and a slow current maintained during the operation.

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  • In 1826 Dumas devised a method suitable for substances of high boiling-point; this consisted in its essential point in vaporizing the substance in a flask made of suitable material, sealing it when full of vapour, and weighing.

    3
    1
  • Before the commercial production of calcium carbide made it one of the most easily obtainable gases, the processes which were most largely adopted for its preparation in laboratories were: - first, the decomposition of ethylene bromide by dropping it slowly into a boiling solution of alcoholic potash, and purifying the evolved gas from the volatile bromethylene by washing it through a second flask containing a boiling solution of alcoholic potash, or by passing it over moderately heated soda lime; and, second, the more ordinarily adopted process of passing the products of incomplete combustion from a Bunsen burner, the flame of which had struck back, through an ammoniacal solution of cuprous chloride, when the red copper acetylide was produced.

    3
    1
  • Soc., 1862, p. 267) recommends melting the metal in a flask filled with nitrogen and gradually displacing this gas by oxygen; the first formed grey film on the metal changes to a deep blue, and then the gas is rapidly absorbed, the film becoming white and afterwards yellow.

    3
    1
  • Three old-established inns, the Bull and Bush, the Spaniards, and Jack Straw's Castle (the name of which has no historical significance), claim many great names among former visitors; while the Upper Flask Inn, now a private house, was the meeting-place of the Kit-Cat Club.

    3
    1
  • The female organ is essentially a flask-shaped structure; the neck of the flask growing out as the trichogyne, and the belly composed of an axial carpogenic cell surrounded by investing cells, and with one cell (trichophoric) between it and the trichogyne.

    3
    1
  • The earliest form of Leyden jar consisted of a glass vial or thin Florence flask, partly full of water, having a metallic nail inserted through the cork which touched the water.

    3
    1
  • The tetrachloride, WC1 41 is obtained by partial reduction of the higher chlorides with hydrogen; a mixture of the pentaand hexa-chloride is distilled in a stream of hydrogen or carbon dioxide, and the pentachloride which volatilizes returned to the flask several times.

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  • In summer the club met at the Upper Flask, Hampstead Heath.

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  • The tetrachloride, WC1 41 is obtained by partial reduction of the higher chlorides with hydrogen; a mixture of the pentaand hexa-chloride is distilled in a stream of hydrogen or carbon dioxide, and the pentachloride which volatilizes returned to the flask several times.

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    1
  • In summer the club met at the Upper Flask, Hampstead Heath.

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  • In the electrolytic method from o 5 to 5 grammes of ore are treated in a flask or beaker, with a mixture of io cc. of nitric and ro cc. of sulphuric acid, until thoroughly decomposed.

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    1
  • 5 of a gramme of pure iron wire in a flask, in hydrochloric acid, oxidizing it with a little potassium chlorate, boiling off all traces of chlorine, deoxidizing by one of the methods described above, and titrating with the solution.

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    2
  • Soc., 1900, 77, p. 648) prepares pure hydrobromic acid by covering bromine, which is contained in a large flask, with a layer of water, and passing sulphur dioxide into the water above the surface of the bromine, until the whole is of a pale yellow colour; the resulting solution is then distilled in a slow current of air and finally purified by distillation over barium bromide.

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    2
  • A simpler arrangement, also employed by Tyndall, is to cause the rays to be reflected outwards parallel to one another, and to concentrate them by means of a small flask, containing the iodine solution and used as a lens, placed some distance from the camera.

    2
    2
  • The success of the operation depends upon two factors: (I) that the heating be careful, slow and steady, and (2) that the column attached to the flask be efficient to sort out, as it were, the most volatile vapour.

    1
    1
  • Phosphorous acid, P(OH) 3, discovered by Davy in 1812, may be ' obtained by dissolving its anhydride, P 4 0 61 in cold water; by immersing sticks of phosphorus in a solution of copper sulphate contained in a well-closed flask, filtering from the copper sulphide and precipitating the sulphuric acid simultaneously formed by baryta water, and concentrating the solution in vacuo; or by passing chlorine into melted phosphorus covered with water, the first formed phosphorus trichloride being decomposed by the water into phosphorous and hydrochloric acids.

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    1
  • (2) The preparation of the solution of the substance consists in dissolving an accurately determined weight, and making up the volume in a graduated cylinder or flask to a known volume.

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  • nitrobenzene, air cooling of the retort neck or of a straight tube connected with the distilling flask will suffice; or wet blotting-paper placed on the tube and the receiver immersed in water may be used.

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  • The titration is complete when the blue colour is so faint that it is almost imperceptible after the flask has been vigorously shaken.

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  • The thermometer is placed so that the bulb is near the neck of the retort or the side tube of the distilling flask.

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  • The vapours pass through the inner tube, and the cold water enters at the end farthest from the distilling flask.

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  • Dittmar showed that this may be avoided by leading a fine, steady stream of dry gas - air, carbon dioxide, hydrogen, &c., according to the substance operated upon - through the liquid by means of a fine capillary tube, the lower end of which reaches to nearly the bottom of the flask.

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  • A tube closed at the bottom is traversed by an open narrower tube, and the arrangement is fitted in the neck of the distilling flask.

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  • Occasionally this residue contains a small amount of iron in a difficultly soluble form; in that case the solution is slightly diluted with water and filtered into a larger flask.

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  • This should be added about 3 cm 3 at a time, and the contents of the flask thoroughly mixed after each added about 3 cm 3 at a time, and the contents of the flask thoroughly mixed after each addition.

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  • bellows side pockets, which will easily take a liter flask or water bottle and lie flat when not needed.

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  • boric acid solution using Kjeldahl flask and titrate with weak acid.

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  • caesiumactive cesium was found on the outside on the flask.

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  • The flask used for the dilution will also need to be accurately calibrated.

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  • cask strength malt does not like to be stored in a hip flask for too long.

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  • The feckin ' family thermos flask still chafes on amorous picnics with my secretary.

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  • conical flask.

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  • deuterium atoms in the glass flask.

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  • Dewar (flask) dewar of the Wide-Field Imager with liquid nitrogen.

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  • Dewar (flask) officials the only people who would open a dewar in transit?

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  • Dewar (flask)r being used was cooled in a liquid nitrogen dewar to in order to minimize the dark current.

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  • Dewar (flask)ce plugs may form in the neck of open dewar flasks and cause a build-up of pressure.

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  • Dewar (flask)nning the cryostat, liquid helium is transferred from a storage dewar into the bath reservoir.

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  • Dewar (flask) The CCD65 detector in the camera dewar.

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  • distillation apparatus using a distilling flask of 500 cm 3 capacity.

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  • Polymeric material was violently ejected from the Dewar flask.

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  • An engraved hip flask or engraved tankard can make the perfect personalized gift for that someone special.

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  • flask of brandy, sorry coffee, in the glove box.

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  • flask of tea?

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  • flask of hot soup or tea.

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  • flask of coffee.

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  • A thermos or insulating flask allows hot drinks to be carried.

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  • An engraved hip flask or engraved tankard can make the perfect personalized gift for that someone special.

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  • flask completely filled with coffee.

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  • He would carry a flask of ale to drink.

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  • Sit the funnel on top of a large conical flask.

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  • volumetric flask Used to make up an accurate volume of a solution, for example, 250 cm 3.

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  • Simply fill the stainless steel flask with your favorite tipple, hide inside the book, and slam shut.

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  • As I had a small part in the design of the type of nuclear flask pictured, I would be very interested.

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  • You can transport the strips in an empty thermos flask, as this protects them from sudden temperature changes.

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  • The ceramic spheres each have a vacuum inside, similar to a mini Thermos flask.

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  • The hip flask measures approx 5 inches / 12.5 cm tall, 3 inches / 7.5 cm tall.

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  • He had fogotten to remove his powder flask from his pocket.

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  • insulatemos or insulating flask allows hot drinks to be carried.

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  • Be sure to drink the contents, as cask strength malt does not like to be stored in a hip flask for too long.

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  • shrieked aloud; the flask dropped from his hand and broke in pieces.

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  • An engraved hip flask or engraved tankard can make the perfect personalized gift for that someone special.

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  • vacuum flask.

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  • volumetric flask Used to make up an accurate volume of a solution, for example, 250 cm 3.

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  • This method did not give very certain results, for it could not be guaranteed that the growth in the inoculated flask was necessarily derived from a single bacterium.

    0
    0
  • (2) The preparation of the solution of the substance consists in dissolving an accurately determined weight, and making up the volume in a graduated cylinder or flask to a known volume.

    0
    0
  • The oxidation, which is effected by chromic acid and sulphuric acid, is conducted in a flask provided with a funnel and escape tube, and the carbon dioxide formed is swept by a current of dry air, previously freed from carbon dioxide, through a drying tube to a set of potash bulbs and a tube containing soda-lime; if halogens are present, a small wash bottle containing potassium iodide, and a U tube containing glass wool moistened with silver nitrate on one side and strong sulphuric acid on the other, must be inserted between the flask and the drying tube.

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  • The Talmudic sources say that when the perpetual lamp of the temple was to be relighted only one flask of holy oil sufficient for the day remained, but this miraculously lasted for the eight days (cf.

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  • a condenser so placed that the condensed vapours return to the distilling flask, a device permitting the continued boiling of a substance with little loss; W.

    0
    0
  • The retort may be replaced by a distilling flask, which is a round-bottomed flask (generally with a lengthened neck) provided with an inclined side tube.

    0
    0
  • The neck of the retort, or side tube of the flask, is connected to the condenser c by an ordinary or rubber cork, according to the nature of the substance distilled; ordinary corks soaked in paraffin wax are very effective when ordinary or rubber corks cannot be used.

    0
    0
  • The thermometer is placed so that the bulb is near the neck of the retort or the side tube of the distilling flask.

    0
    0
  • It generally happens that much of the mercury column is outside the flask and consequently at a lower temperature than the bulb, hence a correction of the observed temperature is necessary.

    0
    0
  • ether, ligroin, &c., immersion of the flask in warm water suffices; for less volatile liquids a directly heated water or sand bath is used; for other liquids the flask is heated through wire gauze or asbestos board, or directly by a Bunsen.

    0
    0
  • nitrobenzene, air cooling of the retort neck or of a straight tube connected with the distilling flask will suffice; or wet blotting-paper placed on the tube and the receiver immersed in water may be used.

    0
    0
  • The vapours pass through the inner tube, and the cold water enters at the end farthest from the distilling flask.

    0
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  • Practically any vessel may serve as a receiver - test tube, flask, beaker, &c. If noxious vapours come over, it is necessary to have an air-tight connexion between the condenser and receiver, and to pro vide the latter with an outlet tube leading to an absorption column or other contrivance in which the vapours are taken up. If the substances operated upon decompose when heated in air, as, for example, the zinc alkyls which inflame, the air within the apparatus is replaced by some inert gas, e.g.

    0
    0
  • nitrogen, carbon dioxide, &c., which is led in at the distilling flask before the process is started, and a slow current maintained during the operation.

    0
    0
  • Dittmar showed that this may be avoided by leading a fine, steady stream of dry gas - air, carbon dioxide, hydrogen, &c., according to the substance operated upon - through the liquid by means of a fine capillary tube, the lower end of which reaches to nearly the bottom of the flask.

    0
    0
  • the less volatile vapours are condensed and return to the flask,, while the more volatile component passes over.

    0
    0
  • The success of the operation depends upon two factors: (I) that the heating be careful, slow and steady, and (2) that the column attached to the flask be efficient to sort out, as it were, the most volatile vapour.

    0
    0
  • A tube closed at the bottom is traversed by an open narrower tube, and the arrangement is fitted in the neck of the distilling flask.

    0
    0
  • On distilling such a mixture under constant pressure, a mixture of the two components (of variable composition) will come over until there remains in the distilling flask the mixture of minimum vapour pressure.

    0
    0
  • For volatile liquids, a flask provided with a long neck which carries a graduation and is fitted with a well-ground stopper is recommended.

    0
    0
  • The flask was then brought to o° by immersion in melting ice, the pressure of the gas taken, and the stop-cock closed.

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    0
  • The flask is removed from the ice, allowed to attain the temperature of the room, and then weighed.

    0
    0
  • The flask is now partially exhausted, transferred to the cooling bath, and after standing the pressure of the residual gas is taken by a manometer.

    0
    0
  • The method differed from Regnault's inasmuch as the flask was exhausted to an almost complete vacuum,a performance rendered possible by the high efficiency of the modern air-pump. The actual experiment necessitates the most elaborate precautions, for which reference must be made to Morley's original papers in the Smithsonian Contributions to Knowledge (1895), or to M.

    0
    0
  • In 1826 Dumas devised a method suitable for substances of high boiling-point; this consisted in its essential point in vaporizing the substance in a flask made of suitable material, sealing it when full of vapour, and weighing.

    0
    0
  • Before the commercial production of calcium carbide made it one of the most easily obtainable gases, the processes which were most largely adopted for its preparation in laboratories were: - first, the decomposition of ethylene bromide by dropping it slowly into a boiling solution of alcoholic potash, and purifying the evolved gas from the volatile bromethylene by washing it through a second flask containing a boiling solution of alcoholic potash, or by passing it over moderately heated soda lime; and, second, the more ordinarily adopted process of passing the products of incomplete combustion from a Bunsen burner, the flame of which had struck back, through an ammoniacal solution of cuprous chloride, when the red copper acetylide was produced.

    0
    0
  • In filtering into a vacuum the flask receiving the filtrate should be connected to the exhaust through a second flask.

    0
    0
  • Soc., 1862, p. 267) recommends melting the metal in a flask filled with nitrogen and gradually displacing this gas by oxygen; the first formed grey film on the metal changes to a deep blue, and then the gas is rapidly absorbed, the film becoming white and afterwards yellow.

    0
    0
  • Three old-established inns, the Bull and Bush, the Spaniards, and Jack Straw's Castle (the name of which has no historical significance), claim many great names among former visitors; while the Upper Flask Inn, now a private house, was the meeting-place of the Kit-Cat Club.

    0
    0
  • This is typically of a flask-shaped form opening with a small pore at the top. The asci live at the bottom often mixed with paraphyses, while the upper" neck "of the flask is lined with special hyphae, the periphyses, which aid in the ejection of the spores (fig.

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    0
  • The female organ is essentially a flask-shaped structure; the neck of the flask growing out as the trichogyne, and the belly composed of an axial carpogenic cell surrounded by investing cells, and with one cell (trichophoric) between it and the trichogyne.

    0
    0
  • The earliest form of Leyden jar consisted of a glass vial or thin Florence flask, partly full of water, having a metallic nail inserted through the cork which touched the water.

    0
    0
  • They found that the germ of tetanus had been introduced into the fluid before the bottle was opened at Malkowal, and they thought it probable that this might have occurred owing either to insufficient sterilization or to the process of filling the bottle from a larger flask having been performed with defective precautions.

    0
    0
  • In the electrolytic method from o 5 to 5 grammes of ore are treated in a flask or beaker, with a mixture of io cc. of nitric and ro cc. of sulphuric acid, until thoroughly decomposed.

    0
    0
  • One gramme of the ore is treated in a flask with a mixture of nitric and sulphuric acids and evaporated until all the nitric acid is expelled.

    0
    0
  • The titration is complete when the blue colour is so faint that it is almost imperceptible after the flask has been vigorously shaken.

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  • One gramme of ore is usually taken for assay and treated in a small flask or beaker with 10 cc. of hydrochloric acid.

    0
    0
  • Occasionally this residue contains a small amount of iron in a difficultly soluble form; in that case the solution is slightly diluted with water and filtered into a larger flask.

    0
    0
  • In the reduction by metallic zinc, about 3 grammes of granulated or foliated zinc are placed in the flask, which is closed with a small funnel; when the iron is reduced, add 10 cc. of sulphuric acid, and as soon as all the zinc is dissolved the solution is ready for titration.

    0
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  • In the reduction by stannous chloride the solution of the ore in the flask is heated to boiling, and a strong solution of stannous chloride is added until the solution is completely decolorized; then 60 cc. of a solution of mercuric chloride (so grammes to the litre) are run in and the contents of the flask poured into a dish containing 600 cc. of water and 60 cc. of a solution containing 200 grammes of manganous sulphate, i litre of phosphoric acid (1.3 sp. gr.), 400 cc. of sulphuric acid, and 1600 cc. of water.

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  • 5 of a gramme of pure iron wire in a flask, in hydrochloric acid, oxidizing it with a little potassium chlorate, boiling off all traces of chlorine, deoxidizing by one of the methods described above, and titrating with the solution.

    0
    0
  • Soc., 1900, 77, p. 648) prepares pure hydrobromic acid by covering bromine, which is contained in a large flask, with a layer of water, and passing sulphur dioxide into the water above the surface of the bromine, until the whole is of a pale yellow colour; the resulting solution is then distilled in a slow current of air and finally purified by distillation over barium bromide.

    0
    0
  • Phosphorous acid, P(OH) 3, discovered by Davy in 1812, may be ' obtained by dissolving its anhydride, P 4 0 61 in cold water; by immersing sticks of phosphorus in a solution of copper sulphate contained in a well-closed flask, filtering from the copper sulphide and precipitating the sulphuric acid simultaneously formed by baryta water, and concentrating the solution in vacuo; or by passing chlorine into melted phosphorus covered with water, the first formed phosphorus trichloride being decomposed by the water into phosphorous and hydrochloric acids.

    0
    0
  • A simpler arrangement, also employed by Tyndall, is to cause the rays to be reflected outwards parallel to one another, and to concentrate them by means of a small flask, containing the iodine solution and used as a lens, placed some distance from the camera.

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  • A Cossack who accompanied him had handed him a knapsack and a flask, and Nesvitski was treating some officers to pies and real doppelkummel.

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  • Let's dwink to dwown our gwief! shouted Denisov, who had settled down by the roadside with a flask and some food.

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  • He shrieked aloud; the flask dropped from his hand and broke in pieces.

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  • Filter coffee from these coffee machines then passes through the filter basket on the coffee machines into a vacuum flask.

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  • Where would George and Marion Kerby be without their flask?

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  • One interesting features was Colton's flask.

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  • Later, Italian fashion designer Elsa Schiaparelli designed one especially for air raids - it was the same functional style, complete with a gas mask, flask and velvet turban.

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  • This may be embroidered on a silk scarf, embossed on personalized stationery, or etched onto the side of a pen, flask or some other personal item.

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  • Run water into the filling flask, which comes with the mop, until it is completely full.

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  • Pour the water into the mop's water tank until it's filled, refilling the flask as needed.

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  • College Sports Stuff - This store has OSU golf balls, beer mugs, bottle stoppers, bookends and even a stainless steel Buckeyes flask.

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  • Practically any vessel may serve as a receiver - test tube, flask, beaker, &c. If noxious vapours come over, it is necessary to have an air-tight connexion between the condenser and receiver, and to pro vide the latter with an outlet tube leading to an absorption column or other contrivance in which the vapours are taken up. If the substances operated upon decompose when heated in air, as, for example, the zinc alkyls which inflame, the air within the apparatus is replaced by some inert gas, e.g.

    0
    1
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