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firth

firth

firth Sentence Examples

  • It lies on the southern shore of the Firth of Forth, 17 m.

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  • The burgh, which stretches for a mile along the south shore of the Firth of Forth, is intersected by the Esk and embraces the village of Fisherrow on the left bank of the river.

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  • Firth (1909); Oliver Cromwell, by Fred.

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  • Firth (the best edition, rejecting the spurious Squire papers, 1904); Oliver Cromwell, by F.

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  • Firth (1902); The Diplomatic Relations between Cromwell and Charles X.

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  • The estuary of the Urr, known as Rough Firth, is navigable by ships of from 80 to 100 tons, and small vessels can ascend as far as the mouth of Dalbeattie Burn, within a mile of the town.

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  • from the Solway Firth and 81 m.

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  • When the danger of a war with Germany came first to be apprehended, it was proposed to establish the chief British naval base, in the event of war, at Rosyth in the Firth of Forth, but it was afterwards decided that a larger base in a natural harbour farther N.

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  • Scapa Flow was preferred to the Cromarty Firth as his chief naval base by Admiral Jellicoe, but no preparations had been made and everything had to be improvised, guns being landed from the ships to strengthen the defences.

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  • It is situated on the Firth of Forth, 24 m.

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  • Inchkeith, an island in the fairway of the Firth of Forth, 22 m.

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  • To the north, west and south, a flat coastal belt, bordering the Irish Sea, with its inlets Morecambe Bay and Solway Firth, and broadest in the north, marks off the Lake District, while to the east the valleys of the Eden and the Lune divide it from the Pennine mountain system.

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  • Reisner & Firth have shown that the early culture of Nubia was closely akin to that of the predynastic Egyptians, which no doubt came from the south.

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  • Four instances have, however, been recorded of its occurrence on the British coasts, one on the coast of Norfolk in 1588, one in the Firth of Forth in 1648, one near Boston in Lincolnshire in 1800, while a fourth entangled itself among rocks in the Sound of Weesdale, Shetland, in September 1808.

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  • Yell (2483), separated from the north-east coast of Mainland by Yell Sound, is the second largest island of the group, having a length of 17 m., and an extreme width of 62 m., though towards the middle the voes of Mid Yell and Whale Firth almost divide it into two.

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  • Burra Firth, in the north of Unst, is flanked on both sides by magnificent cliffs, including the Noup of Unst, the hill of Saxavord (934 ft.), the Gord and Herma Ness.

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  • ELIE, a village and watering-place of Fifeshire, Scotland, on the shore of the Firth of Forth.

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  • from Saltcoats on the coast of the Firth of Clyde, 29 m.

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  • EDINBURGH, a city and royal burgh, and county of itself, the capital of Scotland, and county town of Edinburghshire, or Midlothian, situated to the south of the Firth of Forth, 396 m.

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  • Towards the north the site of the city slopes gently to the Firth of Forth and the port of Leith; while to the south, Liberton Hill, Blackford Hill, Braid Hills and Craiglockhart Hills roughly mark the city bounds, as Corstorphine Hill and the Water of Leith do the western limits.

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  • The central public baths in Infirmary Street, with branch establishments in other parts of the town, including Portobello, are largely resorted to, and the proximity of the Firth of Forth induces the keener swimmers to visit Granton every morning.

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  • BROUGHTY FERRY, a municipal and police burgh, seaport and watering-place of Forfarshire, Scotland, on the Firth of Tay, 4 m.

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  • DYSART, a royal and police burgh and seaport of Fifeshire, Scotland, on the shore of the Firth of Forth, 2 m.

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  • Firth, Municipal London (1876); Walter Delgray Birch, Historical Charters and Constitutional Documents of the City of London (1884, 1887); J.

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  • New docks, 93 acres in extent, with an entrance from the firth, were opened in 1905 at a cost of more than i,000,000.

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  • SOLWAY FIRTH, an estuarine inlet of the Irish Sea, between England and Scotland.

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  • The breadth at the mouth is 32 m.; near the head, where the Solway viaduct of the Caledonian railway crosses the firth, it is nearly i 2 m.

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  • The Scottish counties bordering the firth are Wigtownshire, Kirkcudbright and Dumfriesshire; the English coast belongs to Cumberland.

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  • On the English side the low Solway Plain borders the firth; except for a short distance above St Bees Head.

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  • Thus in Scotland the Cree and other streams enter Wigtown Bay; the Dee, Kirkcudbright Bay; Auchencairn Bay and Rough Firth receive numerous small streams, and the Nith discharges through a long estuary.

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  • The Annan has its mouth near the town of that name; and the Esk and Eden at the head of the firth, in Cumberland.

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  • The waters of the firth are shallow, and a tidal bore occurs periodically.

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  • The fisheries are extensive, and though there are no ports of the first magnitude on the firth, a considerable shipping trade is carried on at Whitehaven, Harrington, Workington, Maryport and Silloth in Cumberland, and at Annan, Kirkcudbright, Creetown and Wigtown on the Scottish side.

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  • It is situated on the southern shore of the entrance to the Firth of Forth, 294 m.

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  • Firth, for which see his Cromwell, pp. 281 ff.

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  • It is situated on the south shore of the entrance to the Firth of Forth, 222 m.

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  • on the left of the 1st, so that the second phase would be carried out by the 3rd, 4th and 1st Canadian and firth British Div.

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  • Firth in the Dict.

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  • According to General William Roy (1726-1790) Trimontium - so called, according to this theory, from the triple Eildon heights - was Old Melrose; other authorities incline to place the station on the northern shore of the Solway Firth.

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  • Firth of Forth and Moray Firth.

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  • The most successful of the first class, or pick machines, that of William Firth of Sheffield, consists essentially of a horizontal pick with two cutting arms placed one slightly in advance of the other, which is swung backwards and forwards by a pair of bell crank levers actuated by a horizontal cylinder engine mounted on a railway truck.

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  • It is situated on rising ground within a mile of the southern shore of Dornoch Firth, 254 m.

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  • PORT GLASGOW, a municipal and police burgh and seaport of Renfrewshire, Scotland, on the southern shore of the Firth of Clyde, 204 m.

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  • In the 18th century it ranked next to Leith as a port, but the growth of Grangemouth, higher up the firth, seriously affected its shipping trade, which is, however, yet considerable, coal and pig-iron forming the principal exports, and pit props from the Baltic the leading import.

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  • It is situated near the head of Cromarty Firth where the valley of the Peffery unites with the alluvial lands at the mouth of the Conon, 182 m.

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  • The river flows out of Loch Earn, pursues an eastward course with a gentle inclination towards the south, and reaches the Firth of Tay, 62 m.

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  • Strathearn, as the valley of the Earn is called, extending from the loch to the Firth of Tay, is a beautiful and, on the whole, fertile tract, though liable at times to heavy floods.

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  • He was abbot of Inchcolm (in the Firth of Forth) from 1418, was one of the commissioners for the collection of the ransom of James I., king of Scots, in 1423 and 1424, and in 1433 one of the embassy to Paris on the business of the marriage of the king's daughter to the dauphin.

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  • The fleet now stood in to a bay called by the explorers Streamfiord or Firth of Currents, and wintered there (1003-1004), suffering some privations, and apparently getting no more news of the fruitful country desired.

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  • 544 and 557 of the Arne-Magnaean collection in Copenhagen; the MS. of the Flatey Book, so called because it was long the property of a family living on Flat Island in Broad Firth.

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  • Formerly the term was held to embrace not only all the islands off the Scottish western coast, including the islands in the Firth of Clyde, but also the peninsula of Kintyre, the Isle of Man and the Isle of Rathlin, off the coast of Antrim.

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  • of Lossiemouth its port, on the Moray Firth, and 714 m.

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  • The islands are separated from the mainland by the Pentland Firth, which is 64 m.

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  • Many indications of ice action are found in these islands; striated surfaces are to be seen on the cliffs in Eday and Westray, in Kirkwall Bay and on Stennie Hill in Eday; boulder clay, with marine shells, and with many boulders of rocks foreign to the islands (chalk, oolitic limestone, flint, &c.), which must have been brought up from the region of Moray Firth, rests upon the old strata in many places.

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  • Sule Skerry (3) and the Pentland Skerries (8) lie at the eastern entrance of the Portland Firth; Swona (23), m.

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  • Papa Westray (295) and North Ronaldshay (442) are the most northerly islands of the group. The latter is only reached from Sanday, from which it is separated by a dangerous firth 2 m.

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  • corum, a double star, of magnitudes 3 and 6; this star was named Cor Caroli, or The Heart of Charles II., by Edmund Halley, on the suggestion of Sir Charles Scarborough (1616-1694), the court physician; a cluster of stars of the firth magnitude and fainter, extremely rich in variables, of the goo stars examined no less than 132 being regularly variable.

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  • With this he took part in the capture of Arkansas Post on the firth of January 1863.

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  • B 1 Scale, 1:3,000,000 English Miles 0 5 10 20, ,04050 firth ramond' f Forth 56 Roman Names Durobrivae Modern Names Lincoln, Rochester Uplands, over 600 feet Forests ?- - u Marshes 55 ester Hun Roads Military Stations * Civil Sites.

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  • This territory came to be known to Europeans as " Tibet " evidently because the great plateau with its uplands bordering the frontiers of China, Mongolia and Kashmir, through which travellers communicated with this country, is called by the natives T o-bhot (written stod-bod) or " High Bod" or " Tibet," which designation in the loose orthography of travellers assumed a variety of forms. Thus in Chinese annals are found T'u-bat (5th century, A.D.), Tu-po-te, Tie-bu-te, T'u-bo-te (loth and firth centuries) and at the present day T'u-fan (fan, as Bushell shows, being the same.

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  • to more than 1 m., affording to any number of vessels a haven of refuge from the roughest weather of the Pentland Firth.

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  • PRESTONPANS, a police burgh and watering-place of Haddingtonshire, Scotland, on the Firth of Forth, 91 m.

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  • According to Cedrenus, a Greek writer of the firth century (2uvoIits `Ivropu,)v, i.

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  • - The development of the German navy in the first years of the 10th century rendered it necessary to create a British naval base suitable for a fleet concentrated in the North Sea, and in 1903 it was decided to establish a firstclass naval base at Rosyth on the Firth of Forth.

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  • The Firth of Forth had been selected, before the war, as the eastern terminus of a mid-Scotland canal which was to connect with the existing canal and follow its line for part of the way, and then crossing the low ground in the neighbourhood of Stirling, to enter Loch Lomond, and ultimately to reach the sea by a short canal from Balloch to a point near Dumbarton.

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  • It is situated on the Moray Firth, at the mouth of the Nairn and on its left bank, 154 m.

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  • It lies on the Firth of Forth, 26 m.

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  • The discovery of new lands in the West by the Norsemen came in the course of the great Scandinavian exodus of the 9th, 10th and firth centuries - the Viking Age - when Norsemen, Swedes and Danes swarmed over all Europe, conquering kingdoms and founding colonies.

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  • It is situated on an inner bay of the shore of the Firth of Forth, 31 m.

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  • by Cromarty Firth, E.

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  • by Moray Firth, S.

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  • by Inner Moray Firth (or Firth of Inverness) and Beauly Firth, and W.

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  • It is a diamond-shaped peninsula jutting out from the mainland in a north-easterly direction, the longer axis, from Muir of Ord station to the South Sutor at the entrance to Cromarty Firth, measuring 20 m., and the shorter, from Ferryton Point to Craigton Point, due north and south, 12 m., and it has a coastline of 52 m.

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  • DUNOON, a police and municipal burgh of Argyllshire, Scotland, on the western shore of the Firth of Clyde, opposite to Gourock.

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  • shore of the Firth of Clyde, opposite Greenock, 24 m.

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  • It is separated from England by the Solway Firth, the Sark, Scotsdyke (an old embankment in 55°3' N., connecting the Sark with the Esk), the Esk (for one mile), the Liddel, the Kershope, the Cheviot Hills, the Tweed and a small area known as the " liberties " of Berwick.

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  • The greatest length from Cape Wrath in Sutherland to the Mull of Galloway is 274 m., and the greatest breadth from Buchan Ness to Applecross in the shire of Ross and Cromarty 154 m., but from Bonar Bridge at the head of Dornoch Firth to the head of Loch Broom it is only 26 m.

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  • Along both sides of the Moray Firth a strip of level land lies between the foot of the hills and the sea, while the county of Caithness, occupying a wide plain, does not, strictly speaking, belong to the Highlands.

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  • Seen from Strathmore or the Firth of Clyde the Highlands present well-defined masses of hills abruptly rising from the Lowland plains, and from any of the western islands their sea front resembles a vast rampart indented by lochs and rising to a uniform level, which sinking here and there allows glimpses of still higher summits in the interior.

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  • The Lowlands of Mid-Scotland, or the Central Plain, constitute a broad depression with south-westerly to north-easterly trend lying between the Highland line that runs from the head of the Firth of Clyde to Stonehaven and the pastoral uplands that stretch from Girvan to Dunbar.

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  • The chains of the Ochil, Sidlaw, Pentland, Renfrew, Campsie and Fintry Hills, and the valleys of the Strathmore, Firth of Tay, and the basin of Midlothian may be cited as examples.

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  • The Carse of Gowrie is the strip of low ground intervening between the Firth of Tay and the Sidlaw Hills.

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  • In the basin of the gorges Moray Firth some fine examples may be seen on the Nairn and Findhorn, while on the west side of the Cromarty Firth some of the small streams descending from the high grounds of the east of the shire of Ross and Cromarty have cut out defiles in the Conglomerates, remarkable for their depth and narrowness.

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  • They are more abundant on the east coast, however, especially on the shores of Aberdeenshire, between the mouths of the two Esks in Forfarshire, on both sides of the mouth of the Firth of Tay, and at various places on the Firth of Forth.

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  • The Lower, with its abundant intercalated lavas and tuffs, extends continuously as a broad belt along the northern margin of the Central Plain, reappears in detached tracts along the southern border, is found again on the south side of the Uplands in Berwickshire and the Cheviot Hills, occupies a tract of Lorne (Oban and the vicinity) in Argyllshire, and on the north side of the Highlands underlies most of the low ground on both sides of the Moray Firth, stretches across Caithness and through nearly the whole of the Orkney Islands, and is prolonged into Shetland.

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  • The thin seams of the Calciferous Sandstone are not workable, but the bituminous shales in the Firth of Forth basin are largely worked for the manufacture of mineral oil.

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  • The largest tract occurs in the south of Dumfriesshire between Annan and the head of the Solway Firth.

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  • Enormous numbers of flints and also less abundant fragments of chalk are found in glacial deposits bordering the Moray Firth.

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  • The driest climates of the east are in Tweeddale about Kelso and Jedburgh, the low grounds of East Lothian, and those on the Moray Firth from Elgin round to Dornoch.

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  • At several of the ports on the lower firth, as at Ardrossan and Fairlie, famous for its yachts, the industry is also carried on.

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  • The most important Roman stations which have hitherto been excavated are those of Birrenswark, on the north side of Solway Firth; Ardoch, near the historical battlefield of Sheriffmuir (1715); and Newstead, a site first occupied by Agricola, under the Eildon hills.

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  • Roman roads extended, with camps, as far as the Moray Firth.

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  • While southern Scotland was thus English and Cymric, the north, from Cape Wrath to Lochaber, in the west, and to the Firth of Tay, on the east, was Pictland; and the vernacular spoken there was the Gaelic. The west, south of Lochaber to the Mull of Kintyre, with the isles of Bute, Islay, Arran and Jura, was the realm of the Dalriadic kings, Scots from Ireland (503): here, too, Gaelic was spoken, as among the " Southern Picts " of the kingdom of Galloway.

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  • But Forbin was chased away from the Firth of Forth by a fleet under Sir George Byng; he refused to allow the young adventurer to land farther north, and the Jacobites doubted that France was never serious in the enterprise.

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  • Firth in the Diet.

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  • AILSA CRAIG, an island rock at the mouth of the Firth of Clyde, 10 m.

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  • Solway Firth >>

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  • The earliest instances of its use are to be found in the Latin and French versions of English documents in the firth and r 2th centuries (cf.

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  • Firth, Augustus Caesar (London, 1903), in "Heroes of the Nations" series; O.

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  • CHARLES HARDING FIRTH (1857-), British historian, was born at Sheffield on the r6th of March 1857, and was educated at Clifton College and at Balliol College, Oxford.

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  • Firth's historical work was almost entirely confined to English history during the time of the Great Civil War and the Commonwealth; and although he is somewhat overshadowed by S.

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  • Mark Firth >>

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  • ARRAN, the largest island of the county of Bute, Scotland, at the mouth of the Firth of Clyde.

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  • It is situated on the southern shore of the mouth of Cromarty Firth, 5 m.

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  • Its name is variously derived from the Gaelic crom, crooked, and bath, bay, or ard, height, meaning either the "crooked bay," or the "bend between the heights" (the high 'rocks, or Sutors, which guard the entrance to the Firth), and gave the title to the earldom of Cromarty.

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  • Cromarty Firth >>

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  • BURNTISLAND, a royal, municipal and police burgh of Fife, Scotland, on the shore of the Firth of Forth, 54 m.

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  • Until the opening of the Forth bridge, its commodious harbour was the northern station of the ferry across the firth from Granton, 5 m.

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  • The final results were obtained in 1880-81 across the Firth of Clyde from Kelly, his house at Wemyss Bay, and a hill above Inellan, and gave values rather higher than those obtained by M.

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  • BUCKIE, a fishing town and police burgh of Banffshire, Scotland, on the Moray Firth, at the mouth of Buckie burn, about 17 m.

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  • His mother when with child was thrown down from a hill called Dunpelder (Traprain Law, Haddingtonshire), but survived the fall and escaped by sea to Culross on the farther side of the Firth of Forth, where Kentigern was born.

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  • He is credited with missionary work in Galloway and north of the Firth of Forth, but most of the dedications to him which survive are north of the Mounth in the upper valley of the Dee.

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  • The population of the north shore of the Solway Firth at the beginning of the 5th century were probably either Picts or Goidels or a blend of both, and naturally hostile to the Romanized Britons.

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  • Returning to Scotland in 1790, he first settled as a carpenter at Glasgow and afterwards removed to Helensburgh, on the Firth of Clyde, where he pursued his mechanical projects, and also found occasional employment as an engineer.

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  • Firth, 1895); Charles II.

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  • CROMARTY FIRTH, an arm of the North Sea, belonging to the county of Ross and Cromarty, Scotland.

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  • From the Moray Firth it extends inland in a westerly and then south-westerly direction for a distance of 19 m.

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  • GREENOCK, a municipal and police burgh and seaport of Renfrewshire, Scotland, on the southern shore of the Firth of Clyde, 23 m.

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  • by the river and firth.

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  • The streets are laid out on the comparatively level tract behind the firth, the older thoroughfares and buildings lying in the centre.

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  • The fairway between this bank, which begins to the west of Dumbarton, and the southern shore constitutes the safest anchorage in the upper firth.

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  • from Land's End to the head of Solway Firth, a distance of 354 m., or following the much-indented coast, 1225 m.

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  • In the extreme north-west is the so-called Solway Plain, of no great extent, but clearly defined between the northern foothills of the Lake District and the shore of Solway Firth.

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  • On the west there are Solway Firth, Morecambe Bay, the estuaries of the Mersey and Dee, Cardigan Bay of the Welsh coast, and the Bristol Channel and Severn estuary.

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  • The four prominent groups of high land rising from the plain of the Red Rocks are: (1) the Lake District, bounded by the Solway Firth, Morecambe Bay and the The valleys of the Eden and the Lune; (2) the Pennine western.

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  • Firth as The Last Years of the Protectorate (1909).

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  • It has a station also on the Caledonian railway company's branch line from Kirtlebridge to Brayton (Cumberland), which crosses the Solway Firth at Seafield by a viaduct, 13 m.

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  • It is situated on the south shore of the Firth of Forth, i z m.

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  • along the shore of the Firth from Seafield in the east to near Granton in the west.

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  • Pop. (1901), 4753 A branch of the Highland railway also gives access to Elgin, and there is a line to Buckie and Portessie on the Moray Firth.

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  • ~Ethelstans greatest and best-remembered achievement was his, decisive victory in 937 at Brunanburhan unknown spot, probably by the Solway Firth or the Ribbleover a great confederacy of rebel Danes of Yorkshire, Irish Danes from Dublin, the Scottish king, Constantine, and Eugenius, king of Strathclyde.

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  • The battle of Carham (1018) had given this land to the Scots, and Canute consented to draw the border line of England at the Tweed instead of at the Firth of Forth, when Malcolm did him homage.

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  • from the shore of the Firth of Forth, with two stations on the North British railway - Lower Dunfermline 164 m., and Upper Dunfermline 194 m.

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  • it cuts across country due west to the Sark, which it follows to the river's mouth at the head of the Solway Firth.

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  • It lies on the north shore of Dornoch Firth, an arm of the North Sea, 74 m.

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  • GOUROCK, a police burgh and watering-place of Renfrewshire, Scotland, on the southern shore of the Firth of Clyde, 3t m.

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  • long, the longest in Scotland, affords great facilities for travel to the ports of the Firth, the sea lochs on the southern Highland coast and the Crinan Canal.

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  • Firth, which contains a chronological list of Burnet's published works.

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  • Firth (1894); the Memoirs of James Touchet, earl of Castlehaven (1815); and Cromwell's Letters and Speeches, edited by T.

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  • Firth, Reports on The Archaeological Survey of Nubia; G.

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  • Indeed, Thames whitebait which have been compared with that from the mouth of the Exe, the Cornish coast, Menai Strait, and the Firth of Forth seemed to be better fed; but, of course, the specific characteristics of the herring and sprat - into which we need not enter here - were nowise modified.

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  • THAMES, a seaport and gold-mining centre in North Island, New Zealand, in the county and at the mouth of the river of its name, on the Firth of Thames, a deep inlet of the Hauraki Gulf of the east coast.

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  • The view from the summit extends northward as far as the Grampians, with occasional glimpses of Ben Nevis; westward to Jura in the Atlantic; south-westward to Arran in the Firth of Clyde; southward to Tinto Hill, the Lowthers and Cairnsmore; and eastward to Edinburgh Castle and Arthur's Seat.

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  • These days the A9 takes a dual carriageway bypass route which crosses the Moray Firth at Kessock bridge.

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  • Alex Hale marine crannogs: the archeological and palaeoenvironmental potential with special reference to Redcastle marine crannog, Beauly Firth, Scotland.

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  • Superb views from the front windows over the width of the Solway Firth with colors changing as the tides ebb and low.

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  • The Moray Firth is a large triangular embayment in NE Scotland.

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  • Its root has been noted on seismic surveys in connection with the oil exploration of the Moray Firth.

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  • So I was pretty beat by the time we crossed the firth again and made it back to our hotel in Wick.

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  • Almost anywhere in the upper firth that you wanted!

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  • Dornoch Firth and Morrich More Highland Dornoch Firth and Morrich More has the most extensive area of pioneer glasswort Salicornia spp. saltmarsh in Scotland.

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  • Subsequent detailed sampling showed that alluvial gold is present over a large area of the central Ochils and eastwards to the Firth of Tay.

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  • ANSWER Firth of Forth Q5 What is a kissing gourami?

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  • hydrocarbon prospectivity of the Moray Firth has increased in recent years.

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  • Right across the country on the east coast the Moray Firth is a huge sea inlet where dolphins may be seen.

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  • From the coastguard lookout tower scan the sea for signs of the Firth's resident bottlenose dolphins.

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  • modifyresulting boundary was then modified to reflect notable geographic features such as the Beauly Firth, Cromarty Firth and Firth of Clyde.

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  • oyster beds in the Firth of Forth were famous.

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  • promontory of rock extending into the Firth of Clyde.

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  • watch the puffins nesting on Bass Rock and the sun rising over the Firth of Tay.

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  • These allowed a faster flow of water which scoured the riverbed, taking huge amounts of silt downstream into the Firth of Clyde.

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  • Moray Firth 2.40 Exploration activity in the Moray Firth increased to seven wells (including two sidetracks) compared with five drilled in 1999.

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  • travelogueo the top The Clyde, River and Firth A beautiful travelog with painted illustrations by Mary Y. and J. Young Hunter.

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  • visible in the far distance, behind the Firth of Forth.

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  • Firth, Cromwell, p. 324.2 John Morley, Oliver Cromwell, p. 393.

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  • Firth (1888).

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  • Firth (1909); Oliver Cromwell, by Fred.

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  • Firth (the best edition, rejecting the spurious Squire papers, 1904); Oliver Cromwell, by F.

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  • Firth (1902); The Diplomatic Relations between Cromwell and Charles X.

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  • The burgh, which stretches for a mile along the south shore of the Firth of Forth, is intersected by the Esk and embraces the village of Fisherrow on the left bank of the river.

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  • The estuary of the Urr, known as Rough Firth, is navigable by ships of from 80 to 100 tons, and small vessels can ascend as far as the mouth of Dalbeattie Burn, within a mile of the town.

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  • from the Solway Firth and 81 m.

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  • When the danger of a war with Germany came first to be apprehended, it was proposed to establish the chief British naval base, in the event of war, at Rosyth in the Firth of Forth, but it was afterwards decided that a larger base in a natural harbour farther N.

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  • Scapa Flow was preferred to the Cromarty Firth as his chief naval base by Admiral Jellicoe, but no preparations had been made and everything had to be improvised, guns being landed from the ships to strengthen the defences.

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  • It is situated on the Firth of Forth, 24 m.

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  • Inchkeith, an island in the fairway of the Firth of Forth, 22 m.

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  • To the north, west and south, a flat coastal belt, bordering the Irish Sea, with its inlets Morecambe Bay and Solway Firth, and broadest in the north, marks off the Lake District, while to the east the valleys of the Eden and the Lune divide it from the Pennine mountain system.

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  • Reisner & Firth have shown that the early culture of Nubia was closely akin to that of the predynastic Egyptians, which no doubt came from the south.

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  • Four instances have, however, been recorded of its occurrence on the British coasts, one on the coast of Norfolk in 1588, one in the Firth of Forth in 1648, one near Boston in Lincolnshire in 1800, while a fourth entangled itself among rocks in the Sound of Weesdale, Shetland, in September 1808.

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  • Yell (2483), separated from the north-east coast of Mainland by Yell Sound, is the second largest island of the group, having a length of 17 m., and an extreme width of 62 m., though towards the middle the voes of Mid Yell and Whale Firth almost divide it into two.

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  • Burra Firth, in the north of Unst, is flanked on both sides by magnificent cliffs, including the Noup of Unst, the hill of Saxavord (934 ft.), the Gord and Herma Ness.

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  • ELIE, a village and watering-place of Fifeshire, Scotland, on the shore of the Firth of Forth.

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  • Still more recently the hardship of treating the greater part of Moray Firth as open sea to the exclusion of British and to the advantage of foreign fishermen has been raised (see North Sea Fisheries Convention; Territorial Waters).

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  • from Saltcoats on the coast of the Firth of Clyde, 29 m.

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  • EDINBURGH, a city and royal burgh, and county of itself, the capital of Scotland, and county town of Edinburghshire, or Midlothian, situated to the south of the Firth of Forth, 396 m.

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  • Towards the north the site of the city slopes gently to the Firth of Forth and the port of Leith; while to the south, Liberton Hill, Blackford Hill, Braid Hills and Craiglockhart Hills roughly mark the city bounds, as Corstorphine Hill and the Water of Leith do the western limits.

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  • The central public baths in Infirmary Street, with branch establishments in other parts of the town, including Portobello, are largely resorted to, and the proximity of the Firth of Forth induces the keener swimmers to visit Granton every morning.

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  • BROUGHTY FERRY, a municipal and police burgh, seaport and watering-place of Forfarshire, Scotland, on the Firth of Tay, 4 m.

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  • The name is a corruption of Brugh or Burgh Tay, in allusion to the fortress standing on the rock that juts into the Firth.

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  • DYSART, a royal and police burgh and seaport of Fifeshire, Scotland, on the shore of the Firth of Forth, 2 m.

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  • Firth, Municipal London (1876); Walter Delgray Birch, Historical Charters and Constitutional Documents of the City of London (1884, 1887); J.

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  • New docks, 93 acres in extent, with an entrance from the firth, were opened in 1905 at a cost of more than i,000,000.

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  • SOLWAY FIRTH, an estuarine inlet of the Irish Sea, between England and Scotland.

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  • The breadth at the mouth is 32 m.; near the head, where the Solway viaduct of the Caledonian railway crosses the firth, it is nearly i 2 m.

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  • The Scottish counties bordering the firth are Wigtownshire, Kirkcudbright and Dumfriesshire; the English coast belongs to Cumberland.

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  • On the English side the low Solway Plain borders the firth; except for a short distance above St Bees Head.

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  • Thus in Scotland the Cree and other streams enter Wigtown Bay; the Dee, Kirkcudbright Bay; Auchencairn Bay and Rough Firth receive numerous small streams, and the Nith discharges through a long estuary.

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  • The Annan has its mouth near the town of that name; and the Esk and Eden at the head of the firth, in Cumberland.

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  • The waters of the firth are shallow, and a tidal bore occurs periodically.

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  • The fisheries are extensive, and though there are no ports of the first magnitude on the firth, a considerable shipping trade is carried on at Whitehaven, Harrington, Workington, Maryport and Silloth in Cumberland, and at Annan, Kirkcudbright, Creetown and Wigtown on the Scottish side.

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  • It is situated on the southern shore of the entrance to the Firth of Forth, 294 m.

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  • Firth, for which see his Cromwell, pp. 281 ff.

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  • It is situated on the south shore of the entrance to the Firth of Forth, 222 m.

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  • on the left of the 1st, so that the second phase would be carried out by the 3rd, 4th and 1st Canadian and firth British Div.

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  • Firth in the Dict.

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  • According to General William Roy (1726-1790) Trimontium - so called, according to this theory, from the triple Eildon heights - was Old Melrose; other authorities incline to place the station on the northern shore of the Solway Firth.

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  • Firth of Forth and Moray Firth.

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  • Mill has shown that in the North Sea off the Firth of Forth the average depth of visibility of a disk in the winter half-year was 4; fathoms and in the summer half-year 62 fathoms, and, although the greater frequency of rough weather in winter might tend to obscure the effect, individual observations made it plain that the angle of the sun was the main factor in increasing the depth to which the disk remained visible.

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  • The most successful of the first class, or pick machines, that of William Firth of Sheffield, consists essentially of a horizontal pick with two cutting arms placed one slightly in advance of the other, which is swung backwards and forwards by a pair of bell crank levers actuated by a horizontal cylinder engine mounted on a railway truck.

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  • It is situated on rising ground within a mile of the southern shore of Dornoch Firth, 254 m.

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  • PORT GLASGOW, a municipal and police burgh and seaport of Renfrewshire, Scotland, on the southern shore of the Firth of Clyde, 204 m.

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  • The organs of this vast monarchy were the papal Curia, which first appears distinctly in the firth century (see Curia Rommana), 'See further, Innocent III.

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  • It lies on the southern shore of the Firth of Forth, 17 m.

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  • In the 18th century it ranked next to Leith as a port, but the growth of Grangemouth, higher up the firth, seriously affected its shipping trade, which is, however, yet considerable, coal and pig-iron forming the principal exports, and pit props from the Baltic the leading import.

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  • It is situated near the head of Cromarty Firth where the valley of the Peffery unites with the alluvial lands at the mouth of the Conon, 182 m.

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  • Pleasantly situated on the shore of the Firth of Forth, 17 1/2 m.

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  • The river flows out of Loch Earn, pursues an eastward course with a gentle inclination towards the south, and reaches the Firth of Tay, 62 m.

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  • Strathearn, as the valley of the Earn is called, extending from the loch to the Firth of Tay, is a beautiful and, on the whole, fertile tract, though liable at times to heavy floods.

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  • He was abbot of Inchcolm (in the Firth of Forth) from 1418, was one of the commissioners for the collection of the ransom of James I., king of Scots, in 1423 and 1424, and in 1433 one of the embassy to Paris on the business of the marriage of the king's daughter to the dauphin.

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  • The fleet now stood in to a bay called by the explorers Streamfiord or Firth of Currents, and wintered there (1003-1004), suffering some privations, and apparently getting no more news of the fruitful country desired.

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  • 544 and 557 of the Arne-Magnaean collection in Copenhagen; the MS. of the Flatey Book, so called because it was long the property of a family living on Flat Island in Broad Firth.

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  • Formerly the term was held to embrace not only all the islands off the Scottish western coast, including the islands in the Firth of Clyde, but also the peninsula of Kintyre, the Isle of Man and the Isle of Rathlin, off the coast of Antrim.

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  • of Lossiemouth its port, on the Moray Firth, and 714 m.

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  • The islands are separated from the mainland by the Pentland Firth, which is 64 m.

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  • Many indications of ice action are found in these islands; striated surfaces are to be seen on the cliffs in Eday and Westray, in Kirkwall Bay and on Stennie Hill in Eday; boulder clay, with marine shells, and with many boulders of rocks foreign to the islands (chalk, oolitic limestone, flint, &c.), which must have been brought up from the region of Moray Firth, rests upon the old strata in many places.

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  • Sule Skerry (3) and the Pentland Skerries (8) lie at the eastern entrance of the Portland Firth; Swona (23), m.

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  • Papa Westray (295) and North Ronaldshay (442) are the most northerly islands of the group. The latter is only reached from Sanday, from which it is separated by a dangerous firth 2 m.

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  • corum, a double star, of magnitudes 3 and 6; this star was named Cor Caroli, or The Heart of Charles II., by Edmund Halley, on the suggestion of Sir Charles Scarborough (1616-1694), the court physician; a cluster of stars of the firth magnitude and fainter, extremely rich in variables, of the goo stars examined no less than 132 being regularly variable.

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  • With this he took part in the capture of Arkansas Post on the firth of January 1863.

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  • B 1 Scale, 1:3,000,000 English Miles 0 5 10 20, ,04050 firth ramond' f Forth 56 Roman Names Durobrivae Modern Names Lincoln, Rochester Uplands, over 600 feet Forests ?- - u Marshes 55 ester Hun Roads Military Stations * Civil Sites.

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  • This territory came to be known to Europeans as " Tibet " evidently because the great plateau with its uplands bordering the frontiers of China, Mongolia and Kashmir, through which travellers communicated with this country, is called by the natives T o-bhot (written stod-bod) or " High Bod" or " Tibet," which designation in the loose orthography of travellers assumed a variety of forms. Thus in Chinese annals are found T'u-bat (5th century, A.D.), Tu-po-te, Tie-bu-te, T'u-bo-te (loth and firth centuries) and at the present day T'u-fan (fan, as Bushell shows, being the same.

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  • to more than 1 m., affording to any number of vessels a haven of refuge from the roughest weather of the Pentland Firth.

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  • PRESTONPANS, a police burgh and watering-place of Haddingtonshire, Scotland, on the Firth of Forth, 91 m.

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  • According to Cedrenus, a Greek writer of the firth century (2uvoIits `Ivropu,)v, i.

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  • - The development of the German navy in the first years of the 10th century rendered it necessary to create a British naval base suitable for a fleet concentrated in the North Sea, and in 1903 it was decided to establish a firstclass naval base at Rosyth on the Firth of Forth.

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  • The Firth of Forth had been selected, before the war, as the eastern terminus of a mid-Scotland canal which was to connect with the existing canal and follow its line for part of the way, and then crossing the low ground in the neighbourhood of Stirling, to enter Loch Lomond, and ultimately to reach the sea by a short canal from Balloch to a point near Dumbarton.

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  • It is situated on the Moray Firth, at the mouth of the Nairn and on its left bank, 154 m.

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  • It lies on the Firth of Forth, 26 m.

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  • The discovery of new lands in the West by the Norsemen came in the course of the great Scandinavian exodus of the 9th, 10th and firth centuries - the Viking Age - when Norsemen, Swedes and Danes swarmed over all Europe, conquering kingdoms and founding colonies.

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  • It is situated on an inner bay of the shore of the Firth of Forth, 31 m.

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  • by Cromarty Firth, E.

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  • by Moray Firth, S.

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  • by Inner Moray Firth (or Firth of Inverness) and Beauly Firth, and W.

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  • It is a diamond-shaped peninsula jutting out from the mainland in a north-easterly direction, the longer axis, from Muir of Ord station to the South Sutor at the entrance to Cromarty Firth, measuring 20 m., and the shorter, from Ferryton Point to Craigton Point, due north and south, 12 m., and it has a coastline of 52 m.

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  • DUNOON, a police and municipal burgh of Argyllshire, Scotland, on the western shore of the Firth of Clyde, opposite to Gourock.

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  • shore of the Firth of Clyde, opposite Greenock, 24 m.

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  • 140 the district up to the Firth of Forth was definitely annexed, and a rampart with forts along it, the Wall of Antoninus Pius, was drawn from sea to sea (see Britain: Roman; and Graham'S Dyke).

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  • It is separated from England by the Solway Firth, the Sark, Scotsdyke (an old embankment in 55°3' N., connecting the Sark with the Esk), the Esk (for one mile), the Liddel, the Kershope, the Cheviot Hills, the Tweed and a small area known as the " liberties " of Berwick.

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  • The greatest length from Cape Wrath in Sutherland to the Mull of Galloway is 274 m., and the greatest breadth from Buchan Ness to Applecross in the shire of Ross and Cromarty 154 m., but from Bonar Bridge at the head of Dornoch Firth to the head of Loch Broom it is only 26 m.

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  • Along both sides of the Moray Firth a strip of level land lies between the foot of the hills and the sea, while the county of Caithness, occupying a wide plain, does not, strictly speaking, belong to the Highlands.

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  • Seen from Strathmore or the Firth of Clyde the Highlands present well-defined masses of hills abruptly rising from the Lowland plains, and from any of the western islands their sea front resembles a vast rampart indented by lochs and rising to a uniform level, which sinking here and there allows glimpses of still higher summits in the interior.

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  • The Lowlands of Mid-Scotland, or the Central Plain, constitute a broad depression with south-westerly to north-easterly trend lying between the Highland line that runs from the head of the Firth of Clyde to Stonehaven and the pastoral uplands that stretch from Girvan to Dunbar.

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  • The chains of the Ochil, Sidlaw, Pentland, Renfrew, Campsie and Fintry Hills, and the valleys of the Strathmore, Firth of Tay, and the basin of Midlothian may be cited as examples.

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  • The Carse of Gowrie is the strip of low ground intervening between the Firth of Tay and the Sidlaw Hills.

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  • In the basin of the gorges Moray Firth some fine examples may be seen on the Nairn and Findhorn, while on the west side of the Cromarty Firth some of the small streams descending from the high grounds of the east of the shire of Ross and Cromarty have cut out defiles in the Conglomerates, remarkable for their depth and narrowness.

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  • They are more abundant on the east coast, however, especially on the shores of Aberdeenshire, between the mouths of the two Esks in Forfarshire, on both sides of the mouth of the Firth of Tay, and at various places on the Firth of Forth.

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  • The Lower, with its abundant intercalated lavas and tuffs, extends continuously as a broad belt along the northern margin of the Central Plain, reappears in detached tracts along the southern border, is found again on the south side of the Uplands in Berwickshire and the Cheviot Hills, occupies a tract of Lorne (Oban and the vicinity) in Argyllshire, and on the north side of the Highlands underlies most of the low ground on both sides of the Moray Firth, stretches across Caithness and through nearly the whole of the Orkney Islands, and is prolonged into Shetland.

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  • The thin seams of the Calciferous Sandstone are not workable, but the bituminous shales in the Firth of Forth basin are largely worked for the manufacture of mineral oil.

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  • The largest tract occurs in the south of Dumfriesshire between Annan and the head of the Solway Firth.

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  • Enormous numbers of flints and also less abundant fragments of chalk are found in glacial deposits bordering the Moray Firth.

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  • The driest climates of the east are in Tweeddale about Kelso and Jedburgh, the low grounds of East Lothian, and those on the Moray Firth from Elgin round to Dornoch.

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  • At several of the ports on the lower firth, as at Ardrossan and Fairlie, famous for its yachts, the industry is also carried on.

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  • The most important Roman stations which have hitherto been excavated are those of Birrenswark, on the north side of Solway Firth; Ardoch, near the historical battlefield of Sheriffmuir (1715); and Newstead, a site first occupied by Agricola, under the Eildon hills.

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  • Roman roads extended, with camps, as far as the Moray Firth.

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  • While southern Scotland was thus English and Cymric, the north, from Cape Wrath to Lochaber, in the west, and to the Firth of Tay, on the east, was Pictland; and the vernacular spoken there was the Gaelic. The west, south of Lochaber to the Mull of Kintyre, with the isles of Bute, Islay, Arran and Jura, was the realm of the Dalriadic kings, Scots from Ireland (503): here, too, Gaelic was spoken, as among the " Southern Picts " of the kingdom of Galloway.

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  • But Forbin was chased away from the Firth of Forth by a fleet under Sir George Byng; he refused to allow the young adventurer to land farther north, and the Jacobites doubted that France was never serious in the enterprise.

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  • Firth in the Diet.

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  • AILSA CRAIG, an island rock at the mouth of the Firth of Clyde, 10 m.

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  • Solway Firth >>

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  • The earliest instances of its use are to be found in the Latin and French versions of English documents in the firth and r 2th centuries (cf.

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  • Firth, Augustus Caesar (London, 1903), in "Heroes of the Nations" series; O.

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  • CHARLES HARDING FIRTH (1857-), British historian, was born at Sheffield on the r6th of March 1857, and was educated at Clifton College and at Balliol College, Oxford.

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  • Firth's historical work was almost entirely confined to English history during the time of the Great Civil War and the Commonwealth; and although he is somewhat overshadowed by S.

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  • Mark Firth >>

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  • ARRAN, the largest island of the county of Bute, Scotland, at the mouth of the Firth of Clyde.

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  • It is situated on the southern shore of the mouth of Cromarty Firth, 5 m.

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  • Its name is variously derived from the Gaelic crom, crooked, and bath, bay, or ard, height, meaning either the "crooked bay," or the "bend between the heights" (the high 'rocks, or Sutors, which guard the entrance to the Firth), and gave the title to the earldom of Cromarty.

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  • Cromarty Firth >>

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  • BURNTISLAND, a royal, municipal and police burgh of Fife, Scotland, on the shore of the Firth of Forth, 54 m.

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  • Until the opening of the Forth bridge, its commodious harbour was the northern station of the ferry across the firth from Granton, 5 m.

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  • The final results were obtained in 1880-81 across the Firth of Clyde from Kelly, his house at Wemyss Bay, and a hill above Inellan, and gave values rather higher than those obtained by M.

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  • BUCKIE, a fishing town and police burgh of Banffshire, Scotland, on the Moray Firth, at the mouth of Buckie burn, about 17 m.

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  • His mother when with child was thrown down from a hill called Dunpelder (Traprain Law, Haddingtonshire), but survived the fall and escaped by sea to Culross on the farther side of the Firth of Forth, where Kentigern was born.

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  • He is credited with missionary work in Galloway and north of the Firth of Forth, but most of the dedications to him which survive are north of the Mounth in the upper valley of the Dee.

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  • The population of the north shore of the Solway Firth at the beginning of the 5th century were probably either Picts or Goidels or a blend of both, and naturally hostile to the Romanized Britons.

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  • Returning to Scotland in 1790, he first settled as a carpenter at Glasgow and afterwards removed to Helensburgh, on the Firth of Clyde, where he pursued his mechanical projects, and also found occasional employment as an engineer.

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  • Firth, 1895); Charles II.

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  • CROMARTY FIRTH, an arm of the North Sea, belonging to the county of Ross and Cromarty, Scotland.

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  • From the Moray Firth it extends inland in a westerly and then south-westerly direction for a distance of 19 m.

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  • GREENOCK, a municipal and police burgh and seaport of Renfrewshire, Scotland, on the southern shore of the Firth of Clyde, 23 m.

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  • by the river and firth.

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  • The streets are laid out on the comparatively level tract behind the firth, the older thoroughfares and buildings lying in the centre.

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  • The fairway between this bank, which begins to the west of Dumbarton, and the southern shore constitutes the safest anchorage in the upper firth.

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  • from Land's End to the head of Solway Firth, a distance of 354 m., or following the much-indented coast, 1225 m.

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  • In the extreme north-west is the so-called Solway Plain, of no great extent, but clearly defined between the northern foothills of the Lake District and the shore of Solway Firth.

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  • On the west there are Solway Firth, Morecambe Bay, the estuaries of the Mersey and Dee, Cardigan Bay of the Welsh coast, and the Bristol Channel and Severn estuary.

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  • The four prominent groups of high land rising from the plain of the Red Rocks are: (1) the Lake District, bounded by the Solway Firth, Morecambe Bay and the The valleys of the Eden and the Lune; (2) the Pennine western.

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  • Firth as The Last Years of the Protectorate (1909).

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  • It has a station also on the Caledonian railway company's branch line from Kirtlebridge to Brayton (Cumberland), which crosses the Solway Firth at Seafield by a viaduct, 13 m.

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  • It is situated on the south shore of the Firth of Forth, i z m.

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  • along the shore of the Firth from Seafield in the east to near Granton in the west.

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  • Pop. (1901), 4753 A branch of the Highland railway also gives access to Elgin, and there is a line to Buckie and Portessie on the Moray Firth.

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  • ~Ethelstans greatest and best-remembered achievement was his, decisive victory in 937 at Brunanburhan unknown spot, probably by the Solway Firth or the Ribbleover a great confederacy of rebel Danes of Yorkshire, Irish Danes from Dublin, the Scottish king, Constantine, and Eugenius, king of Strathclyde.

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  • The battle of Carham (1018) had given this land to the Scots, and Canute consented to draw the border line of England at the Tweed instead of at the Firth of Forth, when Malcolm did him homage.

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  • from the shore of the Firth of Forth, with two stations on the North British railway - Lower Dunfermline 164 m., and Upper Dunfermline 194 m.

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  • it cuts across country due west to the Sark, which it follows to the river's mouth at the head of the Solway Firth.

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  • Of tales relating to the east there survive the Weapon-firth cycle - the tales of Thorstein the White (c. 900), of Thorstein the Staffsmitten (c. 985), of Gunnar Thidrand's Bane (1000-1008) and of the Weapon firth Men (975-990), all relating to the family of Hof and their friends and kin for several generations - and the story of Hrafnkell Frey's Priest (c. 960), the most idyllic of sagas and best of the eastern tales.

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  • It lies on the north shore of Dornoch Firth, an arm of the North Sea, 74 m.

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  • GOUROCK, a police burgh and watering-place of Renfrewshire, Scotland, on the southern shore of the Firth of Clyde, 3t m.

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  • long, the longest in Scotland, affords great facilities for travel to the ports of the Firth, the sea lochs on the southern Highland coast and the Crinan Canal.

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  • Firth, which contains a chronological list of Burnet's published works.

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  • Firth (1894); the Memoirs of James Touchet, earl of Castlehaven (1815); and Cromwell's Letters and Speeches, edited by T.

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  • Firth, Reports on The Archaeological Survey of Nubia; G.

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  • Indeed, Thames whitebait which have been compared with that from the mouth of the Exe, the Cornish coast, Menai Strait, and the Firth of Forth seemed to be better fed; but, of course, the specific characteristics of the herring and sprat - into which we need not enter here - were nowise modified.

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  • THAMES, a seaport and gold-mining centre in North Island, New Zealand, in the county and at the mouth of the river of its name, on the Firth of Thames, a deep inlet of the Hauraki Gulf of the east coast.

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  • The view from the summit extends northward as far as the Grampians, with occasional glimpses of Ben Nevis; westward to Jura in the Atlantic; south-westward to Arran in the Firth of Clyde; southward to Tinto Hill, the Lowthers and Cairnsmore; and eastward to Edinburgh Castle and Arthur's Seat.

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  • These allowed a faster flow of water which scoured the riverbed, taking huge amounts of silt downstream into the Firth of Clyde.

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  • Moray Firth 2.40 Exploration activity in the Moray Firth increased to seven wells (including two sidetracks) compared with five drilled in 1999.

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  • The Moray Firth is a wide bay, with the port of Inverness at its southwesterly corner.

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  • Return to the top The Clyde, River and Firth A beautiful travelog with painted illustrations by Mary Y. and J. Young Hunter.

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  • Fife is visible in the far distance, behind the Firth of Forth.

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  • In 2003, she was cast as the lead in What a Girl Wants, with Colin Firth and Kelly Preston.

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  • Well-known Brits around the world include J.K. Rowling, Naomi Campbell, Rod Stewart, Catherine Zeta-Jones, David Tennant, Daniel Radcliffe, Jason Stathem and Academy Award winner Colin Firth to name a few.

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  • One of Britain's favorite everyman actors, Firth has appeared in dozens of roles throughout his career including an Academy Award winning turn as King George VI in The King's Speech.

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  • In 2011, Time magazine added Firth to its list of 100 most influential people and he has been named Commander of the Order of the British Empire by Queen Elizabeth II.

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  • Tarot Doorway: This monthly newsletter for tarot enthusiasts is published by Peggy Firth, and it may be accessed online at her website.

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  • Tarot Doorway: This monthly newsletter for tarot enthusiasts is published by Peggy Firth, and it may be accessed online at her website.

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  • In 2008, the popular stage show was re-invented a s a feature length film starring Meryl Streep, Colin Firth, Pierce Brosnan, Amanda Seyfried and Stellan Skarsgard.

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  • It has songs by Meryl Streep, Colin Firth, and the movie's cast.

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  • Mill has shown that in the North Sea off the Firth of Forth the average depth of visibility of a disk in the winter half-year was 4; fathoms and in the summer half-year 62 fathoms, and, although the greater frequency of rough weather in winter might tend to obscure the effect, individual observations made it plain that the angle of the sun was the main factor in increasing the depth to which the disk remained visible.

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  • Firth, Cromwell, p. 324.2 John Morley, Oliver Cromwell, p. 393.

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  • Firth (1888).

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  • Firth (1900); Oliver Cromwell, by J.

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  • Firth (1900); Oliver Cromwell, by J.

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