This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience. Learn more

fish

fish

fish Sentence Examples

  • You can be a cold fish, sometimes.

  • The surface of the water ruptured, spewing a colorful fish into the air.

  • The fish flipped and dived back into the water.

  • Do you ever fish here?

  • Oh, I'd love to come here and fish sometime.

  • I don't believe in catch-and-release except if the fish is simply too small.

  • Her prior night's transgressions were apparently forgotten as she and Betsy acted as compatible as guppies in a fish bowl.

  • Yup. The fish are practically jumping in the boat.

  • You could say that, and it's a big fish.

  • I left a message, from Tommy, his so called fishing buddy, saying I had a fish story for him and requesting him to call as soon as possible.

  • Daniel Brennan came calling and the county was reduced of fish by his visit.

  • Dusty wouldn't be there to fish her out as he had Darian.

  • Fred's quick enough to hear what I have to say, but tight-lipped as a smart fish about anything he knows.

  • Joseph was ready to end the conversation but Dean was hoping for more fish in his creel.

  • But neither one of us gave a flying fish.

  • We used to camp over on the Gunnison River, and fish some, all four of us.

  • Hannah had succeeded in landing a big fish blueblood, a descendant of Italian royalty, whose old money placated the chilly welcome she received into a lifestyle far, far different from her own.

  • He tossed fish tied together on a rope into the center of the cave, ignoring her inspection.

  • Her eyes fell to the fish, and her nose wrinkled.

  • She knelt beside the fish and unwrapped them with a grimace, cheered to find the section of rope nearly five feet long.

  • She tossed the fish back to the ocean and coiled the rope, hiding it beneath several small rocks in the back of the cave.

  • He walked out again, and she tossed the fish and hid the rope, straightening just as he reappeared.

  • If he brought her more fish tomorrow morning, she'd have rope enough to reach the cliff edge ten feet above.

  • She lay down on her back to watch the sun set and didn't move until he returned early the next morning to toss stinky fish beside her.

  • She watched him until he disappeared, then freed the fish.

  • With each name, she flung a fish at him.

  • And no raw fish!

  • "They don't eat fish," Rhyn grunted.

  • The room was straightened and the fish removed, though the scent of them lingered.

  • "It sounds like sin was a very big business," Cynthia offered as she stirred a pot of fish chowder.

  • He opened the refrigerator and took out the fish that had been thawing.

  • Fred wandered into the kitchen as Dean was reading the label of a Campbell's soup can in hopes of creating an exotic sauce for his broiling fish.

  • Maybe I can fish around on the Internet and dig up some poop.

  • Most women on a first date would order a piece of fish or even a salad and end up pushing it around their plate.

  • Alex jerked the pole, setting the hook, and then glanced at her as the fish fought for freedom.

  • I'll believe it when they fish his body out of the drink, which they won't, 'cause it ain't there.

  • Give him a week and he'll float in somewhere down south of here if the fish don't eat him first.

  • According to the time-stamped dinner receipt, Byrne had dined on fish, and had two beers as Hunter had remarked.

  • Some guy out on a yacht with his family spotted the body floating in the middle of the bay and hauled it in like Hemingway's fish.

  • The drinks arrived in glasses better designed for raising fish than serving alcohol—a sure hit with the traveling salesmen.

  • He has to be out there, caught in the seaweed at the bottom of Chesapeake Bay, with the fish and crabs having a party, getting as bloated as the fat Wassermann twin lying on the slab at the Norfolk morgue.

  • I haven't been lying to you and I haven't for one minute been seeing you so I could fish for information.

  • Dean thought a dead fish might have been more appropriate.

  • A fish flopped in the pond, probably avoiding a snapping turtle, and water raced over rocks in the creek below.

  • Did you ever hunt or fish with your father?

  • We'll worry about breakfast later? right now we have other fish to fry.

  • Somewhere up there past the tree line were the four Elk Alex had coerced from the Game and Fish Commission.

  • Alex had written the Game and Fish Commissions in several western states, hoping for a chance at a mountain goat or sheep.

  • Sometime she would have to get out the old cane pole and fish like she used to.

  • Fish in a barrel, he said.

  • Do you allow your guests to fish?

  • Josh and Lori had helped her search for crawdads back then, but they weren't using them for fish bait.

  • The anchorage is safe, and the bay full of fish; the harbour has a certain amount of trade.

  • Salt springs exist in the neighbourhood, and to the south there are two small lakes, Zonar and Rincon, which abound in fish.

  • Sugarmaking, the distillation of rice-spirit, silk-weaving, fishing and the preparation of a fish-sauce (nuoc-mam) made from decayed fish, and the manufacture of salt from sea-water and of lime are carried on in many localities.

  • Rice is the chief article of export, dried or salted fish, pepper and cotton ranking next in order of value.

  • It is the largest peanut market in the world, is in a great truck-gardening region, and makes large shipments of cotton (822,930 bales in 1905), oysters, coal, fertilizers, lumber, grain, fruits, wine, vegetables, fish and live stock.

  • The most important export is fish, other items being seaweed, marble, preserved foods, butter and margarine and infusorial earth.

  • The unhealthy lagoons contain abundance of fish.

  • Perch (Fish) >>

  • The fish crowd round him and pay homage.

  • Laristan is famous for the condiment called mahiabeh (fish-jelly), a compound of pounded small sprat-like fish, salt, mustard, nutmeg, cloves and other spices, used as a relish with nearly all foods.

  • C. Fish's History and Repository of Pulpit Eloquence (ii., 1857).

  • The lakes and rivers of Albania abound in fish.

  • Large quantities of fresh fish caught in lakes Winnipeg and Manitoba are exported to all parts of the United States.

  • Fish abound in its waters, which are sweet, save at low-level, when they become brackish.

  • Corn from middle Russia for Astrakhan is transferred from the railway to boats at Tsaritsyn; timber and wooden wares from the upper Volga are unloaded here and sent by rail to Kalach; and fish, salt and fruits sent from Astrakhan by boat up the Volga are here unloaded and despatched by rail to the interior of Russia.

  • A gate in the valley, known as the Fish Gate, opened on a road which, leading from the north, went down the Tyropoeon valley to the southern part of the city.

  • A very fine freshwater fish is the Murray cod, which sometimes weighs Too lb; and the golden perch, found in the same river, has rare beauty of colour.

  • Among the sea fish, the schnapper is of great value as an article of food, and its weight comes up to 50 lb.

  • These fish frequent rocky shoals off the eastern coast and are caught in numbers outside Port Jackson for the Sydney market.

  • The so-called red garnet, a pretty fish, with hues of carmine and blue stripes on its head, is much esteemed for the table.

  • Excellent fish of many varieties abound in the Australian seas and in many of the rivers.

  • In several of the states, fish have been introduced successfully from other countries.

  • No word exists in their language for such general terms as tree, bird or fish; yet they have invented a name for every species of vegetable and animal they know.

  • Their nets, made by women, either of the tendons of animals or the fibres of plants, will catch and hold the kangaroo or the emu, or the very large fish of Australian rivers.

  • deep, which baffled every effort to reach the interior until in 1813, when a summer of severe drought had made it of vital importance to find new pastures, three of the colonists, Messrs Blaxland, Lawson and Wentworth, more fortunate than their predecessors in exploration, after crossing the Nepean river at Emu Plains and ascending the Dividing Range, were able to reach a position enabling them to obtain a view of the grassy valley of the Fish river, which lies on the farther side of the Dividing Range.

  • Science (1893); Tenison-Woods, The Fish and Fisheries of New South Wales (Sydney, 1883); Ogilvy, Catalogue of Australian Mammals (Sydney, 1892); Aflalo, Natural History of Australia (London, 1896); Flower and Lydekker, Mammals, Living and Extinct (London, 1891); J.

  • In 1529 he produced a free version (Klagbrief der armen Diirftigen in England) of the famous Supplycacyon of the Beggers, written abroad (1528 ?) by Simon Fish.

  • They neither plant nor have they any manufactures except their rude bamboo and rattan vessels, the fish and game traps which they set with much skill, and the bows, blow-pipes and bamboo spears with which they and the produce of their hunting and fishing.

  • They are skilful hunters, however, catch fish by in geniously constructed traps, and live almost entirely on jungle-roots of these people is found in Upper Perak, and the members of this clan have acquired some knowledge of the art of planting, &c. They they have been raided by the latter, and many Negritos are to be found in captivity in some of the Malayan villages on the eastern side of the peninsula.

  • There is a state fish and game commissioner, and the state has a fish hatchery at Roxbury and a forest and game farm at Sharon.

  • Lake Champlain furnishes the only commerical fishing grounds in Vermont, with the exceptions of small catches of white fish in Lake Bomoseen, Lake St Catherine in Rutland county and Lake Memphremagog.

  • The most valuable fish taken was walleyed pike, and the catch of this fish and of pickerel from Lake Champlain in 1902 exceeded in value that from any other body of fresh water in the United States excepting Lake Huron and Lake Erie.

  • The wall-eyed pike taken in 1902 were valued at $16,915 (210,936 lb); white fish, $5777 (80,191 lb); pickerel, $4144 (51,711 lb); yellow perch, $ 2 575 (43,9 1 7 lb); sturgeon, $20 5 1 (1 5,59 0 lb), and suckers, $ 18 54 (37,375 lb); other varieties taken in smaller quantities included smelt, sun-fish and eels.

  • The administrative officers of the state are a governor, a lieutenantgovernor, a secretary of state, a state treasurer, and an auditor of accounts, elected by popular vote, and an inspector of finance, a commissioner of taxes, a superintendent of education, a fish and game commissioner, three railroad commissioners, and various boards and commissions, of whom some are elected by the General Assembly and some are appointed by the governor with the advice and consent of the Senate.

  • It abounds in fish, but its banks are somewhat deserted and not free from malaria.

  • In 1651 the Dutch completed a treaty with Denmark to injure English trade in the Baltic; to which England replied the same year by the Navigation Act, which suppressed the Dutch trade with the English colonies and the Dutch fish trade with England, and struck at the Dutch carrying trade.

  • HAKE (Merluccius vulgaris), a fish which differs from the cod in having only two dorsal fins and one anal.

  • The people are employed in fishing for coral and sponges, as well as for bream, mullet and other fish.

  • Some of the other edible fish, such as the palombo, are not found in northern waters.

  • Of freshwater fish the trout of the mountain streams and the eels of the coast lagoons may be mentioned.

  • In 1902 there were 48 tunny fisheries, employjng 3006 men, and 5116 tons of fish worth 80,000 were caught.

  • Fish are very numerous and many species are peculiar to the Andaman seas.

  • Protohydra occurs in oysterbanks and Monobrachium also grows on the shells of bivalves, and both these hydroids probably fish in the currents produced by the lamellibranchs.

  • There is no difficulty whatever in regarding Hydra as bearing the same relation to the actinula-stage of other Hydromedusae that a Rotifer bears to a trochophore-larva or a fish to a tadpole.

  • It is not true, for example, that a fish is a reptile arrested in its development, or that a reptile was ever a fish; but it is true that the reptile embryo, at one stage of its development, is an organism which, if it had an independent existence, must be classified among fishes; and all the organs of the reptile pass, in the course of their development, through conditions which are closely analogous to those which are permanent in some fishes.

  • The chief Lenten food from the earliest days was fish, and entries in the royal household accounts of Edward III.

  • show the amount of fish supplied to the king.

  • Charters granted to seaports often stipulated that the town should send so many herrings or other fish to the king annually during Lent.

  • The statute, however, would not seem to have had much effect; for in spite of a proclamation of Queen Elizabeth in 1560 imposing a fine of £ 20 for each offence on butchers slaughtering animals during Lent, in 1563 Sir William Cecil, in Notes upon an Act for the Increase of the Navy, says that "in old times no flesh at all was eaten on fish days; even the king himself could not have license; which was occasion of eating so much fish as now is eaten in flesh upon fish days."

  • The revolt against fish had ruined the fisheries and driven the fishermen to turn pirates, to the great scandal and detriment of the realm.

  • Pseudis was first described by Marie Sibylle de Merlon (1647-1717), in her work on the fauna of Surinam (published first in 1705 at Amsterdam, republished in Latin in 1719), as a frog changing into a fish.

  • The rules of the Orphic life prescribed abstinence from beans, flesh, certain kinds of fish, &c., the wearing of a special kind of clothes, and numerous other practices and abstinences.

  • HADDOCK (Gadus aeglefinus), a fish which differs from the cod in having the mental barbel very short, the first anal fin with 22 to 25 rays, instead of 17 to 20, and the lateral line dark instead of whitish; it has a large blackish spot above each pectoral fin - associated in legend with the marks of St Peter's finger and thumb, the haddock being supposed to be the fish from whose mouth he took the tribute-money.

  • Coprolites have been found at Lyme Regis, enclosed by the ribs of ichthyosauri, and in the remains of several species of fish; also in the abdominal cavities of a species of fossil fish, Macropoma Mantelli, from the chalk of Lewes.

  • thick, containing rolled fossil bones, cetacean and fish teeth, and shells of the Crag period, with nodules or pebbles of phosphatic matter derived from the London Clay, and often investing fossils from that formation.

  • b.h, The so-called basihyal, answering to the first basibranchial of a fish.

  • Pandionidae, ospreys or fish hawks, cosmopolitan.

  • dobula), a freshwater fish belonging to the family Cyprinidae.

  • The dace is a lively, active fish, of gregarious habits, and exceedingly prolific, depositing its eggs in May and June at the roots of aquatic plants or in the gravelly beds of the streams it frequents.

  • Calarashi has a considerable transit trade in wheat, linseed, hemp, timber and fish from a broad mere on the west or from the Danube.

  • Monterey Bay has a remarkable variety of fish; and there is a large fish hatchery near the city.

  • outside the customs union (Zollverein), the imports being principally coals, bricks and timber, and the exports fish.

  • The fish of the lagoons and streams are coarse, and some of them primitive in type; but two or three kinds, found generally in the large rivers, are much prized.

  • The varieties of fish on the sea coast are many and excellent.

  • They lived principally upon fish, venison and honey.

  • Sugar, rice, indigo and tropical fruits are the chief products of the fertile district in which the town lies; it is widely known for its fish-ponds and its excellent fish, and its principal manufactures are jusi, pina, ilang ilang perfume and sugar.

  • The fish are sea-trout, lake-trout, pike and perch.

  • The fresh-water fish seem in their affinities to be nearly allied to those of the Niger and the Nile.

  • There is a species of Polypterus, and it is probable that the Protopterus or lung fish is also found there, though its existence has not as yet been established by a specimen.

  • The river is navigable for 770 m.; grain and a variety of goods conveyed from the upper Kama are floated down, while furs, fish and other products of the sea are shipped up the river to be transported to Cherdyn on the Kama.

  • Notwithstanding serious obstacles offered by shallows, corn, fish, salt and timber are largely shipped to and from Archangel.

  • With regard to the imports into Russia-they consist mainly of raw materials and machinery for the manufactures, and of provisions, the principal items being raw cotton, 17% of the aggregate; machinery and metal goods, 13%; tea, 5%; mineral ores, 5%; gums and resins, 4%; wool and woollen yarns, 32%; textiles, 3%; fish, 3%; with leather and hides, chemicals, silks, wine and spirits, colours, fruits, coffee, tobacco and rice.

  • Fish form an important article of national food.

  • The numerous fasts of the national church prescribe a fish diet on many days in the Fishing.

  • year, and the continuous frost of winter is favourable to F the transportation of fish for great distances.

  • Of anchovies alone, to,000,000 jars are prepared annually, while salted fish is, next after bread, the staple food of large masses of the population.

  • The Black Sea fisheries, in which about 4000 men are engaged, yield fish valued at £300,000 per annum.

  • The value of the fish has much increased owing to the introduction of cold storage; as a result of the employment of this method of packing, fish is now exported in a fresh state from the Black Sea to all parts of S.W.

  • In the Volga section of the Caspian Sea fish are caught to the value of about £I,000,000 annually; in the Ural section over 40,000 tons of fish and nearly 1500 tons of caviare are obtained.

  • It was, however, at Rochester, where Kate and her sister Margaret (1836-1893)(1836-1893) went to live with a married sister (Mrs Fish) that modern spiritualism assumed its present form, and that communication was, as it was believed, established with lost relatives and deceased eminent men.

  • It is full of fish, and the neighbouring country, though barren and uncultivated, contains quantities of game.

  • The principal foods of the Samoans are vegetables, coco-nut, bread-fruit, fish and pork.

  • The river abounds in coarse fish.

  • Plymouth is a popular resort for visitors,, having, in addition to its wealth of historic associations and a healthy summer climate, thousands of acres of hilly woodland and numerous lakes and ponds well stocked with fish.

  • To the fisherman in India the mahseer affords the same kind of sport as the salmon in the British Isles, and it rivals that fish as regards size, strength and activity.

  • Gorinchem possesses a good harbour, and besides working in gold and silver, carries on a considerable trade in grain, hemp, cheese, potatoes, cattle and fish, the salmon fishery being noted.

  • Fish and game are plentiful, and the silkworm is bred in the warmer districts.

  • The most petty limitations of Jewish commercial activity continued; thus at about this period the community of Prague, in a petition, " complain that they are not permitted to buy victuals in the market before a certain hour, vegetables not before 9 and cattle not before II o'clock; to buy fish is sometimes altogether prohibited; Jewish druggists are not permitted to buy victuals at the same time with Christians " (op. cit.).

  • The principal imports are grain and agricultural produce, timber and coal, and the exports cement and fish.

  • FISH (0.

  • The article Fisheries deals with the subject from the economic and commercial point of view, and Angling with the catching of fish as a sport.

  • The fish was an early symbol of Christ in primitive and medieval Christian art.

  • 'Invous X ptar6s, Oeou `Tuffs, 16 y TIJp, Jesus Christ, Son of God, Saviour, which together spell the Greek word for "fish," ix9vs.

  • The fish is also said to be represented in the oval-shaped figure, pointed at both ends, and formed by the intersection of two circles.

  • The word "fish" is used in many technical senses.

  • This word also appears in the English form "fish," in the metal, pearl or bone counters, sometimes made in the form of fish, used for scoring points, &c., in many games.

  • This gives access to a whole series of halls and private rooms (halls " of the Colonnades," " of the Double Axes," " Queen's Megaron" with bath-room attached and remains of the fish fresco, " Treasury " with ivory figures and other objects of art), together with extensive remains of an upper storey.

  • The oyster beds, for which Loch Ryan was once noted, are not cultivated, but the fisheries (white fish and herrings) are still of some consequence.

  • By the Greeks the place was called Latopolis, from the worship here of the latus fish.

  • TENCH (Tinca vulgaris), a small fish of the Cyprinid family, which is one of the commonest and most widely spread freshwater fishes of Europe.

  • As the tench is of comparatively uncommon occurrence in unenclosed waters, its place among the indigenous fishes of Great Britain has been denied, and it has been supposed to have been introduced from the Continent; a view which, however, is not supported by any evidence, and is practically disposed of by the fact that fossil remains of the fish are found in the Pleistocene deposits of Great Britain.

  • The tench is really an excellent fish for the table, if kept in cool, clear water for a few days, as it is the custom to do in Germany, in order to rid it of the muddy flavour imparted to it by its favourite abode.

  • Large numbers of shad, blue fish, weak fish (squeteague), alewives, Spanish mackerel, perch, bass, croakers (Micropogon undulatus), mullet, menhaden, oysters and clams are caught in the sounds, in the lower courses of the rivers flowing into them, or in the neighbouring waters of the sea.

  • In addition to being the principal emporium for the Austrian traffic on the Elbe, Tetschen has a considerable industry, its products comprising chemicals, oil, soap, cotton stuffs, plaster of Paris, glazed and coloured paper, cellulose, beer, flour and preserved fish.

  • These cocoons, which may often be seen carried between the mandibles of the workers, are the "ants' eggs" prized as food for fish and pheasants.

  • Owing to its excellent harbour Baku is a chief depot for merchandise coming from Persia and Transcaspia - raw cotton, silk, rice, wine, fish, dried fruit and timber - and for Russian manufactured goods.

  • It is almost made up of fragments of spines, teeth and scales of ganoid fish.

  • Another well-known bed, formerly known as the "Bristol" or "Lias" Bone Bed, exists in the form of several thin layers of micaceous sandstone, with the remains of fish and saurians, which occur in the Rhaetic Black Paper Shales that lie above the Keuper marls in the south-west of England.

  • Gilla on the W., which produces fish in abundance, was originally an open bay.

  • The oesophagus is provided often with caeca which in Syllids and Hesionidae have been found to contain air, and possibly therefore perform the function of the fish's air-bladder.

  • The land around Beauly is fertile and the town drives a brisk trade in coal, timber, lime, grain and fish.

  • It was represented by the ancients as a creature having the forepart a goat, and the hindpart a fish, or sometimes simply as a goat.

  • The chief industries of Grimsby are shipbuilding, brewing, tanning, manufactures of ship tackle, ropes, ice for preserving fish, turnery, flour, linseed cake, artificial manure; and there are saw mills, bone and corn mills, and creosote works.

  • The industries mainly consist in shipbuilding, fish-curing, and the manufacture of machinery (particularly for agriculture), and the commerce in the export of corn, wood and fish.

  • is perhaps the fine spring north of the village, a shallow pool of good water full of small fish, rising between black basalt boulders: or more probably the copious `Ain Jalud.

  • Her votaries abstained from the flesh of domestic fowls, fish, beans, pomegranates and apples.

  • Semper, pursued as food by the leaping fish Periophthalmus, and the dorsal eyes are of especial value to them in aiding them to escape from this enemy.

  • I.-Flying Fish Fresco, Phylakopi.

  • Cnossian frescoes show women grouped apart, and they appear alone on gems. Flesh and fish and many kinds of vegetables were evidently eaten, and wine and beer were drunk.

  • The soil is an oozy mud which can only be made capable of carrying buildings by the artificial means of pile-driving; there is no land fit for agriculture or the rearing of cattle; the sole food supply is fish from the lagoon, and there is no drinking-water save such as could be stored from the rainfall.

  • The most striking of these modern buildings are the new wing of the Hotel d'Italie, San Moise, and the very successful fish market at Rialto, designed by Laurenti and carried out by Rupolo, in which a happy return to early Venetian Gothic has been effected in conjunction with a skilful adaptation of one of the most famous of the old houses of Venice, the Stalon, or palace of the Quirini family.

  • Propagation facilities are being greatly improved, and there are stringent laws for the protection of immature fish.

  • Inland streams and lakes are well supplied with game fish; state laws prohibit the sale of game fish and their being taken, except with hook and line.

  • It is the largest wool and the largest fish market of the United States, being in each second in the world to London only.

  • From very early days executive officers known as " select-men," constables, clerks of markets, hog reeves, packers of meat and fish, &c., were chosen; and the select-men, particularly, gained power as the attendance of the freemen on meetings grew onerous.

  • No other fish shows finer proportions in the shape of its body.

  • Every "line" of its build is designed and eminently adapted for rapid progression through the water; the muscles massed along the vertebral column are enormously developed, especially on the back and the sides of the tail, and impart to the body a certain rigidity which interferes with abruptly sideward motions of the fish.

  • All fishes of the mackerel family are strictly carnivorous; they unceasingly pursue their prey, which consists principally of other fish and pelagic crustaceans.

  • Towards the end of May the old fish become heavy with spawn and are in the highest condition for the table; and the latter half of June or beginning of July may be regarded as the time at which the greater part of mackerel spawn.

  • Desis lives invariably between tide-marks upon the rocks and coral reefs, and may be found at low tide either crawling about upon them or swimming in tidal pools and feeding upon small fish or crustaceans.

  • The waters of the lake swarm with fish (sturgeons and salmonidae), and its herring (Salmo omul) is the chief product of the fisheries, though notably fewer have been taken within the last forty or fifty years.

  • The rivers are well stocked with fish, especially with salmon, which forms a common article of food.

  • In such immense shoals do these fish appear in some of the smaller streams that numbers are squeezed out on to the banks and there perish.

  • Peckham, but others have held that it is of exclusively animal origin, a view supported by such occurrences as those in the orthoceratities of the Trenton limestone, and by the experiments of C. Engler, who obtained a liquid like crude petroleum by the distillation of menhaden (fish) oil.

  • The few fish include the barbel.

  • Another compound, properly of mixed sex, appears in the Aramaean Atargatis (`At[t]ar-`athe), worn down to Derketo, who is specifically associated with sacred pools and fish (Ascalon, Hierapolis-Mabog).

  • To nomads, Astarte may well have been a sheep-goddess, but this, if her earliest, was not her only type, as is clear from the sacred fish of Atargatis, the doves of Ascalon (and of the Phoenician sanctuary of Eryx), and the gazelle or antelope of the goddess of love (associated also with the Arabian Athtar).

  • The fisheries are very valuable; the total number of species of fish in Florida waters is about 600, and many species found on one coast are not found on the other.

  • The king fish and tarpon are hunted for sport, while mullet, shad, redsnappers, pompano, trout, sheepshead and Spanish mackerel are of great economic value.

  • success does not attend wisdom, knowledge and skill; men are like fish taken in a net or birds caught in a snare.

  • There is a large export trade in fish, including that of pilchards to Italy.

  • Great quantities of early potatoes and vegetables, together with flowers and fish, are sent to London and elsewhere.

  • The rivers and neighbouring seas seem to be well stocked with fish, and especial mention must be made of the turtles, flying-fish, and brilliant I coral-fish which swarm in the waters warmed by the Kurosiwo current, the gulf-stream of the Pacific. Shell-fish form an important article of diet to both the Chinese and the aborigines along the coast - a species of Cyrena, a species of Tapes, Cytheraea petechiana and Modiola teres being most abundant.

  • There are a few species of fresh-water fish, but food-fishes are scarce both in the rivers and along the coast.

  • Lobsters and fish in considerable quantities are shipped from the city.

  • 37, where Atargatis is derived from &Tep Far050s,"without Gatis," - a queen who is said to have forbidden the eating of fish).

  • Thus Diodorus Siculus, using Ctesias, tells how she fell in love with a youth who was 823 worshipping at the shrine of Aphrodite, and by him became the mother of Semiramis, the Assyrian queen, and how in shame she flung herself into a pool at Ascalon or Hierapolis and was changed into a fish (W.

  • Fish taken in the lakes include perch, pike, char and trout in Windermere, Ennerdale, Bassenthwaite, Derwentwater, &c., and the gwyniad or fresh-water herring in Ullswater.

  • The size of the animals varies greatly, from forms a few millimetres in length to Gigantorhynchus gigas, which measures from 10 to 65 cms. The adults live in great numbers in the alimentary canal of some vertebrate, usually fish, the larvae are as a rule encysted in the body cavity of some invertebrate, most often an insect or crustacean, more rarely a small fish.

  • It is then, if lucky, eaten by some crustacean, or insect, more rarely by a fish.

  • This is by far the largest family and contains the commonest species; the larva of Echinorhynchus proteus lives in Gammarus pulex and in small fish, the adult is common in many fresh-water fish: E.

  • Among the products are coco-nuts, sago, fish, trepang, timber, copra, maize, yams and tobacco.

  • Charlevoix is an important hardwood lumber port, and the principal industries are the manufacture of lumber and of cement; fishing (especially for lake trout and white fish); the raising of sugar beets; and the manufacture of rustic and fancy wood-work.

  • Lake Timsah) with fish in it.

  • They are fed on fish, game and meat.

  • In the rivers and lakes pike, pickerel, white fish and sturgeon supply food for the natives, and the brook trout is found in the small mountain streams. The turtle and frog also appear.

  • (From Bosio.) The subjects, beginning at the top and going to the right, are-- (I) The paralytic carrying his (5) Jonah swallowed by the fish.

  • porcus, pig, and piscis, fish; the mod.

  • They serve the trade of Lake Pontchartrain and the Florida parishes, the lumber, coal, fish, oyster and truck trade of New Orleans, and to some extent are the highway of a miscellaneous coasting trade.

  • Felipa Poey, in his Ictiologia Cubana, listed 782 species of fish and crustaceans, of which 105 were doubtful; but more than one-half of the remainder were first described by Poey.

  • The fish of Cuban waters are remarkable for their metallic colourings.

  • Shell fish are unimportant.

  • Two species of blind fish, of extreme scientific interest, are found in the caves of the island.

  • Among the most important are the robalo (Labrax), an exquisite food fish, the tunny, eel, Spanish sardine and mangua.

  • Of fresh-water fish the lisa, dogro, guayacbn and viajocos (Chromis fuscomaculatus) are possibly the most noteworthy.

  • The waters of the Bahamas swarm with fish; the turtle procured here is particularly fine, and the sponge fishery is of importance.

  • The caves are rich in curious kinds of fish, Paraphoxinus Gethaldii, which is unknown elsewhere, Chondrostoma phoximus, Phoxinellus alepidatus and others, which are caught and eaten by the peasantry.

  • Birds came at his call, and forgot their hereditary fear of man; beasts lipped and caressed him; the very fish in lake and stream would glide, unfearful, between his hands.

  • It is also the largest market for fresh-water fish in America, and handles large quantities of lumber and grain.

  • There are also important fisheries for cod, caplin, halibut, red fish (Sebastes) and nepisak (Cyclopterus lumpus); a shark (Somniosus microcephalus) is taken for the oil from its liver; and sea-trout are found in the streams and small lakes of the south.

  • The chief articles of export (together with those that have lapsed) have been already indicated; but they may be summarized as including seal-oil, seal, fox, bird and bear skins, fish products and eiderdown, with some quantity of worked skins.

  • It supports a fishing population of over 30,000, most of whom are Annamese; the fish, which are taken by means of large nets at the end of the inundation, are either dried or fermented for the production of the sauce known as nuoc-mam.

  • Rice, dried fish, beans, pepper and oxen are the chief elements in the export trade of the country, which is in the hands of Chinese.

  • by stringent game laws, administered by an efficient state Game and Fish Commission.

  • The fisheries, which are of great value, are carefully supervised and systematically replenished from the State Fish Hatchery at St Paul, and the Federal Fish Hatchery maintained at Duluth, in which particular attention is devoted to the fish of Lake Superior.

  • Fish, as is well known, devour them greedily, and enjoy a veritable feast during the short period in which any particular species appears.

  • The inflowing Baltic undercurrent carries with it herrings and other fish from the North Sea outside, and the submarine current entering the Barents Sea also carries with it such fish as plaice.

  • It was difficult to be sure as to the variations in the actual number of fish caught, but it was easy to show that there was a real variability in the yield of cod-liver oil (an important product of the fishery).

  • Tracing, then, the quantities of oil given per 1,000 fish from year to year, they seemed to establish a connexion between the variation in " condition " of the fish, the variation in the inflow of Atlantic water, and the variation in the number of sunspots from year to year.

  • It appeared that the quantity of oil contained in the liver of a cod (per unit of weight) increases with the age of the fish.

  • Detailed study of the cod shoals also showed that their composition was continually changing: in some years the shoal is composed of younger or older fish than the average and with this latter variation there are changes in the quantities of oil yielded per t,000 fish.

  • Other phosphoglobulins are vitelline, found in the yolk of hens eggs, and ichthulin, found in the eggs of fish.

  • Gelatin occurs also in the cornea and the sclerotic coat of the eye; and in fish scales, the latter containing 80% of collagen, and 20% of ichthylepidin, a substance differing from gelatin in giving a wellmarked Millon's reaction.

  • of the business centre of the city is the Bernice Pauahi Bishop Museum, a fine stone building on a commanding site, and containing a large collection of Hawaiian and Polynesian relics and curios, especially Hawaiian feather-work, and notable collections of fish and of Hawaiian land shells and birds.

  • The Lake Of Bizerta, called Tinja by the Arabs, abounds in excellent fish, especially mullets, the dried roe of which, called botargo, is largely exported, and the fishing industry employs a large proportion of the inhabitants.

  • BURBOT, or EEL-Pout (Lota vulgaris), a fish of the family Gadidae, which differs from the ling in the dorsal and anal fins reaching the caudal, and in the small size of all the teeth.

  • and is a freshwater fish, although examples are exceptionally taken in British estuaries and in the Baltic; some specimens are handsomely marbled with dark brown, with black blotches on the back and dorsal fins.

  • It is very locally distributed in central and northern Europe, and an uncommon fish in England.

  • The rivers and lakes of Siberia abound in fish; but little is known of their relations with the species of neighbouring regions.'

  • Fish (e.g.

  • The dehesas or moorlands abound in game, and fish are plentiful in all the streams. The mineral resources of the province, which are considerable, were known to some extent to the ancients.

  • Grenfell, M.P., with the object of reintroducing this fish into the river, and in April 1901 and on subsequent occasions a number of young salmon were placed at Teddington by way of experiment.

  • The right of the public to take fish has been frequently in dispute, but a committee of the House of Commons, which took much evidence on the question in the year 1884, came to the conclusion that "it is impossible to recognize anything like a general public right to take fish as now existing."

  • Cattle-rearing is not well developed, but game and fish are plentiful.

  • 1 Thus it was taught that " if a lodestone be anointed with garlic, or if a diamond be near, it does not attract iron," and that " if pickled in the salt of a sucking fish, there is power to pick up gold which has fallen into the deepest wells."

  • The settlement in Flying Fish Cove now numbers some 250 inhabitants, consisting of Europeans, Sikhs, Malays and Chinese, by whom roads have been cut and patches of cleared ground cultivated.

  • "Flying Fish," having discovered an anchorage in a bay which he named Flying Fish Cove, landed a party and made a small but interesting collection of the flora and fauna.

  • Soon afterwards a small settlement was established in Flying Fish Cove by Mr G.

Browse other sentences examples →