Fisheries sentence example

fisheries
  • Ihe main fisheries are in Sardinia, Sicily and Elba.

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  • The revolt against fish had ruined the fisheries and driven the fishermen to turn pirates, to the great scandal and detriment of the realm.

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  • The fisheries are important - for herring, mackerel, sprats, cod, salmon, lobsters and anchovies.

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  • The lagoon fisheries are also of great importance, more especially those of Comacchio, the lagoon of Orbetello and the Mare Piccolo at Taranto &c The deep-sea fishing boats in 1902 numbered 1368, with a total tonnage of 16,149; 100 of these were coral-fishing boats and 111 sponge-fishing boats.

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  • Lerwick's main industries are connected with the fisheries, of which it is an important centre.

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  • The number of boats and smacks engaged in the fisheries has considerably increased.

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  • It also has important fisheries.

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  • Lowestoft (Lothu Wistoft, Lowistoft, Loistoft) owes its origin to its fisheries.

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  • Trade is in cider, cattle, butter, flowers and fruit, and there are salmon and other fisheries.

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  • In 1902 the number of men employed in the home fisheries was 144,000 and the number of vessels 25,481 (tonnage 127,000); in the deep-sea fisheries 10,500 men and 450 vessels (tonnage 51,000) were employed.

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  • The fisheries were held by the Incorporated Company of Dredgers (incorporated by Act of Parliament in 1793), the affairs being administered by a foreman, deputy foreman and jury of twelve; but in 1896 an Act of Parliament transferred the management of the fishery to a company.

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  • In 1902 there were 48 tunny fisheries, employjng 3006 men, and 5116 tons of fish worth 80,000 were caught.

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  • The substitution of steamships for sailing vessels has brought about a diminution in the number of vessels belonging to the Italian mercantile marine, whether employed in the coasting trade, the fisheries or in traffic on the high seas.

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  • Light boats and rafts are floated at all points, and steamers ply on its lower portion; its estuary has important fisheries.

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  • Its navigation is of great importance, especially for goods brought from the Volga, and its fisheries are extensive.

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  • The Black Sea fisheries, in which about 4000 men are engaged, yield fish valued at £300,000 per annum.

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  • The annual yield of the Azov Sea fisheries, occupying 15,000 men, is valued at £600,000.

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  • The total value of the Caspian fisheries is estimated at £3,000,000 per annum.

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  • Taking the Lake Aral and Siberian river fisheries into account, it is estimated that altogether the fishing industries yield a revenue to the state of £330,000 annually.'

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  • This question has given rise to an enormous amount of discussion among learned men, and some of the disputants have not yet laid down their arms; but for impartial outsiders who have carefully studied the evidence there can be little doubt that 1 See Researches into the State of Fisheries in Russia (9 vols.), edited by Minister of Finance (1896, Russian); Kusnetzow's Fischerei and Thiererbeutung in den Gewassern Russlands (1898).

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  • It abounds in loach, and there are valuable salmon fisheries.

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  • It is navigable only for a few miles above the mouth, but its salmon fisheries are both attractive to sportsmen and of considerable commercial value.

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  • The fisheries are important, principally those for shrimps and lobsters.

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  • The article Fisheries deals with the subject from the economic and commercial point of view, and Angling with the catching of fish as a sport.

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  • The oyster beds, for which Loch Ryan was once noted, are not cultivated, but the fisheries (white fish and herrings) are still of some consequence.

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  • Pine stumps and waste limbs are utilized, notably at Hattiesburg, for the manufacture of charcoal, tar, creosote, turpentine, &c. Fisheries Fishing is a minor industry, confined for the most part to the Mississippi Sound and neighbouring waters and to the Mississippi and Yazoo rivers.

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  • The fisheries are chiefly of shad, oysters, mullet, alewives, clams, black bass, menhaden, croakers and bluefish.

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  • The State Geological and Economic Survey has made a careful study of the fishes of North Carolina, of the shad fisheries, of oyster culture, and of the development of terrapin.

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  • At Beaufort the United States Bureau of Fisheries has a marine biological laboratory, established in 1901 for the study of the aquatic fauna of the south-east coast.

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  • It has important fisheries, and manufactures salt, pottery, roofing (made of nipa leaves), and nipa wine.

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  • The fishery then assumes proportions which render it next in importance to the herring and cod fisheries.

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  • This enactment applies to leases of agricultural subjects, houses, mills, fisheries and whatever is fundo annexum; provided that (a) the lease, when for more than one year, must be in writing, (b) it must be definite as to subject, rent (which may consist of money, grain or services, if the reddendum is not illusory) and term of duration, (c) possession must follow on the lease.

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  • Throughout the 14th century references are made to Margate in crown regulations regarding fisheries and shipping.

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  • The waters of the lake swarm with fish (sturgeons and salmonidae), and its herring (Salmo omul) is the chief product of the fisheries, though notably fewer have been taken within the last forty or fifty years.

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  • The fisheries are very valuable; the total number of species of fish in Florida waters is about 600, and many species found on one coast are not found on the other.

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  • The sponge and oyster fisheries are also important.

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  • The total product of the fisheries in 1902 was valued at about $2,000,000.

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  • A large number of the inhabitants are also engaged in the fisheries and as pilots.

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  • The ordnance survey, too, no longer depends on the war office but upon the board of agriculture and fisheries.

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  • The herring, cod, lobster and crab fisheries are prosecuted.

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  • The male inhabitants are mostly employed in the fisheries and the women are the most expert knitters of hosiery in the islands.

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  • Batabano and Caibarien are centres of the sponge fisheries.

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  • Since 1885 great attention has been paid to the sponge fisheries of Tripoli, the annual value of which is about £30,000.

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  • Sanitary taxes, £T20,519, and fisheries and sporting licenses affected to the service of the public debt, £T153,990.

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  • These " six indirect contributions " were the revenues from tobacco, salt, wines and spirits, stamps (commercial), certain specified fisheries, and the silk tithe in specified provinces.

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  • There are also important fisheries for cod, caplin, halibut, red fish (Sebastes) and nepisak (Cyclopterus lumpus); a shark (Somniosus microcephalus) is taken for the oil from its liver; and sea-trout are found in the streams and small lakes of the south.

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  • It might be expected that there should be a decrease in the Greenland seal fisheries, caused by the European and American sealers catching larger quantities every year, especially along the coasts of Newfoundland and Labrador, and so actually diminishing the number of the animals in the Greenland seas.

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  • The average number of seals killed annually is about 33,000.1 The 1 Owing to representations of the Swedish government in 1874 as to the killing of seals at breeding time on the east coast of Greenland, and the consequent loss of young seals left to die of starvation, the Seal Fisheries Act 1875 was passed in England to provide for the establishment of a close time for seal fishery in the seas in question.

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  • The fisheries, which are of great value, are carefully supervised and systematically replenished from the State Fish Hatchery at St Paul, and the Federal Fish Hatchery maintained at Duluth, in which particular attention is devoted to the fish of Lake Superior.

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  • Its work is primarily that of the investigation of the fisheries of northern Europe, but its general methods are oceanographical, and its published results have formed an immense contribution to the science.

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  • It still flows on, however, as a deep current and it then becomes a factor of immense importance with regard to the fisheries in the regions into which it penetrates.

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  • It is mainly because these fisheries are seasonal that the periodicity has been noticed, and because of the economic interests involved the study of the seasonal and longer periodicities has become very important.

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  • Many economic changes probably occurred in consequence of the variations in tide-generating force, as, for instance, the decline in the mediaeval Baltic herring fisheries controlled by the Hanseatic League.

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  • In 1877 he was one of the counsel for the United States before the commission which in accordance with the treaty of Washington met at Halifax, N.S., to arbitrate the fisheries question between the United States and Great Britain.

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  • The difficulty between America and Newfoundland about fisheries was referred to the Hague Tribunal for final settlement.

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  • Agriculture engages the greater part of the resident population, both male and female; other industries, except the fisheries, are little developed.

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  • They added "that the public at large have only to know that their rights are imaginary to induce them also to be content with the extant system under which permission is very freely granted by owners of fisheries to the public for angling on the more frequented parts of the Thames."

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  • The fisheries are under the regulation of by-laws made by the Thames Conservancy, which apply to the riparian owners as well as to the public generally.

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  • Dunkirk annually despatches a fleet to the Icelandic codfisheries, and takes part in the herring and other fisheries.

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  • Although the coast and river fisheries of Brazil are numerous and valuable, cured fish is one of the staple imports, and foreign products are to be found even along the Amazon.

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  • Along the coast the best known fisheries are among the Abrolhos islands and in the shallow waters of Espirito Santo, where the garoupa, pargo and vermelho (species of Serranus) abound in great numbers.

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  • The importance of Fishguard is due to the local fisheries and the excellence of its harbour, and its early history is obscure.

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  • The oyster fisheries are important, and are managed by a very ancient gild, the Company of Free Dredgermen of the Hundred and Manor of Faversham.

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  • One of the oldest of Venezuelan industries, the Margarita pearl fisheries, was prohibited in 1909 for an indefinite time because of the threatened extinction of the oyster beds.

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  • The fisheries are established about the islands of Margarita, Coche and Cubagua,.

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  • Besides these authorities, the London County Council, the Board of Trade, the Admiralty, the Metropolitan and City Police, police of riparian boroughs, Kent and Essex Fisheries Commissioners, all the dock companies and others played some part in the government and public services of the port.

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  • Fisheries and fish-curing exist both along the sea-coast of Burma and in inland tracts, and afforded employment to 126,651 persons in 1907.

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  • The chief seat of the industry is in the Thongwa and Bassein districts, where the income from the leased fisheries on individual streams sometimes amounts to between £6000 and £7000 a year.

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  • Net fisheries, worked by licence-holders in the principal rivers and along the sea-shore, are not nearly so profitable as the closed fisheries - called In - which are from time to time sold by auction for fixed periods of years.

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  • In addition to rice-growing and the felling and extraction of timber, and the fisheries, the chief occupations are rice-husking, silk-weaving and dyeing.

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  • The people have to work on the chief's plantations and fisheries, and also work in parties for each other, breaking up new land, &c. This often ends in feasting and in dances (pilu pilu), which include allegorical representations of events or ideas.

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  • Scandinavia had early been sought for its copper and iron, its forest products and its valuable fisheries, especially of herring at Schonen, but it was backward in its industrial development and its own commerce had seriously declined in the 14th century.

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  • By the peace of Copenhagen in 1441, after the unsuccessful war of the League with Holland, the attempted monopoly of the Baltic was broken, and, though the Hanseatic trade regulations were maintained on paper, the Dutch with their larger ships increased their hold on the herring fisheries, the French salt trade, and the Baltic grain trade.

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  • Its population, principally engaged in the fisheries, numbered 25,124 in 1900.

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  • There is a trade in agricultural produce, a salmon fishery, sea fisheries and a manufacture of linen.

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  • The coasts are very rich in fish, and the tunny fisheries of the north are one of the principal sources from which the world's supply of tunny is derived.

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  • The alfa and cork industries employ large numbers of persons, as do also the sardine, anchovy and tunny fisheries.

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  • The fisheries are in the hands of Italians, Maltese and Greeks.

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  • The principal sources of revenue are direct taxation, stamp and death duties, customs, port and lighthouse dues, octroi and tithes, tobacco, salt and gunpowder monopolies, postal and telegraph receipts, and revenue from the state domains (lands, fisheries, forests, mines).

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  • Rich in corn, in herds, and in later times also in oil, and possessing valuable fisheries, mines and quarries, the province of Africa, of which Tunisia was the most important part, attained under the empire a prosperity to which Roman remains in all parts of the country still bear witness.

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  • It had complete control over the Euxine grain-trade; the absence of tides and the depth of its harbour rendered its quays accessible to vessels of large burden; while the tunny and other fisheries were so lucrative that the curved inlet near which it stood became known as the Golden Horn.

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  • The other administrative officers are a secretary of state, an attorney-general, an auditor, a treasurer, a commissioner of public schools, a railroad commissioner, and a factory inspector, and various boards and commissions, such as the board of education, the board of agriculture, the board of health, and the commissioners of inland fisheries, commissioners of harbours and commissioners of pilots.

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  • The chief industries include coast and deep-sea fisheries, shipbuilding, tanning, the making of cod-liver oil and fish-curing.

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  • The fisheries are of great value, and there is an export trade to England in salmon, which are despatched in ice.

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  • Vessels set out to the fisheries, as far as Spitsbergen and the Kara Sea; and trade is brisk, not only Norwegian and Danish but British, German and particularly Russian vessels engaging in it.

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  • Its former extensive trade with the West Indies has lately suffered owing to the enormous development of the North Sea ports, but it is still largely engaged in the Greenland whale and the oyster fisheries.

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  • The fisheries of the Zuider Zee are of considerable importance.

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  • Wine, fruit, cork, baskets and sumach are exported in small coasting vessels; there are important sardine and tunny fisheries; and boats, sails and cordage are manufactured.

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  • Agriculture, fisheries and import and export trade furnish the chief means of subsistence.

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  • The fisheries are important, and there are salt-works in the neighbourhood.

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  • The principal manufactures include leather, carpets, woollen goods, flannels, blankets, lace, boots and shoes; and fisheries and shipbuilding are also carried on.

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  • It is an important centre both for sea fisheries and for sport with the rod.

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  • The fisheries are extensive, and though there are no ports of the first magnitude on the firth, a considerable shipping trade is carried on at Whitehaven, Harrington, Workington, Maryport and Silloth in Cumberland, and at Annan, Kirkcudbright, Creetown and Wigtown on the Scottish side.

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  • It exported wine and carried on coral fisheries.

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  • Olive oil is manufactured, and the fisheries are important, notably those of sponges and of octopuses (exported to Greece).

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  • Among the manufactures are beer, wagons, wool, and pearl buttons, and the city is a centre of the fresh-water pearl fisheries along the Mississippi.

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  • The fisheries are actively prosecuted along the coast by a.

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  • The Council of State, being mainly anxious to destroy the Dutch trade and fisheries, began by reinforcing Blake, and sending him north to scatter the Dutch herring fleet.

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  • In 1877 he was the Canadian nominee on the Anglo-American fisheries commission at Halifax, and rendered brilliant service.

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  • He was Canadian delegate at the Paris Monetary Conference of 1881, and to the International Exhibition of Fisheries in 1883.

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  • The fisheries, chiefly oyster, sturgeon and shad, yield an annual product valued at about $250,000.

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  • This council was nominated by the governments of Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, Russia, Germany, Great Britain, Holland and Belgium, with headquarters in Copenhagen and a central laboratory at Christiania, and its aim was to furnish data for the improvement of the fisheries of the North Sea and surrounding waters.

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  • Fisheries.-The value of the fisheries product of Texas increased from $286,610 (7,174,550 lb) in 18 97 to $353, 81 4 (8, 0 44,4 0 4 lb) in 1902; and the amount of capital invested in the industry from $ 2 37,49 6 in 18 97 to $373,7 2 4 in 1902, but the number of wageearners employed decreased slightly-from 1199 in 1897 to 1144 in 1902.

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  • European industries include gold mining, in which 500 miners, besides natives, are engaged (chiefly in the Louisiade Archipelago), and the beche de mer and pearl-shell fisheries, which were formerly more productive than at present.

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  • The Newfoundland Bank fisheries were of greater economic importance and are still very important.

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  • The value of fishery products in 1895 was $5,703,143, and in 1905 $7,025,249; and 15,694 persons were engaged in the fisheries.

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  • The shell fisheries are less important than those of Maine.

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  • From 1869 to 1879 he took part in local politics, and was premier from 1876-1879; in 1882 he entered the Canadian parliament as a Liberal, and from 1896 to 1901 was minister of marine and fisheries.

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  • In 1877 he was counsel for Great Britain before the Anglo-American fisheries arbitration at Halifax; in 1897 he was a joint delegate to Washington with Sir Wilfrid Laurier on the Bering Sea seal question; and in1898-1899a member of the Anglo-American joint high commission at Quebec.

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  • Fish are plentiful round the coasts, and the whale-fishery was once an important industry, but the fisheries as a whole have not been developed.

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  • The species of greatest use is the river-lamprey, which as bait is preferred to all others in the cod and turbot fisheries of the North Sea.

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  • There are about 375 species of fish in New York waters (see below under Fisheries).

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  • New York was in 1904 more extensively engaged in oyster culture than any other state, and was making more rapid progress in the cultivation of hard clams. In 1909 there were distributed from state fish hatcheries 1 531,293,721 fishes (mostly smelt, pike-perch, and winter flatfish); a large number of fish and eggs were also placed in New York waters by the United States Bureau of Fisheries.

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  • The New York fisheries of Lakes Erie and Ontario and the Niagara and St Lawrence rivers yielded products in 1903 valued at $187,198 and consisting largely of pikeperch, herring, catfish, bullheads and sturgeon, and in 1902 there were commercial fisheries in sixteen interior lakes and rivers which yielded muscallonge, smelt, bullheads, pickerel, pike-perch and several other varieties having a total value of $87,897.

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  • The fisheries along the coast are active.

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  • Hobson landed in the Bay of Islands on the 22nd of January 1840, hoisted the Union Jack, and had little difficulty in inducing most of the native chiefs to accept the queen's sovereignty at the price of guaranteeing to the tribes by the treaty of Waitangi possession of their lands, forests and fisheries.

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  • There are large quantities of salmon in the lower Columbia river, in Gray's and Willapa harbours, and in Puget Sound; oyster fisheries in Gray's and Willapa harbours and in Puget Sound; cod, perch, flounders, smelt, herring and sardines in these and other salt waters.

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  • Washington's many waterways, both fresh and salt, and especially those which indent or are near the coast, make the fisheries resources of great value.

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  • By an act of 1886 the powers of the home office over salmon and other fisheries were transferred to the board of trade, and a small department was consequently created charged with the care of those industries.

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  • The history of the Kentish oyster fisheries goes back to the time of the Roman occupation, when the fame of the oyster beds off Rutupiae (Richborough) extended even to Rome.

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  • The Domesday Survey, besides testifying to the agricultural activity of the country, mentions over one hundred salt-works and numerous valuable fisheries, vines at Chart Sutton and Leeds, and cheese at Milton.

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  • The deep-sea and coastal fisheries are important.

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  • At West New Brighton is a large dyeing establishment, there are also ship-building yards, oyster fisheries, and truck farms, and among the maufactures are linoleum, paper, white lead, linseed oil, brick, and fire-clay products.

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  • The fisheries of the Bann and of Lough Neagh (especially for salmon) are of value both commercially and to sportsmen, the small town of Toome, at the outflow of the river, being the centre.

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  • The township had important herring fisheries in early times and manufactured straw hats (from 1828) and ladies' dress goods.

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  • There are salt works on the coast; and the fisheries employ a number of the inhabitants.

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  • It has important fisheries and manufactures of spirits, beer and tobacco.

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  • In 1882 he became Conservative member for King's County, N.B., in the Dominion parliament, and in 1885 entered the cabinet of Sir John Macdonald as minister of marine and fisheries; in 1888 he became minister of finance, which position he held till the defeat of his party in 1896.

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  • Coral fisheries exist along the coast from Bona to Tunis.

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  • The chief industries of the Basque Provinces are the sea fisheries and iron mining.

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  • Game is plentiful, and the fisheries on the coast are excellent.

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  • As to the different employments of capital, the quantity of productive labour put in motion by an equal amount varies extremely according as that amount is employed - (i) in the improvement of lands, mines or fisheries, (2) in manufactures, (3) in wholesale or (4) retail trade.

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  • There are no fisheries of importance except the pearl fisheries on the eastern coast of Lower California, and the tortoise fisheries on the coasts of Campeche, Yucatan, and some of the states facing the Pacific. The pearl fisheries have been worked since the arrival of the Spaniards, and were once very productive notwithstanding the primitive methods employed.

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  • The chief sources of revenue in Norman times were the valuable fisheries and numerous mills.

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  • Sheep-farming and cattle-raising are carried on very generally, and, with the fisheries, provide the main occupation of the inhabitants, though they profit not a little from the tourists who flock to many of the islands throughout the summer.

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  • Some shipbuilding and the manufacture of rope, sails and ship-fittings are carried on, and the fisheries are valuable.

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  • For Agriculture, see the article AGRICULTURE; for Fisheries, see FIsHERIEs; and for Forestry, see FORESTS AND FORESTRY.

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  • The whaling and cod and mackerel fisheries were of earlier colonial origin.

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  • Woollen cloth, machinery and spirits are manufactured; there is an extensive salt-mine in the neighbouring Zillenberg; the salmon and lamprey fisheries are important; and a fair amount of commercial activity is maintained.

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  • The principal fisheries are those on the Atlantic coast, carried on by the inhabitants of Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island, and the eastern section of Quebec. Cod, herring, mackerel and lobsters are the fish chiefly caught, though halibut, salmon, anchovies and so-called sardines are also exported.

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  • Indeed, no department of national life has caused more continual trouble between the two peoples than the fisheries, owing to different laws regarding fish protection, and the constant invasion by each of the territorial waters of the other.

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  • The naval forces, consisting of a fisheries protection service, are under the minister of marine and fisheries, the land forces under the minister of militia and defence.

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  • During the next sixty years the fisheries and the fur trade received some attention, but no colonization was undertaken.

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  • It followed that the citizens of the United States lost the right which they had received under the treaty to share in the fisheries of Canada.

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  • In 1869 the government of Canada sent a deputation to England to press upon the imperial government the necessity of asserting Canada's position in regard to the fisheries, and the desirability of settling other questions in dispute with the republic. The outcome of this application was the appointment of a commission to consider and if possible settle outstanding differences between the three countries.

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  • By the terms of this treaty the " Alabama " claims and the San Juan boundary were referred to arbitration; the free navigation of the St Lawrence was granted to the United States in return for the free use of Lake Michigan and certain Alaskan rivers; and it was settled that a further commission should decide the excess of value of the Canadian fisheries thrown open to the United States over and above the reciprocal concessions made to Canada.

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  • The clauses relating to the fisheries and the San Juan boundary were reserved for the approval of the Canadian parliament, which, in spite of much violent opposition, ratified them by a large majority.

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  • The Fishery Commission, on the other hand, which sat in Halifax, awarded Canada $5,500,000 as the excess value of its fisheries for twelve years, and after much hesitation this sum was paid by the United States into the Canadian treasury.

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  • Its clauses dealing with the fisheries and trade lasted for fourteen years, and were then abrogated by the action of the United States.

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  • This agreement, known as the Chamberlain-Bayard treaty, was rejected by the Senate, and as a consequence it became necessary to carry on the fisheries under a modus vivendi renewed annually.

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  • In 1886 a difference about international rights on the high seas arose on the Pacific coast in connexion with the seal fisheries of Bering Sea.

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  • The Alaskan boundary, the Atlantic and inland fisheries, the alien labour law, the bonding privilege, the seal fishery in the Bering Sea and reciprocity of trade in certain products were among the subjects considered by the commission.

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  • The oyster fisheries in the vicinity are of considerable importance.

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  • Its range towards the pole seems to be only bounded by open water, and it is the constant attendant upon all who are employed in the whale and seal fisheries, showing the greatest boldness in approaching boats and ships, and feeding on the offal obtained from them.

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  • Their lucrative pearl fisheries have been practically monopolized by the Japanese, who use proper diving apparatus.

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  • It has an excellent harbour, Port Kennedy, and is a port of call for mail steamers and the centre of the beche-de-mer and pearl fisheries of the Torres Strait.

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  • The port was an early seat of the whale fisheries.

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  • The fisheries are of importance.

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  • Potatoes are largely grown in the district, and the salmon fisheries are valuable.

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  • The sea fisheries are important and have their chief centre at Geestemunde.

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  • Keel, Belmullet and Ballycastle are the headquarters of sea and coast fishing districts, and Ballina of a salmon-fishing district, and these fisheries are of some value to the poor inhabitants.

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  • Padstow has fisheries and shipyards and some agricultural trade.

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  • Several new species are described in U.S. Bureau of Fisheries Document, No.

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  • The oyster fisheries at the mouth of the Colne, for which the town has been famous for centuries, belong to the corporation, and are held on a ninetynine years' lease by the Colne Fishery Company, incorporated under an act of 1870.

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  • The coast is locally noted for fisheries (especially of lobsters and oysters) and some ship-building is carried on.

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    0
  • Pike-perch and a few blue pike are taken in the Susquehanna, where shad are no longer plentiful since work was begun on McCall's Ferry dam, and in 1908 the entire catch for the river was valued at about $20,000, but in the Delaware there are valuable shad 'and herring fisheries.

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  • There are also many statutory administrative officials and boards, such as the adjutant-general, insurance commissioner, board of health, board of agriculture, board of public grounds and buildings, commissioners of fisheries, and factory and mining inspectors.

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    0
  • The city is a centre of the Virginia oyster "fisheries."

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  • Fisheries are still of importance, although the bed of Pandore oysters (an esteemed variety) has lost something of its former fertility.

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    0
  • The salmon fisheries of the Tay yield a substantial revenue.

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  • A very old town and the seat of a former margraviate belonging to the counts of Holland, Vlaardingen is now chiefly important as the centre of the great herring and cod fisheries of the North Sea.

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  • It has a good harbour (in which there are three lighthouses), considerable coastwise trade, and important oyster fisheries.

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    0
  • In 1755 he was appointed a member of the board of trustees for encouragement of the fisheries, arts and manufactures of Scotland, and about the same time he was named one of the commissioners for the management of the forfeited estates annexed to the Crown.

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    0
  • Besides the manufacture of sheeting, towelling, ticks, dowlas and sail-cloth, the principal industries include flax-spinning, net-making, bleaching, dyeing, tanning, brewing, brass and iron founding, and there are potteries, flour-mills, engineering works, fisheries, and factories for the making of oil-cloth and linoleum.

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    0
  • Lace is made, while the men go in May to the coral fisheries off the Sardinian coast.

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    0
  • But the pearl fisheries of Katr are still under the protection of the chiefs of Bahrein, who are themselves under British suzerainty.

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    0
  • The fisheries are commonly divided into four particular fishing areas, namely, the " deep-sea " fishery of the North Sea, and the " inner " (binnengaatsch) fisheries of the Wadden, the Zuider Zee, and the South Holland and Zeeland waters.

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  • The value of the herring fisheries is enhanced by the careful methods of smoking and salting, the export of salted fish being considerable.

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  • The oyster-beds and salmon fisheries are largely in the hands of the state, which lets them to the highest bidder.

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    0
  • The fisheries not only supply the great local demand, but allow of large exports.

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    0
  • In summer, passenger steamers run to and from Ilfracombe pier; but the shipping trade generally has declined, though herring fisheries are carried on with success.

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    0
  • The fisheries are of considerable local importance.

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    0
  • Fisheries.The German fisheries, long of little importance, have been carefully fostered within recent years.

    0
    0
  • Equally well developed are the Baltic fisheries, the chief ports engaged in which are Danzig, Eckernfrde, Kolherg and Travemnde.

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    0
  • The catch of the North Sea and Baltic fisheries in 1906 was valued at over 700,000, exclusive of herrings for salting.

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    0
  • The fisheries do not, however, supply the demand for fish, and fresh, salt and dried fish is imported largely in excess of the home yield.

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    0
  • The chief industries are agriculture - high farming flourishes owing to the great fertility of the peninsula - sandstone-quarrying and fisheries (mainly from Avoch).

    0
    0
  • The fisheries are valuable, especially the oyster fisheries.

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    0
  • The city manufactures pianos, refrigerators, printing presses and leather; is a centre for the shipment of fruit and celery; and has valuable fisheries near - fresh, salt and smoked fish, especially whitefish, are shipped in considerable quantities.

    0
    0
  • As one of the Bering Sea Commissioners he spent the summer of 1891 investigating the facts of the seal fisheries on the northern coasts of Asia and America.

    0
    0
  • Deep-sea fisheries give employment to some twenty thousand Sicilians, who exercise their calling not only off the coasts of their island, but along the north African shore, from Morocco to Tripoli.

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    0
  • There are also thriving fisheries, the Looe fishermen being particularly expert with the seine on a rocky bottom.

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    0
  • The medieval trade seems to have centred round the fisheries and the neighbouring coal mines which are mentioned in 1364 and also by Leland.

    0
    0
  • The average annual value of the fisheries is about 200,000.

    0
    0
  • The salmon fisheries of the Shannon, for which Limerick is the headquarters of a district, are the most valuable in Ireland.

    0
    0
  • The sea fisheries are of importance.

    0
    0
  • There were signs too of the rise of a vigorous middle class, due to the extraordinary development of the national resources (chiefly the herring fisheries, horse-breeding and cattle-rearing) and the foundation of gilds, the oldest of which, the Edslag of Schleswig, dates from the early 12th century.

    0
    0
  • Various attempts were also made to improve trade and industry by abolishing the still remaining privileges of the Hanseatic towns, by promoting a wholesale immigration of skilful and well-to-do Dutch traders and handicraftsmen into Denmark under most favourable conditions, by opening up the rich fisheries of the Arctic seas, and by establishing joint-stock chartered companies both in the East and the West Indies.

    0
    0
  • The possession of the Sound enabled her to close the Baltic against the Western powers; the possession of Norway carried along with it the control of the rich fisheries which were Danish monopolies, and therefore a source of irritation to England and Holland.

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    0
  • The fisheries are valuable.

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  • Besides the fisheries there is fish-curing and a distillery; and the quarrying of a pink-coloured variety of granite and of Portsoy marble is carried on.

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    0
  • The inhabitants are principally engaged in agriculture and the fisheries, and in the preservation of sardines, anchovies, &c. The breed of draught horses in the island is highly prized.

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  • The herring and other sea fisheries are of some value, and the salmon fishery, in the hands of a company, has long been famous.

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  • During the first half of the 19th century wholesale clearances had been effected in many districts, and the crofters were compelled either to emigrate or to crowd into areas already congested, where, eking out a precarious living by following the fisheries, they led a hard and miserable existence.

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    0
  • The whole of the fisheries are controlled by the Fishery Board for Scotland, which was established in 1882 in succession to the former Board of White Herring Fishery.

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    0
  • In 1903 the number of fishermen directly employed in fishing was 36,162, there were 17,496 engaged in curing and preserving the fish landed, while 32,201 were employed in subsidiary industries on shore, making a total of 85,859 persons engaged in the fisheries and dependent industries.

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    0
  • Elsewhere there are no fisheries of importance, except those of the Galapagos Islands.

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    0
  • The yield of the fisheries in 1900 was valued at 8388,876.

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    0
  • The most important fisheries on the Illinois river and its tributaries were at Havana, Pekin and Peoria, which in 2907-1908 were represented by a total catch of about 10,000,000 lb, out of a total for this river system of 27,570,000 lb.

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  • These forests yield immense supplies of magnificent timber, which together with the coal-field and fisheries constitute the chief resources of the island.

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  • Although the islands promise to become important, because of their excellent harbours, the discovery of good seams of bituminous coal (beside the anthracite already known), their abundant timber of certain kinds and their prolific fisheries, but little settlement has taken place.

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  • The wonderfully productive halibut fisheries of Hecate Strait, which separates these islands from the mainland and its adjacent islands, have attracted the attention of fishing companies, and great quantities of this fish are taken regularly and shipped across the continent in cold storage.

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    0
  • The fisheries include cod, ling and herring.

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    0
  • The people are chiefly engaged in fisheries and cattle-rearing.

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    0
  • The annual value of the fisheries is about £40,000 (pearls £10,000, mother of pearl £30,000).

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    0
  • Carisbrooke formerly had a considerable market, several mills, and valuable fisheries, but it never acquired municipal or representative rights, and was important only as the site of the castle.

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    0
  • He is found to-day in the mines and fisheries, in various lines of manufacture, in small farming, and in all branches of domestic service.

    0
    0
  • For the innumerable conventions, to which Great Britain is a party, as to commerce, consular jurisdiction, fisheries and the slave trade, it must suffice to refer to the exhaustive and skilfully devised index to vols.

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    0
  • The fisheries are of some value, Loch Ranza being an important station.

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    0
  • The site was probably chosen partly on account of the fisheries, which are mentioned in the Domesday Survey, one of the chief services of the burgesses being that of taking fish to the king's court wherever it might be.

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    0
  • It occupies an advantageous position on the great artery of Russian trade, at a place where the manufactured and agricultural products of the basin of the Oka meet the metal wares from that of the Kama, the corn and salt brought from the south-eastern governments, the produce of the Caspian fisheries, and the various wares imported from Siberia, Central Asia, Caucasia and Persia.

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  • The harbour, enclosed by two piers, accommodates the herring fleet, but the fisheries, the staple industry, have declined.

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  • In the Mall are the building of the Department of Agriculture, the Smithsonian Institution (q.v.), the National Museum (1910), the Army Medical Museum and the Bureau of Fisheries, and here a building for the Department of Justice is to be erected.

    0
    0
  • Besides these there is a vast amount of material in the collections of the Bureau of Education, the Bureau of Ethnology, the Smithsonian Institution, the National Museum, the House of Representatives, the Patent Office, the Department of Agriculture, the Botanic Gardens, the Bureau of Fisheries, the Naval Observatory, the Geological Survey and the Coast and Geodetic Survey.

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  • Chesapeake Bay covers much land that might otherwise be agriculturally valuable, but repays this loss, in part at least, by its excellent fisheries, including those for oysters.

    0
    0
  • There are valuable oyster fisheries in Chesapeake Bay.

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    0
  • Oysters are by far the most valuable of the fisheries products, but, of the 400,000 acres of waters within the state suitable for oyster culture, in 1909 only about one-third was used for that purpose.

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  • On fisheries see the Report of the Commission of Fisheries, 1908-9 (Richmond, 1909).

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    0
  • The chief industries are distilling, fisheries, shipbuilding and shipping, especially the export of coal and iron.

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    0
  • The sea fisheries are not important, with the exception of the sponge fishery, which is under the protection of the administration.

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    0
  • The deep-sea fisheries on the south-western coasts are of some importance; the Mumbles, Tenby and Milford Haven being the chief centres of this industry.

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  • Cranberries are raised in large quantities, and there are oyster and other shell fisheries.

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    0
  • In the 17th century the mackerel and whale fisheries were the basis of economic life; the latter gave way later to the cod and other fisheries, but the fishing industry is now relatively unimportant.

    0
    0
  • The cod, ling and herring fisheries are important, and the coasts abound with shell-fish, especially cockles, for which it has always been famous.

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    0
  • In the museums at Trondhjem there are interesting zoological and antiquarian collections, also exhibits illustrative of the fisheries and other industries.

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  • Besides the fisheries, there are engineering works, distilleries, and works for the making of ropes, sails and oil.

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  • The fisheries for which Saltash was famous have suffered from the chemicals brought down by the Tamar; but there is a considerable seafaring population, and the town is a recruiting ground for the Royal Navy.

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  • It is the centre of the Algerian and Tunisian coral fisheries and has an extensive industry in the curing of sardines; but .the harbour is small and exposed to the N.E.

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  • Many of the inhabitants are engaged in the carrying trade, while the fisheries on the coast are also actively prosecuted, tunny and anchovies being caught in great numbers.

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  • He upheld American rights in Samoa, pursued a vigorous diplomacy with Italy over the lynching of eleven Italians, all except three of them American naturalized citizens, in New Orleans on the 14th of May 1891, held a firm attitude during the strained relations between the United States and Chile (growing largely out of the killing and wounding of American sailors of the U.S. ship "Baltimore" by Chileans in Valparaiso on the 16th of October 1891), and carried on with Great Britain a resolute controversy over the seal fisheries of Bering Sea, - a difference afterwards settled by arbitration.

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  • He served on the committee which drafted the Articles of Confederation, and contended that there should be no treaty of peace with Great Britain which did not grant to the United States both the right to the Newfoundland fisheries and the free navigation of the Mississippi.

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    0
  • Coal-seams, formerly extensively worked, and from an unknown period of antiquity, appear in the cliffs towards Fair Head, and the fisheries are important.

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    0
  • The fisheries, both fresh-water and sea, are important, and fall for consideration as an industry.

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  • The chief inspector of fisheries is a member of the board of agriculture.

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    0
  • Oysters are more valuable than any other single product of the fisheries, and in at least twenty-five countries are an important factor in the food-supply.

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  • The oyster fisheries give employment to over 56,000 fishermen, who man 4000 vessels, valued at $4,000,000, and 23,000 boats, valued at $1,470,000; the value of the 1 i,000 dredges and 37,000 tongs, rakes and other appliances used is $365,000.

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  • In the estuaries of Essex there are many private or semi-private oyster fisheries, where the method of culture is to dredge up the oysters in autumn and place them in pits, where they are sorted out, and the suitable ones are selected for the market.

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  • The genuine English "native" is produced in its greatest perfection in the Essex fisheries, and is probably the highest priced oyster in the world.

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  • Fisheries.Fish is a staple food along the shores of the Persian Gulf, but the Crown derives no revenue from fisheries there.

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    0
  • The fisheries of the Caspian littoral are leased to a Russian firm (since 1868), and most of the fish goes to Russia (31,120 tOns, value 556,125, 10 1906-1907).

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    0
  • The revenues from rents and leases of state monopolies are derived from posts, telegraphs, mines, mint, forests, banks, fisheries, factories, &c., and amount to about 110,000 per annum.

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  • Silver is still exported, in addition to hides, timber, coffee and indigo, and there are valuable fisheries.

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    0
  • The fisheries, both sea and salmon, are important.

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    0
  • The fisheries in the lakes and haffs are of some importance; but the only mineral product of note is amber, which is found in the peninsula of Samland in greater abundance than in any other part of the world.

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  • The majority of these are employed in the sardine and tunny fisheries.

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    0
  • In 20 years these industries became the most important in the country after agriculture, the wine and cork trades and the fisheries.

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  • Colonial development was fostered, and the commercial dependence of Portugal upon induced the king to marry Maria Sophia de Neuberg, Great Britain was reduced, by the formation of chartered companies, the first of which (1753) was given control of the Algarve sardine and tunny fisheries.

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  • In the United States the utility of the cod-hatching operations has been constantly asserted by representatives of the Bureau of Fisheries, but practically the only evidence adduced is the occasional appearance of unusual numbers of cod in the neighbourhood.

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  • It has not been established that the fluctuations in the local cod fisheries bear any fixed relation to the extent of the hatching operations, while the earlier reports of the Commissioners of Fisheries contain evidence that similar fluctuations occurred before the hatching of "fish commission cod" had begun.

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  • For a summary of these investigations see papers on "Artificial Fish-hatching in Norway," by Captain Dannevig and Mr Dahl, in the Report of the Lancashire Sea Fisheries Laboratory for 1906 (Liverpool, 1907).

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  • The chief industries include gold and silver work, and there are also tobacco factories, saw-mills and some small boat-building yards, a considerable number of vessels being engaged in the Zuider Zee fisheries.

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  • In the 16th century it was a commercial centre, important for its trade, fisheries and breweries.

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    0
  • The annual value of the exports and imports from and into Bander Lingah from 1890 to 1905 averaged about £800,000, but nearly half of that amount is represented by pearls which pass in transit from the fisheries on the Arab coast to Bombay.

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  • In the estuary the fisheries give employment to large numbers of people.

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  • Through many generations the inhabitants have gained their living chiefly from the sea; the township's fisheries, however, have greatly decreased in importance (the invested capital diminishing 67.1% in 1885-1895).

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  • Provincetown village was long second only to Gloucester in the cod fisheries, which low prices and the introduction of larger vessels and correspondingly costlier fittings have greatly 1 Sulla excluded the equites from the list; the lex Aurelia (70) reinstated them.

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  • Whaling retains a remnant of its old importance, and there are also mackerel and shore fisheries, oil-works, cold storage establishments for preserving fish for food and bait, and canning works for herring.

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  • Rostov has excellent fisheries.

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  • For many years there were important cod and mackerel fisheries here and Duxbury clams were famous; there were large shipyards in Duxbury in the 18th century and in the first half of the 19th.

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  • Southwold (Sudwold, Suwold, Suthwaud) owes its origin and prosperity to its herring fisheries, which were considerable in 1086, while the importance of its harbour increased with the decay of Dunwich.

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  • The rich fisheries of Spitzbergen and the fur industry of the Hudson Bay Territory were the immediate fruit of his labours.

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  • These scalps are in some cases in the hands of private owners, and the Fisheries Department has made arrangements by which some local authorities, e.g.

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  • The quantity of mussels landed on Scottish coasts has decreased in recent years owing to the decline in the line fisheries.

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  • In the last forty years of the 18th century pearls were exported from the Scotch fisheries to Paris to the value of £Ioo,000; round pearls, the size of a pea, perfect in every respect, were worth £3 or £4.

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  • See Georgian Bay and North Channel Pilot, Department of Marine and Fisheries (Ottawa, 1903); Sailing Directions for Lake Huron, Canadian Shore, Department of Marine and Fisheries (Ottawa, 1905); Bulletin No.

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  • The fisheries of the state are of great commercial value.

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  • In 1904 the fisheries and the wholesale fish trade gave employment to 9094 persons.

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  • Until 1901 New Jersey's fisheries were more important than those of any other state in the Middle or South Atlantic groups; but after that date, owing to a decrease in the catch of bluefish, shad, clams and oysters, the annual catch of New York and Virginia became more valuable.

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  • The value of the shad fisheries has greatly declined since.

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  • The shell fisheries (oysters particularly) are centred in Delaware Bay and at Maurice River Cove, in Cumberland county, but are important also in Cape May, Atlantic, Ocean and Monmouth 1 The following statistics of the products for 1900 and for 1905 are for factory products, those for 1900 differing, therefore, from the statistics which appear in the reports of the census of 1900.

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  • Clams are gathered from Perth Amboy to the upper Delaware Bay; the most important fisheries being at Keyport, Port Monmouth and Belford.

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  • In 1909 the State Bureau of Shell Fisheries estimated the annual value of shell fisheries in the state at nearly $6,000,000, of which $500,000 was the value of clams. Monmouth, Ocean and Cape May counties furnish large quantities of menhaden, which are utilized for oil and fertilizer.

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  • The seal and whale fisheries, once vigorously prosecuted, are extinct, but the fishing-fleets for the home waters and the Newfoundland grounds are considerable.

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  • There are about 400 boats now employed in the pearl fisheries, each of them paying a tax to the Sheik.

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  • Vigo owes its importance to its deep and spacious harbour, and to its fisheries.

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  • Distinctions may be drawn, as will be seen, between the nature and methods of the fisheries on the various coasts, and the relative prosperity of the industry from year.

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  • Considered as a whole, the individual fish, by far the most important in the English fisheries, is the herring, for which Yarmouth and Lowestoft are the chief ports.

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  • The next in order are haddock, cod and plaice, and the east coast fisheries return the greatest bulk of these also.

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  • But whereas the south coast has the advantage over the west in the herring and plaice fisheries, the reverse is the case in the haddock and cod fisheries, haddock, in particular, being landed in very small quantities at the south coast ports.

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  • A fish of special importance to the west coast fisheries is the hake.

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  • The English freshwater fisheries are not of great commercial importance, nor, from the point of view of sport, are the salmon and trout fisheries as a whole of equal importance with Fresh- those of Scotland, Ireland or Wales.

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    0
  • The powers of the Local Government Board under the Allotments Acts were transferred by the act of 1907 to the Board of Agriculture and Fisheries, and by the same act the powers and duties of rural district councils were transferred to parish councils.

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  • Among other statutes conferring powers or imposing duties upon county councils, mention may be made of such acts as those relating to sea fisheries regulation, open spaces, police MisceI superannuation, railway and canal traffic, shop hours, laneous.

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    0
  • The income which the Cossack voiskos receive from the lands which they rent to different persons, also from various sources (trade patents, rents of shops, fisheries, permits of gold-digging, &c.), as also from the subsidies they receive from the government (about £712,500 in 1893), is used to cover all the expenses of state and local administration.

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  • The recklessly wasteful manner in which these fisheries are conducted, and the inadequate measures taken by the United States government for their protection, threaten the entire industry with destruction.

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  • The treasury department has chartered the coasts, sought to enforce the prohibition law, controlled and protected the fur seals and fisheries, and incidentally collected the customs. Since the creation of the department of commerce and labour (1903), it has taken over from other departments some of these scattered functions.

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  • Since its acquisition by the United States the history of Alaska has been mainly that of the evolution of its administrative system described above, and the varying fortunes of its fisheries and sealing industries.

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  • In 1892 he was appointed associate counsel for the United States on the Bering Sea Commission, and later was American counsel or agent before several important arbitral tribunals or mixed commissions, including the Alaskan Boundary Tribunal (1903), the Hague Tribunal for Arbitration of the North Atlantic Fisheries (1910), and the Anglo-American Commission (1911) for settling outstanding claims between Great Britain and the United States.

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  • His assumption of the government was greeted with joy in Holland, and in his reign the province enjoyed rest and its fisheries benefited from the commercial treaty concluded with England.

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  • Here he was brought into official relations with Sir Ferdinando Gorges, then a commissioner to regulate the Newfoundland fisheries.

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  • Apart from fisheries the wealth of the islands depends upon agriculture, and the industries connected therewith.

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  • The tortoise-shell and calipee fisheries and the export of salt fish are important industries.

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  • By an act of 1895, a close period was instituted, the lakes and rivers restocked, and the state fisheries, which are either farmed by private companies or directly administered, were set in order.

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  • Mussel fisheries, an industry confined to the Mississippi river counties from Lincoln to Lewis, are economically important, as the shells are used in the manufacture of pearl buttons.

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  • The famous Pearl islands of the Gulf of Panama are claimed by Colombia, and their pearl oyster fisheries are considered a rentable asset by the government.

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  • There are several fishing villages whose inhabitants are largely engaged in the pearl fisheries, and a number of cocoa-nut plantations.

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  • The public revenues are derived from import duties on foreign merchandise, from export duties on national produce, from internal taxes and royalties on liquors, cigarettes and tobacco, matches, hides and salt, from rentals of state emerald mines and pearl fisheries, from stamped paper, from port dues and from postal and telegraph charges.

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  • Shipbuilding thrives and the fisheries are important.

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    0
  • Fisheries were little developed before 1897 when government experiments were begun, which proved that large quantities of fish were easily procurable by trawling.

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  • Thus the benefit to the fisheries and to the riparian owners generally is beyond all question; but the cost to the water authority of conferring that benefit is also very great - commonly (according to the proportion of the natural flow intended to be rendered uniform) 20 to 35% of ' The volume of compensation water is usually fixed as a given fraction of the so-called " available supply " (which by a convention that has served its purpose well, is understood to be the average flow of the stream during the three consecutive driest years).

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  • Manufacturing is encouraged both by the variety and abundance of raw material furnished by the mines, the forests, the farms and the fisheries, and by the coal and water-power available for operating the machinery.

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  • This, though once the predominant industry, has been surpassed by the deep-sea fisheries, which derived a great impetus from beam-trawling, introduced in 1882, and steam line fishing in 1889, and threaten to rival if not to eclipse those of Grimsby.

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  • Fisheries were important in the 13th century.

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  • He had his country houses and fisheries, and when he travelled to attend parliament his retinue amounted to upwards of ioo persons.

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  • Both nations maintain a Fishery Protection Service, and the fisheries are replenished from artificial hatcheries.

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  • There are considerable fisheries along the Irrawaddy and on the Paunglin lake, which is a lagoon fed from the Irrawaddy.

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  • The seasonal changes in the distribution of the bank-waters in different parts of the coast are too complex to be briefly explained; their relations to the times of occurrence of various fisheries of the region present many remarkable features, which have been investigated in recent years by the Swedish Commission.

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  • It is the headquarters of extensive salmon and sea fisheries.

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  • The fisheries of Wisconsin are of considerable importance; the catch in 1908 was valued at $1,067,170, lake trout and herring being the most valuable.

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  • Other administrative officers are a commissioner of insurance (from 1867 to 1878 the secretary of the state was commissioner of insurance; the office became elective in 1881); a commissioner of labour and industrial statistics; three railroad commissioners,3 who have jurisdiction over all public utilities, including telegraph and telephone; a commissioner of banking; a diary and food commissioner; a state superintendent of public property; three tax commissioners who act (since 1901) as a state board of assessment; commissioners of fisheries (established 1874); a state board of agriculture (1897); and a state board of forestry (2905, succeeding a department created in 2903).

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  • There is a very slight lumber industry; salmon fisheries are of greater importance.

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  • The most important fisheries extend along the coasts of Tunisia, Algeria and Morocco; but red coral is also obtained in the vicinity of Naples, near Leghorn and Genoa, and on the coasts of Sardinia, Corsica, Catalonia and Provence.

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  • From the middle ages downwards the securing of the right to the coral fisheries on the African coasts was an object of considerable rivalry among the Mediterranean communities of Europe.

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  • For a short period (about 1806) the British government controlled the fisheries, and now they are again in the hands of the French authorities.

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  • On the Algerian coast, however, boats not flying the French flag have to pay heavy dues for the right to fish, and in the early years of the 10th century the once flourishing fisheries at La Calle were almost entirely neglected.

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  • At the Dissolution its revenues amounted to between £750 and £800 a year, exclusive of meadows, pastures, fisheries, mines, mills and salt works, and the wealth of the monks enabled them to practise a regal hospitality.

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  • In the spring they go down to the Norwegian coast and take part in the sea fisheries, returning to the lake about midsummer.

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  • The cod fisheries are amongst the most important in the world.

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  • The fisheries give employment to about 12,000 people.

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  • Iceland was not agricultural but pastoral, depending upon flocks and herds for subsistence, for, though rye and other grain would grow in favoured localities, the hay, self-sown, was the only regular crop. In some districts the fisheries and fowling Mode of were of importance, but nine-tenths of the population M i lved by their sheep and cattle.

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  • The only seaport of importance in the county, it has a considerable export trade in peat fuel, extensive fisheries, and flagstone quarries; while general fairs, horse fairs and annual agricultural shows are held.

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  • The principal fisheries are in the Danube and Save.

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  • Fowling has somewhat decreased in modern times, as the fisheries have risen in importance.

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  • The leading industries include the manufacture of sailcloth, canvas and coarse linens, tanning, boot and shoe making, and bleaching, besides engineering works, iron foundries, chemical works, shipbuilding and fisheries.

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  • In the extent and value of its fisheries Boulogne is exceeded by no seaport in France.

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  • In 1905 the fisheries of Boulogne and the neighbouring village of Etaples employed over 400 boats and 4500 men, the value of the fish taken being estimated at £1,025,000.

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