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fischer

fischer

fischer Sentence Examples

  • Fischer and E.

  • In 1894 and 1895, Fischer, in a remarkable series of papers on the influence of molecular structure upon the action of the enzyme, showed that various species of yeast behave very differently towards solutions of sugars.

  • Fischer found that the enzyme "invertase," which is present in yeast, attacks methyl-d-glucoside but not methyl-l-glucoside.

  • Fischer); or from 2.4.

  • From Strasburger's Lehrbuch der Bolanik, by permission of Gustav Fischer.

  • von Kirchmann under the title Philosophische Werke (with biography, &c., Berlin, 1868; 2nd ed, 1882-1891), by Kuno Fischer, Die Hauptschriften zur Grundlegung seiner Philosophie (1863), with introduction by Ludwig Fischer (1892).

  • Joerges, Die Lehre von den Empfindungen bei Descartes (1901); Kuno Fischer, Hist.

  • Fischer, ibid., 1896, 29, p. 1874).

  • - Trophosome polyps After Haeckel, System der Medusen, by with capitate tentacles, simple or permission of Gustav Fischer.

  • Thus the affinities of the hydranth are clearly, as Dendy points out, After Haeckel, System der Medusen, by permission of Gustav Fischer.

  • - Trophosome unknown; gonosome, free medusae of deep form, with radial canals branched in a feathery manner, and After Haeckel, System der Medusen, by permission of Gustav Fischer.

  • After Haeckel, System der Medusen, by permission of Gustav Fischer.

  • To Spinoza (as Kuno Fischer observes) man differs from the rest of nature in the degree only and not in the kind of his powers.

  • der Pflanzen; Fischer, Forest Protection, iv.

  • xxiv.; Fischer, Fixirung, Fdrbung and Bau des Protoplasmas (Jena, 1899); Flemming, Morphologic der Zelle, Ergebnisse der Anatomic und Entwickelungsgeschichte (i 896); Gardiner, The 1-listology of the Cell-Wall, with Special Reference to the iVlode of Connection of Cells, Proc. Roy.

  • The Uruguay is navigable all the year by steamers from the island From Strasburger's Lehrbuch der Botanik, by permission of Gustav Fischer.

  • Ruff and Fischer (Ber., 1903, 36, p. 418) did not appear to exist, but E.

  • p. 46 seq.; Fischer, Comment.

  • Fischer's Versuch einer Naturgeschichte von Livland appeared at Konigsberg, next year Beseke brought out at Mitau his Beytrag zur Naturgeschichte der Vogel Kurlands, and in 1794 Siemssen's Handbuch of the birds of Mecklenburg was published at Rostock.

  • From Strasburger's Lehrbuch der Botanik, by permission of Gustav Fischer.

  • Fischer among the products of hydrolysis of proteids.

  • Fischer and F.

  • Fischer's Sammlung mitteldlterlicher Weltand Seekarten (Vienna, 1886).

  • (1899), pp. 265-329; Joseph Fischer, The Discoveries of the Norsemen in America, translated from German by B.

  • In this field Bechamp, Cohnheim, Albrecht Kossel, and, especially, Emil Fischer and his pupils have been extremely active.

  • By further decomposition peptones yield peptides, a certain number of which have been synthesized by Emil Fischer and his collaborators.

  • one more than in the Fischer formulae.

  • Figures 2-5 are from Strasburger's Lehrbuch der Betanik, by permission of Gustav Fischer.

  • The scientific exploration of Siberia, begun in the period 1733 to 5742 by Messerschmidt, Gmelin, and De Lisle de la Croyere, was followed up by Muller, Fischer and Georgi.

  • The development of the brachial supports has been studied by Friele, Fischer and Oehlert.

  • Fischer, Geschichte der Stadt Ulm (Stuttgart, 1863); Pressel, Ulmisches Urkundenbuch (Stuttgart, 1873) and Ulm and sein Munster (Ulm, 1877); Schultes, Chronik von Ulm (Stuttgart, 1881 and 1886); Hassler, Ulms Kunstgeschichte im Mittelalter (Stuttgart, 1872); and Das rote Buch der Stadt Ulm, edited by C. Mollvo (1904).

  • See Fischer, Geschichte der Stadt Zabern (Zabern, 1824).

  • Convallaria is lily of the valley; Aspidistra, native of the Himalayas, China and Japan, is a well-known pot plant; its flowers depart from the normal arrangement of the order in having the parts From Strasburger's Lehrbuch der Botanik, by permission of in fours (tetraGustav Fischer.

  • Fischer, Ber., 1883, 16, p. 657).

  • Fischer, by the action of baryta water, obtained the synthetic sugars aand 0-acrdse (Berichte, 1889, 22, p. 360).

  • Fischer, Bellerophon (1851); R.

  • Editions: Heinsius (Leiden, 1630); Fischer (Leipzig, 1783) � in Aldine Edition of Apuleius (Venice, 1521; Paris, 1532); Fell (Oxford, 1667).

  • If the striking conceptions of Paul Ehrlich and Emil Fischer continue to prove as fertile in inspiring and directing research as at present they seem to be, another wide sphere of.

  • Fischer in 1723, and by C. J.

  • Fischer, Ber., 1884, 17, p. 102); by passing the vapours of orthoaminodiphenylmethane over heated litharge (0.

  • Fischer); by heating salicylic aldehyde with aniline and zinc chloride to 260° C. (R.

  • Fischer and G.

  • To 1 First described by the Turk, Haj j i Khalifa, in the 37th century; first seen by the Swedish traveller Otter in 1736, and first published in 1840 in Ritter's Erdkunde, iii., after a drawing by Major Fischer, made in 1837.

  • Fischer) CH20H CH20H / CH CH OH (CH OH) 2 -> (CH OH)2 CH-OH CH OH CO CHO -> Lactone -> Hexose.

  • - Fischer found that if one molecule of phenylhydrazine acted upon one molecule of an aldose or ketose a hydrazone resulted which in most cases was very soluble in water, but if three molecules of the hydrazine reacted (one of which is reduced to ammonia and aniline) insoluble crystalline substances resulted, termed osazones, which readily characterized the sugar from which it was obtained.

  • Fischer may be regarded as one of the most brilliant achievements in modern chemistry.

  • Fischer showed that methose was identical with the a-acrose obtained by himself and Tafel in 1887 by decomposing acrolein dibromide with baryta, and subsequently prepared by oxidizing glycerin with bromine in alkaline solution, and treating the product with dilute alkali at o°.

  • The identity of the formulae and osazones of d-mannose and d-glucose showed that the stereochemical differences were situated at the carbon atom adjacent to the aldehyde group. Fischer applied a method indicated by Pasteur in converting dextro into laevo-tartaric acid; he found that both d-mannonic and d-gluconic acids (the latter is yielded by glucose on oxidation) were mutually convertible by heating with quinoline under pressure at 140°.

  • Fischer's a-acrose therefore led to the synthesis of the dextro and laevo forms Gf mannose, glucose and fructose; and these substances have been connected synthetically with many other sugars by means of his cyanhydrin process, leading to higher sugars, and Wohl and.

  • - The only possible biose is glycollic aldehyde, CHO.CH20H, obtained impure by Fischer from bromacetaldehyde and baryta water, and crystalline by Fenton by heating dihydroxymaleic acid with water to 60°.

  • The remaining aldohexoses discovered by Fischer are derived from d-galactose from milk-sugar.

  • Fischer has proposed formulae for the important disaccharoses, and in conjunction with Armstrong devised a method for determining how the molecule was built up, by forming the osone of the sugar and hydrolysing, whereupon the hexosone obtained indicates the aldose part of the molecule.

  • By acting with hydrochloric acid on glucose Fischer obtained isomaltose, a disaccharose very similar to maltose but differing in being amorphous and unfermentable by yeast.

  • Also Marchlewski (in 1899) synthesized cane sugar from potassium fructosate and acetochloroglucose; and after Fischer discovered that acetochlorohexoses readily resulted from the interaction of the hexose penta-acetates and liquid hydrogen chloride, several others have been obtained.

  • It hides by day under stones or From Strasburger's Lehrbuch der Botanik, by permission of Gustav Fischer.

  • 1177); the church of St Peter, reconstructed by Fischer von Erlach in 1702-13, and the University church, erected by the Jesuits in 1625-31, both in the baroque style with rich frescoes; lastly, the small church of St Ruprecht, the oldest church in Vienna, first built in 740, and several times reconstructed; and the old Rathaus.

  • Fischer, Ber., 1884, 17, p. 1 799).

  • Fischer, Ober Ottos I.

  • Fischer (Leipzig, 1786), and K.

  • The situation proved unsuitable; the lady, as Kuno Fischer says, "required greater submission and better French" than Fichte could yield, and after a fortnight's stay Fichte set out for Konigsberg to see Kant.

  • Lowe, Die Philosophie Fichtes (Stuttgart, 1862); Kuno Fischer, Geschichte d.

  • Fischer, Jena, 1901).

  • Naivasha was discovered in 1883 by Gustav Adolf Fischer (1848-1886), one of the early explorers of the Tana and Masai regions, and the first to demonstrate the continuance of the rift-valley through equatorial Africa.

  • Fischer was followed later in the same year by Joseph Thomson, the Scottish explorer.

  • Fischer, Die Stadt Hildesheim wcihrend des dreissigjahrigen Krieges (Hildesheim, 1897); A.

  • Of the Oranjie Unie Mr Abraham Fischer became chairman, other prominent members being Messrs Hertzog, C. de Wet and Steyn.

  • Mr Fischer, the leader of the party, was one of the ablest statesmen on the Boer side in the pre-war period.

  • Following the elections the governor, Sir Hamilton Goold-Adams, sent for Mr Fischer, who formed a ministry, his colleagues being ex-General J.

  • Wessels, minister of public works, &c. Mr Fischer, besides the premiership, held the portfolio of colonial secretary.

  • (For the union movement see South Africa: History.) Mr Fischer and General Hertzog became members of the first union ministry while Dr A.

  • Flowers in which the relative position of the organs allows of spontaneous self-pollination may be all alike as regards length of style and stamens (homomorphy or homostyly), or differ in this respect (heteromorphy) the styles (From Strasburger's by permission of Gustav Fischer.) FIG.

  • 2 permission of Gustav Fischer.) of Salvia pratensis.

  • Fischer, The Arts Journal, August 1900.)

  • It became established as a distinct branch in the beginning of the 19th century, and somewhat later received the appellation " palaeontology," which was given independently by De Blainville and by Fischer von Waldheim about 1834.

  • Fischer in his Gesch.

  • The biography in Kuno Fischer's Gesch.

  • Fischer], 1901); (to) C. Donovan, " Human Piroplasmosis," Lancet (1904), p. 744, I pl.; (Ii) E.

  • Fischer in Jahrbiicher f.

  • (22) Fischer, Manuel deconchyliologie (1887).

  • the Collemaceae; Rivularia &c., Polycoccus punctiformis From Strasburger's Lehrbuch sion of Gustav Fischer.

  • In many other cases, especially those algae possessing Pleurococcus as their gonidia, there are no penetrating hyphae, but merely From Strasburger's Lehrbuck der Botanik, by permission of Gustav Fischer.

  • The observations of Moller, &c., on the germination cannot be assumed to negative the sexual hypothesis for the sexual cells of Ulothrix and Ectocarpus, for example From Strasburger's Lehrbuch der Botanik, by permission of Gustav Fischer.

  • A After E..Baur, from Strasburger's Lehrbuch der Botanik, by permission of Gustav Fischer.

  • A From Strasburger's Lehrbuch permission of Gustav Fischer.

  • Fischer, Lessing als Reformator der deutschen Literatur dargestellt (2 vols., 1881, 2nd ed., 1888); B.

  • Fischer in 1878 (Ann., 1878, 194, p. 242); A.

  • Fischer showed that these compounds were derivatives of triphenylmethane and tolyldiphenylmethane respectively.

  • Fischer (Ber., 1880, 13, p. 2204) as follows: Nitrous acid converts pararosaniline into aurin, which when superheated with water yields para-dioxybenzophenone.

  • We thus have a process of "multiple fertilization"; the oosphere really represents a large From Strasburger's Lehrbuch der Botanik, by permission of Gustav Fischer.

  • They are characterized by their unicellular nature, their power of rapid budding, their capacity for fermenting various sugars, and their power of forming endogenous From Strasburger's Lehrbuch der Botanik, by permission of Gustav Fischer.

  • The group From Strasburger's Lehrbuch der Botanik, by permission of Gustav Fischer.

  • size.) From Strasburger's Lehrbuch der Botanik, by permission of Gustav Fischer.

  • (After De Bary.) B, Part of vertical section through leaf of Berberis From Strasburger's Lehrbuch der Botanik, by permission of Gustav Fischer.

  • From each of the four segments in the case of Tremella a long outgrowth arises which reaches to the surface of the hymenium From Strasburger's Lehrbuch der Bolanik, by permission of Gustav Fischer.

  • i (1903); Fischer in Engler and Prantl, Die natiirlichen Pflanzenfamilien (1896).

  • Fischer and M.

  • Fischer and A.

  • Fischer, Armin and die Romer (1893); W.

  • 2, ps), and applied so closely to each other as to leave From Strasburger's Lehrbuch der Botanik by permission of Gustav Fischer.

  • Fischer, 1905-1906).

  • Fischer, Deutsches, Leben mid deutsche Zustnde von der Hohenstaufenzeit his ins Reformationszeitalter (Gotha, 1884); V.

  • Fischer, Die Nation und der Bundestag (Leipzig, i88o); K.

  • Fischer has further established the fact that the peripheral mass, which is a hollow sphere in spherical cells, and either a hollow cylinder or barrel-shaped body in filamentous forms, must be regarded as the single chromatophore of the Cyanophyceous cell.

  • Biologie der Algen, by permission of Gustav Fischer.) Dermatophyton grows on the carapace of the tortoise and Trichophilus nucleus, each cell is found to contain many small nuclei, and is in the hairs of the sloth.

  • (A from Cooke, British Freshwater Algae, by permission of Kegan Paul, Trench, Triibner and Co.; C, E, F, G, H, K from Engler and Prantl, by permission of Wilhelm Engel mann; B 1 from Vines, by permission of Swan Sonnenschein and Co.; B2, D from Oltmanns, by permission of Gustav Fischer.) protoplasts.

  • (A, B, C, D, E, H, L, M, P, from Engler and Prantl, by permission of Wilhelm Engelmann; F, G, K, 0, from Oltmanns, by permission of Gustav Fischer; Q, from by permission of the Clarendon Press; N 1, N 2, from Hauck, by permission of Eduard Kummer.) the brown colouring matter which is added to chlorophyll is identical with phycophaein; two varieties of it have been termed phycopyrrin and peridinine.

  • (A, C, D, E, F, G, H, K, L, M, P, Q, from Oltmanns, by permission of Gustav Fischer; B, N, 0, R, from Engler and Prantl, by permission of Wilhelm Engelman,) mass and from it all the nuclei of the carpospores are thus derived.

  • Fischer, Schiller-Schriften (1891-1892); J.

  • Guhrauer, Sime, and Zimmern; Kuno Fischer, Geschichte der neuern Philosophie (vol.

  • From Strasburger's Lehrbuch der Botanik, by permission of Gustav Fischer.) FIG.

  • (Berlin, 1878); Kuno Fischer, Hegels Leben and Werke.

  • Barbey d'Aurevilly, Goethe et Diderot (1880); A Fischer, Goethe and Napoleon (1899; 2nd ed., 1900); R.

  • Fischer, Goethes Iphigenie (1888); F.

  • Fischer, Goethes Faust (3 vols., 1893, 1902, 1903); O.

  • The trees yield fruit in eight From Strasburger's Lehrbuch der Botanik, by permission of Gustav Fischer.

  • Fischer, Ann., 1881, 206, p. 152).

  • Fischer, R.

  • Fischer, Chaldeiische Grammatik fiir Bibel and Talmud, 1882; Eng.

  • In a very offensive and quite unjustifiable tone, which is severely commented on by Sigwart and Fischer, he attacks the Baconian methods and its results.

  • He crowns his criticism by expounding what he considers to be the true scientific method, which, as has been pointed out by Fischer, is simply that Baconian doctrine against which his attack ought to have been directed.

  • Fischer, Bacon, pp. 499-502.) Mill, Logic, ii.

  • Fowler editions, and general histories of philosophy, see :- Kuno Fischer, Fr.

  • Fischer, Ber.

  • Bamberger, Das Tier in der Philosophic Schopenhauers (1897) Kuno Fischer, Schopenhauer (in the Gesch.

  • Fischer has used it as a condensing agent in the preparation of aand 0-acrose from acrolein dibromide.

  • Fischer as premier and Generals Hertzog and de Wet as prominent colleagues.

  • Towards the end of May, Lord Gladstone called upon General Botha to form a ministry, which was constituted from the ranks of the existing cabinets and included Natal ministers as well as strong Boer partisans like Mr Fischer and General Hertzog.

  • In 1865 he became involved in an acrimonious controversy on the interpretation of Kant's doctrine of Space with Kuno Fischer, whom he attacked in Kuno Fischer and sein Kant (1869), which drew forth the reply Anti-Trendelenburg (1870).

  • The bacterial cell is always clothed by a definite cell-membrane, as was shown by the plasmolysing experiments of Fischer and others.

  • These cilia appear to be attached to the cell-wall, being unaffected by plasmolysis, but Fischer states that they really are derived from the central protoplasm and pass through minute pores in cfl,8 the wall.

  • The principal attempts at morphological classifications recently brought forward are those of de Toni and Trevisan (1889), Fischer (1897) and Migula (1897).

  • Of these systems, which alone are available in any practical scheme of classification, the two most important and most modern are those of Fischer and Migula.

  • Sporogenous rodlets cylindric, not altered in shape: - Bacillus (Cohn), non-motile; Bactrinium (Fischer), motile, with one polar flagellum (monotrichous); Bactrillum (Fischer), motile, with a terminal tuft of cilia (lophotrichous); Bactridium (Fischer), motile, with cilia all over the surface (peritrichous) .

  • Sporogenous rodlets, drumstick-shaped: - Plectridium (Fischer), motile (peritrichous).

  • (3) The monotrichous and lophotrichous conditions are by no means constant even in the motile stage; thus Pseudomonas rosea (Mig.) may have I, 2 or 3 cilia at either end, and would be distributed by Fischer's classification between Bactrinium and Bactrillum, according to which state was observed.

  • after Quehl; C-E,after Thaxter.) From Strasburger's Lehrbuch der Bolanik, by permission of Gustav Fischer.

  • Fischer has proposed that the old division into saprophytes and parasites should be replaced by one which takes into account other peculiarities in the mode of nutrition of bacteria.

  • These forms are termed by Fischer Metatrophic, because they require various kinds of organic materials obtained from the dead remains of other organisms or from the surfaces of their bodies, and can utilize and decompose them in various ways (Polytrophic) or, if monotrophic, are at least unable to work them up. The true parasites - obligate parasites of de Bary - are placed by Fischer in a third biological group, Paratrophic bacteria, to mark the importance of their mode of life in the interior of living organisms where they live and multiply in the blood, juices or tissues.

  • (From Fischer's Vorlesungen uber Bakk rien.) outside the plant.

  • (c X 600;) al X 1500, above.) (From Fischer's Vorlesungen uber Bakterien.) into the higher plants as sulphates, built up into proteids, decomposed by putrefactive bacteria and yielding SH 2 which the sulphur bacteria oxidize; the resulting sulphur is then again oxidized to SO 3 and again combined with calcium to gypsum, the cycle being thus complete.

  • cultivation of which have been successfully carried out by Cohn, Beyerinck, Fischer and others.

  • - General: Fischer, The Structure and Functions of Bacteria (Oxford, 1900, 2nd ed.), German (Jena, 1903); Migula, System der Bakterien (Jena, 1897); and in Engler and Prantl, Die natiirlichen Pflanzenfamilien, I.

  • Cell-membrane, &c.: Biitschli, Weitere Ausfuhrungen uber den Bau der Cyanophyceen and Bakterien (Leipzig, 1896); Fischer, Unters.

  • Cilia: Fischer, " Unters.

  • xxvii.; also the works of Migula and Fischer already cited.

  • p. 659; also Migula and Fischer, l.c.; Vejdovsky, " fiber den Kern der Bakterien and seine Teilung," Cent.

  • vi.; Lehmann and Neumann, Atlas and Essentials of Bacteriology; also the works of Migula and Fischer already cited.

  • Abbott, Principles of Bacteriology (7th ed., London, 1905); Crookshank, Bacteriology and Infective Diseases (with bibliography, 4th ed., London, 1896); Duclaux, Traite de microbiologie (Paris, 1899-1900); Eyre, Bacteriological Technique (Philadelphia and London, 1902); Flugge, Die Mikroorganismen (3rd ed., Leipzig, 1896); Fischer, Vorlesungen fiber Bakterien (2nd ed., Jena, 1902); Gunther, Einfiihrung in das Studium der Bakteriologie (6th ed., Leipzig, 1906); Hewlett, Manual of Bacteriology (2nd ed., London, 1902); Hueppe, Principles of Bacteriology (translation, London, 1899); Klein, Micro-organisms and Disease (3rd ed., London, 1896); Kolle and Wassermann, Handbuch der pathogenen Mikroorganismen (Jena, 1904) (supplements are still being published; this is the most important work on the subject); Lofler, Vorlesungen fiber die geschichtliche Entwickelung der Lehre von der Bacterien (Leipzig, 1887); M`Farland, Text-book upon the Pathogenic Bacteria (5th ed., London, 1906); Muir and Ritchie, Manual of Bacteriology (with bibliography, 4th ed., Edin.

  • Fischer, Monats., 1881, 2, p. 321).

  • Fischer, Waldeyer and von Bergmann among scientists and surgeons; Mommsen, Treitschke and Sybel among historians, Harnack among theologians, Brunner among jurists.

  • Fischer, Zwei Kaukasische Expeditionen (Berne, 1891); E.

  • Fischer (Berichte, 1897, 30, p. 2238) by heating 2.6.8-trichlorpurin with 10 times its weight of ammonia for six hours at 100° C.; by this means 6-amino-2.8-dichlorpurin is obtained, which on reduction by means of hydriodic acid and phosphonium iodide is converted into adenine.

  • Fischer also obtained it from 8-oxy-2.6-dichlorpurin (Berichte, 1898, 31, p. 104).

  • Fischer (Berichte, 1898, 31, p. 104) and by M.

  • For modern times, in addition to the general histories already named, the works of Kuno Fischer, R.

  • For oxidizing purposes bromine is generally employed in aqueous and in alkaline solutions, one of its most important applications being by Emil Fischer (Berichte, 1889, 22, p. 362) in his researches on the sugars.

  • Mr Schreiner, on the 3rd of August, telegraphed to Mr Fischer begging the Transvaal to welcome Mr Chamberlain's proposal.

  • Fischer, Ber., 1886, 19, p. 1037).

  • Fischer and C. Rudolph, Ber., 1882, 15, p. 1500), or by heating orthoand para-aminoacetophenone with zinc chloride to 90° C. (0.

  • Fischer, Ber., 1886, 19, p. 1038).

  • Fischer, Chemische Technologie der Brennstoffe (1897-1901); Gasformige Heizstoffe, in Stohmann and Kerl's Handbuch der technischen Chemie, 4th edition, iii.

  • In the cortical tissue beneatJI each furrow a wide intercellular space is present running the length of the internode, and called the (C, D, E from Strasburger's Lehrbuch der Bolanik, by permission of Gustav Fischer.) FIG.

  • Pottinger, "Appendicostomy in Chronic Dysentery," Lancet (December 28, 1907); Robert Doerr, Das Dysenterietoxin (Gustav Fischer, Jena, 1907); F.

  • From S t r a s b u r g e is Lehrbuch der Botanik, by permission of Gustav Fischer.

  • The great towns are wholly given up to the abominations of the From Strasburger's Lehrbuch der Botanik, by permission of Gustav Fischer.

  • Fischer, Schleiermacher (1899); Lulmann, Das Bild des Christentums bei den grossen deutschen Idealisten (1901), and Schleiermacher der Kirchenvater der 19.

  • Baaders (Tubingen, 1901); Kuno Fischer, Zur hundertjahrigen Geburtstagfeier Baaders (Erlangen, 1865).

  • The spathe protects the flowers in their young state, and often falls off after they are developed, or hangs down From Strasburger's Lehrbuch der Botanik, by permission of Gustav Fischer.

  • (Ficus hollow (From Strasburger's Lehrbuch der Botanik, by permission of Gustav Fischer.) FIG.

  • If there are numerous flowers on a flattened, convex or slightly concave receptacle, having either very short pedicels or none, a a (From Strasburger's Lehrbuch der Botanik, by permission of Gustav Fischer.) FIG.

  • In addition to the dichasial form there are others where more than two lateral axes are produced from the primary floral axis, each of which in turn (From Strasburger's Lehrbuch der Botanik, by permission of Gustav Fischer.) FIG.

  • From Strasburger's Lehrbuch mission of Gustav Fischer.

  • From Strasburger's Lehrbueh der Botanik, by permission of Gustav Fischer.

  • From Strasburger's Lenrbuch der Bolanik, by permission of Gustav Fischer.

  • Ewald,Kants kritischer Idealismus als Grundlage von Erkenntnistheorie and Ethik (1908) and Kants Metkodologie in ihren Grundziigen (1906); Kuno Fischer, Immanuel Kant (4th ed., 1898-1899), Die beiden Kantischen Schulen in Jena (1862), and Commentary on Kant's Kritik of Pure Reason (1878) F.

  • Windelband, Kuno Fischer and sein Kant (1897).

  • bicameral system proposed by minister Fischer is a step in the right direction.

  • Fischer was reclusive, socially gauche and a slave to chess, tho his other interests included expensive suits, money and rock.

  • According to British chess grandmaster Nigel Short, the reclusive and eccentric chess genius Bobby Fischer is actively playing chess online.

  • According to British chess grandmaster Nigel Short, the reclusive and eccentric chess genius Bobby Fischer is actively playing chess online.

  • knowese were from the family of Hans Fischer who knew nothing about what became of him.

  • several sesquiterpene lactones have been isolated from the plant (see Fischer et al.

  • These were from the family of Hans Fischer who knew nothing about what became of him.

  • Louis Fischer, the son of a fish peddler, was born in Philadelphia on 29th February, 1896.

  • It was, however, Mr Fischer, who was a last-minute stand-in, who provided me with most food for thought.

  • Fischer said, My priestly vocation, the source of my happiness, I owe to almighty God.

  • Fischer and E.

  • In 1894 and 1895, Fischer, in a remarkable series of papers on the influence of molecular structure upon the action of the enzyme, showed that various species of yeast behave very differently towards solutions of sugars.

  • Fischer next suggested that enzymes can only hydrolyse those sugars which possess a molecular structure in harmony with their own, or to use his ingenious analogy, "the one may be said to fit into the other as a key fits into a lock."

  • Fischer found that the enzyme "invertase," which is present in yeast, attacks methyl-d-glucoside but not methyl-l-glucoside.

  • The remarkable discoveries of Fischer and Buchner to a great extent confirm Traube's views, and reconcile Liebig's and Pasteur's theories.

  • Fischer, Ber., 1901, 34, p. 3759).

  • Fischer); or from 2.4.

  • Fischer, Cardinal Consalvi (Mainz, 1899); Dr Fredrik Nielsen, bishop of Aarhus, Hist.

  • From Strasburger's Lehrbuch der Bolanik, by permission of Gustav Fischer.

  • von Kirchmann under the title Philosophische Werke (with biography, &c., Berlin, 1868; 2nd ed, 1882-1891), by Kuno Fischer, Die Hauptschriften zur Grundlegung seiner Philosophie (1863), with introduction by Ludwig Fischer (1892).

  • Joerges, Die Lehre von den Empfindungen bei Descartes (1901); Kuno Fischer, Hist.

  • Fischer, ibid., 1896, 29, p. 1874).

  • - Trophosome polyps After Haeckel, System der Medusen, by with capitate tentacles, simple or permission of Gustav Fischer.

  • Thus the affinities of the hydranth are clearly, as Dendy points out, After Haeckel, System der Medusen, by permission of Gustav Fischer.

  • - Trophosome unknown; gonosome, free medusae of deep form, with radial canals branched in a feathery manner, and After Haeckel, System der Medusen, by permission of Gustav Fischer.

  • After Haeckel, System der Medusen, by permission of Gustav Fischer.

  • To Spinoza (as Kuno Fischer observes) man differs from the rest of nature in the degree only and not in the kind of his powers.

  • der Pflanzen; Fischer, Forest Protection, iv.

  • xxiv.; Fischer, Fixirung, Fdrbung and Bau des Protoplasmas (Jena, 1899); Flemming, Morphologic der Zelle, Ergebnisse der Anatomic und Entwickelungsgeschichte (i 896); Gardiner, The 1-listology of the Cell-Wall, with Special Reference to the iVlode of Connection of Cells, Proc. Roy.

  • The Uruguay is navigable all the year by steamers from the island From Strasburger's Lehrbuch der Botanik, by permission of Gustav Fischer.

  • Ruff and Fischer (Ber., 1903, 36, p. 418) did not appear to exist, but E.

  • p. 46 seq.; Fischer, Comment.

  • Fischer's Versuch einer Naturgeschichte von Livland appeared at Konigsberg, next year Beseke brought out at Mitau his Beytrag zur Naturgeschichte der Vogel Kurlands, and in 1794 Siemssen's Handbuch of the birds of Mecklenburg was published at Rostock.

  • In 1806 Fischer de Waldheim, in his Tableaux syn- optiques de zoognosie (p. 181), quoting Nieremberg, extended his figure of speech, and, while justly deprecating the notion that the series of forms belonging to any particular group of creatures - the Mammalia was that whence he took his instance - could be placed in a straight line, imagined the various genera to be arrayed in a series of contiguous circles around Man as a centre.

  • Though there is nothing to show that Fischer intended, by what is here said, to do anything else than illustrate more fully the marvellous interconnexion of different animals, or that he attached any realistic meaning to his metaphor, his words were eagerly caught up by the prophet of the new faith.

  • From Strasburger's Lehrbuch der Botanik, by permission of Gustav Fischer.

  • Fischer among the products of hydrolysis of proteids.

  • Fischer and F.

  • Fischer's Sammlung mitteldlterlicher Weltand Seekarten (Vienna, 1886).

  • (1899), pp. 265-329; Joseph Fischer, The Discoveries of the Norsemen in America, translated from German by B.

  • In this field Bechamp, Cohnheim, Albrecht Kossel, and, especially, Emil Fischer and his pupils have been extremely active.

  • By further decomposition peptones yield peptides, a certain number of which have been synthesized by Emil Fischer and his collaborators.

  • The subject was taken up by Emil Fischer, who succeeded in synthesizing glucose, and also several of its stereo-isomers, there being 16 according to the Le Bel-van't Hoff theory (see Stereo-Isomerism and Sugar).

  • one more than in the Fischer formulae.

  • Figures 2-5 are from Strasburger's Lehrbuch der Betanik, by permission of Gustav Fischer.

  • The scientific exploration of Siberia, begun in the period 1733 to 5742 by Messerschmidt, Gmelin, and De Lisle de la Croyere, was followed up by Muller, Fischer and Georgi.

  • The development of the brachial supports has been studied by Friele, Fischer and Oehlert.

  • Fischer, Geschichte der Stadt Ulm (Stuttgart, 1863); Pressel, Ulmisches Urkundenbuch (Stuttgart, 1873) and Ulm and sein Munster (Ulm, 1877); Schultes, Chronik von Ulm (Stuttgart, 1881 and 1886); Hassler, Ulms Kunstgeschichte im Mittelalter (Stuttgart, 1872); and Das rote Buch der Stadt Ulm, edited by C. Mollvo (1904).

  • See Fischer, Geschichte der Stadt Zabern (Zabern, 1824).

  • Convallaria is lily of the valley; Aspidistra, native of the Himalayas, China and Japan, is a well-known pot plant; its flowers depart from the normal arrangement of the order in having the parts From Strasburger's Lehrbuch der Botanik, by permission of in fours (tetraGustav Fischer.

  • Fischer, Ber., 1883, 16, p. 657).

  • Fischer, by the action of baryta water, obtained the synthetic sugars aand 0-acrdse (Berichte, 1889, 22, p. 360).

  • Fischer, Bellerophon (1851); R.

  • Editions: Heinsius (Leiden, 1630); Fischer (Leipzig, 1783) � in Aldine Edition of Apuleius (Venice, 1521; Paris, 1532); Fell (Oxford, 1667).

  • If the striking conceptions of Paul Ehrlich and Emil Fischer continue to prove as fertile in inspiring and directing research as at present they seem to be, another wide sphere of.

  • Fischer in 1723, and by C. J.

  • Fischer, Ber., 1884, 17, p. 102); by passing the vapours of orthoaminodiphenylmethane over heated litharge (0.

  • Fischer); by heating salicylic aldehyde with aniline and zinc chloride to 260° C. (R.

  • Fischer and G.

  • To 1 First described by the Turk, Haj j i Khalifa, in the 37th century; first seen by the Swedish traveller Otter in 1736, and first published in 1840 in Ritter's Erdkunde, iii., after a drawing by Major Fischer, made in 1837.

  • Fischer) CH20H CH20H / CH CH OH (CH OH) 2 -> (CH OH)2 CH-OH CH OH CO CHO -> Lactone -> Hexose.

  • - Fischer found that if one molecule of phenylhydrazine acted upon one molecule of an aldose or ketose a hydrazone resulted which in most cases was very soluble in water, but if three molecules of the hydrazine reacted (one of which is reduced to ammonia and aniline) insoluble crystalline substances resulted, termed osazones, which readily characterized the sugar from which it was obtained.

  • Fischer may be regarded as one of the most brilliant achievements in modern chemistry.

  • Fischer showed that methose was identical with the a-acrose obtained by himself and Tafel in 1887 by decomposing acrolein dibromide with baryta, and subsequently prepared by oxidizing glycerin with bromine in alkaline solution, and treating the product with dilute alkali at o°.

  • The identity of the formulae and osazones of d-mannose and d-glucose showed that the stereochemical differences were situated at the carbon atom adjacent to the aldehyde group. Fischer applied a method indicated by Pasteur in converting dextro into laevo-tartaric acid; he found that both d-mannonic and d-gluconic acids (the latter is yielded by glucose on oxidation) were mutually convertible by heating with quinoline under pressure at 140°.

  • Fischer's a-acrose therefore led to the synthesis of the dextro and laevo forms Gf mannose, glucose and fructose; and these substances have been connected synthetically with many other sugars by means of his cyanhydrin process, leading to higher sugars, and Wohl and.

  • - The only possible biose is glycollic aldehyde, CHO.CH20H, obtained impure by Fischer from bromacetaldehyde and baryta water, and crystalline by Fenton by heating dihydroxymaleic acid with water to 60°.

  • The remaining aldohexoses discovered by Fischer are derived from d-galactose from milk-sugar.

  • These and other considerations have led to the proposal of an alkylen oxide formula for glucose, first proposed by Tollens; this view, which has been mainly developed by Armstrong and Fischer, has attained general acceptance (see Glucose and Glucosjde).

  • Fischer has proposed formulae for the important disaccharoses, and in conjunction with Armstrong devised a method for determining how the molecule was built up, by forming the osone of the sugar and hydrolysing, whereupon the hexosone obtained indicates the aldose part of the molecule.

  • By acting with hydrochloric acid on glucose Fischer obtained isomaltose, a disaccharose very similar to maltose but differing in being amorphous and unfermentable by yeast.

  • Also Marchlewski (in 1899) synthesized cane sugar from potassium fructosate and acetochloroglucose; and after Fischer discovered that acetochlorohexoses readily resulted from the interaction of the hexose penta-acetates and liquid hydrogen chloride, several others have been obtained.

  • It hides by day under stones or From Strasburger's Lehrbuch der Botanik, by permission of Gustav Fischer.

  • 1177); the church of St Peter, reconstructed by Fischer von Erlach in 1702-13, and the University church, erected by the Jesuits in 1625-31, both in the baroque style with rich frescoes; lastly, the small church of St Ruprecht, the oldest church in Vienna, first built in 740, and several times reconstructed; and the old Rathaus.

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