Fish sentence example

fish
  • The fish flipped and dived back into the water.
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  • I ate very small fish for supper.
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  • You can be a cold fish, sometimes.
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  • Did you ever hunt or fish with your father?
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  • Alex jerked the pole, setting the hook, and then glanced at her as the fish fought for freedom.
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  • There was not a fish in it.
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  • I would drink deeper; fish in the sky, whose bottom is pebbly with stars.
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  • He walked out again, and she tossed the fish and hid the rope, straightening just as he reappeared.
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  • Do you ever fish here?
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  • Fish in a barrel, he said.
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  • Yup. The fish are practically jumping in the boat.
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  • With each name, she flung a fish at him.
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  • There were pigs and goats on the island, and plenty of fish could be caught from the shore.
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  • Old story-tellers say that he alighted on the back of a large fish, called a dolphin, which had been charmed by his music and was swimming near the ship.
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  • Her eyes fell to the fish, and her nose wrinkled.
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  • After the fish, which made a certain sensation, the count exchanged glances with the other committeemen.
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  • The surface of the water ruptured, spewing a colorful fish into the air.
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  • I'll believe it when they fish his body out of the drink, which they won't, 'cause it ain't there.
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  • Give him a week and he'll float in somewhere down south of here if the fish don't eat him first.
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  • According to the time-stamped dinner receipt, Byrne had dined on fish, and had two beers as Hunter had remarked.
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  • The drinks arrived in glasses better designed for raising fish than serving alcohol—a sure hit with the traveling salesmen.
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  • He has to be out there, caught in the seaweed at the bottom of Chesapeake Bay, with the fish and crabs having a party, getting as bloated as the fat Wassermann twin lying on the slab at the Norfolk morgue.
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  • Alex had written the Game and Fish Commissions in several western states, hoping for a chance at a mountain goat or sheep.
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  • It is the largest peanut market in the world, is in a great truck-gardening region, and makes large shipments of cotton (822,930 bales in 1905), oysters, coal, fertilizers, lumber, grain, fruits, wine, vegetables, fish and live stock.
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  • Laristan is famous for the condiment called mahiabeh (fish-jelly), a compound of pounded small sprat-like fish, salt, mustard, nutmeg, cloves and other spices, used as a relish with nearly all foods.
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  • Large quantities of fresh fish caught in lakes Winnipeg and Manitoba are exported to all parts of the United States.
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  • Fish abound in its waters, which are sweet, save at low-level, when they become brackish.
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  • The adults occur in Elasmobranch fish, the metacestode encysted in Teleosts.
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  • Fish and game are also plentiful.
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  • Several kinds of fish, among which are trout, salmon, grayling and white fish, inhabit many of the lakes, rivers and mountain streams, and a government fish hatchery at Bozeman, Gallatin county, restocks waters in which the supply has been diminished.
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  • I caught fish with hook and line and pole.
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  • It is much larger, being said to contain one hundred and ninety-seven acres, and is more fertile in fish; but it is comparatively shallow, and not remarkably pure.
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  • Such a man has some right to fish, and I love to see nature carried out in him.
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  • Oh, I'd love to come here and fish sometime.
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  • Her prior night's transgressions were apparently forgotten as she and Betsy acted as compatible as guppies in a fish bowl.
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  • I left a message, from Tommy, his so called fishing buddy, saying I had a fish story for him and requesting him to call as soon as possible.
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  • Dusty wouldn't be there to fish her out as he had Darian.
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  • Fred's quick enough to hear what I have to say, but tight-lipped as a smart fish about anything he knows.
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  • Joseph was ready to end the conversation but Dean was hoping for more fish in his creel.
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  • She knelt beside the fish and unwrapped them with a grimace, cheered to find the section of rope nearly five feet long.
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  • If he brought her more fish tomorrow morning, she'd have rope enough to reach the cliff edge ten feet above.
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  • She lay down on her back to watch the sun set and didn't move until he returned early the next morning to toss stinky fish beside her.
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  • The room was straightened and the fish removed, though the scent of them lingered.
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  • He opened the refrigerator and took out the fish that had been thawing.
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  • Maybe I can fish around on the Internet and dig up some poop.
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  • Sometime she would have to get out the old cane pole and fish like she used to.
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  • Josh and Lori had helped her search for crawdads back then, but they weren't using them for fish bait.
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  • A gate in the valley, known as the Fish Gate, opened on a road which, leading from the north, went down the Tyropoeon valley to the southern part of the city.
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  • It is very locally distributed in central and northern Europe, and an uncommon fish in England.
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  • The rivers and lakes of Siberia abound in fish; but little is known of their relations with the species of neighbouring regions.'
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  • The dehesas or moorlands abound in game, and fish are plentiful in all the streams. The mineral resources of the province, which are considerable, were known to some extent to the ancients.
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  • Grenfell, M.P., with the object of reintroducing this fish into the river, and in April 1901 and on subsequent occasions a number of young salmon were placed at Teddington by way of experiment.
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  • The baba or cat fish and the yellow fish are plentiful in the rivers and the trout has been acclimatized.
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  • Their chief food is rice and fish.
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  • Fish are plentiful round the coasts, and the whale-fishery was once an important industry, but the fisheries as a whole have not been developed.
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  • Hampton is an agricultural shipping point, ships fish, oysters and canned crabs, and manufactures fish oil and brick.
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  • The mahseer fish is found in the Tista.
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  • Native spirits are distilled from the palm, salt is made and fish caught.
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  • By boiling the livers at a somewhat high temperature, "unracked" cod oil is obtained, containing a considerable quantity of "stearine"; this fat, which separates on cooling, is sold as "fish stearine" for soapmaking, or as "fish-tallow" for currying.
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  • Hunters and fishermen frequented its innumerable rivers, returning home laden with rich store of fish and pelts, while runaway serfs occasionally settled in small communities beneath the shelter of the fortresses built, from time to time, to guard the 'southern frontiers of Poland and Muscovy.
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  • Among the social clubs of the city are the Queen City Club, organized in 1874; the Phoenix Club, organized in 1856 and the leading Jewish club in the city; the Cuvier Club, organized in 1871 and originally an association of hunters and anglers for the preservation of game and fish; the Cincinnati Club, the Business Men's Club, the University Club, the Art Club, and the Literary Club, of the last of which many prominent men, including President Hayes, have been members.
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  • Fruit, grain, wine and oil are produced in the islands, and there is an active trade with Barcelona in fresh fish, including large quantities of lobsters.
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  • The principal exports are fish, coarse black tea, cotton, vegetable tallow, sweet potatoes, and some wheat.
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  • The total value of the fish product of 1901 was $3,767,461.
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  • The state laws for the protection of fish and shell-fish were long carelessly enforced because of the fishermen's strong feeling against them, but this sentiment has slowly, changed and enforcement has become more vigorous.
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  • Of the twenty-one species of freshwater fish, five are peculiar to the country, but none is of much economic value save the barbel and eel.
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  • The fish caught are principally sardines, bonito, smelts and sprats.
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  • Fresh fish are exported to France, dried and preserved fish to Spain and Italy.
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  • These fish are eaten by the Indians, who, before attempting to capture them, seek to exhaust their electrical power by driving horses into the ponds.
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  • Many of the rivers are well stocked with fish.
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  • It is a business centre for the prosperous farming region by which it is surrounded, and is a shipping point for oysters and fish; among its manufactures are canned fruits and vegetables, flour, hominy, phosphates, underwear and lumber.
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  • An extensive trade is carried on in peltry, silk goods, iron and wooden wares, salt fish, grain, cattle and horses.
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  • To the second century, lastly, belongs in part the evidence of the catacombs, on the walls of which are depicted persons reclining at tables supporting a fish, accompanied by one or more baskets of loaves, and more rarely by flasks of wine or water.
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  • Still farther to the east, divided from the monastic buildings by a wall, were the vegetable gardens and orchards, and tank for fish.
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  • It became necessary to enforce the terms of that convention, under which the fishermen of the United States could not pursue their avocations within the three miles' limit, tranship cargoes of fish in Canadian ports, or enter them except for shelter, water, wood or repairs.
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  • The artificial cultivation of fish, now chiefly carp, in the numerous ponds that surround the town dates from the 14th century.
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  • There is a considerable import of coal, cotton, iron and breadstuffs, the chief exports being butter, fish, timber and wood pulp. During the period of emigration, owing to political troubles with Russia, over 12,000 Finns sailed from Hangs in a single year (1901), mostly for the United States and Canada.
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  • These liinus, as they are called by the Kanakas, are washed, salted, broken and eaten as a relish or as a flavouring for fish or other meat.
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  • But it varies much in form and scaling, and some most aberrant varieties have been fixed by artificial selection, the principal being the king-carp or mirror-carp, in which the scales are enlarged and reduced in number, forming more or less regular longitudinal series on the sides, and the leather-carp, in which the scales have all but disappeared, the fish being covered with a thick, leathery skin.
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  • It is a small fish, rarely exceeding a length of 8 or 9 in.
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  • Besides the tithes dealt with by local acts as already mentioned, certain other kinds of tithes are outside the scope of the Commutation Acts, namely, tithes of fish and fishing, personal tithes other than tithes of mills, and mineral tithes, unless the landowners and tithe-owners consent to make a parochial agreement for commutation before the confirmation of an apportionment after a compulsory award in such parish.
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  • From a hilltop you can see a fish leap in almost any part; for not a pickerel or shiner picks an insect from this smooth surface but it manifestly disturbs the equilibrium of the whole lake.
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  • No word exists in their language for such general terms as tree, bird or fish; yet they have invented a name for every species of vegetable and animal they know.
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  • Their nets, made by women, either of the tendons of animals or the fibres of plants, will catch and hold the kangaroo or the emu, or the very large fish of Australian rivers.
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  • In 1529 he produced a free version (Klagbrief der armen Diirftigen in England) of the famous Supplycacyon of the Beggers, written abroad (1528 ?) by Simon Fish.
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  • They neither plant nor have they any manufactures except their rude bamboo and rattan vessels, the fish and game traps which they set with much skill, and the bows, blow-pipes and bamboo spears with which they and the produce of their hunting and fishing.
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  • They are skilful hunters, however, catch fish by in geniously constructed traps, and live almost entirely on jungle-roots of these people is found in Upper Perak, and the members of this clan have acquired some knowledge of the art of planting, &c. They they have been raided by the latter, and many Negritos are to be found in captivity in some of the Malayan villages on the eastern side of the peninsula.
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  • There is a state fish and game commissioner, and the state has a fish hatchery at Roxbury and a forest and game farm at Sharon.
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  • Lake Champlain furnishes the only commerical fishing grounds in Vermont, with the exceptions of small catches of white fish in Lake Bomoseen, Lake St Catherine in Rutland county and Lake Memphremagog.
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  • The most valuable fish taken was walleyed pike, and the catch of this fish and of pickerel from Lake Champlain in 1902 exceeded in value that from any other body of fresh water in the United States excepting Lake Huron and Lake Erie.
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  • The wall-eyed pike taken in 1902 were valued at $16,915 (210,936 lb); white fish, $5777 (80,191 lb); pickerel, $4144 (51,711 lb); yellow perch, $ 2 575 (43,9 1 7 lb); sturgeon, $20 5 1 (1 5,59 0 lb), and suckers, $ 18 54 (37,375 lb); other varieties taken in smaller quantities included smelt, sun-fish and eels.
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  • The administrative officers of the state are a governor, a lieutenantgovernor, a secretary of state, a state treasurer, and an auditor of accounts, elected by popular vote, and an inspector of finance, a commissioner of taxes, a superintendent of education, a fish and game commissioner, three railroad commissioners, and various boards and commissions, of whom some are elected by the General Assembly and some are appointed by the governor with the advice and consent of the Senate.
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  • In 1651 the Dutch completed a treaty with Denmark to injure English trade in the Baltic; to which England replied the same year by the Navigation Act, which suppressed the Dutch trade with the English colonies and the Dutch fish trade with England, and struck at the Dutch carrying trade.
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  • The people are employed in fishing for coral and sponges, as well as for bream, mullet and other fish.
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  • Some of the other edible fish, such as the palombo, are not found in northern waters.
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  • Of freshwater fish the trout of the mountain streams and the eels of the coast lagoons may be mentioned.
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  • In 1902 there were 48 tunny fisheries, employjng 3006 men, and 5116 tons of fish worth 80,000 were caught.
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  • Fish are very numerous and many species are peculiar to the Andaman seas.
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  • Protohydra occurs in oysterbanks and Monobrachium also grows on the shells of bivalves, and both these hydroids probably fish in the currents produced by the lamellibranchs.
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  • There is no difficulty whatever in regarding Hydra as bearing the same relation to the actinula-stage of other Hydromedusae that a Rotifer bears to a trochophore-larva or a fish to a tadpole.
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  • It is not true, for example, that a fish is a reptile arrested in its development, or that a reptile was ever a fish; but it is true that the reptile embryo, at one stage of its development, is an organism which, if it had an independent existence, must be classified among fishes; and all the organs of the reptile pass, in the course of their development, through conditions which are closely analogous to those which are permanent in some fishes.
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  • The chief Lenten food from the earliest days was fish, and entries in the royal household accounts of Edward III.
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  • Charters granted to seaports often stipulated that the town should send so many herrings or other fish to the king annually during Lent.
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  • The statute, however, would not seem to have had much effect; for in spite of a proclamation of Queen Elizabeth in 1560 imposing a fine of £ 20 for each offence on butchers slaughtering animals during Lent, in 1563 Sir William Cecil, in Notes upon an Act for the Increase of the Navy, says that "in old times no flesh at all was eaten on fish days; even the king himself could not have license; which was occasion of eating so much fish as now is eaten in flesh upon fish days."
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  • The revolt against fish had ruined the fisheries and driven the fishermen to turn pirates, to the great scandal and detriment of the realm.
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  • Pseudis was first described by Marie Sibylle de Merlon (1647-1717), in her work on the fauna of Surinam (published first in 1705 at Amsterdam, republished in Latin in 1719), as a frog changing into a fish.
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  • The rules of the Orphic life prescribed abstinence from beans, flesh, certain kinds of fish, &c., the wearing of a special kind of clothes, and numerous other practices and abstinences.
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  • Coprolites have been found at Lyme Regis, enclosed by the ribs of ichthyosauri, and in the remains of several species of fish; also in the abdominal cavities of a species of fossil fish, Macropoma Mantelli, from the chalk of Lewes.
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  • The dace is a lively, active fish, of gregarious habits, and exceedingly prolific, depositing its eggs in May and June at the roots of aquatic plants or in the gravelly beds of the streams it frequents.
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  • Calarashi has a considerable transit trade in wheat, linseed, hemp, timber and fish from a broad mere on the west or from the Danube.
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  • Monterey Bay has a remarkable variety of fish; and there is a large fish hatchery near the city.
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  • The fish of the lagoons and streams are coarse, and some of them primitive in type; but two or three kinds, found generally in the large rivers, are much prized.
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  • The varieties of fish on the sea coast are many and excellent.
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  • They lived principally upon fish, venison and honey.
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  • Sugar, rice, indigo and tropical fruits are the chief products of the fertile district in which the town lies; it is widely known for its fish-ponds and its excellent fish, and its principal manufactures are jusi, pina, ilang ilang perfume and sugar.
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  • The fish are sea-trout, lake-trout, pike and perch.
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  • There is a species of Polypterus, and it is probable that the Protopterus or lung fish is also found there, though its existence has not as yet been established by a specimen.
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  • The river is navigable for 770 m.; grain and a variety of goods conveyed from the upper Kama are floated down, while furs, fish and other products of the sea are shipped up the river to be transported to Cherdyn on the Kama.
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  • Notwithstanding serious obstacles offered by shallows, corn, fish, salt and timber are largely shipped to and from Archangel.
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  • With regard to the imports into Russia-they consist mainly of raw materials and machinery for the manufactures, and of provisions, the principal items being raw cotton, 17% of the aggregate; machinery and metal goods, 13%; tea, 5%; mineral ores, 5%; gums and resins, 4%; wool and woollen yarns, 32%; textiles, 3%; fish, 3%; with leather and hides, chemicals, silks, wine and spirits, colours, fruits, coffee, tobacco and rice.
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  • The numerous fasts of the national church prescribe a fish diet on many days in the Fishing.
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  • Of anchovies alone, to,000,000 jars are prepared annually, while salted fish is, next after bread, the staple food of large masses of the population.
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  • The Black Sea fisheries, in which about 4000 men are engaged, yield fish valued at £300,000 per annum.
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  • The value of the fish has much increased owing to the introduction of cold storage; as a result of the employment of this method of packing, fish is now exported in a fresh state from the Black Sea to all parts of S.W.
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  • In the Volga section of the Caspian Sea fish are caught to the value of about £I,000,000 annually; in the Ural section over 40,000 tons of fish and nearly 1500 tons of caviare are obtained.
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  • It was, however, at Rochester, where Kate and her sister Margaret (1836-1893)(1836-1893) went to live with a married sister (Mrs Fish) that modern spiritualism assumed its present form, and that communication was, as it was believed, established with lost relatives and deceased eminent men.
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  • It is full of fish, and the neighbouring country, though barren and uncultivated, contains quantities of game.
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  • The principal foods of the Samoans are vegetables, coco-nut, bread-fruit, fish and pork.
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  • The river abounds in coarse fish.
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  • Plymouth is a popular resort for visitors,, having, in addition to its wealth of historic associations and a healthy summer climate, thousands of acres of hilly woodland and numerous lakes and ponds well stocked with fish.
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  • To the fisherman in India the mahseer affords the same kind of sport as the salmon in the British Isles, and it rivals that fish as regards size, strength and activity.
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  • Gorinchem possesses a good harbour, and besides working in gold and silver, carries on a considerable trade in grain, hemp, cheese, potatoes, cattle and fish, the salmon fishery being noted.
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  • Fish and game are plentiful, and the silkworm is bred in the warmer districts.
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  • The most petty limitations of Jewish commercial activity continued; thus at about this period the community of Prague, in a petition, " complain that they are not permitted to buy victuals in the market before a certain hour, vegetables not before 9 and cattle not before II o'clock; to buy fish is sometimes altogether prohibited; Jewish druggists are not permitted to buy victuals at the same time with Christians " (op. cit.).
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  • The principal imports are grain and agricultural produce, timber and coal, and the exports cement and fish.
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  • The article Fisheries deals with the subject from the economic and commercial point of view, and Angling with the catching of fish as a sport.
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  • The fish was an early symbol of Christ in primitive and medieval Christian art.
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  • The fish is also said to be represented in the oval-shaped figure, pointed at both ends, and formed by the intersection of two circles.
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  • The word "fish" is used in many technical senses.
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  • This word also appears in the English form "fish," in the metal, pearl or bone counters, sometimes made in the form of fish, used for scoring points, &c., in many games.
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  • This gives access to a whole series of halls and private rooms (halls " of the Colonnades," " of the Double Axes," " Queen's Megaron" with bath-room attached and remains of the fish fresco, " Treasury " with ivory figures and other objects of art), together with extensive remains of an upper storey.
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  • The oyster beds, for which Loch Ryan was once noted, are not cultivated, but the fisheries (white fish and herrings) are still of some consequence.
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  • By the Greeks the place was called Latopolis, from the worship here of the latus fish.
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  • As the tench is of comparatively uncommon occurrence in unenclosed waters, its place among the indigenous fishes of Great Britain has been denied, and it has been supposed to have been introduced from the Continent; a view which, however, is not supported by any evidence, and is practically disposed of by the fact that fossil remains of the fish are found in the Pleistocene deposits of Great Britain.
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  • The tench is really an excellent fish for the table, if kept in cool, clear water for a few days, as it is the custom to do in Germany, in order to rid it of the muddy flavour imparted to it by its favourite abode.
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  • Large numbers of shad, blue fish, weak fish (squeteague), alewives, Spanish mackerel, perch, bass, croakers (Micropogon undulatus), mullet, menhaden, oysters and clams are caught in the sounds, in the lower courses of the rivers flowing into them, or in the neighbouring waters of the sea.
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  • In addition to being the principal emporium for the Austrian traffic on the Elbe, Tetschen has a considerable industry, its products comprising chemicals, oil, soap, cotton stuffs, plaster of Paris, glazed and coloured paper, cellulose, beer, flour and preserved fish.
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  • These cocoons, which may often be seen carried between the mandibles of the workers, are the "ants' eggs" prized as food for fish and pheasants.
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  • Owing to its excellent harbour Baku is a chief depot for merchandise coming from Persia and Transcaspia - raw cotton, silk, rice, wine, fish, dried fruit and timber - and for Russian manufactured goods.
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  • It is almost made up of fragments of spines, teeth and scales of ganoid fish.
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  • Another well-known bed, formerly known as the "Bristol" or "Lias" Bone Bed, exists in the form of several thin layers of micaceous sandstone, with the remains of fish and saurians, which occur in the Rhaetic Black Paper Shales that lie above the Keuper marls in the south-west of England.
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  • Gilla on the W., which produces fish in abundance, was originally an open bay.
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  • The oesophagus is provided often with caeca which in Syllids and Hesionidae have been found to contain air, and possibly therefore perform the function of the fish's air-bladder.
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  • The land around Beauly is fertile and the town drives a brisk trade in coal, timber, lime, grain and fish.
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  • It was represented by the ancients as a creature having the forepart a goat, and the hindpart a fish, or sometimes simply as a goat.
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  • The chief industries of Grimsby are shipbuilding, brewing, tanning, manufactures of ship tackle, ropes, ice for preserving fish, turnery, flour, linseed cake, artificial manure; and there are saw mills, bone and corn mills, and creosote works.
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  • The industries mainly consist in shipbuilding, fish-curing, and the manufacture of machinery (particularly for agriculture), and the commerce in the export of corn, wood and fish.
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  • Her votaries abstained from the flesh of domestic fowls, fish, beans, pomegranates and apples.
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  • Semper, pursued as food by the leaping fish Periophthalmus, and the dorsal eyes are of especial value to them in aiding them to escape from this enemy.
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  • Cnossian frescoes show women grouped apart, and they appear alone on gems. Flesh and fish and many kinds of vegetables were evidently eaten, and wine and beer were drunk.
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  • The soil is an oozy mud which can only be made capable of carrying buildings by the artificial means of pile-driving; there is no land fit for agriculture or the rearing of cattle; the sole food supply is fish from the lagoon, and there is no drinking-water save such as could be stored from the rainfall.
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  • The most striking of these modern buildings are the new wing of the Hotel d'Italie, San Moise, and the very successful fish market at Rialto, designed by Laurenti and carried out by Rupolo, in which a happy return to early Venetian Gothic has been effected in conjunction with a skilful adaptation of one of the most famous of the old houses of Venice, the Stalon, or palace of the Quirini family.
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  • Propagation facilities are being greatly improved, and there are stringent laws for the protection of immature fish.
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  • Inland streams and lakes are well supplied with game fish; state laws prohibit the sale of game fish and their being taken, except with hook and line.
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  • It is the largest wool and the largest fish market of the United States, being in each second in the world to London only.
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  • From very early days executive officers known as " select-men," constables, clerks of markets, hog reeves, packers of meat and fish, &c., were chosen; and the select-men, particularly, gained power as the attendance of the freemen on meetings grew onerous.
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  • No other fish shows finer proportions in the shape of its body.
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  • Every "line" of its build is designed and eminently adapted for rapid progression through the water; the muscles massed along the vertebral column are enormously developed, especially on the back and the sides of the tail, and impart to the body a certain rigidity which interferes with abruptly sideward motions of the fish.
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  • All fishes of the mackerel family are strictly carnivorous; they unceasingly pursue their prey, which consists principally of other fish and pelagic crustaceans.
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  • Towards the end of May the old fish become heavy with spawn and are in the highest condition for the table; and the latter half of June or beginning of July may be regarded as the time at which the greater part of mackerel spawn.
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  • Desis lives invariably between tide-marks upon the rocks and coral reefs, and may be found at low tide either crawling about upon them or swimming in tidal pools and feeding upon small fish or crustaceans.
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  • The waters of the lake swarm with fish (sturgeons and salmonidae), and its herring (Salmo omul) is the chief product of the fisheries, though notably fewer have been taken within the last forty or fifty years.
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  • The rivers are well stocked with fish, especially with salmon, which forms a common article of food.
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  • In such immense shoals do these fish appear in some of the smaller streams that numbers are squeezed out on to the banks and there perish.
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  • Peckham, but others have held that it is of exclusively animal origin, a view supported by such occurrences as those in the orthoceratities of the Trenton limestone, and by the experiments of C. Engler, who obtained a liquid like crude petroleum by the distillation of menhaden (fish) oil.
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  • The few fish include the barbel.
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  • Another compound, properly of mixed sex, appears in the Aramaean Atargatis (`At[t]ar-`athe), worn down to Derketo, who is specifically associated with sacred pools and fish (Ascalon, Hierapolis-Mabog).
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  • To nomads, Astarte may well have been a sheep-goddess, but this, if her earliest, was not her only type, as is clear from the sacred fish of Atargatis, the doves of Ascalon (and of the Phoenician sanctuary of Eryx), and the gazelle or antelope of the goddess of love (associated also with the Arabian Athtar).
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  • The fisheries are very valuable; the total number of species of fish in Florida waters is about 600, and many species found on one coast are not found on the other.
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  • The king fish and tarpon are hunted for sport, while mullet, shad, redsnappers, pompano, trout, sheepshead and Spanish mackerel are of great economic value.
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  • There is a large export trade in fish, including that of pilchards to Italy.
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  • Great quantities of early potatoes and vegetables, together with flowers and fish, are sent to London and elsewhere.
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  • The rivers and neighbouring seas seem to be well stocked with fish, and especial mention must be made of the turtles, flying-fish, and brilliant I coral-fish which swarm in the waters warmed by the Kurosiwo current, the gulf-stream of the Pacific. Shell-fish form an important article of diet to both the Chinese and the aborigines along the coast - a species of Cyrena, a species of Tapes, Cytheraea petechiana and Modiola teres being most abundant.
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  • There are a few species of fresh-water fish, but food-fishes are scarce both in the rivers and along the coast.
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  • Lobsters and fish in considerable quantities are shipped from the city.
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  • Fish taken in the lakes include perch, pike, char and trout in Windermere, Ennerdale, Bassenthwaite, Derwentwater, &c., and the gwyniad or fresh-water herring in Ullswater.
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  • The size of the animals varies greatly, from forms a few millimetres in length to Gigantorhynchus gigas, which measures from 10 to 65 cms. The adults live in great numbers in the alimentary canal of some vertebrate, usually fish, the larvae are as a rule encysted in the body cavity of some invertebrate, most often an insect or crustacean, more rarely a small fish.
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  • It is then, if lucky, eaten by some crustacean, or insect, more rarely by a fish.
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  • Among the products are coco-nuts, sago, fish, trepang, timber, copra, maize, yams and tobacco.
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  • Charlevoix is an important hardwood lumber port, and the principal industries are the manufacture of lumber and of cement; fishing (especially for lake trout and white fish); the raising of sugar beets; and the manufacture of rustic and fancy wood-work.
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  • They are fed on fish, game and meat.
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  • In the rivers and lakes pike, pickerel, white fish and sturgeon supply food for the natives, and the brook trout is found in the small mountain streams. The turtle and frog also appear.
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  • They serve the trade of Lake Pontchartrain and the Florida parishes, the lumber, coal, fish, oyster and truck trade of New Orleans, and to some extent are the highway of a miscellaneous coasting trade.
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  • Felipa Poey, in his Ictiologia Cubana, listed 782 species of fish and crustaceans, of which 105 were doubtful; but more than one-half of the remainder were first described by Poey.
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  • The fish of Cuban waters are remarkable for their metallic colourings.
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  • Shell fish are unimportant.
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  • Two species of blind fish, of extreme scientific interest, are found in the caves of the island.
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  • Among the most important are the robalo (Labrax), an exquisite food fish, the tunny, eel, Spanish sardine and mangua.
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  • Of fresh-water fish the lisa, dogro, guayacbn and viajocos (Chromis fuscomaculatus) are possibly the most noteworthy.
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  • The waters of the Bahamas swarm with fish; the turtle procured here is particularly fine, and the sponge fishery is of importance.
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  • The caves are rich in curious kinds of fish, Paraphoxinus Gethaldii, which is unknown elsewhere, Chondrostoma phoximus, Phoxinellus alepidatus and others, which are caught and eaten by the peasantry.
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  • Birds came at his call, and forgot their hereditary fear of man; beasts lipped and caressed him; the very fish in lake and stream would glide, unfearful, between his hands.
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  • It is also the largest market for fresh-water fish in America, and handles large quantities of lumber and grain.
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  • There are also important fisheries for cod, caplin, halibut, red fish (Sebastes) and nepisak (Cyclopterus lumpus); a shark (Somniosus microcephalus) is taken for the oil from its liver; and sea-trout are found in the streams and small lakes of the south.
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  • The chief articles of export (together with those that have lapsed) have been already indicated; but they may be summarized as including seal-oil, seal, fox, bird and bear skins, fish products and eiderdown, with some quantity of worked skins.
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  • It supports a fishing population of over 30,000, most of whom are Annamese; the fish, which are taken by means of large nets at the end of the inundation, are either dried or fermented for the production of the sauce known as nuoc-mam.
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  • Rice, dried fish, beans, pepper and oxen are the chief elements in the export trade of the country, which is in the hands of Chinese.
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  • The fisheries, which are of great value, are carefully supervised and systematically replenished from the State Fish Hatchery at St Paul, and the Federal Fish Hatchery maintained at Duluth, in which particular attention is devoted to the fish of Lake Superior.
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  • Fish, as is well known, devour them greedily, and enjoy a veritable feast during the short period in which any particular species appears.
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  • The inflowing Baltic undercurrent carries with it herrings and other fish from the North Sea outside, and the submarine current entering the Barents Sea also carries with it such fish as plaice.
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  • It was difficult to be sure as to the variations in the actual number of fish caught, but it was easy to show that there was a real variability in the yield of cod-liver oil (an important product of the fishery).
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  • Tracing, then, the quantities of oil given per 1,000 fish from year to year, they seemed to establish a connexion between the variation in " condition " of the fish, the variation in the inflow of Atlantic water, and the variation in the number of sunspots from year to year.
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  • It appeared that the quantity of oil contained in the liver of a cod (per unit of weight) increases with the age of the fish.
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  • Other phosphoglobulins are vitelline, found in the yolk of hens eggs, and ichthulin, found in the eggs of fish.
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  • Gelatin occurs also in the cornea and the sclerotic coat of the eye; and in fish scales, the latter containing 80% of collagen, and 20% of ichthylepidin, a substance differing from gelatin in giving a wellmarked Millon's reaction.
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  • The Lake Of Bizerta, called Tinja by the Arabs, abounds in excellent fish, especially mullets, the dried roe of which, called botargo, is largely exported, and the fishing industry employs a large proportion of the inhabitants.
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  • The right of the public to take fish has been frequently in dispute, but a committee of the House of Commons, which took much evidence on the question in the year 1884, came to the conclusion that "it is impossible to recognize anything like a general public right to take fish as now existing."
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  • Cattle-rearing is not well developed, but game and fish are plentiful.
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  • The settlement in Flying Fish Cove now numbers some 250 inhabitants, consisting of Europeans, Sikhs, Malays and Chinese, by whom roads have been cut and patches of cleared ground cultivated.
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  • The chief exports are chestnut extract for tanning, cedrates, citrons, oranges, early vegetables, fish, copper ore and antimony ore.
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  • These openings are usually the sandy beds of dried-up or intermittent affluents, such as the Bak, Ham, Houm, Aub (or Great Fish) rivers of Great Namaqualand.
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  • Some of the small fish along the coast are highly esteemed for their flavour.
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  • Of the edible river fish, the best known is the pirarucd (Sudis gigas), a large fish of the Amazon which is salted and dried for market during the low-water season.
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  • Fish is a staple food of the Indian tribes of the Amazon region, and their fishing season is during the period of low water.
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  • Although an agricultural country, Brazil does not produce all its own bread and meat, and the imports of wheat, wheat flour, rice, fish, jerked beef and preserved meats, lard, butter, beans, potatoes, packed fruits and vegetables, Indian corn and other food-stuffs, are surprisingly large.
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  • Although the coast and river fisheries of Brazil are numerous and valuable, cured fish is one of the staple imports, and foreign products are to be found even along the Amazon.
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  • In the Amazon valley fish is a principal article of food, and large quantities of pirarucu (Sudis gigas) are caught during the season of low water and prepared for storage or market by drying in the sun.
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  • It used to be a popular resort for fish dinners, and it plays a prominent part in Charles Reade's novel of Christie Johnstone.
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  • The chief exports are fish, cereals, bacon; imports, petroleum and coal.
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  • The fish moth, a steel-grey slimy active fish-shaped insect, is found in every house and is very destructive.
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  • Fish of excellent quality and in great quantities abound on the coast.
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  • The rivers and lakes yield enormous quantities of fish, and leeches also are plentiful.
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  • The Theiss, once better supplied with fish than any other river in Europe, has for many years fallen off in its productiveness.
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  • Supposing a number of some species of arthropod or fish to be swept into a cavern or to be carried from less to greater depths in the sea, those individuals with perfect eyes would follow the glimmer of light and eventually escape to the outer air or the shallower depths, leaving behind those with imperfect eyes to breed in the dark place.
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  • The chief elements of the native diet are rice, fish and poultry; vegetables and pork are also eaten.
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  • The fruit is edible and its juice is made into beer; the sap of the tree is made into wine, and its pith into bread; the leaves furnish an excellent thatch, and the fibre extracted from their midribs is used f or fish lines, cordage, hammocks, nets, &c.; and the wood is hard and makes good building' material.
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  • In 1900 a concession was granted for an exclusive right to fish for pearls, &c., between Margarita and the coast, the contractor to use submarine apparatus.
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  • The river is well stocked with fish, both salt-water and fresh-water species being found in its waters, and several varieties of fresh-water fish in its tributaries.
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  • Game is plentiful and the rivers swarm with fish.
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  • The cod spawns in February, and is exceedingly prolific, the roe of a single female having been known to contain upwards of eight millions of ova, and to form more than half the weight of the entire fish.
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  • The fishery is also carried on along the coast of Norfolk and Suffolk, where great quantities of the fish are caught with hook and line, and conveyed to market alive in "well-boats" specially built for this traffic. Such boats have been in use since the beginning of the '8th century.
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  • The most important codfishery in the world is that which has been prosecuted for centuries on the Newfoundland banks, where it is not uncommon for a single fisherman to take over Soo of these fish in ten or eleven hours.
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  • The Monument (1677), Fish Street Hill, City, erected from the designs of Wren in commemoration of the great fire of 1666, is a Doric column surmounted by a gilt representation of a flaming urn.
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  • In the heart of the delta numerous large lakes or marshes abounding in fish are formed by the overflow of the Irrawaddy river during the rainy season, but these either assume very diminutive proportions or disappear altogether in the dry season.
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  • The food of the people consists as a rule of boiled rice with salted fresh or dried fish, salt, sessamum-oil, chillies, onions, turmeric, boiled vegetables, and occasionally meat of some sort from elephant flesh down to smaller animals, fowls and almost everything except snakes, by way of condiment.
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  • Salted fish forms, along with boiled rice, one of the chief articles of food among the Burmese; and as the price of salted fish is gradually rising along with the prosperity and purchasing power of the population, this industry is on a very sound basis.
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  • Caryophyllaeus mutabilis occurs in the roach and other fresh-water fish, and passes its earlier stages of development in fresh-water Oligochaets (Tubifex).
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  • It becomes fully developed in its invertebrate host, but apparently cannot produce eggs until transferred into the intestine of a fish.
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  • The Cestodes of Elasmobranch fish offer more convincing examples of independent growth of the proglottides, for these are often set free with only the male organs developed, and each attains twice the size of the parental strobila.
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  • The Elasmobranchs swallow infected molluscs or fish; pike and trout devour smaller fry; birds pick up sticklebacks, insects and worms which contain Cestode larvae; and man lays himself open to infection by eating the uncooked or partially prepared flesh of many animals.
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  • The metacestode-larva occurs free in the intestine of fish, Cephalopods and crabs, and is known as Scolex polymorphus.
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  • Turtle abound on the coast, and fish, of which some kinds, as the tetrodons (globe-fish), are poisonous, especially at certain seasons.
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  • Most bats are insect-eaters, but the tropical "flying foxes" or fox-bats of the Old World live on fruit; some are blood-suckers, and two feed on small fish.
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  • The coasts are very rich in fish, and the tunny fisheries of the north are one of the principal sources from which the world's supply of tunny is derived.
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  • The principal exports are olive oil, wheat, esparto grass, barley, sponges, dates, fish (especially tunny), hides, horses, wool, phosphates, copper, zinc and lead.
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  • The harbour is too shallow to admit vessels of large size, but the proximity of the town to Odessa secures for it a thriving business in wine, salt, fish, wool and tallow.
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  • They are transparent leaf-like organisms and may often be found attached to the skin, mouth, nostrils or gills of fish; on the skin and bladder of Amphibia; and on those of certain Reptilia.
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  • The cercaria swims freely for a time and either encysts directly on grass or weeds or it enters a second host which may be another mollusc, an insect, crustacean or fish, and then encysts.
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  • The further development of the cercaria is dependent on the weed or animal in which it lies being eaten by the final host which is usually a predaceous fish or one of the higher vertebrates.
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  • The ciliated larva escapes from the egg into the water and enters an intermediate host (leech, mollusc, arthropod, batrachian or fish) where it undergoes a metamorphosis into a second stage in which most of the adult organs are present.
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  • The exports mainly consist of grain, cattle, fish, dairy produce and potatoes; the imports of coal and timber.
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  • The value of trade probably exceeds 2,000,000, principal exports being rice, raw silk, dry fruit, fish, sheep and cattle, wool and cotton, and cocoons, the principal imports sugar, cotton goods, silkworm "seed" or eggs (70,160 worth in 1906-7), petroleum, glass and china., The trade in dried silkworm cocoons has increased remarkably since 1893, when only 76,150 lb valued at 6475 were exported; during the year 1906-7 ending 10th March, 2,717,540 lb valued at 238,000 were exported.
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  • The staple exports are beans, pulse and peas, marine products, sulphur, furs and timber; the staple imports, comestibles (especially salted fish), kerosene and oil-cake.
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  • Here is the salmon leap, where the fish are trapped in large numbers, but also assisted to mount the fall by salmon-ladders.
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  • It thus falls out that in spite of the enormous quantity of fish consumed as food or used as fertilizers year after year by the Japanese, the seas remain as richly stocked as ever.
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  • Unfortunately, even he had not all the courage of his creed, and while he would paint a bird or a fish with perfect realism, he no more dared to trust his eyes in larger motives than did the most devout follower of ShUbun or Motonobu.
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  • The veining of a cherry petal, for example, the tessellation of a carps scales, the serration of a leafs edgeall these lines remain intact, spared by the cutters tool, while the leaf itself, or the petal, or the scales of the fish, have the threads forming them cut so as to show the velvet nap and to appear in soft, low relief.
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  • But although the use of the potters wheel had long been understood, the objects produced were simple utensils tc contain offerings of rice, fruit and fish at the austere ceremonials of the Shinto faith, jars for storing seeds, and vessels for commor domestic use.
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  • The Carboniferous Limestone beneath it and around it is red-brown instead of grey, and is famous for its richness in fish remains.
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  • Cod-liver oil and salted fish are exported with some reindeer-skins, fox-skins and eiderdown; and coal and salt for curing are imported.
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  • They feed on fish, frogs and other aquatic animals, and are innocuous and viviparous.
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  • The common use of the word animal as the equivalent of mammal, as opposed to bird or reptile or fish, is erroneous.
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  • Minos, disgusted at Scylla's treachery, tied her to the rudder of his ship, and afterwards cast her body ashore on the promontory called after her Scyllaeum; or she threw herself into the sea and swam after Minos, constantly pursued by her father, until at last she was changed into a ciris (a bird or a fish).
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  • The bait is any kind of meat, a mouse, squirrel, piece of fish or bird's head.
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  • This species swarms in some years in prodigious numbers; in Pennant's time amazing shoals appeared in the fens of Lincolnshire every seven or eight years, No instance of a similar increase of this fish has been observed in our time, and this possibly may be due to the diminished number of suitable breeding-places in consequence of the introduction of artificial drainage.
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  • In 1118 he died, after an expedition to Egypt, during which he captured Farama, and, as old Fuller says, "caught many fish, and his death in eating them."
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  • Excellent fish abound in the Mare Piccolo, ninety-three different species being found.
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  • Among the fish may be mentioned the tunny, dolphin, mackerel, sardine, sea-bream, dentice and pagnell; wrasse, of exquisite rainbow hue and good for food; members of the herring family, sardines, anchovies, flying-fish, sea-pike; a few representatives of the cod family, and some flat fish; soles (very rare); Cernus which grows to large size; several species of grey and red mullet; eleven species of Triglidae, including the beautiful flying gurnard whose colours rival the angel-fish of the West Indies; and eighteen species of mackerel, all migratory.
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  • The food of the working classes is principally bread, with oil, olives, cheese and fruit, sometimes fish, but seldom meat; common wine is largely imported from southern Europe.
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  • More than two-thirds of the wheat comes from abroad; fish, vegetables and fruit are also imported from Sicily in considerable quantities.
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  • Excellent honey is produced in Malta; at certain seasons tunny-fish and young dolphin (lampuca) are abundant; other varieties of fish are caught all the year round.
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  • Fish are also plentiful.
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  • The commodities otherwise mostly dealt in are opium, tea, rice, oil, raw cotton, fish and silk.
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  • It contains a fine Gothic Protestant church (St Mary's) dating from the 13th century and has several educational establishments, notably a school of seamanship. Its industries comprise iron-founding, ship-building, brewing, and the manufacture of cigars, leather and tinned fish.
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  • Cod, bream, tunny and anchovy are the principal fish taken.
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  • Corn, salt, sugar and fish are brought from the south, whilst skins and manufactured wares, imported from Germany, are sent to the southern governments.
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  • Sir John Murray finds the source of the phosphoric acid to be the decomposition of large quantities of animal matter, and he illustrates this by the well-known circumstance of the death of vast shoals of fish when warm Gulf-Stream water displaces the cold current which usually extends to the American coast.
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  • The importance of the osmotic pressure of sea-water in biology will be easily understood from the fact that a frog placed in sea-water loses water by exosmosis and soon becomes 20% lighter than its original weight, while a true salt-water fish suddenly transferred to fresh water gains water by endosmosis, swells up and quickly succumbs.
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  • Berossus describes Oannes as having the body of a fish but underneath the figure of a man.
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  • His dominions contained the monstrous ants that dug gold and the fish that gave the purple; they produced all manner of precious stones and all the famous aromatics.
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  • Within them was found the Fountain of Youth; the pebbles which give light, restore sight, and render the possessor invisible; the Sea of Sand was there, stored with fish of wondrous savour; and the River of Stones was there also; besides a subterranean stream whose sands were of gems. His territory produced the worm called "salamander," which lived in fire, and which wrought itself an incombustible envelope from which were manufactured robes for the presbyter, which were washed in flaming fire.
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  • Zwolle has a considerable trade by river, a large fish market, and the most important cattle market in Holland after Rotterdam.
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  • Freshwater fish, consisting mostly of catfish, buffalo fish, bass, sunfish and drum, are common in the lower courses of the rivers.
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    0
  • The chief exports consist of rice, rattans, torches, dried fish, areca-nuts, sesamum seeds, molasses, sea-slugs, edible birds' nests and tin.
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  • Straw or grass hats, straw mats, samshu (from the Shao-sing district), Chinese drugs, vegetable tallow and fish are among the chief exports; in 1904 the hats numbered 2,125,566, though in 1863 they had only amounted to 40,000, and the mats, mainly despatched to south China, average from 1,000,000, to 2,000,000.
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  • All the Baganda belong to one or other of twenty-nine clans, or " Bika, " which are named after and have as totem familiar beasts, birds, fish or vegetables.
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    0
  • The exports consist chiefly of cereals, cattle, horses, sheep, wine, fish and hides.
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    0
  • The manufacture of machinery, amber articles, tobacco and cigars, and bricks, with some iron-founding, linen-weaving, and salmon-fishing in the Stolpe, are the chief industrial occupations of the inhabitants, who also carry on trade in grain, cattle, spirits, timber, fish and geese.
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  • Brook trout are found, especially in the streams in the western part of the state, and bass, pickerel, perch and smaller fish occur in the rivers and other inland waters.
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  • Fish are so abundant on the coast that the cod is sometimes used as an emblem of the state; thus a figure of one hangs in the representatives' chamber at the State House.
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  • The artificial propagation and preservation of salmon and other edible fresh-water fish have been carried on successfully under the supervision of a state commission.
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  • Though cod is much the most important fish (in 1905 fresh cod were valued at $991,679, and salted cod at $696,928), haddock (fresh, $1,051,910; salted, $17,194), mackerel (value in 1905, including horse mackerel, $970,876), herring (fresh, $266,699; salted, $114,997), pollock ($267,927), hake ($258,438), halibut ($218,232), and many other varieties are taken in great quantities.
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  • Provisions taken to Newfoundland, poor fish to the West Indies, molasses to New England, rum to Africa and good cod to France and Spain, were the commonest ventures of foreign trade.
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  • James parochial school and for several years was employed in the Fulton Fish Market.
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  • The inner surface of their cup-shaped mouth is armed with pointed teeth, with which they perforate the integuments of the fish attacked, scraping off particles of the flesh and sucking the blood.
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  • Mackerel, cod, pollack and flat-fishes are the kinds most frequently attacked by them in the sea; of river-fish the migratory Salmonidae and the shad are sometimes found with the marks of the teeth of the lamprey, or with the fish actually attached to them.
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  • The original varieties of trees still abound, though in less numbers, on lands illadapted to agriculture, and in the Adirondack and Catskill Mountains, where the state has established forest preserves, and the Forest, Fish and Game Commissioner began reforesting in 1901, principally with pine, spruce and larch.
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  • The moose, the elk and the beaver have been placed under the protection of the Forest, Fish and Game Commissioner.
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    0
  • There are about 375 species of fish in New York waters (see below under Fisheries).
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  • New York was in 1904 more extensively engaged in oyster culture than any other state, and was making more rapid progress in the cultivation of hard clams. In 1909 there were distributed from state fish hatcheries 1 531,293,721 fishes (mostly smelt, pike-perch, and winter flatfish); a large number of fish and eggs were also placed in New York waters by the United States Bureau of Fisheries.
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  • Menhaden are caught in much larger quantities in New York than any other fish, but being too bony for food they are used only in the manufacture of oil and fertilizer.
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  • The most valuable catches of food fish in 1904 were those of bluefish ($556,527), squeteague ($212,623), flounders ($67,159), eels ($53,832), cod ($52,710), scup ($48,068) and shad ($36,826).
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  • Under the present system, therefore, there is a biennial election (in even-numbered years) of a governor, a lieutenant-governor, a secretary of state, a state comptroller, a state treasurer, an attorney-general and a state engineer and surveyor; and the governor appoints, subject to the approval of the Senate, a superintendent of public works, a superintendent of state prisons, a superintendent of insurance, a superintendent of banks, a commissioner of excise, a commissioner of agriculture, a forest, fish and game commissioner, a commissioner of health, a commissioner of labour, a state architect, a state historian, a state librarian, two public service commissions, a civil service commission, a board of charities, a commission of prisons, a commission in lunacy, three tax commissioners and several other boards and commissions.
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  • Manufactures are insignificant, but there is a brisk export trade in grain, salt, fish, wool and tallow.
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  • Again and again salmon have been successfully hatched out into rivers, but the young fish hastening down stream to the sea never return thence.
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  • The snapper is at once the handsomest and most palatable of a good variety of sea fish.
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  • Besides machine shops and shipbuilding facilities, the important industries are the weaving of hats and hammocks, and the preparation of salt fish; and there is a considerable export of rubber and straw hats.
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  • Poultry, fish and timber are important sources of wealth.
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  • The speckled trout, which abounds in nearly all of the mountain streams and lakes, is the principal game fish.
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  • These words are for (I) the swim-bladder of a fish; (2) a narrow stretch of water between an inland sea and the ocean, or between an island and the mainland, &c., cf.
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  • About fifty streams flow into the lake, which drains into the Danube and is well stocked with fish.
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  • Fossil remains of mammals, fish and reptiles found in the Tertiary deposits of south-western Montana are preserved in the Carnegie Museum at Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, and in the museum of the university of Montana.
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  • They include the mandible of a mastodon and a portion of a vertebra of a large fish, both found in the Lower Madison Valley; the skull and other parts of a dog (Mesocyon drummondanus), found near Drummond, Granite county; the skull of a Poatrephes paludicola, found near New Chicago,.
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  • The president's uncle, Robert Barnwell Roosevelt (1829-1906), was a New York lawyer, New York state fish commissioner in 1866-68, a member of the Committee of Seventy which exposed the corruption of Tammany in New York City, a Democratic member of the national House of Representatives in 1871-73, U.S. minister to the Netherlands in 1888, and author of works on American game birds and fish.
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  • The Elbe produces excellent pike, salmon and eels, its tributaries trout in considerable quantities, while the marshy ponds lying on the left bank furnish a good supply of carp, a fish held in great esteem by the inhabitants.
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  • All that needed to be done was to fish the fractured ribs of the high arches, put oval holes in the fishes, and not screw up the bolts too tight.
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  • At Sheppey it is rich in various kinds of fossil fish and shells.
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  • In the Isle of Thanet a light mould predominates, which has been much enriched by fish manure.
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  • This view has been proved to be erroneous, and we know now that this fish lives throughout the year in the vicinity of our shores, but at a greater depth, and at a greater distance from the coast, than at the time when it approaches land for the purpose of spawning.
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  • These are not the same fish but different races.
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  • Some have added fish to their dietary; but, speaking generally, all who are called vegetarians will be found to abstain from the use of flesh and fowl and almost invariably also from fish as food.
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  • The rule laid down by the Order is abstinence so far as possible from all foods which are obtained by the cruel infliction of pain, and the minimum that is set is complete "abstinence from flesh and fowl," while net-caught fish may be used by associate members.
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  • Ages before Assur-bani-pal reigned at Nineveh the eighth month (Marchesvan) was known as " the month of the star of the Scorpion," the tenth (Tebet) belonged to the " star of the Goat," the twelfth (Adar) to the " star of the Fish of Ea."
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